​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
 
Archaeopress: Publishing Scholarly Archaeology since 1997
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide.

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in scholarly books and journals in the field of archaeology and related heritage subjects.
 
COVID-19 / Brexit Updates
Publishing: 
Our publishing schedule proceeds as normal without significant interruptions; our team continue to work as usual, albeit in various locations. Our printing and fulfilment partners are all open and functioning at this time.

Shipping delays: We are accepting and processing orders in the usual way. The ongoing impact of COVID, compounded throughout January as shipping firms adapt to new export rules following Brexit, have caused considerable delay to shipments to Europe and beyond. Packages are safely reaching their destination, however delivery times are unpredictable and are typically far longer than usual. We sincerely thank you for your patience while you await your order. If you do have any concerns, please contact info@archaeopress.com.

EU customers: Website orders destined for EU addresses are now likely to be subject to import VAT and customs clearance charges. If you have any queries on this point please contact us and we will do our best to advise: info@archaeopress.com.
 
 
eBook Bargain of the Week: Cultural Dynamics and Production Activities in Ancient Western Mexico. Only available as e-version. £3.99 (Exc. VAT) Buy Now

This eBook will be available here at the bargain price of £3.99 until approx. 10am GMT 8/3/2021.

Read full information about the title here.
NEW: Présence et influence assyriennes dans le royaume de Hamat by Adonice-Ackad Baaklini. Paperback; 205x290mm; 392pp; 246 figures, 30 tables. French text with English abstract. 723 2021. ISBN 9781789696875. £58.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The major part of the Near East was conquered by the Neo-Assyrian Empire (934-610BC) in a few centuries. If the geopolitical map of the region was altered, the concrete impact it exerted on the territories with which it came into contact is difficult to appraise. Until recently, there was a general tendency to consider that the Assyrians tightly controlled their whole periphery by maintaining a high number of soldiers and personnel while initiating a process of 'Assyrianization'. Présence et influence assyriennes dans le royaume de Hamat assesses the importance and nature of the Assyrian presence in the kingdom of Hamat (in northwest Syria) to determine whether there is a link between the presence and influence of the Assyrians. The results of an analysis of historical and archaeological sources show that the Assyrian presence in Hamat was much more subtle than what might have been imagined. On the one hand, the Assyrian provincial elite insisted on being legitimized with the natives and cooperating with the local elite rather than using force to maintain the yoke of the Empire. On the other hand, far from indicating Assyrian colonization or a change of culture, the influence of Assyrian culture in Hamat would rather translate into the local elite adopting new objects of prestige that contributed to conspicuous consumption and competitive emulation.

About the Author
Adonice-Ackad Baaklini is an archaeologist specialising in the Ancient Near East. The author received a PhD in Archaeology from Sorbonne University (2019) and a certificate in Akkadian Epigraphy from the Catholic University of Paris (2014). His research focuses on the Levant, and especially the Northern Levant, during the Neo-Assyrian period.

French Description:
L’Empire néo-assyrien (934-610 av. J.-C.) a conquis la majeure partie du Proche-Orient en quelques siècles. S’il modifie la carte géopolitique de la région, l’impact concret qu’il exerce sur les territoires avec lesquels il entre en contact est difficile à cerner. La tendance générale était jusqu’à il y a peu de considérer que les Assyriens contrôlaient étroitement toute leur périphérie par une présence importante de militaires et de fonctionnaires, tout en initiant un processus d’« assyrianisation ». Présence et influence assyriennes dans le royaume de Hamat propose d’évaluer l’importance et la nature de la présence assyrienne dans le royaume de Hamat (nord-ouest de la Syrie) et de déterminer s’il existe un lien entre présence et influence assyriennes. Les résultats d’une analyse des sources historiques et archéologiques montrent que la présence assyrienne à Hamat était bien plus subtile que ce que l’on aurait pu croire. D’une part, l’élite provinciale assyrienne insistait sur sa légitimation auprès des autochtones et sa coopération avec l’élite locale plutôt que sur l’utilisation de la force pour maintenir le joug de l’Empire. D’autre part, loin d’indiquer une colonisation assyrienne ou un changement de culture, l’influence de la culture assyrienne à Hamat se traduirait plutôt par l’adoption par l’élite locale de nouveaux objets de prestige qui contribuaient à la consommation ostentatoire et à l’émulation compétitive.

Spécialiste du Proche-Orient ancien, Adonice-Ackad Baaklini est titulaire d’un doctorat en archéologie soutenu à Sorbonne Université et d’un certificat d’épigraphie akkadienne obtenu à l’Institut Catholique de Paris. Ses recherches portent sur le Levant, et en particulier le Levant Nord, à l’époque néoassyrienne. En parallèle, il poursuit une carrière dans l’archéologie préventive.
NEW: Liburnians and Illyrian Lembs: Iron Age Ships of the Eastern Adriatic by Luka Boršić, Danijel Džino and Irena Radić Rossi. Paperback; 175x245mm; 226 pages; 35 figures, 2 tables, 4 maps (colour throughout). 720 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699159. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699166. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Liburnians and Illyrian Lembs: Iron Age Ships of the Eastern Adriatic explores the origins of two types of ancient ship which appear in the written sources connected with the protohistoric eastern Adriatic area: the ‘Liburnian’ (liburna or liburnica) and the southern Adriatic (Illyrian) ‘lemb’. The relative abundance of written sources suggests that both ships played significant roles in ancient times, especially the Liburnian, which became the main type of light warship in early Roman imperial fleets and ultimately evolved into a generic name for warships in the Roman Imperial period and Late Antiquity. The book provides an extensive overview of written, iconographic and archaeological evidence on eastern Adriatic shipbuilding traditions before the Roman conquest in the late first century BC / early first century AD, questioning the existing scholarly assumption that the liburna and lemb were closely related, or even that they represent two sub-types of the same ship. The analysis shows that identification of the Liburnian liburna and Illyrian lemb as more or less the same ship originates from the stereotypical and essentially wrong assumption in older scholarship that the prehistoric indigenous population of the eastern Adriatic shared the same culture and, roughly, the same identities. The main point made in the book is that two different terms, liburna and lemb, were used in the sources depicting these as two different kinds of ship, rather than being interchangeable terms depicting the same ship type.

About the Authors Luka Boršić obtained his first PhD degree in philosophy with emphasis on classical languages and his second PhD degree in the history of philosophy. His main areas of research are ancient philosophy, Renaissance philosophy and the birth of modern science, as well as gender philosophy. He is currently Director, and Senior Research Fellow of the Institute of Philosophy in Zagreb. In 2019 he was a Fulbright Scholar at Columbia University in New York, during which period he completed his contribution to this book. His main approach to the history of ideas and history of philosophy is hermeneutics, the endeavour to understand multifaceted layers of historical texts. ;

Danijel Džino is Senior Lecturer in the Department of History and Archaeology at Macquarie University, Sydney. His books include: Illyricum in the Roman Politics 229 BC – AD 68 (CUP, 2010), Becoming Slav, Becoming Croat: Identity Transformation in Post-Roman and Early Medieval Dalmatia (Brill, 2010), From Justinian to Branimir: The Making of the Middle Ages in Dalmatia (Routledge, 2021); he is co-author of Rimski ratovi u Iliriku: Povijesni antinarativ (Zagreb, 2013). Džino is also co-editor of the volumes: Byzantium, its Neighbors and its Cultures (Australian Association for Byzantine Studies, 2014) and Migration, Integration and Connectivity on the Southeastern Frontier of the Carolingian Empire (Brill, 2018). ;

Irena Radić Rossi graduated from the Department of Archaeology of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences of the University of Zagreb. In 2004 she became Senior Conservator, the highest rank in the Cultural Heritage Conservation Service. In 2009 she moved to the University of Zadar, where she is currently employed as Associate Professor. She is an associated researcher of the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS), an adjunct professor at the Nautical Archaeology Program of the Texas A&M University, and an affiliated scholar of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology. Her main research interests focus on the technological development of Adriatic shipbuilding and seafaring.
NEW: From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 10 Session XXXIII-1&2 edited by Françoise Bostyn, François Giligny and Peter Topping. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 71 figures, 7 tables (colour throughout). 718 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697117. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697124. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age presents the papers from Session XXXIII of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). 23 authors contribute nine papers from Parts 1 and 2 of the Session. The first session ‘Siliceous rocks: procurement and distribution systems’ was aimed at analysing one of the central research issues related to mining, i.e. the production systems and the diffusion of mining products. The impact of extraction on the environment, group mobility and the numbers involved in the exploitation phase were considered; mining products were also examined with a view to identifying local and imported/exported products and the underlying social organization relating to the different fields of activity. The second session ‘Flint mines and chipping floors from prehistory to the beginning of the nineteenth century’ focused on knapping activities. The significance of the identification of knapping workshops in the immediate vicinity of mine shafts and of their presence in villages as well as in intermediary places between the two was considered in the analysis of chaîne opératoire sequences. The potential of product quality and artefact distribution to contribute to the understanding of the social organisation of the communities being studied was also examined.
About the Editors
Françoise Bostyn is currently Professor at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne. She specialises in the European Neolithic and works particularly on lithic industries, from the characterisation of resources and procurement systems, especially from flint mines, to the abandonment of tools within domestic settlements. Through technological and typological approaches, the questions of the organization of production at different scales, the structure of supply and exchange networks, and the emergence of craft specialists are explored from an evolutionary perspective, from the arrival of the first farmers in France until the emergence of the first hierarchical societies. ;

François Giligny has been Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University since 2009. Experienced in preventive archaeology, he conducts research and excavations in the Paris basin. He has created and since 2016 has been co-director of two professional master’s degree courses at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne: Master of Archaeology ‘Archaeological Engineering’ and Master in Heritage and Museums ‘Archaeological Heritage Mediation and Valorisation’. François is Scientific Director of the magazine « Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie » and is engaged in two UISPP Commissions for which he organised the 18th Congress in 2018 in Paris. His research topics include the European Neolithic, ceramic technology, archaeological methodology, digital heritage and digital archaeology. ;

Peter Topping is a Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University. His expertise lies in the analysis of multiperiod landscapes, and his main research interest is the European Neolithic period. Formerly employed by RCHME and English Heritage, he has worked on Neolithic flint mines, causewayed enclosures and the Stonehenge landscape, amongst many others types of site. He has also participated in fieldwork led by the US National Park Service in Ohio and Minnesota, and is currently directing a project on prehistoric quarries in the Northumberland Cheviots, alongside researching European Neolithic mines and quarries for a Prehistoric Society research monograph.
NEW: Going Underground: The Meanings of Death and Burial for Minority Groups in Israel by Talia Shay. Paperback; 156x234mm; 106 pages; 16 colour figures, 3 tables. 715 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696196. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696202. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Going Underground: The Meanings of Death and Burial for Minority Groups in Israel is about the attitudes towards death and burial in contemporary society. It provides information on the attitudes of several minority groups living in Israel today, including four communities of Russian Jews, an ultra-religious Jewish community and a Palestinian-Christian community. ‘Going Underground’ has a double meaning: it refers to the actions taken by archaeologists to inquire about the past and present and involves digging and recording. Second, it considers the challenges and protests launched by the groups of immigrants and minorities mentioned in the book, against state-control over death.

About the Author
Talia Shay has a PhD in archaeology from Tel Aviv University and MA degrees from UCLA and UNAM, Mexico. Her research encompasses both early and contemporary periods. She has published articles on art, urban space, general archaeology, and death and burial in several international journals and has co-edited ‘The Limitation of Archaeological Knowledge’. During her academic career, her primary affiliation was with the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology.
NEW: Current Perspectives in Sudanese and Nubian Archaeology A Collection of Papers Presented at the 2018 Sudan Studies Research Conference, Cambridge edited by Rennan Lemos and Samantha Tipper. Paperback; 203x276mm; 126 pages; 39 figures, 14 tables. 133 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698978. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698985. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Current Perspectives in Sudanese and Nubian Archaeology brings together papers presented at the 2nd Sudan Studies Research Conference, held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge. Scholars from various institutions around the world gathered to discuss the most recent trends in the field of Sudanese and Nubian archaeology, ranging from recent fieldwork in Sudan to scientific analysis of material culture and current theoretical approaches. The papers collected here focus on early administrative and mortuary material culture in the Nile valley and adjacent areas; religious beliefs and practices at Kerma; the adoption and local use of imported objects in the New Kingdom colonial period; and the role of Sudan and East Africa in human population history. Together, all papers represent the diversity of current approaches to the archaeology of Sudan and Nubia in various periods.

About the Author
Rennan Lemos is an ERC postdoctoral research fellow at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. He recently completed his PhD in Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology at the University of Cambridge, specialising in mortuary material culture in New Kingdom Nubia. ;

Samantha Tipper is a senior lecturer at the University of Lincoln. She is a bioarchaeologist and paleopathologist with experience working in both the commercial and academic sectors in human osteology, paleopathology and forensic anthropology.
NEW: Current Research in Egyptology 2019 Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Symposium, University of Alcalá, 17–21 June 2019 edited by Marta Arranz Cárcamo, Raúl Sánchez Casado, Albert Planelles Orozco, Sergio Alarcón Robledo, Jónatan Ortiz García, Patricia Mora Riudavets. Paperback; 203x276mm; 248 pages; 89 figures, 11 tables. 133 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699074. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699081. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Current Research in Egyptology 2019 presents the papers and posters from the twentieth meeting of the prestigious international student Egyptology conference, on this occasion held at the University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain. The conference took place 17–21 June 2019 at the Major College of San Ildefonso, the historic centre of the University of Alcalá, with almost 200 participants from various countries and institutions all over the world. The conference addressed a wide range of topics including all periods of ancient Egyptian History and different aspects of its material culture, archaeology, history, society, religion and language. Fifteen wide-ranging papers are published here with wider information on the scientific and cultural programme of the conference.

About the Editors
Marta Arranz holds a master’s degree in archaeology and heritage from the Autónoma University of Madrid, and she is a doctoral candidate in Egyptology at the University of Alcalá. ;

Raúl Sánchez Casado obtained a PhD in Egyptology at the University of Seville; he is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Granada. ;

Albert Planelles Orozco completed a master´s degree in ancient cultures and languages at the University of Barcelona; he is currently working on his PhD in Assyriology at the University of Alcalá. ;

Sergio Alarcón Robledo holds an MPhil in Egyptology at the University of Cambridge and an MA in archaeology from the University of California, Los Angeles; he is a PhD candidate in Egyptology at Harvard University. ;

Jónatan Ortiz García completed his PhD in Cultural Heritage at the University of Valencia; he is a Juan de la Cierva postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alcalá. ;

Patricia Mora Riudavets completed an MA in Egyptology at the University of Liverpool. She is a professional archaeological photographer.
NEW: Ex Asia et Syria: Oriental Religions in the Roman Central Balkans by Nadežda Gavrilović Vitas. Paperback; 205x290mm; 266 pages; 40 figures, 7 maps, illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). 721 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 78. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699135. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699142. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ex Asia Minor et Syria: Religions in the Roman Central Balkans investigates the cults of Asia Minor and Syrian origin in the Roman provinces of the Central Balkans. The author presents, analyzes and interprets all hitherto known epigraphical and archaeological material which attests to the presence of Asia Minor and Syrian cults in that region, a subject which is yet to be the object of a serious scholarly study. Thus the book both reviews previously known monuments and artefacts, many of which are now missing or are destroyed, and adds new finds, exploring their social and geographical context from all possible angles, and focusing on the thoughts and beliefs of the dedicants and devotees of the particular cult in question. New conclusions are presented in a scientific framework, taking account of the latest theoretical developments.

About the Author
Nadežda Gavrilović Vitas obtained her PhD in archaeology from the University of Belgrade. She has worked at the Institute of Archaeology in Belgrade since 1999, mainly focusing on Roman religion, epigraphy, settlements and necropolises. She is the director of the archaeological projects and excavations ‘Mediana – the residence of Constantine the Great’ and ‘Building with octagon in Niš Fortress’ in Niš.
NEW: Excavations at Stanground South, Peterborough Prehistoric, Roman and Post-Medieval Settlement along the Margins of the Fens by William A Boismier, Edmund Taylor and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 120 figures, 91 tables. 716 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698442. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698459. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (formerly Northamptonshire Archaeology) undertook archaeological excavations at Stanground South between September 2007 and November 2009 on behalf of Persimmon Homes (East Midlands) Ltd and in accordance with a programme of works designed and overseen by CgMs Heritage. The site is situated on the south-eastern outskirts of Peterborough, on glacial tills overlooking along the Fen edge. The works comprised five areas of set-piece excavation and a series of strip map and record areas, targeted on areas of archaeological potential identified by previous evaluation works. In total, an area of 70ha was subject to archaeological mitigation.

The excavations recorded archaeological remains dating from the Bronze Age to the medieval period. The earliest features comprised four burnt mounds dating to the early Bronze Age, one of which was associated with two superimposed buildings and a small group of up to six cremations. In the middle Bronze Age there was a substantial unenclosed cemetery (urnfield) comprising 78 cremations (as well as a further possible three outlying cremations to the urnfield). In the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a substantial droveway, up to 65m wide, was constructed leading northwards from the Fen edge to higher ground. A series of post-built roundhouses were later constructed within the confines of the droveway.

In the middle Iron Age, the droveway was partitioned to form a series of enclosures, within one of which a settlement was established adjacent to the Fen edge. This included roundhouses and a number of two-post and four-post structures.

In the later Iron Age, an enclosed settlement had developed to the north-west. This comprised several roundhouses within a substantial rectangular enclosure, which was open at its southern end. It appears that this began as an unenclosed site, which was later enclosed. Removal of cattle horn for working may have been occurring.

In the Roman period (2nd and late 4th centuries AD) a series of small enclosures were constructed on the eastern side of the later Iron Age enclosed settlement. These contained structures and features apparently associated with rural industry, which may have also exported surplus to market. Industries including the processing of hide, late Roman cheese making (with seven presses recovered), late Roman pottery production and some metalworking.

The economy of the site from the later Bronze Age onwards was focussed on pastoralism, with limited evidence for grain cultivation. During the Roman period, this seems to have specialised further towards dairy farming. The environment of the site seems to have undergone little change from the later Bronze Age, being largely open with areas of woodland and wetter areas. Peat growth during the Iron Age resulted in the covering of some of the Bronze Age features.

During the medieval period, large portions of the site were given over to open field cultivation, evidenced by the remains of ridge and furrow cultivation. The area was partitioned in the post-medieval period by the construction of a series of drainage ditches, which form the basis of the current field pattern.

About the Authors
William A Boismier’s professional background includes four university degrees and extensive fieldwork experience across Eastern and Southern England with archaeological remains ranging in date from the Palaeolithic to the medieval and postmedieval periods. He has published reports and other work in monographs, journals and other peer-reviewed outlets and has written a number of ‘grey literature’ reports, project designs and period summaries. He currently works as an archaeological consultant. ;

Edmund Taylor is a Project Manager for the York Archaeological Trust. He gained his degree in Archaeology from the University of Bradford in 2000 and soon after joined Northamptonshire Archaeology (now Mola Northampton)
NEW: Doors, Entrances and Beyond... Various Aspects of Entrances and Doors of the Tombs in the Memphite Necropoleis during the Old Kingdom by Leo Roeten. Paperback; 205x290mm; 202 pages; 169 figures, 11 tables (black & white throughout). 714 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 33. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698718. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698725. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Doors are more than a physical means to close off an entrance or an exit; doors can also indicate that a boundary between two worlds has been crossed. This is above all the case for the door into the chapel. Such a door constitutes a barrier between the world of the living and the world where the living and the dead can coexist, while, inside the chapel, the false door acts as a barrier between the world of the living and that of the dead. Taking into account both physical and non-physical aspects of the door, Doors, Entrances and Beyond... proposes that porticos, false doors, niches and mastaba chapel entrances are interconnected in their function as a barrier between two worlds, of which the entrance into the chapel is the most important. The different elements of the entrance have a signalling, identifying, inviting and in some cases a warning function, but once inside the entrance itself, the decoration of its corridor walls adds a guiding and an explanatory function to it. The main themes there are the tomb owner standing or seated with or without members of the family, and subsidiary figures. Over the course of time, decreasing tomb dimensions correlate with the decreasing size of the chosen decoration themes. At the same time, both on the walls of the corridor and the false door, a change of decoration themes took place which can be explained through the changing mode of supply of the k3 of the deceased.

About the Author
Leo Roeten obtained a Masters degree in biochemistry and plant physiology at the University of Amsterdam in 1972, which was followed by a career in this field, after which he completed a PhD in Egyptology at the University of Leiden in 2011. From then on he has been active as an independent researcher specializing in the Old Kingdom tombs of the Memphite necropoleis. This research has led to a number of articles and three books: The decoration of the cult chapel walls of the Old Kingdom at Giza (2014), Chronological developments in the Old Kingdom tombs in the necropoleis of Giza, Saqqara and Abusir (2016), and Loaves, beds, plants and Osiris (2018).
NEW: Daily Life in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence by Susan Thorpe. Paperback; 156x234mm; 136 pages. 713 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 32. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695076. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695083. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Representations and inscriptions on tomb and temple walls and individual stelae have provided considerable knowledge of ancient Egyptian daily life, religious custom and military achievements. However, as visual or eulogistic textual evidence they are unable to provide the insight into the people themselves, their personalities and the events and issues they were concerned with, insight which can be found in personal correspondence. Daily Life in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence addresses a selection of letters from the Old Kingdom up to and including the Twenty-first Dynasty. Under the topic headings of problems and issues, daily life, religious matters, military and police matters, it will show the insight they provide regarding aspects of belief, relationships, custom and behaviour, evidencing the distinctiveness of the data such personal correspondence can provide as a primary source of daily life in ancient Egypt – the extra dimension.

About the Author
Susan Thorpe moved to New Zealand from the UK in 1976. In 2003 she enrolled at the University of Auckland and graduated in 2008, majoring in Ancient History. Specialising in Egyptology, she achieved BA Honours (First Class) in 2009 and Masters (First class) in 2010. The topic for her PhD, which she commenced in 2011, was ‘Social Aspects found in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence’. She graduated in 2016. Since then, she has held the position of Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Auckland. She has attended and presented at conferences in Europe, the UK, Australia and New Zealand and had her work accepted for publication in conference proceedings and journals. This publication is the result of further research into the topic of ancient Egyptian personal letters.
NEW: Life, Death and Rubbish Disposal in Roman Norton, North Yorkshire by Janet Phillips and Pete Wilson. Paperback; 205x290mm; 296 pages; 209 figures, 54 tables (colour throughout). 712 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 77. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698381. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698398. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Life, Death and Rubbish Disposal in Roman Norton, North Yorkshire: Excavations at Brooklyn House 2015-16 reports on excavations in advance of the development of a site in Norton-on-Derwent, North Yorkshire close to the line of the main Roman road running from the crossing point of the River Derwent near Malton Roman fort to York (Eboracum). The Brooklyn House site provided much information on aspects of the poorly understood ‘small town’ of Delgovicia. The area came to be used for apparently widely-dispersed burials in the mid-3rd century AD. Among these was the bustumtype burial of a soldier, or former soldier, which produced a well-preserved assemblage of military equipment and incorporated some ‘non-standard’ features. In addition, evidence was found for a possible mausoleum. During the late third and fourth centuries the burial activity was succeeded by occupation in the form of substantial stone-founded, or in some cases possibly stone-built buildings fronting onto the Roman road which was the main approach road to the town from the south. These structures could have been related in some way to the Norton Roman pottery industry, the core area of which was located to the east of the site, although no evidence from them suggested this. Following the fairly short-lived occupation, much of the site was used for the disposal of large quantities of rubbish and structural debris that presumably originated from locations closer to or beyond the river crossing, including possibly the Roman fort. The Roman pottery assemblage incorporated in excess of 21,000 sherds and adds considerably to our knowledge of pottery use and production in Roman Malton/Norton. Similarly, the substantial and well-preserved Roman-period finds assemblage provides insights, not only into the bustum burial but also wider aspects of life in Delgovicia. Within the assemblage, there were some unusual and rarely found individual items such as a pair of iron-working tongs, a two-link snaffle bit and a bone needle case, as well as a wide range of other material including military equipment, jewellery, styli and a possible scroll holder. The medieval and later pottery from the site provides a baseline for work on assemblages recovered from Malton/Norton in the future.

About the contributors
Having started in archaeology as a volunteer on the Mary Rose in 1982 John Buglass formed his own company, JB Archaeology Ltd, in 2004. During his career John has worked on a wide range of sites from complex urban ones in London through to rural sites scattered across North Yorkshire. He has also excavated foreshore and submerged remains including 30 historic wrecks as well as having excavated on the Studley Royal/Fountains Abbey World Heritage Site. JB Archaeology has undertaken all of the archaeological works for the Brooklyn House development since the initial desk-based assessment in 2014. John has a BSc (Hons) Biology and an MA Archaeological Science. ;

After earning her MA in Medieval History and Archaeology from St. Andrews University, Janet Phillips began work as an archaeologist in 2007. While working, she gaining a further MA in Archaeology and Heritage from Leicester University. From 2011 Janet worked as a Project Officer on a range of multi-period sites. During that time she ran both phases of the Brooklyn House fieldwork and also developed an interest in finds work becoming a Post Excavation Supervisor in 2018. ;

Pete Wilson worked for English Heritage/Historic England for many years, including as Head of Research Policy (Roman Archaeology), and is now an Independent Consultant. A graduate of Birmingham University, he obtained a PhD from the University of Bradford for a thesis on Roman North Yorkshire. He has published widely on Roman topics including major monographs on Cataractonium (Catterick) (2002) and reports and papers on various subjects
NEW: Searching for the 17th Century on Nevis: The Survey and Excavation of Two Early Plantation Sites by Robert A. Philpott, Roger H. Leech and Elaine L. Morris. Paperback; 205x290mm; 238 pages; 118 figures; 14 tables. 711 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698862. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698879. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Searching for the 17th Century on Nevis is the first of a series of monographs dedicated to the archaeological investigation of the landscape, buildings and artefacts of the Eastern Caribbean by the Nevis Heritage Project. This volume presents the results of documentary research and excavation on two sugar plantation sites on the island of Nevis. Upper Rawlins, located high on Nevis mountain, was occupied in the late 17th and early 18th century and abandoned early. Fenton Hill was occupied from the mid-17th to the mid-19th century and originated with an earthfast timber building, probably a dwelling house, later converted to a kitchen and encapsulated in stone about 1700. The adjacent main house was probably destroyed in the French raid of 1706 and rebuilt in timber. The final occupation was by Portuguese Madeiran labourers, who were introduced to fill a labour force shortage in the 1840s.

Detailed reports on the finds assemblage include discussions of the handmade, bonfired Afro-Caribbean pottery made by enslaved African women, imported European ceramics and glass, clay tobacco pipes, metalwork and building materials. The dominance of imported goods from south-western England demonstrates the strong mercantile links between Nevis and Bristol, but local Nevis production of ceramics adds new insights into the estatebased ceramic production on European lines.

Includes contributions by David Barker, Clive Gamble, Jerzy Gawronski, Sheila Hamilton-Dyer, David A. Higgins, Linda Mitchell, Sebastiaan Ostkamp and Jaco Weinstock.

About the Authors
Dr Robert Philpott MCIfA FSA is a researcher at the University of Liverpool, with interests in post-medieval archaeology of colonial settlement in the Caribbean, material culture and the Roman and later archaeology of North West England. ;

Professor Roger Leech MCIfA FSA, formerly Head of Archaeology for the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, now Visiting Professor in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Southampton, has published widely on urban archaeology and architecture, and the historical archaeology of the Caribbean. ;

Dr Elaine L. Morris MCIfA FSA is Visiting Fellow at the University of Southampton (UK) with interests in prehistoric and colonial archaeology in the Caribbean and prehistoric ceramics in Britain.
NEW: Le four de Sévrier et autres fours et fourneaux d’argile aux âges des métaux en Europe occidentale by Jean Coulon. Paperback; 205x290mm; 248 pages; 181 figures, 25 tables. French text. 710 2021 Laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique UNIGE . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698619. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698626 . Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Sevrier kiln, discovered in 1974 on a submerged island in Lake Annecy in the Haute-Savoie region of France, is a headline find of alpine archeology. Almost fifty years later, it continues to provoke debate. This study looks back at the history of an artefact considered in turn as one of the earliest Western pottery kilns, as an enigmatic stove for domestic use, and as a technological link in the Final Bronze Age which would herald the professionalization of pottery, hitherto a purely domestic industry, seasonal and self-sufficient.

It takes the form of a multidisciplinary investigation where archaeological, ethnoarchaeological and experimental approaches are brought together to consider the contradictory hypotheses, broaden the focus and put forward new perspectives.

In particular the study focuses on technological history, and on the changing social structure of Bronze Age communities, which contributed to the advent of proto-artisans specialising in pottery production, a few centuries later.

About the Author
Jean Coulon, archaeologist, teacher, and artist, was born in Annecy in 1952 and is a member of the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology of Geneva. The practical experience acquired during a long practice of ceramics led him naturally to take an interest in this famous discovery from the Alpine lake-dwellings.

French Description
Le four de Sévrier, découvert en 1974 sur un haut fond immergé du lac d’Annecy, est un objet phare de l’archéologie alpine. Près d’une cinquantaine d’années plus tard, il continue de se dérober à l’interprétation des spécialistes. Cette étude revient sur l’histoire d’un artefact considéré tour à tour comme le princeps des fours de potier occidentaux, comme un énigmatique fourneau à usage domestique, comme un maillon technologique de l’âge du bronze fi nal qui annoncerait la professionnalisation de la poterie, activité jusqu’alors familiale, saisonnière et autarcique.

Ce nouveau regard sur cet objet de référence, prend la forme d’une enquête pluridisci-plinaire ou les volets archéométrique, ethnoarchéologique et expérimental accueillent et passent au crible les hypothèses contradictoires, élargissent les problématique s et posent de nouvelles perspectives.

Il interroge par le prisme de l’histoire des techniques, les infl exions dans l’organisation sociale des communautés de l’âge du Bronze. Celles, en particulier, qui favoriseront, quelques siècles plus tard, l’avènement de proto artisans, spécialisés dans les activités de transformation de l’argile.

Jean Coulon, archéologue, enseignant, artiste, né à Annecy en 1952, est titulaire d’un Master en Arts Plastiques de l’Université de St Etienne, d’un doctorat en Langue, Histoire et Civilisation des mondes anciens de l’Université Lyon Lumière 2, membre du Laboratoire d’Archéologie Préhistorique et Anthropologie de Genève. Son parcours est riche d’une grande diversité d’expériences. Celles acquises au cours d’une longue pratique de la céramique l’ont amené tout naturellement à s’intéresser à cet objet célèbre des palafi ttes alpins.
NEW: La transformación del mundo rural en la isla de Mallorca durante la Antigüedad tardía (c. 300-902/903 d. C.) by Catalina Mas Florit. Paperback; 205x290mm; 138pp; 38 figures, 8 tables (black & white throughout); Spanish text. 709 2021 Limina/Limites: Archaeologies, histories, islands and borders in the Mediterranean (365-1556) 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698503. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698510. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

La transformación del mundo rural en la isla de Mallorca durante la Antigüedad tardía presents the study of the rural landscape of the eastern part of the island of Mallorca (Balearic Islands) during Late Antiquity, providing new data that improves our understanding of one of the least well-known periods of the island. The author describes the results of the study of old archaeological surveys carried out on the island – which had not been published yet – and the results of new archaeological surveys. The conclusions from these studies detected a series of trends that help to better understand the settlement patterns of the island during the transition from the Roman period to medieval times. Furthermore, they help to obtain an overview of different transformations that occurred in the rural world in a territory that was strongly marked by its insularity. Equally discernable in this territory was the role played by the old indigenous substrate, which was reflected in the survival or re-use of pre and proto-historic settlements.

About the Author
Catalina Mas Florit is currently an Associate Professor of Archaeology in the Department of History and Archaeology at the University of Barcelona. Her research examines the transformation of landscapes with a particular interest in island systems and rural areas in the western Mediterranean. She co-directed or directed excavations in the building at the Ripoll street of Barcelona, the early Christian set of l'Illa del Rei (Mahon, Menorca) and the Roman villa at Sa Mesquida (Calvià, Mallorca). She is currently co-director of the excavations of the Roman and Late Antique city of Pollentia (Alcúdia, Mallorca).

Spanish Description
En La transformación del mundo rural en la isla de Mallorca durante la Antigüedad tardía la autora presenta el estudio del paisaje rural de la zona este de la isla de Mallorca (islas Baleares) durante la Antigüedad Tardía, proporcionando nuevos datos que permiten mejorar el conocimiento de uno de los periodos peor conocidos de la historia insular. Se presentan los resultados del estudio de antiguas prospecciones arqueológicas realizadas en la isla que no habían sido publicadas y los resultados de nuevas prospecciones arqueológicas. Las conclusiones permiten detectar una serie de tendencias, que ayudan a comprender mejor el patrón de asentamiento de la población en el tránsito entre época romana y época medieval, así como obtener una visión global de las transformaciones acaecidas en el mundo rural de forma diacrónica en un territorio intensamente marcado por su insularidad. Destaca la presencia antiguos yacimientos indígenas (cuevas y poblados en general de la Edad del Hierro) que fueron reocupados o que perduraron.

Catalina Mas Florit es actualmente profesora agregada interina de Arqueología en el departamento de Historia y Arqueología de la Universidad de Barcelona. Ha centrado su investigación en el estudio de la trasformación del paisaje con un interés particular en sistemas insulares y áreas rurales del Mediterráneo occidental. Ha codirigido o dirigido excavaciones arqueológicas en el edificio de la calle Ripoll de la ciudad de Barcelona, en el complejo cristiano de la Illa del Rei (Mahón, Menorca) y en la villa romana de Sa Mesquida (Calvià, Mallorca). Actualmente es codirectora de las excavaciones de la ciudad romana y tardoantigua de Pollentia (Alcúdia, Mallorca).
NEW: Göytepe: Neolithic Excavations in the Middle Kura Valley, Azerbaijan edited by Yoshihiro Nishiaki and Farhad Guliyev. Hardback; 210x297mm; 384 pages; 285 figures, 37 tables (colour throughout). 708 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698787. £88.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698794. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Göytepe: Neolithic Excavations in the Middle Kura Valley, Azerbaijan, publishes the first round of fieldwork and research (2008-2013) at this key site for understanding the emergence and development of food-producing communities in the South Caucasus. Situated close to the Fertile Crescent of Southwest Asia, where Neolithisation processes occurred earlier, research in the South Caucasus raises intriguing research questions, including issues of diffusion from the latter and interaction with ‘incoming’ Neolithic communities as well as the possibility of independent local Neolithisation processes. In order to address these issues in the South Caucasus, a joint Azerbaijan–Japan research programme was launched in 2008 to investigate Göytepe, one of the largest known Neolithic mounds in the South Caucasus. The results of the first phase of the project (2008-2013) presented here provide rich archaeological data from multi-disciplinary perspectives: chronology, architecture, technology, social organisation, and plant and animal exploitation, to name a few. This volume is the first to present these details in a single report of the South Caucasian Neolithic site using a high-resolution chronology based on dozens of radiocarbon dates.

About the Editors
Yoshihiro Nishiaki, who received his BA and MA from the University of Tokyo and PhD from University College London, is a professor of prehistoric archaeology at the University of Tokyo and Director of its University Museum. His research involves the prehistory of Southwest Asia and its neighbouring regions through fieldwork and archaeological analyses of material remains. He has directed a number of field campaigns at Palaeolithic and Neolithic sites in Syria, Iran, Azerbaijan, and Uzbekistan. The Neolithisation processes of the South Caucasus have been a major target of his research in the past few decades. ;

Farhad Guliyev, a graduate of the Baku State University of the Republic of Azerbaijan, received his PhD from the Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences (ANAS) and currently serves as Director of the Museum of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, ANAS. His major research interests lie in the socio-economic development of the South Caucasus from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age. His recent international field projects besides Göytepe include the Neolithic sites of Hacı Elamxanlıtepe, Menteshtepe and Kiciktepe, also in western Azerbaijan.
NEW: Rei Cretariae Romanae Fautorum: Acta 46 Congressus tricesimus primus Rei Cretariae Romanae Fautorum Napocae habitus MMXVIII edited by Catarina Viegas. DOI: 10.32028/9781789697483. Hardback; 210x297; 620 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English, Italian and Spanish. 706 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697483. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697490. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Acta 46 comprises 64 articles. Out of the 120 scheduled lectures and posters presented at the 31st Congress of the Rei Cretariæ Romanæ Favtores, 61 are included in the present volume, to which three further were added. Given the location of the conference in Romania it seems natural that the number of articles related to the Balkans and Danube region is the largest (with 20 articles), followed by contributions concerning Italy (15), and the Iberian Peninsula (13). The 'rest of the world' is split between the Roman provinces in the East (eight papers), in North-Africa (six), and in central respectively western Europe (two).
NEW: La séquence paléolithique de Karain E (Antalya, Turquie) Analyses techniques et typologiques (1989-2009) by Marcel Otte and Janusz Kozlowski. Paperback; 210x297mm; 90 pages; 99 plates (6 in colour). French text. 703 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696790. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696806. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The long Palaeolithic sequence of Karain (Antalya, Turkey) began around 500,000 years ago and continued until the final Palaeolithic around 10,000 BC. This volume presents all the cultural and technical variations during this immense period, situated in a context which joins Africa, Asia, and Europe. In brief, the assemblage of tools appears to belong to Asian traditions; no Acheulian bifaces were observed. The earlier half of the sequence (stages 9 and 10) corresponds to centripetal industries with thick flakes and with denticulates and racloirs, classified as 'Proto-Charentian'. 'Modern archaic' human remains were sporadically discovered there. The upper phase is by far the most important: stages 8 to 5. These are superb Levallois industries with good quality exogenous materials. The tools are made from elongated flakes and transformed into racloirs with very elegant points. They have been termed 'Karain Mousterian'. Human remains are also associated with this phase (mandible and phalanges). The final phase (stage 4) is classically Mousterian with Neanderthal human remains.

About the Authors
Marcel Otte, Professor Emeritus at the University of Liège (Belgium), specializes in Palaeolithic civilizations in Eurasia and contacts between Europe and other continents during prehistory. ;

Janusz Kozlowski, Professor Emeritus at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków (Poland), specializes in the origin of the Upper Paleolithic in Europe and the migration routes of modern humans across the Balkans, as well as on the origin and spread of the Neolithic throughout the European continent.

French Description
La longue séquence paléolithique de Karain (Antalya, Turquie), débute vers 500.000 ans et se poursuit jusqu’au paléolithique final, vers 10.000 ans. Ce volume présente toutes les variations culturelles et techniques durant cette immense période et située au milieu des grands continents qu’elle joint : Afrique, Asie, Europe. À la base, des ensembles à éclats semblent appartenir aux traditions asiatiques, nous n’avons pas observé de bifaces acheuléens dans toute la séquence. La moitié inférieure (stades 9 et 10) correspond à des industries centripètes à éclats épais et à denticulés et racloirs, classées comme « Proto-Charentien ». Des restes humains « modernes archaïques » y furent découverts sporadiquement. La phase supérieure est de loin le plus importante : stades 8 à 5. Il s’agit de superbes industries Levallois avec matériaux exogènes de bonne qualité. Les outils sont faits sur éclats allongés, et transformés en racloirs et pointes très élégants. Nous l’avons dénommée « Moustérien de Karain ». Des restes humains y sont également associés (mandibule et phalanges). La partie supérieure (stade 4) contient un Moustérien classique avec des restes humains néanderthaliens.

Marcel Otte, professeur émérite à l’université de Liège (Belgique), spécialisé dans les civilisations paléolithiques d’Eurasie, et des contacts entre l’Europe et les autres continents au cours de la plus longue préhistoire. Il travaille surtout sur les aspects spirituels et religieux durant l’évolution humaine. ;

Janusz Kozlowski, professeur émérite à l’université Jagellon de Cracovie (Pologne), est spécialiste de l’origine du paléolithique supérieur en Europe et des voies de migrations de l’homme moderne à travers les Balkans, ainsi que sur ‘origine et la diffusion du Néolithique à travers tout le contient européen.
NEW: Indigenous Heritage and Rock Art Worldwide Research in Memory of Daniel Arsenault edited by Carole Charette, Aron Mazel and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; 210 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French. 691 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696899. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696905. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Professor Daniel Arsenault, along with his wife, Nadine Desbiens, and stepson, Jacob Desbiens-Doyle, were sadly taken from this world in 2016 following a tragic car accident. Daniel was the leading exponent in Canadian Shield rock art. Working in the northern part of Quebec, Daniel explored many hundreds of square kilometres of this vast area for rock art. Working with ethnographers and First Nation people, Daniel became a formidable force in promoting this little known assemblage, lecturing all over the world and stimulating audiences wherever he went. Complementing his knowledge of rock art, Daniel also had a deep understanding of the heritage of the people whose ancestors made the images. Shortly before his death, Daniel was made an Erasmus Mundus Professor at Polytechnic Institute of Tomar in Portugal. Here, he was due to share his wealth of knowledge and enthusiasm about rock art and cultural heritage to an attentive audience.

Daniel clearly had much more to offer, and this book is an extension of his ways of thinking. He has left an important legacy that has touched the lives of many, including people who contributed to this volume.

The book has 14 thought-provoking chapters and deals with Daniel’s first love - the archaeology of artistic endeavour. It gathers together both academic colleagues and family who share with the reader elements of Daniel’s life. The book is also a serious academic volume, providing the reader with new ideas about the interpretation and dating of rock art, ethnography, heritage and material culture.

About the Author
Carole Charette holds a PhD in art education and design at Concordia University, Quebec; an MFA in stylistic interpretations in typography and a degree in graphic design at Université Laval, Quebec; a certificate in multimedia at Sheridan College, Ontario; and a diploma in exhibition design at Collège du Vieux-Montréal, Quebec. She was an assistant professor at MacEwan University in Edmonton (2014–2018) and has also been a creative director and editor of several publications about design.

Aron Mazel is a Reader in Heritage Studies in Media, Culture, and Heritage at Newcastle University and a Research Associate in the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand.

George Nash is employed at the Museum of Prehistoric Art (Quaternary and Prehistory Geosciences Centre, Maçao, Portugal [IPT]). George has been an academic and professional archaeologist for the past 35 years and has undertaken extensive fieldwork on prehistoric rock-art in Indonesia, Malaysia, Norway, Sardinia, Spain, Sweden, and more recently, the Negev (Israel).

Table of Contents
Préface / Preface ;
Nécrologie / Necrology - Daniel Arsenault ( 1957–2016 ) ;
Daniel Arsenault : The scholarly legacy gone but not forgotten ;
Dancing in the dark with firelight: the power of shaded paintings in the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg and surrounding areas, southeastern Africa – Aron Mazel ;
Contextualising megalithic rock art on Neolithic chambered tombs: A Welsh perspective – George Nash ;
Understanding landscape composition without rock art: A study of panel/canvas behaviour in the Valcamonica, Lombardy, Northern Italy – George Nash ;
Prehistory of central Portugal: brief panoramic of rock art and archaeometry studies – Sara Garcês, Hugo Gomes, Luiz Oosterbeek, Pierluigi Rosina ;
Pleistocene Art at the Beginnings of the Twentieth-First Century: Rethinking the place of Europe in a Globalised Context – Oscar Moro Abadía and Bryn Tapper ;
A multifaceted approach for contextualising the rock art of the Algonquian First Nations in the Canadian Shield – Daniel Arsenault ;
E=mc0, an equation for studying the timeframes of world rock art – Daniel Arsenault ;
NEW: Masters of the Steppe: The Impact of the Scythians and Later Nomad Societies of Eurasia Proceedings of a conference held at the British Museum, 27-29 October 2017 edited by Svetlana Pankova and St John Simpson. Paperback; 802 pages; 604 figures, 21 tables (colour throughout). 632 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696479. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696486. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Masters of the Steppe: the impact of the Scythians and later nomad societies of Eurasia consists of 45 papers presented at a major international conference held at the British Museum in 2017 on the occasion of the BP exhibition Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia, both conference and exhibition being jointly organised with the State Hermitage Museum. There are 58 contributors and co-authors from 16 countries, mostly from Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan, but also America, Britain, France, Germany, China and Mongolia. The papers range from new archaeological discoveries, results of scientific research and studies of museum collections to reconstructions of social elites, the phenomenon of monumental tomb construction, and ‘Animal Style’ art. Most results are presented for the first time in the English language and they throw a completely new light on a huge range of aspects of the lives of Scythians and other ancient nomads of Eurasia, their horses, rock art and the working of precious metals, textiles and other materials.

About the Editors
Svetlana Pankova is a senior researcher and curator of the Altai-Sayan collections in the Department of the Archaeology of Eastern Europe and Siberia in the State Hermitage Museum. Her main academic interests are sites from southern Siberia and central Asia with well-preserved organic materials dating from the 1st millennium BC to the 1st millennium AD. She is currently studying materials from the important Tashtyk-period Oglakhty burialground in the Minusinsk Basin, and textile finds from the Hermitage collection. She was the lead Hermitage curator and co-editor of the catalogue for the BP exhibition Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia (2017/18).

St John Simpson is a senior curator in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum. He has excavated extensively in the Middle East but it was his first experience of travelling across central Asia in 1991 which led him to co-direct nine seasons of excavations at ancient Merv, in present-day Turkmenistan (1992–2000), and develop extensive relations there and in Russia. He was the lead British Museum curator and co-editor of the catalogue for the BP exhibition Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia (2017/18). His previous exhibitions include Afghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World (BM, 2011) and Queen of Sheba: Treasures from Ancient Yemen (BM, 2002), and he also curated the Rahim Irvani Gallery for Ancient Iran at the British Museum (2007).

Reviews
'The main content of the volume comprises some 44 papers based on contributions given at a conference held at the British Museum, 27-29 October 2017. As one would expect of a meeting of this kind, the papers, while relevant to the main conference theme, focus on specialist aspects. The contributions are written by experts and present new material and insights or make accessible data embedded in the more obscure literature. For these reasons, there is a great deal here that is new and exciting, particularly to a western audience—a sufficient reason in itself for supporting the publication.

But as everyone who has had to publish conference proceedings knows, the art lies in transforming what is essentially a collection of disparate, often narrowly focussed, papers into a cohesive volume. The editors have done this with considerable skill and success. All the papers have been translated into English, and they have undertaken the laborious task of compiling a single bibliography, which not only saves space but makes the volume much easier to use. They have also provided an Introduction (5400 words) and a Conclusions (13000 words), both substantial pieces of work, far more than conventional bookends.

The Introduction is a fascinating text in its own right. It sets the scene in a novel way by explaining the philosophy and the process that led to the mounting of
NEW: Discurso, espacio y poder en las religions antiguas edited by Rafael A. Barroso-Romero and José Ángel Castillo Lozano. Paperback; 203x276mm; 212 pages; 12 figures, 1 table; Spanish text. 132 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698848. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698855. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas aims to reflect on how the wielders of power, be they religious, social or political, shape the discourses that justify their power within the framework of a society or a specific group, and how space participates in these discourses. Intellectuals, aristocrats, holy men or even the dead all needed to shape a discourse that would allow them to justify their hierarchies, whether they were internal or common to all of society, to reach a social consensus and to sustain them over time. The forms in which power used religion to express itself were quite diverse, such as ritual violence, martyrdom, sacrifice, or even divine trickery. Sometimes certain spaces became places whose political and religious control brought about conflicts, whose resolution was found through the legitimisation generated by the complex theological discourse, which reinforced the extraordinary qualities of the gods to reaffirm their authority, or through the cohesive value of the rites. This volume analyses these questions through fourteen works by sixteen researchers from different institutions. It includes studies carried out with materials from a wide range of sources: epigraphy, the archaeological record, and literary sources.

About the Editors
Rafael A. Barroso-Romero is a doctoral researcher at the Max-Weber-Kolleg, Universität Erfürt and at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where he lectures as a member of the Department of Ancient History. He is currently developing his doctoral research on materiality, spatiality, and the body in unusual burials in the Roman West. ;

José Ángel Castillo Lozano completed his Doctorate in History at the Universidad de Murcia. He is currently a High School teacher. His area of specialisation lies in the world of Late Antiquity, on which he has published around fifteen papers.

Spanish Description
Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas pretende reflexionar acerca de cómo el poder da forma a los discursos que lo justifican en el marco de una sociedad o de un grupo concreto y cómo el espacio participa de aquellos. Intelectuales, aristócratas, hombres santos o incluso los difuntos, todos ellos necesitaron configurar un discurso que permitiera justificar sus jerarquías −ya fueran internas o comunes a toda la sociedad− consensuarlas socialmente y sustentarlas en el tiempo. Las formas en las que el poder utilizaba a la religión para expresarse fueron muy diversas, como la violencia ritual, el martirio, el sacrificio, o incluso el engaño divino. A veces, determinados espacios se convirtieron en lugares cuyo control político y religioso generaba conflictos, cuya solución se encontró en la legitimación generada por el complejo discurso teológico, que refuerza las cualidades extraordinarias de los dioses para reafirmar su autoridad, o por el valor cohesivo de los ritos. Este volumen analiza tales cuestiones a través de catorce trabajos de dieciséis investigadores procedentes de diversos centros. Recoge investigaciones realizadas con materiales de muy diversa procedencia: la epigrafía, el registro arqueológico o las fuentes literarias.

Rafael A. Barroso-Romero es Graduado en Historia (UCO) y Máster en Ciencias de las Religiones (UCM). Actualmente es investigador predoctoral en el Max-Weber-Kolleg (IGS “Resonant Self- World Relations in Ancient and Modern Socio-Religious Practices”) de la Universität Erfürt y al mismo tiempo en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, donde imparte docencia como miembro del Departamento de Prehistoria, Historia Antigua y Arqueología. ;

José A. Castillo-Lozano (1991) es graduado en Historia en la Universidad de Murcia. En la actualidad es profesor de secundaria (funcionario de carrera) y doctor en historia. Su ámbito de especialización radica en el mundo de la Antigüedad Tardía del cual ha publicado un
NEW: Professor Challenger and his Lost Neolithic World: The Compelling Story of Alexander Thom and British Archaeoastronomy by Euan W. MacKie†. Paperback; 203x276mm; 158 pages; 81 figures (colour throughout). 131 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918330. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918347. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Professor Challenger and his Lost Neolithic World combines the two great passions of the author’s life: reconstructing the Neolithic mind and constructively challenging consensus in his professional domain. The book is semi-autobiographical, charting the author’s investigation of Alexander Thom’s theories, in particular regarding the alignment of prehistoric monuments in the landscape, across a number of key Neolithic sites from Kintraw to Stonehenge and finally Orkney. It maps his own perspective of the changing reception to Thom’s ideas by the archaeological profession from initial curiosity and acceptance to increasing scepticism. The text presents historical summaries of the various strands of evidence from key Neolithic sites across the UK and Ireland with the compelling evidence from the Ness of Brodgar added as an appendix in final justification of his approach to the subject.

About the Author Euan W. MacKie (1936-2020), was a British archaeologist who graduated with a degree in Archaeology and Anthropology from St John’s College, Cambridge in 1959. He excavated at the Mayan site of Xunantunich in 1959-60 and was then employed at the British Museum Department of Ethnography before becoming Curator and Keeper of Archaeology and Anthropology at the Hunterian Museum at the University of Glasgow where he later obtained his PhD. His principal research areas were the brochs and vitrified forts of the Scottish Iron Age, and archaeoastronomy – the investigation of the astronomical knowledge of prehistoric cultures.
NEW: “Los animales enseñaron el camino…”: La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas by María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa and José Carlos Castañeda Reyes. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94 pages; colour throughout. 130 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698596. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698602. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

“Los animales enseñaron el camino…”: La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas examines the past fauna of the Sierra Gorda region of Mexico, and its representation in archaeological ceramics. Queretaro's Sierra Gorda was declared a “Biosphere Reserve” on May 19, 1997, by presidential decree. As a natural area thus protected, there are almost 400,000 hectares of great biodiversity, in which there are at least 15 types and subtypes of different vegetation, more than 1800 species of plants, 124 of fungi and 550 species of vertebrates, among other elements that prove the natural wealth of the region. As part of the "Northern Archaeological Project of the State of Querétaro, Mexico" (PANQ), the book presents ceramic representations of the fauna of the region, relating them to the oral traditions that the inhabitants of the region have preserved until now. In so doing it demonstrates the deep interdependence of humans and animals, and analyses wider cultural interconnections across Mesoamerica. The book goes on to analyze some of these Mesoamerican cultural traits, although its main goal is to highlight the archaeological evidence that has been recovered by the project since 1990 in this still little-known region of ancient Mexico.

About the Authors
María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa is Professor of Archaeology at the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Since 1990 she has led the Proyecto Arqueológico Norte del Estado de Querétaro, and has published extensively on the region. ;

José Carlos Castañeda-Reyes, a historian and archaeologist, is Professor at the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana campus Iztapalapa.

Spanish Description: “Los animales enseñaron el camino…” La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas by María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa and José Carlos Castañeda Reyes La Sierra Gorda queretana fue declarada “Reserva de la Biosfera” el 19 de mayo de 1997, por decreto presidencial. Como área natural así protegida, son casi 400 000 hectáreas de gran biodiversidad, en las que habitan al menos 15 tipos y subtipos de vegetación diferente, más de 1800 especies de plantas, 124 de hongos y 550 especies de vertebrados, entre otros elementos que comprueban la riqueza natural de la región. Como parte del desarrollo del “Proyecto Arqueológico del Norte del Estado de Querétaro, México” (PANQ), hemos localizado diversos testimonios que muestran ejemplos de la fauna del pasado, que además forma parte de algunas tradiciones orales que conservan los habitantes de la región hasta nuestros días. En el libro analizamos algunos de estos rasgos culturales mesoamericanos, si bien nos interesa resaltar primordialmente los testimonios arqueológicos que se han recuperado por el proyecto que desde 1990 viene desarrollándose en esta región, todavía poco conocida, del México antiguo.

María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa. Arqueóloga. Egresada de la Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia (Licenciatura en Arqueología) y de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Maestría en Historia del Arte y Doctorado en Estudios Mesoamericanos). Candidata al grado de Doctor en estudios Mesoamericanos por la UNAM. Profesor-Investigador de tiempo completo de la Dirección de Estudios Arqueológicos del INAH. Directora del Proyecto Arqueológico Norte del Estado de Querétaro, México, desde 1990. ;

Jose Carlos Castañeda Reyes. Mexicano. Historiador y arqueólogo. Egresado de la Escuela Normal Superior de México, de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México y de la Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Estudios de Maestría y Doctorado en Estudios de Asia y Africa, especialidad Medio Oriente (Historia antigua) por El Colegio de México. Profesor-investigador en el Departamento de Filosofía. Area de Historia del Estado y de la Sociedad, Universidad Autónoma Metr
NEW: Heritage in the Making: Dealing with the Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany edited by Flaminia Bartolini. Paperback; 210x297mm; 158 pages; colour throughout. 5 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698732. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The fifth volume of Ex Novo has the pleasure to host Flaminia Bartolini as guest editor for the special issue titled Heritage in the Making. Dealing with Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany. This collection of peer-reviewed papers stems in part from the successful workshop held at McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge in December 2018 under the aegis of the DAAD-Cambridge Hub. The event gathered several international heritage experts and professionals from both Germany and Italy to explore the complexities of handling Heritage related to Fascism and National Socialism.

The selection of papers contribute much to the debate on the shifting conditions of the reception of dictatorial regimes, and more specifically the fate of fascist material legacies from the aftermath of WWII to the present day.

The second part of this volume includes an additional contribution by Aydin Abar which keeps in with the broad theme of political reappropriation of the past lying at the core of Bartolini’s collection of papers but strays away from their geographical focus by extending the analysis to the exploitation of Achaemenian material legacies in reinforcing nationalist narratives in nineteenth and twentieth century Iran.
NEW: Mobility and Exchange across Borders: Exploring Social Processes in Europe during the First Millennium BCE – Theoretical and Methodological Approaches Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 9, Sessions XXXIV-4 and XXXIV-5 edited by Veronica Cicolani. Paperback; 205x290mm; 144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French. 707 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697292. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697308. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Mobility and Exchange across Borders presents the proceedings of Sessions XXXIVIV and XXXIV-V of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). Over the last few decades, the study of cultural interactions in the Iron Age has been considerably renewed thanks to the application of new methods and tools, opening the way to new research perspectives. The papers provide different examples from various archaeological contexts and regions while applying new methodologies able to highlight the diversity of cultural transfers. Their purpose is to stimulate a debate on human interactions and cultural transfers in order to open up new analytical perspectives on this topic and to critically examine the markers and approaches traditionally used to identify human and object mobility during the first millennium BC. Through the different approaches and perspectives presented herein, this volume aims to contribute to the renewal of the scientific debate on mobility and interactions as important drivers of societal change and to stimulate future research and debate.

About the editor
Veronica Cicolani is a permanent researcher at the CNRS French Institute, AOrOc UMR8546 CNRS-PSL and member of editorial team of Etudes Celtiques. Archaeologist specialist of European protohistory, and of the history of museum collections, her research focuses on technological and cultural interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds and on Italic craft practices. Since 2005, she has been a scientific collaborator of the National Museum of Saint-Germain-en-Laye (MAN), where she also co-curated the Golasecca French exhibition (2009-2010). She has been involved in international research programmes on Celtic-Italic interactions (DFG Die sitzbanck of Hochdorf, ANR Caecina) and led a French-Italian research program on Ligurian bronze craft production (Labex Archimede 2015-2016). During the past few years, she has been exploring new inter-disciplinary approaches to the study of cultural and technological interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds.
NEW: Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past. Volume 2 A biography of a Soviet archaeologist (1960s – 1980s) by A. K. Konopatskii, translated by Richard L. Bland and Yaroslav V. Kuzmin. Paperback; 148x210mm; 576 pages; 29 figures. 705 2021 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697070. £34.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697087. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past (Volume II) is about the life and works of Aleksei P. Okladnikov (1908–1981), a prominent archaeologist who spent more than 50 years studying prehistoric sites in various parts of the Soviet Union and in Mongolia. This part of Okladnikov’s biography concentrates on his works in 1961–1981, when he was organiser (1961–1966) and since 1966 the Director of the Institute of History, Philology, and Philosophy, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences, in Novosibirsk. This institute was a part of large-scale project of Akademgorodok (Academic Town) built in 1957– 1964, the unique phenomenon of Soviet science. In Novosibirsk, Okladnikov continued active fieldworks in Siberia, Russian Far East, Central Asia and Mongolia, and writing of books and articles on different subjects of archaeology and history. He also created the Novosibirsk school of archaeologists who continue to work in Siberia and the neighbouring regions of Asia until today. In 1974, Okladnikov with four colleagues participated in joint US–Soviet expedition to the Aleutian Islands, where W. S. Laughlin and he directed the excavations of early sites. The book is for archaeologists, historians, and everyone who is interested in the history of scholarship (particularly the humanities) in the twentieth century.

About the Contributors
Aleksander K. Konopatskii joined the Institute of History, Philology and Philosophy, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences in 1972 where he was closely associated with Aleksei P. Okladnikov, assisting in fieldwork, travel and the preparation of scientific reports. Since 1998 he has been an assistant professor at the Novosibirsk General Military Academy where he teaches humanities. ;

Richard L. Bland studied Alaskan prehistory in the 1970s – 1990s (PhD 1996, University of Oregon). He has translated numerous books and articles on the archaeology of Northeastern Siberia and the Russian Far East, helping to bring the rich Soviet/Russian records of prehistory and early history to the international scholarly community. ;

Yaroslav V. Kuzmin has been studying geoarchaeology of the Russian Far East, Siberia and neighbouring Northeast Asia since 1979 (PhD 1991; DSc. 2007). He has also assisted in translating and editing books on the archaeology of eastern Russia.
NEW: Archaeological Mission of Chieti University in Libya: Reports 2006-2008 by Oliva Menozzi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 350 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 702 2020 RES: Reports, Excavations and Studies of the Archaeological Unit of the University G. d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694468. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694475. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The RES Series (Reports, Excavations and Studies of the Archaeological Unit of the University G. d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara) is dedicated to the projects and the researches of the different teams of the university of Chieti-Pescara working on archaeological projects in Italy and abroad. This first volume is dedicated to the Archaeological Mission in Cyrenaica, starting with the reports and researches of the seasons from 2006 to 2008. Chieti University has been working in Libya with a large international team since 1997. The emphasis of the publication is to present archaeological data to form part of an archive of finds, sites and monuments: a resource and reference point for archaeologists from Libya and elsewhere. At this moment the chora (territory) of Cyrene is facing multiple threats, even the potential loss of important monuments. It is hoped that this publication will contribute to the preservation of the local archaeological heritage.

About the Author
Oliva Menozzi began her studies at Chieti University and completed her doctorate at Oxford in 2001. She has been Researcher and Lecturer in Classical Archaeology and Archaeology of Greek Colonization at the University G.d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara (Italy) since 2002 and is now Associate Professor. She has been Director of the CAAM-Centre of the Athenaeum for Archaeometry and Microanalysis since 2015 and of the Master STARch (Sciences and Technologies for Archaeology at risk) since 2019.
NEW: András Bodor and the History of Classical Studies in Transylvania in the 20th century by Csaba Szabo. Paperback; 156x234mm; 222 pages; 59 figures. 701 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698343. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698350. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

András Bodor and the history of classical studies in Transylvania in the 20th century is the first comprehensive work focusing on the life of a classicist from Transylvania, presenting in detail the life and academic heritage of András Bodor (1915-1999). Based on 1348 newly identified letters, 209 photographs (including 25 portraits), András Bodor’s complete bibliography and his unpublished memoir from 1915-1959, the work offers also the first publication of Bodor’s academic correspondence (107 letters) and also extracts from his unpublished journal. Based on a large number of unpublished documents and the major works of Bodor, the book tries to reconstruct the life and academic heritage of a classicist from the periphery of Europe, a region that changed so many times over the long course of the 20th century. András Bodor appears as a student torn between theology and classical studies, a Transylvanian Hungarian who ended up at Oxford, a lecturer at the Hungarian University of Cluj, a researcher who had the idea of establishing a new school of classics, marginalised and compromising, a quiet teacher of the newly established Babeș-Bolyai University and also a senior professor engaged in education policy. The personality and work of Bodor is presented through the short history of classics in Transylvania, Romania, reflecting on the European and global changes of the discipline.

About the Author
Csaba Szabó (1987) is an assistant lecturer at the University of Lucian Blaga, Sibiu (Romania) and research fellow of the University of Szeged (Hungary). His current research is focusing on Roman religious communication and space sacralisation in the Danubian provinces, history of archaeology and classics in Transyslvania, and public archaeology in Romania.
NEW: The World of Disney: From Antiquarianism to Archaeology by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 156x234mm; 154 pages; 44 figures. 700 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698275. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698282. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dr John Disney (1779-1857) was the benefactor of the first chair in archaeology at a British university. He also donated his major collection to the University of Cambridge. The sculptures continue to be displayed in the Fitzwilliam Museum.

The Disney family traced its origins back to the Norman invasion of England, and the family home was at Norton Disney in Lincolnshire. Disney’s father, the Reverend John Disney DD (1746-1816) left the Church of England to become a minister at the Unitarian Essex Street Chapel in London. A major sponsor of the chapel was Thomas Brand-Hollis of The Hyde, Essex, who bequeathed the house and his Grand Tour collection (formed with Thomas Hollis) on his death in 1804 to the Reverend John Disney. Disney inherited part of the classical collection of his uncle and father-in-law Lewis Disney-Ffytche, owner of the 18th century pleasure gardens, Le Désert de Retz, outside Paris. Disney’s brother-in-law was Sir William Hillary, founder of the RNLI. Disney was instrumental in the creation of the Chelmsford Museum through the Chelmsford Philosophical Society, and the formation of the Essex Archaeological Society.

About the Author
Professor David Gill is Honorary Professor in the Centre for Heritage at the University of Kent, and Academic Associate in the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage in the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures at the University of East Anglia (UEA). He is a Fellow of the RSA and the Society of Antiquaries. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.
NEW: Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience: Barbarian perspectives and Roman strategies to deal with new threats edited by Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696813. Paperback; 205x290mm; 244 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 699 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 76. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696813. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696820. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience deals with the Roman Empire’s responses to the threats which were caused by the new geostrategic situation brought on by the crisis of the 3rd century AD, induced by the ‘barbarians’ who – often already part of Roman military structures as mercenaries and auxiliaries – became a veritable menace for the Empire. Rome adopted different strategies: they oscillated between inclusion, warfare and other means of exerting influence. The contributions to this volume explore the archaeological evidence for Roman practice and especially the varying strategies of power and influence in the central regions on the one hand, and the south-eastern parts of the European ‘Barbaricum’ on the other. They show how ‘Divide et impera’ functioned as practical policy based on alliances, as well as consequent warfare, and diplomatic initiatives, which are traceable by prestige-goods and subsidia treasures found in the Barbaricum. The comparison of Roman imports in different parts of Iron-Age Europe can help understand better a complex process of shifting power and influence in an emerging new Europe, which transformed the Empire towards medieval ‘Herrschaft’ and social structure.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel holds a PhD in Ancient history and a second one in German literature. He was appointed a senior research fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and associated professor at Cuza University in Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. ;

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is a Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main.

Table of Contents
Preface ;
Beyond the Fringes of Empire: New Approaches concerning Roman Influence and Power in the Barbaricum. An introduction – Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß ;
Roman limes in military campaigns of the Barbarians – Krzysztof Narloch ;
Archaeological footprints of a superpower in hostile territory. Recent research on the traces of Roman military activities in the barbarian region north of the Middle Danube – Claus-Michael Hüssen, Balázs Komoróczy, Ján Rajtár, Marek Vlach ;
Friend or Foe? The political relations between inhabitants of the Upper Tisza region and the Roman Empire at the end of the 2nd and the 3rd century AD, in the light of archaeological and historical sources – Jan Bulas ;
The Limes Germanicus Trade and the Roman Army – Dan-Alexandru Suharoschi, Iulia Dumitrache, Roxana-Gabriela Curca ;
Barbarian brooches in Roman context. Analysis of the finds from the frontier marketplace at Porolissum (Romania) – Coriolan Horațiu Opreanu, Sorin Cociș, Vlad-Andrei Lăzărescu ;
Luxury tableware? Terra sigillata in the coastal region of the northern Netherlands – Annet Nieuwhof (Open Access) ;
Septentrional Encounters – Another Revisit to Roman Vessels in Scandinavian sites – Tove Hjørungdal ;
Westerholt ‘An der Mühle’- A Roman Iron Age Site on the North Sea Coast. A preliminary report – Jan F. Kegler ;
Beyond Hadrian’s Wall: Considerations on the Massive Terrets – Luisa Di Pastena ;
Pierced Roman coins from the ‘Free Dacians’ settlement of Roșiori (Municipality of Dulcești, Neamț County, Romania) – Lucian Munteanu, George Dan-Hânceanu ;
Mars on the River Uecker in Western Pomerania – a further indication of a Roman policy of ‘divide et impera’ in Germania? – Jens-Peter Schmidt and Hans-Ulrich Voß ;
South-eastern Transylvania during the Late Roman Period (3rd-4th centuries AD) – József Puskás ;
Roman type forts in th