​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
 
Archaeopress: Publishing Scholarly Archaeology since 1997
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide.

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in scholarly books and journals in the field of archaeology and related heritage subjects.
 
COVID-19 / Brexit Updates
Publishing: 
Our publishing schedule proceeds as normal without significant interruptions; our team continue to work as usual, albeit in various locations. Our printing and fulfilment partners are all open and functioning at this time.

Shipping delays: We are accepting and processing orders in the usual way. The ongoing impact of COVID, compounded throughout January as shipping firms adapt to new export rules following Brexit, have caused considerable delay to shipments to Europe and beyond. Packages are safely reaching their destination, however delivery times are unpredictable and are typically far longer than usual. We sincerely thank you for your patience while you await your order. If you do have any concerns, please contact info@archaeopress.com.

EU customers: Website orders destined for EU addresses are now likely to be subject to import VAT and customs clearance charges. If you have any queries on this point please contact us and we will do our best to advise: info@archaeopress.com.
 
 
NEW: Religious Practice and Cultural Construction of Animal Worship in Egypt from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom Ritual Forms, Material Display, Historical Development by Angelo Colonna. Paperback; 205x290mm; 242pp; 33 figures, 23 tables (5 pages of colour). 788 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 36. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698213. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698220. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Religious Practice and Cultural Construction of Animal Worship in Egypt from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom presents an articulated historical interpretation of Egyptian ‘animal worship’ – intended as a segment of religious practice focused on the mobilisation of selected animals within strategically designed ritual contexts – from the Early Dynastic to the New Kingdom, and offers a new understanding of its chronological development through a fresh review of pertinent archaeological and textual data. The goal is twofold: (1) to re-conceptualise the notion of ‘animal worship’ on firm theoretical and material bases, reassessing its heuristic value as a tool for analysis; (2) to demonstrate, accordingly, that ‘animal worship’ did not represent a late degeneration of traditional religion, socially (popular cult) and thematically (animal mummies and burials) restricted, but a complex domain of religious practice with a longer history and a larger variety of configurations than usually assumed.

About the Author Angelo Colonna is Research Fellow in Egyptology at Sapienza University of Rome, where he graduated in 2010 and completed his PhD in 2014. In 2017 he was Academic Visitor at the Oriental Institute – Oxford University. His research on animal worship has been awarded by the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (2016) and the Istituto Italiano per la Storia Antica (2017).
NEW: Environment, Archaeology and Landscape: Papers in honour of Professor Martin Bell edited by Catherine Barnett and Thomas Walker. Paperback; 205x290mm; 220 pages; 72 figures, 18 tables (colour throughout). 774 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270845. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270852. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Environment, Archaeology and Landscape is a collection of papers dedicated to Martin Bell on his retirement as Professor of Archaeological Science at the University of Reading. Three themes outline how wetland and inland environments can be related and investigated using multi-method approaches. ‘People and the Sea: Coastal and Intertidal Archaeology’ explores the challenges faced by humans in these zones – particularly relevant to the current global sea level rise. ‘Patterns in the Landscape: Mobility and Human-environment Relationships’ includes some more inland examples and examines how past environments, both in Britain and Europe, can be investigated and brought to public attention. The papers in ‘Archaeology in our Changing World: Heritage Resource Management, Nature Conservation and Rewilding’ look at current challenges and debates in landscape management, experimental and community archaeology. A key theme is how archaeology can contribute time depth to an understanding of biodiversity and environmental sustainability. This volume will be of value to all those interested in environmental archaeology and its relevance to the modern world.

About the Editors
Catherine Barnett is a senior visiting research fellow, Department of Archaeology, University of Reading, investigating UK prehistoric landscapes; an IMAA workshop co-organiser and former codirector of the Silchester Environs project. She uses archaeological science techniques to examine human involvement in and responses to landscape-scale change. She is a technical director at Stantec, leading a multi-disciplinary team in pursuit of sustainable global design solutions. ;

Thomas Walker studied archaeology as a mature student at the University of Reading, gaining a BSc in 2010 and PhD in 2015. He is the author of The Gwithian Environment; molluscs and archaeology on Cornish sand dunes (Archaeopress, 2018). His current interests are in molluscs in archaeology. He regularly assists Martin Bell in his excavations and research, particularly at Goldcliff in the Gwent Levels.

Table of Contents (Provisional):
Editors’ foreword ;
Editors’ acknowledgements ;

Martin Bell: a personal appreciation – Mike Walker ;

Bishopstone, Sussex ;
NEW: I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione by Nikola D. Bellucci. Paperback; 174x245mm; 596 pages; 51 figures, 63 plates (colour throughout). Italian text. 773 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 83. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699241. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699258. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei. Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione presents a synthesis of Nikola Belluci’s research on Egyptian and Egyptianizing material from Pompeii. Starting from the historical context in which to frame these phenomena and proceeding with a review of terminology in order to offer a common lexicon for future research, the work provides a first up to date corpus of Egyptian and Egyptianizing subjects and finds from Pompeii. More specific analysis focuses on the various Nilotic scenes. Furthermore, the first results of correlations between frescoes and finds allow us to understand better the general and particular distribution of the various types of subjects and finds, evaluating their diffusion among regiones, insulae and domus. The volume includes numerous plates and a rich and up to date bibliography.

About the Author
Nikola D. Bellucci holds Masters degrees in Classical Philology and in Archaeology and Cultures of the Ancient World from the Alma Mater Studiorum (University of Bologna), and a doctorate from the University of Bern, where he is a member of the Department of Mediterranean Archaeology. He is a collaborator with the Pompeii Artistic Landscapes Project (PALP) and is the author of numerous scientific publications, including L’Egitto dei Flavi (with Brunella L. Longo) (2020) and Racconto d’Egitto (with Ahmed F. Kzzo) (2020), both published by Archaeopress.

in italiano
I reperti e i motivi egizi ed egittizzanti a Pompei. Indagine preliminare per una loro contestualizzazione, rappresenta la sintesi delle ricerche svolte dal dott. Bellucci su questa complessa e articolata tematica. Partendo dal contesto storico in cui inquadrare tali fenomeni e proponendo una riflessione terminologica al fine di offrire un lessico comune per future e auspicabili ricerche, l’opera raccoglie, mette in luce, definisce e fornisce un primo e aggiornato corpus dei soggetti e dei reperti egizi ed egittizzanti nel contesto pompeiano, permettendo così anche analisi più specifiche riguardo le diverse scene nilotiche presenti a Pompei. Inoltre, primi risultati di correlazioni tra affreschi e reperti consentono ora di comprendere meglio la distribuzione generale e particolare di questa varia tipologia espressiva valutandone la diffusione tra Regiones, Insulae e domus. Composta di due sezioni per un totale di nove capitoli, con cinque appendici di dati e tre tavole di supplemento fotografico, il volume offre inoltre una ricca e aggiornata bibliografia sul tema.

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia), dottore magistrale in Archeologia e culture del mondo antico (Th. Egittologia) presso l’
NEW: Dana Island: The Greatest Shipyard of the Ancient Mediterranean edited by Hakan Öniz. Paperback; 174x245mm; 232 pages; 311 figures, 18 plates (colour throughout). 759 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699517. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699524. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dana Island: The Greatest Shipyard of the Ancient Mediterranean presents the dramatic archaeological discoveries from Dana Island, off the coast of Rough Cilicia in southern Turkey, where underwater investigations and surface survey in advance of excavation have revealed nearly 300 ancient rock-cut slipways, the largest number of such naval installations discovered to date. Further slipways have been lost to erosion or await excavation. The slipways accommodated a range of different sizes of warship and are identified as ship-sheds, grouped within a shipyard area, behind which are various structures seen as workshops used in shipbuilding, as well as living spaces, military and religious buildings, managerial facilities, barn areas for animals, baths and dock areas, shops, villas, columned areas, watchtow¬ers, and many other buildings whose functions cannot yet be understood. The majority are mortarless stone structures, and some of the architectural forms show resemblances to Iron Age masonry. The volume presents and analyses the slipways, their use and possible dating. Water supply is discussed, and cisterns documented. Further chapters focus on the tombs found on the island, its geology, plant usage, and the geoarchaeology of the island’s structures. Extensive contextual sections review the island’s geographical situation and ancient naval history. Finally, computer modelling is used to produce stunning 3D visualisations of the ancient shipyard and naval base.

About the Author
Hakan Oniz completed his masters and PhD in Underwater Archaeology at Selçuk University, Konya. He is one of the founders and was the first coordinator of the UNESCO UniTwin Underwater Archaeology Network between 2012 and 2015. He is the head of the Mediterranean Underwater Cultural Heritage Division in the Mediterranean Civilizations Research Institute of Akdeniz University, Head of the Department of Restoration and Conservation of Cultural Heritage in the Faculty of Art, and Director of the Underwater Archaeology Research Center in the same University. He manages several Underwater Archaeology research and excavation projects on the Turkish Mediterranean Coast, is Secretary and bureau member of ICOMOS-ICUCH (International Committee of Underwater Cultural Heritage), a member of the UNESCO National Observation Committee of Underwater Archaeology, and a member of the CMAS Scientific Committee.

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
Acknowledgments ;
Foreword – Ahmet Ünal ;
The Prehistoric Strategic Location of Dana Island – Şengül G. Aydingün ;
The Importance of the Southern Mediterranean Coast – Ahmet Ünal ;
Hittites And Seafaring – Özlem Sir Gavaz ;
Ancient shipsheds on Dana Island: Some preliminary observations – Olaf Höckmann and Hakan Öniz ;
An Ancient Naval Yard On The Southern Coast Of Anatolia – Mustafa H. Sayar ;
Dana Island Ancient Shipyard, Rough Cilicia: Archaeological Observations – Hakan Öniz ;
Coastal Aeolianite as the Geological Heritage of Dana Island: Preliminary Results – Ahmet Evren Erginal, Oya Erenoğlu, Hakan Öniz and Savaş Sarialtun ;
Geoarchaeological Investigation Of Architectural Structures On Dana Island – Savaş Sarialtun, Hakan Öniz and Günay Dönmez ;
The Ancient Naval Base/Shipyard on Dana Island – Ahmet Denker and Hakan Öniz ;
Usage Forms Of Plant Species On Dana Island And Its Surroundings From Past To Present – Zerrin Koşdemir ;
The Tomb Types Of Dana Island (Ancient Pityoussa) – Günay Dönmez and Ercan Soydan ;
Water Cisterns On Dana Island – Dilber Bala, Hakan Öniz ;
The Possible Role of Dana Island in the Events Of 1200 BC – Haldun Aydingün ;
Mavikent Harbor: The Mainland Connection Point of the Dana Island Shipyard?
NEW: Arqueología de la arquitectura en el oppidum oretano de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real): los bastiones de la puerta S by Jorge del Reguero González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94pp; 48 figures (colour throughout). Spanish text. 145 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271088. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271095. Institutional Price £9.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Arqueología de la arquitectura en el oppidum oretano de El Cerro de las Cabezas focuses on the two bastions that make up the south gate of the Iberian oppidum of Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real). It comprises two defensive constructions whose internal space fulfilled a socioeconomic function related to the storage of cereal. Primarily archaeoarchitectural, supported by the digitisation and study of the photographic archive of the excavation, the research aims to analyse the construction techniques and materials of both structures, define their successive construction phases within the historical process of the settlement and to evaluate the architectural ensemble within a spatial area of enormous importance within the urban framework. All this allows us to understand the continuous changes and transformations that this space suffered between the 5th and 3rd centuries BC to defend Punic influence and presence in this Iberian oppidum.

About the Author
Jorge del Reguero González holds a degree in history and a masters in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM). He has participated in several annual research projects at the Iberian oppidum of El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real), supported by non-invasive archaeological actions (geophysical surveys) and analysis of construction techniques through the archaeology of architecture. He has also participated in excavations at the Tartessian site of Casas del Turuñuelo (Guareña, Badajoz) and the eastern necropolis of the Spanish-Roman site of Baelo Claudia (Bolonia, Cádiz).

en español
Se aborda en el presente trabajo un estudio arquitectónico sobre los dos bastiones que configuran la puerta sur del oppidum ibérico de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real). Se trata de dos construcciones defensivas cuyo espacio interno cumplió con una función socioeconómica relacionada con el almacenamiento de cereal. A través de este trabajo de investigación, de carácter arqueoarquitectónico, apoyado en la digitalización y reestudio del archivo fotográfico del proceso de excavación, se pretende analizar las técnicas y los materiales constructivos de ambas construcciones, definir sus sucesivas fases constructivas dentro el proceso histórico del asentamiento y valorar el conjunto arquitectónico en un área espacial de enorme importancia dentro del entramado urbano. Todo ello nos permitirá conocer los continuos cambios y transformaciones que sufrió este espacio, entre los siglos V y III a.C., para defender, seguidamente, la influencia y presencia púnica en este oppidum ibérico.

Jorge del Reguero González es graduado en Historia por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) y Máster en Arqueología y Patrimonio por la citada universidad. Ha participado en varios proyectos de investigación, de carácter anual, para el estudio urbano y territorial del oppidum ibérico de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real), apoyado en actuaciones arqueológicas no invasivas (prospecciones geofísicas) y análisis de las técnicas constructivas mediante una lectura propia de la arqueología de la arquitectura. Ha colaborado en las excavaciones en el yacimiento tartésico de Casas del Turuñuelo (Guareña, Badajoz) o la necrópolis oriental del yacimiento hispanorromano de Baelo Claudia (Bolonia, Cádiz).
NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 5 2020 / 2021 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297; 170 pages.. 5 . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698336. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2399-1852-5-2020. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

JHP is an independent learned journal dedicated to the research of ceramics and objects of daily use of the Hellenistic period in the Mediterranean region and beyond. It aims at bringing together archaeologists, historians, philologists, numismatists and scholars of related disciplines engaged in the research of the Hellenistic heritage.

Table of Contents
Editorial ;
Submission Guidelines ;
List of Contributors ;
Abbreviations ;

ARTICLES ;
Pottery and Burial Customs in Hellenistic Megara, Greece – Yannis Chairetakis ;
Dolphins in the Ionian-Adriatic Basin. Hellenistic Moldmade Ware from Orikos, Southern Illyria (Excavations 2012–2020) – Carlo De Mitri ;
Ai Khanoum: A Case Study into Material Culture as a Marker for Ethnocultural Identity and Syncretism on the Hellenistic Frontier – David Thomas Richey-Lowe ;
Contextualizing the Star-shaped Lamps in the Levant – Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom ;
Lissos in Illyria, 2: A Hellenistic Fill from the Upper Town and Some Considerations on the Importance of Ceramic Debris – Patricia Kögler ;

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECTS ;
Indroducing the Levantine Ceramic Project (LCP, www.levantineceramics.org) – Andrea M. Berlin ;

BOOK REVIEWS ;
S. Yu. Monakhov – J. V. Kuznetzova – N. F. Fedoseev – N. B. Churekova, Amphoras of the VI–II Centuries BC from the Collection of the East Crimean Historical and Cultural Reserve and S. Yu. Monakhov – J. V. Kuznetzova – N. B. Churekova, Amphoras of the V–II Centuries BC from the Collection of the State Historical and Archeological Museum-Reserve ›The Tauric Chersonesos‹Nikolai Jefremow
NEW: A Catalogue of the Pictures and Drawings at Wilton House by Francis Russell. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 229x305mm; 310 pages; 126 plates in full colour. 779 2021. ISBN 9781789699845. £80.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The collection of pictures at Wilton has been celebrated since the seventeenth century; and its historic arrangement is uniquely well documented in a series of catalogues of which the first, issued in 1731, was the earliest such publication about any private collection in England. Of successive owners of the house, three made significant contributions: William, 4th Earl of Pembroke, who commissioned van Dyck’s monumental portrait of his family that dominates the Double Cube Room he had created; his grandson, Thomas, 8th Earl of Pembroke who assembled what was in some respects a pioneering collection of old master pictures for the house; and his grandson, Henry, 10th Earl of Pembroke, patron of Reynolds and Wilson, among others. Such masterpieces as Lucas van Leyden’s Card Players, Cesare da Sesto’s Leda – long attributed to Leonardo – and Ribera’s Democritus are matched by remarkable portrait drawings by Raphael and Holbein. These are complemented by a substantial deposit of family portraits and other pictures that attest to the tastes and interests of successive generations of the Herbert family.

About the Author
Francis Russell is a Deputy Chairman of Christie’s. He has contributed numerous articles on subjects ranging from Italian Renaissance painting and Grand Tour portraiture and patronage to the history of collecting to scholarly periodicals, including the Burlington Magazine, Apollo and Master Drawings, to Country Life and to exhibition catalogues. Previous books include John, 3rd Earl of Bute: Patron and Collector, 2004; Places in Italy, 2007 (enlarged editions 2014 and 2019); Places in Turkey, 2010 (enlarged edition 2017); Places in Syria, 2011; and Places in Jordan, 2012.
NEW: Later Prehistoric Settlement in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly: Evidence from Five Excavations edited by Andy M Jones and Graeme Kirkham. Paperback; 205x290mm; 380 pages; 178 figures, 62 tables (60 pages in colour). 778 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699579. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699586. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £52.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Later Prehistoric Settlement in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly reports on the excavation between 1996 and 2014 of five later prehistoric and Roman period settlements. Three of the mainland sites – Killigrew, Nancemere and Higher Besore – are located in central Cornwall, near Truro, with the fourth, at Porthleven, situated on the south coast in west Cornwall. The fifth settlement, Porth Killier, is on the island of St Agnes on the Isles of Scilly. All the sites were multi-phased, revealing both similar and contrasting patterns of occupation stretching from the Bronze Age into the Iron Age and beyond. Despite having broadly comparable chronological sequences, there are considerable differences in both the tempo and intensity of occupation, and significant contrasts in practices associated with them. Significantly, all four mainland sequences culminate with an enclosed settlement in the Late Iron Age and especially during the Roman period, a time of significant economic and social change following the conquest. During this period there continued to be differences in the character of occupation. Notably two of the enclosures seem to have been strongly associated with industrial activities, including metalworking at Killigrew, suggesting that the working of iron may have been a controlled or ritualized activity undertaken within a dedicated space. The volume presents the results from each of the five settlement sites, before reviewing the key themes which have emerged from the investigations.

About the Editors
Andy M Jones is Principal Archaeologist with the Cornwall Archaeological Unit. His research interests include the Neolithic and Bronze Age, as well as the archaeology of the uplands and coastal areas of western Britain. Ongoing research projects include the social responses to the later prehistoric drowning of the Mount’s Bay landscape in west Cornwall and social organization of metalworking in the British Bronze Age. His recent publications include: Excavation of Later Prehistoric and Roman Sites along the Route of the Newquay Strategic Road Corridor, Cornwall (2019); An Intellectual Adventurer in Archaeology: Reflections on the work of Charles Thomas (2018); Preserved in the Peat: An Extraordinary Bronze Age Burial on Whitehorse Hill (2016); and Metalworking in the Middle Bronze Age and Beyond: New evidence from Tremough, Cornwall (2015). ;

Graeme Kirkham was formerly a project archaeologist with Cornwall Archaeological Unit, now a freelance historic environment consultant and independent researcher; joint editor of Cornish Archaeology since 2003. Current research interests include medieval and post-medieval responses to prehistoric monuments and a range of landscape history topics.
NEW: Interdisciplinary Research into Iron Metallurgy along the Drava River in Croatia The TransFER Project edited by Tajana Sekelj Ivančan and Tena Karavidović. DOI: 10.32028/9781803271026. Paperback; 205x290mm; 284 pages; 146 figures, 8 maps, 20 plates, 30 tables (colour throughout). 777 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803271026. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271033. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Interdisciplinary Research into Iron Metallurgy along the Drava River in Croatia – The TransFER Project presents the results of the scientific project ‘Production of Iron Along the Drava River During Antiquity and Middle Ages: Creation and Transfer of Knowledge, Technology and Commodities - TransFER project (IP – 2016 - 06 - 5047)’ funded by the Croatian Science Foundation. The research presented explores the evidence for and nature of iron production in the lowland area of the central Drava River basin in Croatia during late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages, from the turn of the 4th to the early 9th centuries. The wide-ranging methodology of the project features non-destructive archaeological site identification (surface survey and geophysics), archaeological excavation of sites with attested bloomery iron production and processing along with their associated dwelling and settlement structures, as well as experimental archaeology. The record of bloomery iron production and processing is explored via an interdisciplinary approach which examines the technology used as well as the natural resources (bog iron ores, wood and plant remains) exploited in the production process. The results of the research testify to the importance and longevity of iron production in the area of the Drava river valley.

About the Editors
Tajana Sekelj Ivančan graduated archaeology at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Zagreb where she also obtained her doctorate in 1999. She is a Scientific Advisor – Second Appointment (permanent position) at the Institute of Archaeology in Zagreb, where she has been leading the TransFER project funded by the Croatian Science Foundation. Tajana's scholarly interests include Early Middle Ages, High Middle Ages, settlements, ceramics, smelting workshops, smelting furnaces, and iron ore processing. Tajana received the Josip Brunšmid annual award of the Croatian Archaeological Society for her monograph Podravina in the Early Middle Ages published in 2012. ;

Tena Karavidović graduated archaeology at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. She is currently a doctoral fellow – research assistant a
NEW: The Not Very Patrilocal European Neolithic Strontium, aDNA, and Archaeological Kinship Analyses by Bradley E. Ensor. Paperback; 174x245mm; 252 pages; 24 figures, 18 tables. 776 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699807. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699814. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Two decades of strontium isotope research on Neolithic European burials – reinforced by high-profile ancient DNA studies – has led to widespread interpretations that these were patrilocal societies, implying significant residential mobility for women. The Not Very Patrilocal European Neolithic questions that narrative from a social anthropological perspective on kinship. It introduces models for inferring residence and descent with isotope and genetic data and provides in-depth descriptions of archaeological kinship analysis. From social anthropological insights to reassessments of data, an alternative perspective on the social dynamics of Neolithic European societies emerges from this new guide for prehistorians working with biological and archaeological materials.

About the Author Bradley E. Ensor (PhD 2003, University of Florida) is a professor of anthropology at Eastern Michigan University (2003-present). He teaches archaeology, social anthropology, and physical anthropology. His research addresses theory and methods in archaeology, bioarchaeology, and ethnology emphasizing the intersections of political economy, kinship, and gender. His publications include Crafting Prehispanic Maya Kinship (2013), The Archaeology of Kinship (2013), Oysters in the Land of Cacao (2020), 17 journal articles, and 7 chapters in edited volumes.
NEW: Rock Art Studies: News of the World VI edited by Paul G. Bahn, Natalie Franklin and Matthias Strecker. Paperback; 205x290mm; 370 pages; 149 figures, 3 tables (colour throughout). 772 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699623. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699630. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rock Art Studies: News of the World VI, like the previous editions in the series, covers rock art research and management all over the world over a five-year period, in this case, the years 2015 to 2019 inclusive. The current volume once again shows the wide variety of approaches that have been taken in different parts of the world and reflects the expansion and diversification of perspectives and research questions. One constant has been the impact of new techniques of recording rock art. This is especially evident in the realm of computer enhancement of the frequently faded and weathered rock imagery. As has been the case in past volumes, this collection of papers includes all of the latest discoveries, including in areas hitherto not known to contain rock art. While relatively little has happened in some areas, a great deal has occurred in others. Rock art studies continue to go through a period of intense scientific and technological development, but at the same time – due to the problems of preservation and vandalism – it is crucial to educate local people and the young about the importance of this fragile heritage.

About the Editors Paul G. Bahn studied archaeology at Cambridge and wrote his doctoral thesis on the prehistory of the French Pyrenees. He then held postdoctoral fellowships at Liverpool and London, plus a Getty postdoctoral fellowship in the History of Art and the Humanities. Since the mid-80s, he has devoted himself to writing and editing books on archaeology and lecturing on numerous archaeological tours. His main speciality is prehistoric art, especially rock art of the world, most notably Palaeolithic art, as well as Easter Island. ;

Natalie Franklin is an internationally renowned rock art specialist. She has published widely in academic journals, co-edited the previous three volumes of Rock Art News of the World and contributed chapters to the entire series. She has extensive experience in recording rock art and developing management plans for rock art sites. Natalie currently works as a cultural heritage consultant in Brisbane, Australia. ;

Matthias Strecker is an educator and rock art expert. Both in Bolivia and internationally, Strecker has contributed signifi cantly to the knowledge, appreciation and conservation of rock art. He has carried out fi eldwork in Mexico, Bolivia and Peru and has published numerous studies of rock art in Latin America. Since 1987 he has been Secretary of the Sociedad de Investigación del Arte Rupestre de Bolivia (SIARB) and editor of its publications.
NEW: Tinqueux « la Haubette » (Marne, France): Un site exceptionnel du Néolithique ancien edited by Lamys Hachem. Paperback; 210x297mm; 220 pages; 92 figures, 30 tables (colour throughout). French text with English Summary. 771 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699760. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699777. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Neolithic site of Tinqueux ‘la Haubette’ (Marne) dated to the ‘Blicquy/Villeneuve-Saint-Germain’ (5000-4700 cal. BC) is composed of five houses, further series of pits and the remains of an oven. An abundance of finds has allowed us to explore a number of themes in greater detail. The first concerns the potential singularity of the site due to its very easterly location within the BVSG area of expansion and its place within the broader chronological sequence. The second is the nature of the settlement within the network of ‘producer’ and ‘receiver’ sites which characterises the BVSG. The third theme that we focus on is the provenance of raw materials, and the fourth one is the internal settlement chronology.

The analyses carried out on the settlement structure and on the archaeological finds reveal hitherto unknown facets of the BVSG culture, like refining the chronological sequence for this period in its regional facies; and establishing a particularly valuable periodisation for the site itself. Comparison with nearby and distant sites has helped us to understand the relationship of this settlement to other contemporary sites. It reveals that the site looked to the east and that there was a strong cultural dynamic which was expressed by varied networks of influence and circulation, particularly for the acquisition of raw materials and finished products.

About the Author
Lamys Hachem is a researcher in zooarchaeology and pre-history at the Institut National de Recherches Archéologiques Préventives (INRAP). As part of the team Trajectoires « De la sédentarisation à l’Etat » (UMR 8215 of CNRS and Paris I-Sorbonne University), her research and publications focus on the societies of the Early, Middle and Final Neolithic period, particularly in the northern half of France, where she has led teams performing preventive archaeological excavations for more than two decades.

En français
Le site néolithique de Tinqueux « la Haubette » (Marne) daté du « Blicquy/Villeneuve-Saint-Germain » (5000-4700 cal. BC) a livré cinq maisons, ainsi que des fosses et une structure de combustion. Les éléments de la culture matérielle abondants ont permis d’approfondir différentes problématiques. La première traite de la singularité du site en raison de sa position très orientale dans l’aire d’extension du BVSG et sa place dans la séquence chronologique. Le second sujet porte sur la nature de l’habitat dans le réseau des sites « producteurs » ou « receveurs » qui caractérise le BVSG. Le troisième thème abordé est celui de la provenance des matières premières et le quatrième est celui des caractéristiques chronologiques internes au village.

Les analyses menées sur la structuration du village et sur le mobilier archéologique ont permis de révéler un pan encore inconnu de la culture BVSG. Ainsi, la séquence chronologique fine de cette période dans son faciès régional a pu être établie ; comme que la périodisation interne du village. La comparaison avec des sites proches ou éloignés a été déterminante pour comprendre le rapport de cet habitat avec les sites contemporains. Elle révèle une ouverture vers l’est et une forte dynamique culturelle qui se traduit par des réseaux d’influences et de circulations variées, notamment pour l’approvisionnement en matières premières et en produits finis.
NEW: A Vanishing Landscape: Archaeological Investigations at Blakeney Eye, Norfolk by Naomi Field. Paperback; 205x290mm; 240 pages; 65 figures, 76 plates, 71 tables (colour throughout). 769 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698404. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698411. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A Vanishing Landscape: Archaeological Investigations at Blakeney Eye, Norfolk documents the results of several archaeological investigations undertaken on Blakeney Eye on behalf of the Environment Agency after the decision was taken for a managed retreat of the area. The Eye is a part of the north Norfolk coastline that has been under constant pressure of erosion for centuries.

Excavation revealed evidence for multi-period occupation, with abandonments driven by the ever-changing climate. Neolithic features and artefacts were the earliest remains present. Fragmentary remains of an enclosed 13-14th century farmstead were identified, mainly preserved beneath the two-celled flint building of 16th-17th century date (the scheduled monument known locally as Blakeney Chapel). Archaeological evidence for the function of this building is discussed in conjunction with the documentary sources. The archaeological remains throw light on the trading links between the medieval and post-medieval port of Cley and the Continent, as well as the storms and tidal influxes of the past that resulted in repeated abandonments of the area.

Includes contributions from Kathryn Blythe, Michael Clark, Jacqueline Churchill, Jane Cowgill, John Giorgi, Alison Locker, Adrian Marsden, Graham Morgan, Quita Mould, Andrew Peachey, Sara Percival, James Rackham, Ian Rowlandson, Zoe Tomlinson, Alan Vince†, Hugh Willmott, Jane Young.

About the Author
Naomi Field MCIfA has been a Senior Archaeological Consultant at Prospect Archaeology Ltd since 2011. She was Director of Lindsey Archaeological Services Ltd from 1987-2009, the company that undertook the excavations at Blakeney Eye in 2004-5. Her many publications include the Lincolnshire excavations of an Iron Age timber causeway at Fiskerton and the medieval timber-framed building, Gainsborough Old Hall. She was archaeology advisor on the Lincoln Diocesan Advisory Committee for over 30 years and her present interests are focused on the recording of historic buildings.
NEW: The Shaping of the English Landscape: An Atlas of Archaeology from the Bronze Age to Domesday Book by Chris Green and Miranda Creswell. Paperback; 219x297mm; 134 pages; illustrated in colour throughout. 767 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270609. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270616. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Shaping of the English Landscape is an atlas of English archaeology covering the period from the middle Bronze Age (c. 1500 BC) to Domesday Book (AD 1086), encompassing the Bronze and Iron Ages, the Roman period, and the early medieval (Anglo-Saxon) age. It was produced as part of the English Landscape and Identities (EngLaId) project at the University of Oxford, which took place from 2011 to 2016, funded by the European Research Council.

In this book, you will find maps (produced by Chris Green) and discussion of themes including landscape agency, settlement, foodways and field systems, belief and the treatment of the dead, mobility and defence, making things, and material culture. Alongside are artworks (produced by Miranda Creswell) dealing with similar themes and depicting archaeological sites from across England. The authors hope to inspire and encourage debate into the past history of the English landscape.

Includes contributions from Anwen Cooper, Victoria Donnelly, Tyler Franconi, Roger Glyde, Chris Gosden, Zena Kamash, Janice Kinory, Sarah Mallet, Dan Stansbie, John Talbot, and Letty Ten Harkel.

About the Contributors
Chris Green is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the School of Archaeology within the University of Oxford. He worked on English Landscape and Identities throughout the lifespan of the project. Chris specialises in applications of Geographic Information Systems and data science in archaeology. He particularly enjoys making maps. ;

Miranda Creswell is a visual artist based in Oxford. She is currently Artist in Residence at the School of Archaeology and previously worked within the team on English Landscape and Identities, documenting working methods and also creating the Recording England artworks presented in this book.
NEW: Prehistoric Fisherfolk of Oman: The Neolithic Village of Ras Al-Hamra RH-5 by Lapo Gianni Marcucci, Emilie Badel & Francesco Genchi. Paperback; 210x297mm; 248 pages; 164 figures, 7 tables (colour throughout). 764 2021 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 6. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803270340. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270357. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Prehistoric Fisherfolk of Oman reports on excavations at the prehistoric site Ras Al-Hamra RH-5, located on a large promontory in the Qurum area of Muscat, conducted by the Italian Archaeological Mission in Oman with support from the Ministry of Heritage and Tourism. The site dates from the late fifth to the end of the fourth millennia BC and comprises an accumulation of superimposed food discards deriving from continuous and repeated subsistence activities such as fishing, collecting shells, hunting and herding. Dwellings and household installations, including objects of daily use and ornaments, have also been found throughout the occupation sequence. Excavations at RH-5 yielded unprecedented data on the economic and social dynamics of Neolithic societies in eastern Arabia. The exploitation of different ecological niches supplied all the necessary requirements for year-round sedentary human occupation. The lifestyle of fisher-gatherer communities during the Middle Holocene represents a fundamental step of the neolithisation process in Oman.

About the Authors
Lapo Gianni Marcucci obtained his Ph.D in partnership between the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne and the University of Bologna. Working in Oman since 1998 on the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods, he has directed various excavations including Ras Al-Hamra RH-5 and RH-6. Marcucci researches Neolithic coastal villages and manufacturing process with a particular focus on shell. Since 2006, he is working on rescue archaeology for various institutes in France and is a consultant for museums in Oman. ;

Emilie Badel is Associated Researcher at the Vepmo laboratory of French CNRS. She obtained her Ph.D from the University of Paris 1 Panthéon- Sorbonne. Badel specializes in the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods of the Near East and researches on technological revolution that has coincided with the emergence of complex societies, in particular for what concerns man-shaped bitumen assemblages. She worked on the field in Oman, at the archaeological sites of Ras Al-Hamra RH-5 and RH-6 from 2009 to 2013. ;

Francesco Genchi is a Research Fellow at the Sapienza–University of Rome. He is a professional archaeologist specializing in stratigraphic excavation and 3D digital documentation, as well as in archaeological survey and landscape mapping. Genchi participated in excavations at Ras Al-Hadd, Ras Al-Jinz and Ras Al-Hamra and was also field-director for the Ministry of Heritage and Culture in several rescue projects. He is presently directing the excavation of Iron Age collective graves at Dibbā Al-Bayah in the Musandam Governorate.
NEW: Archaeology and History of Toraijin Human, technological, and cultural flow from the Korean Peninsula to the Japanese Archipelago c. 800 BC–AD 600 by Song-nai Rhee and C. Melvin Aikens with Gina L. Barnes. Paperback; 185x250mm; 242 pages; 47 figures, 1 table, 11 maps (black & white throughout). 763 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699661. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699678. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeology and History of Toraijin: Human, technological, and cultural flow from the Korean Peninsula to the Japanese Archipelago c. 800 BC–AD 600 explores the fundamental role in the history of the Japanese archipelago played by Toraijin – immigrants mainly from the Korean Peninsula – during this formative period. The arrival of immigrant rice-agriculturalists from the peninsula in the early first millennium BC was the first of three major waves of technological transfer between the continent and the islands. The second brought bronze and iron-working to the archipelago around the 4th century BC, and the third brought elite crafts and administrative technology as well as Confucianism and Buddhism in the 5th and 6th centuries AD.

In light of the recently uncovered archaeological data and ancient historical records, this book presents a panoramic bird’s eye view of the fourteen centuries-long Toraijin story, from c. 800~600 BC to AD 600 or thereabouts by answering the following seven questions: Where did the Toraijin come from? What was their historical and socio-cultural background? Why did they leave their homeland? Where did they settle in the Archipelago? What did they do in the Archipelago? How did the Archipelago people treat the Toraijin? What contributions did the Toraijin make to the ancient Japanese society?

About the Authors
Song-nai Rhee holds PhDs in archaeology and anthropology from the University of Oregon and from the Dropsie University for Hebrew and Cognate Learning. He is Academic Vice President/Dean Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of Archaeology at Bushnell University, Eugene, OR and Courtesy Research Professor in the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Oregon. His research interests include East Asian history and archaeology; emerging complex society in ancient Korea and Japan; history and archaeology of the Toraijin; archaeology and ancient history of Israel and the Near East; Jewish history; origins and evolution of fortification systems in the Levant.

C. Melvin Aikens obtained his PhD in archaeology and anthropology from the University of Chicago. He is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology at the University of Oregon and Emeritus Director of the Natural and Cultural History Museum, University of Oregon. His research interests include: archaeology and ancient History of Pacific Northeast Asia; prehistory and protohistory of Korea and Japan; transnational cultural interactions in the Japan Oikumene; archaeology of the Great Basin; Oregon archaeology.

Gina L. Barnes, PhD in archaeology and anthropology, University of Michigan, is Professor Emeritus of Japanese Studies, Durham University, Project Affiliate, Earth Sciences, Durham University, and Professorial Research Associate in the Department of History of Art and Archaeology, SOAS University of London. Her Research interests include: archaeology and ancient history of East Asia with a special emphasis on Japan and Korea; state formation in Korea and Japan; ancient Korea-Japan relations; emergence of Yamato kingship; Japanese geology; tectonic archaeology.
NEW: Assessing Iron Age Marsh-Forts With Reference to the Stratigraphy and Palaeoenvironment Surrounding The Berth, North Shropshire by Shelagh Norton. Paperback; 205x290mm; 234 pages; 113 figures, 20 tables (colour throughout). 758 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698633. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698640. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Iron Age marsh-forts are large, monumental structures located in low-lying waterscapes. Although they share chronological and architectural similarities with their hillfort counterparts, their locations suggest that they may have played a specific and alternative role in Iron Age society. Despite the availability of a rich palaeoenvironmental archive at many sites, little is known about these enigmatic structures, and until recently, the only acknowledged candidate was the unusual, dual-enclosure monument at Sutton Common, near Doncaster.

Assessing Iron Age Marsh-Forts considers marsh-forts as a separate phenomenon within Iron Age society through an understanding of their landscape context and palaeoenvironmental development. At the national level, a range of Iron Age wetland monuments has been compared to Sutton Common to generate a gazetteer of potential marsh-forts. At the local level, a multi-disciplinary case-study is presented of the Berth marsh-fort in North Shropshire, incorporating GIS-based landscape modelling and multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental analysis (plant macrofossils, beetles and pollen).

The results of both the gazetteer and the Berth case-study challenge the view that marsh-forts are simply a topographical phenomenon. These substantial Iron Age monuments appear to have been deliberately constructed to control areas of marginal wetland and may have played an important role in the ritual landscape.

About the Author
Shelagh Norton (BA, MPhil, PhD) specialises in the reconstruction of macro-and micro-palaeolandscapes, and in particular, the interpretation of plant macrofossil and coleopteran remains from wetland contexts. Her research is based on the practical application of archaeological principles in a real-world context both in the UK and New Zealand, where she worked as a Regional Archaeologist for Heritage New Zealand. Her publications include The Archaeological and Palaeoenvironmental Potential of the Weald Moors, Shropshire (Transactions of the Shropshire Archaeological and Historical Society, 2016). She is an active member of the Hillfort Studies Group (University of Oxford), Worcestershire Archaeological Society and Worcestershire Archive Services.

Table of Contents
Summary ;
Chapter 1: Assessing Iron Age marsh-forts - an introduction ;
Chapter 2: The British Iron Age, hillforts and marsh-forts - Literature Review ;
Chapter 3: Methodology and Resources ;
Chapter 4: Marsh-forts in a landscape context ;
Chapter 5: North Shropshire’s marsh-forts ;
Chapter 6: The Berth – a marsh-fort in its landscape context ;
Chapter 7: The Berth – stratigraphic sequencing and radiocarbon dating ;
Chapter 8: The Berth – Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction ;
Chapter 9: Assessing Iron Age marsh-forts – Discussion and Conclusions ;
Bibliography ;
Appendix 1 – Radiocarbon dates ;
Appendix 2 – Samples weights and volumes ;
Appendix 3 – Full species lists
NEW: Post-Roman and Medieval Drying Kilns Foundations of Archaeological Research by Robert Rickett. Edited and with an introduction by Mark McKerracher. Paperback; 203x276mm; 156 pages; 45 figures, 1 table (2 figures in colour). 143 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270708. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270715. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Drying kilns, corn-dryers and malting ovens are increasingly familiar features in post-Roman, Anglo-Saxon and medieval archaeology. Their forms, functions and distributions offer critical insights into agricultural, technological, economic and dietary history across the British Isles. Despite the significance and growing corpus of these structures, exceptionally few works of synthesis have been published. Yet such a foundational study was produced by Robert Rickett as early as 1975: an undergraduate dissertation which, for the first time, assembled a gazetteer of drying kilns from across the British Isles, critically examined this archaeological evidence in the light of documentary research, and established a typology and uniform terminology for drying kiln studies. This pioneering and oft-cited dissertation is here published for the first time, providing a foundation for the future study of drying kilns in Britain, Ireland and beyond. A new introduction and notes by Mark McKerracher set the original work within the context of drying kiln research since 1975.

Contributor information
Robert Rickett became interested in archaeology while he was at school in Stamford, Lincolnshire. After participating in several excavations, he went to University College, Cardiff, to study Archaeology and graduated in 1975. He worked on excavations in East Anglia before becoming a Research Officer for the Spong Hill Project (North Elmham, Norfolk), from 1977 to 1989. This included excavation supervision, archiving and publication work. Meanwhile his work in education with all age groups inspired him to study at U.E.A., Norwich, and from 1991 he taught in Primary Education. ;

Mark McKerracher is a Postdoctoral Researcher in the School of Archaeology at the University of Oxford, where he completed his DPhil – studying Mid Saxon agriculture – in 2014. After working in museum archiving, software development and freelance archaeobotany, he is currently researching medieval farming practices as part of the ERC-funded Feeding Anglo- Saxon England project (FeedSax). His interests include archaeobotany, database development, agricultural production and Anglo-Saxon archaeology.
NEW: Spring Archaeology: Atti del Convegno, Siena, 15-17 maggio 2020 edited by Andrea Bellotti, Luca Luppino, Maria Messineo, Mickey Scarcella. Paperback; 203x276mm; 422 pages; 164 figures, 3 tables, 23 plates (colour throughout). Italian text, English abstracts. 142 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270005. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270012. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Spring Archaeology stems from the pressing need to offer young researchers and professionals with a showcase for their work and is a journey across the many facets of archaeology in Italy, a country rich in history and innovation. The event, organised by a group of students and archaeologists from the University of Siena and re-arranged online due to the Covid-19 pandemic, has seen the participation of undergraduate, graduate, PhD students, freelancers, museological institutions and cultural associations. Papers and posters revolve around five major topics: the application of new technologies to the field of archaeology, the study of material culture, examples of public archaeology projects, advances in research and reflections on methodological problems. Contributing authors, including both Italians working abroad and foreign nationals working in Italy, presented case studies from prehistory to the medieval period, mainly centred in the Mediterranean context. These conference proceedings include 29 papers, 22 poster presentations and a synthesis of the closing round table, centred on the current status of archaeology in Italy and its possible future prospects.

About the Editors
The editors are all archaeologists who graduated from the University of Siena. Andrea Bellotti specializes in Public Archaeology and social media communication related to cultural heritage, and currently works as a research fellow at the the University of Siena. Luca Luppino is currently enrolled as a Master's Degree student in archaeology at the the University of Siena, specializing in the Late Antique and Byzantine period. Maria Messineo is a freelance archaeologist, currently fascinated by data science and specializing in Etruscology. Mickey Scarcella specializes in landscape archaeology, Geographical Information System (GIS) and cartography.

In italiano
Nato dall'esigenza di fornire a giovani ricercatori e professionisti un'opportunità di mettersi alla prova e mostrare i propri lavori, Spring Archaeology è un viaggio attraverso le molte sfaccettature dell'archeologia in Italia, un paese ricco di storia e innovazione. L'evento, promosso da un gruppo di studenti e archeologi provenienti dall'Università degli Studi di Siena (IT) e ri-organizzato online a causa delle restrizioni imposte dall'emergere della pandemia da Covid-19, ha visto la partecipazione di studenti con vari livelli di formazione, dalla laurea triennale al titolo di dottorato, liberi professionisti, istituzioni museali e associazioni culturali. Papers e posters presentati si articolano attorno a cinque temi principali: l'applicazione di nuove tecnologie all'archeologia, lo studio della cultura materiale, progetti di archeologia pubblica, progressi nelle ricerche e riflessioni metodologiche. Gli autori, sia italiani impegnati all'estero che stranieri impegnati in Italia, hanno presentato casi studio dalla preistoria al medioevo, principalmente dall'area mediterranea. Questi atti di convegno includono 29 papers, 22 presentazioni di posters e una sintesi della tavola rotonda conclusiva, centrata sullo stato attuale dell'archeologia in Italia e sui suoi possibili futuri sviluppi.

Tutti i curatori sono archeologi provenienti dall'Università degli Studi di Siena, formati in diversi ambiti. Andrea Bellotti è specializzato in archeologia pubblica e comunicazione legata ai social media per la promozione del patrimonio culturale ed è attualmente impegnato come borsista di ricerca. Luca Luppino è attualmente iscritto ad corso di laurea magistrale in Archeologia, con un'enfasi sul periodo tardo antico e bizantino. Maria Messineo è un'archeologa libera professionista, affascinata dal Data Science e specializzata in etruscologia. Mickey Scarcella è specializzato sui temi dell'archeologia del paesaggio, sull'uso del Geographical Information System (GIS) e della cartografia.
NEW: Survey tra Fiumi, Pianure e Colline L’evoluzione del paesaggio archeologico nel territorio di Santa Croce di Magliano by Pasquale Marino. Paperback; 203x276mm; 154 pages; 111 figures, 15 tables, 21 plates, 3 maps (colour throughout). Italian text. 141 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270807. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270814. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Survey tra Fiumi, Pianure e Colline analyses the territory of Santa Croce di Magliano in the province of Campobasso, Molise, Italy and studies all its archaeological aspects in order to understand patterns of occupation of the human groups that have inhabited it and how they, through the evolution of social interactions, have received extraterritorial influences. It maintains a focus on this small area of the lower Molise in the wider regional context of the Frentano state. This study has been able to contribute further evidence to support attempts to explain the interactions between the Samnite cultures located north of the Fortore river and those located south of the same river, characterised by a Daunian culture (at least until the sixth century BC). It also highlights the evolution of settlement types over the centuries. Furthermore it has been also possible to highlight how the types of settlement have evolved over the centuries, up to the current urban form of the village considered in this study.

About the Author
Pasquale Marino is an independent researcher specialising in the archaeology of prehistoric and historical landscapes, in particular the analysis of artefacts related to their territorial contexts. After obtaining a Master’s degree at the University of Molise, he completed a PhD at the University of Campania ‘L.Vanvitelli’ (2018). He has published in various national and international journals and contributed in several national and international conferences. He is currently collaborating with the chairs of Prehistoric Material Culture and the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology at the Department of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education of the University of Molise.

In Italiano
L’archeologia del paesaggio abbina lo studio dei materiali archeologici con lo studio del paesaggio per comprendere le fasi di sviluppo, mutazione e, nel caso, abbandono di un determinato territorio. Essa può essere considerata un grande contenitore in cui far confluire ogni aspetto dell’archeologia per ricostruire tutte le fasi umane relative ad un determinato territorio. La ricostruzione dei commerci, delle vie di comunicazione, del comportamento di gruppi localizzati in un determinato territorio e come essi possano essere stati influenzati dal territorio stesso.

In questo volume è stato preso in analisi il territorio di Santa Croce di Magliano, in provincia di Campobasso, Molise, Italia ed è stato analizzato in tutti i suoi aspetti archeologici per tentare di capire le modalità di spostamento dei gruppi umani che lo hanno abitato e come essi, con l’evolversi delle interazioni sociali, abbiano avuto influenze extraterritoriali, cercando di inquadrare questo fazzoletto di terra del basso Molise in quello che è un contesto di macro area come lo stato Frentano.

Con questo è stato possibile inserire un altro tassello che tenta di spiegare le interazioni tra culture poste a nord del fiume Fortore, di derivazione sannitica, con quelle culture poste a sud dello stesso fiume, di cultura daunia, almeno fino al VI sec. a.C. . Inoltre è stato possibile mettere in evidenza come si siano evolute le tipologie di insediamento nel corso dei secoli, fino ad arrivare all’attuale forma cittadina del paese di riferimento in questo studio.

Il dott. Pasquale Marino è un ricercatore indipendente specializzato il archeologia del paesaggio preistorico e storico. In particolare nell’analisi dei manufatti in riferimento ai contesti territoriali.

Dopo il conseguimento della laurea magistrale presso l’Università degli Studi del Molise, ha conseguito il Dottorato di ricerca presso l’Università degli Studi della Campania “L.Vanvitelli” (2018). Ha pubblicato in diverse riviste nazionali e internazionali e partecipato a diversi convegni nazionali e internazionali. Attualmente è collaboratore delle cattedre di cultura materiale preistorica e laboratorio d
NEW: Understanding and Accessibility of Pre-and Proto-Historical Research Issues: Sites, Museums and Communication Strategies Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 17, Session XXXV-1 edited by Davide Delfino and Valentino Nizzo. Paperback; 205x290mm; 94 pages; 40 figures, 3 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English, one in French. 770 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270784. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270791. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Understanding and Accessibility of Pre-and Protohistorical Research Issues: Sites, Museums and Communication Strategies presents the papers from Session XXXV-1 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). Museums are increasingly seen as the place where scientific research and heritage education meet, rather than being simply a location for exhibitions. The eight contributions from Italy, the United Kingdom, Senegal, Spain and the Netherlands address the following related issues: the mediation of language from research usage to public usage, making the museum visit an educational experience, universal accessibility, involvement of the local community in the management of the sites and museums, use of media and new technology to bring scientific content to the public.

About the Editors
Davide Delfino is an archaeologist in the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities – Regional Direction of Museums of Molise, visiting professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (UNESCO Chair in Humanity and Cultural Integrated Landscape Management), internal researcher of the Geosciences Centre (University of Coimbra), and member of the Land and Memory Institute of Mação (Portugal). He has been Secretary of the UISPP/IUPPS Scientific Commission ‘Metal Ages in Europe’ from 2015. His scientific interests focus on warfare and landscape occupation in the Metal Ages, excavation of hill-top settlements, archaeological forgeries, and museology. He is the author of about 90 national and international scientific publications and has organised several international conferences and conference sessions in Portugal, Brazil, France and Spain.

Valentino Nizzo completed his studies at the ‘Sapienza’ University of Rome with a PhD in Etruscology. He carried out post-doctoral work on ‘Global Archaeology’ at the Italian Institute of Human Sciences in Florence, and then was appointed in 2010 to the Ministry of Cultural Heritage, first at the National Archaeological Museum of Ferrara and then at the General Directorate for Museums. In 2014 he became associate professor of archaeology, and in 2017 director of the National Etruscan Museum of Villa Giulia. His interests focus on the historical and material culture issues of Etruscan- Italic civilisations, on the earliest Greek colonisation, on the comparison between archaeology and anthropology, on funerary ideology and the mechanisms of archaeological communication.
NEW: New Advances in the History of Archaeology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 16 (Sessions Organised by the History of Archaeology Scientific Commission at the XVIII World UISPP) edited by Sophie A. de Beaune, Alessandro Guidi, Oscar Moro Abadía, Massimo Tarantini. Paperback; 205x290mm; 244 pages; 106 figures, 4 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. 768 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270722. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270739. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

New Advances in the History of Archaeology presents the papers from three sessions organised by the History of Archaeology Scientific Commission at the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The first session, From stratigraphy to stratigraphic excavation in pre- and protohistoric archaeology organised by Massimo Tarantini and Alessandro Guidi, reviews the development of stratigraphical methods in archaeology in many European countries. The second session, Epistemology, History and Philosophy of Science: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the History of Archaeology, organised by Sophie A. de Beaune and Oscar Moro Abadia, is characterised by different examples of intersections between archaeology and other disciplines like history and the philosophy of science. Finally, four papers discuss the development of different types of interdisciplinarity in Europe and South America. These were presented in the third session, Archaeology and interdisciplinarity, from the 19th century to present-day research, organized by Laura Coltofean, Géraldine. Delley, Margarita Díaz-Andreu and Marc-Antoine Kaeser.

About the Editors
Sophie Archambault de Beaune is Professor at the University of Lyon and researcher at the ‘Archaeology and Ancient Sciences’ laboratory in Nanterre. She works on the technical behaviour and cognitive skills of prehistoric man and is also interested in the history of prehistory. In particular, she has published Pour une archéologie du geste and L’homme et l’outil (CNRS Éditions, 2000 and 2015), Qu’est-ce que la Préhistoire ? (Gallimard, 2016), and, with Antoine Balzeau, Notre Préhistoire: La grande aventure de la famille humaine (Belin, 2016) and co-directed Cognitive Archaeology and Human Evolution (Cambridge, CUP, 2009). She directs the collection ‘Le passé recomposé’ which she created at CNRS Éditions. ;

Alessandro Guidi has been Full Professor of Palethnology at the University of Roma Tre since 2004. He has been concerned mainly with the proto-history of the Italian peninsula, paying particular attention to the problem of the birth of the city and the state, to the history of prehistoric studies, and to theoretical archaeology and methodology. Among his books are Storia della paletnologia (1988), I metodi della ricerca archeologica (1994, 2005), Preistoria della complessità sociale (2000). ;

Oscar Moro Abadía works as Associate Professor at Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada). He specializes in the study of the history and the epistemology of Pleistocene art. His research on rock art has been published in Cambridge Archaeological Journal, Journal of Archaeological Research, Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, World Art, History of Human Sciences, Journal of Anthropological Research, and Journal of Social Archaeology. ;

Massimo Tarantini works as functionary archaeologist at the Italian Ministry of Culture. His research experience concentrates in the fields of prehistoric mining archaeology and in the history of archaeology. He is the author / editor of Evoluzione, preistoria dell’uomo e società contemporanea (with L. Sarti, 2007), Le miniere preistoriche del Gargano (with A. Galiberti, 2011), La nascita della paletnologia in Italia (2012), and Archivi dell’archeologia italiana (with Andrea Pessina, 2021).
NEW: Iron Age and Roman Settlement at Highflyer Farm, Ely, Cambridgeshire by James Fairclough. Paperback; 205x290mm; 154 pages; 91 figures, 28 tables (colour throughout). 765 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698428. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698435. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Iron Age and Roman settlement at Highflyer Farm, Ely, Cambridgeshire presents the results of archaeological work carried out by MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) at Highflyer Farm in 2018. Remains dating from the Neolithic to the post-medieval period were recorded, with most of the activity occurring between the early Iron Age and late Roman periods. Excavations in 2000 at Prickwillow Road, undertaken directly to the south of Highflyer Farm, had recorded the southern extent of this Iron Age to Roman settlement.

Two features, a pit and a posthole, were dated to the late Neolithic to early Bronze Age. In the 5th to 4th centuries BC a small open early Iron Age settlement was established and was at the lower end of the settlement hierarchy, perhaps occupied by a single family or a seasonal group. In the middle Iron Age, there was a well-planned linear settlement split into three main sections, which consisted of a similar large rounded enclosure at its northern and southern extent, both probably domestic. A complex sub-rectangular arrangement of enclosures and boundaries lay within the centre, a roughly equal distance apart from the circular enclosures. In the late Iron Age and then the early Roman periods, a significant reorganisation of the site occurred with successive enclosures and rectilinear field systems established.

In the middle Roman period, the settlement was reorganised around three routeways with two distinct areas of linked paddocks and compartmentalised enclosures. There were three probable different separate areas of domestic activity, including a rectangular posthole structure centrally located in the main enclosure system. It is possible that there was significant export and trade of livestock occurring from this relatively wealthy settlement with cattle dominating. The routeway system continued into the later Roman period though the number of enclosures reduced. On balance, it is more likely the Roman settlement finished in the late 4th century, but an early 5th-century date should not be ruled out. Post-Roman activity was sparser, with a single sunken feature building identified as well as a waterhole and a few other features dated to the 5th and/or 6th century.

Includes contributions by Sander Aerts, Rob Atkins, Paul Blinkhorn, Andy Chapman, Chris Chinnock, Nina Crummy, Mary Ellen Crothers, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Sarah Percival, Adam Sutton and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray.

Illustrations by Sofia Turk.

About the Author
James Fairclough is a Project Officer with MOLA Northampton, where he has worked since 2014, leading numerous sites, including the Saxon cemetery at Great Ryburgh and areas on the A14 infrastructure project. Between joining MOLA and graduating with a degree and Masters from the University of Manchester in 2012, he worked for Archaeological Solutions on sites across East Anglia. As well as working in the commercial field, James continues to help supervise research projects in the Vale of Pickering in North Yorkshire, targeting preserved Mesolithic sites. This work has been in conjunction with a number of universities and has included sites such as Star Carr and No Name Hill.
NEW: Epigraphy in the Digital Age Opportunities and Challenges in the Recording, Analysis and Dissemination of Inscriptions edited by Isabel Velázquez Soriano and David Espinosa Espinosa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 258 pages; 123 figures, 15 tables (colour throughout). 762 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699876. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699883. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Epigraphy in the Digital Age: Opportunities and Challenges in the Recording, Analysis and Dissemination of Inscriptions originates from the International Conference El patrimonio epigráfico en la era digital: Documentación, análisis y socialización (Madrid, 20–21 June 2019), organized by the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Santiago de Compostela. Taking the results of the conference as a starting point, the book presents epigraphic research using digital and computational tools, bringing together and comparing the outcomes of both well-established projects and newer ones, so as to establish a comprehensive view according to the most innovative trends in investigation. 21 contributions have been gathered together, involving 38 scholars, which address issues related to open-access databases, SfM Photogrammetry and Digital Image Modelling applied to textual restoration, EpiDoc (TEI-XML edition), and Linked Open Data. In this manner, the book offers a dialogue based on very different perspectives and previous experiences to generate common research questions, methodologies, practical solutions, and significant results. The outcome is intended more a starting point and platform for future research than as a definitive point of arrival in terms of so-called ‘digital epigraphy’.

About the Editors
Isabel Velázquez Soriano is Professor of Latin Philology in the Department of Classical Philology at the Complutense University of Madrid. She is the principal Investigator of the Research Group ‘Textos epigráficos antiguos de la Península Ibérica y el Mediterráneo griego’ (TEAPIMeG no. 930750) at the Complutense University of Madrid, Director of the Epigraphic Archive of Hispania, and editor of Hispania Epigraphica series at the same university. Isabel Velázquez Soriano is a specialist in the study of epigraphic and literary texts from Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. ;

David Espinosa Espinosa has a PhD in Ancient History from the Complutense University of Madrid. A Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Santiago de Compostela and the University of Vienna, he is now Lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Oviedo. His research focuses on the granting of Latin rights in the western Roman provinces, the Roman civil wars during the Republic, and Roman epigraphy. Director of the digital epigraphic corpus Epigraphica 3.0, he has among his book publications Plinio y los ‘oppida de antiguo Lacio’. El proceso de difusión del Latium en Hispania Citerior (2014).
NEW: Taymāʾ II: Catalogue of the Inscriptions Discovered in the Saudi-German Excavations at Taymāʾ 2004–2015 by Michael C. A. Macdonald. Hardback; 210x297mm; 264 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 717 2020 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698763. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698770. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Taymāʾ II is a Catalogue which contains all the inscriptions discovered during the 24 seasons of the Saudi- German excavations at Taymāʾ from 2004–15 which were funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The 113 objects carry inscriptions in different languages and scripts, illustrating the linguistic diversity of the oasis through time. Although the majority are fragmentary, they provide an important source for the history of the oasis in ancient and mediaeval times.

The Babylonian cuneiform inscriptions in this volume confirm for the first time the ten-year sojourn at Taymāʾ of the last Babylonian king Nabû-na’id (556–539 BC). In addition, Imperial Aramaic inscriptions dated by the reigns of Lihyanite kings, based at Dadan (modern al-ʿUlā), reveal for the first time that they ruled Taymāʾ at a period in the second half of the first millennium BC.

As well as editing the volume, Michael C. A. Macdonald edited the Imperial Aramaic inscriptions found from 2010–15, plus those in the form of the Aramaic script which developed in Taymāʾ, and the Nabataean, Dadanitic, and Taymanitic texts. In addition, Hanspeter Schaudig edited the cuneiform inscriptions; Peter Stein, the Imperial Aramaic texts found from 2004–09; and Frédéric Imbert, the Arabic inscriptions. Arnulf Hausleiter and Francelin Tourtet provided archaeological contributions, while Martina Trognitz curated the virtual edition of many of the texts recorded by RTI. The indexes contain the words and names from all known texts from the oasis, including those in the Taymāʾ Museum and other collections which will be published as Taymāʾ III.

About the Author
Michael C. A. Macdonald is an Honorary Fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford, and Fellow of the British Academy. He works on the languages, scripts and ancient history of Arabia and directs the Online Corpus of the Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia (http://krc.orient.ox.ac.uk/ociana/). He has been working at Taymāʾ since 2010. ;

With contributions by:
Arnulf Hausleiter is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula. He has been co-directing the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 with Ricardo Eichmann. ;

Frédéric Imbert is Professor at the Institut de recherches et d’études sur les mondes arabes et musulmans, Aix-Marseille University. ;

Hanspeter Schaudig is Associate Professor of Assyriology at the Seminar für Sprachen und Kulturen des Alten Orients at the University of Heidelberg. ;

Peter Stein is Associate Professor for Semitic studies at the Faculty of Theology / Ancient Languages Division at the University of Jena. ;

Francelin Tourtet is a PhD candidate at the Freie Universität Berlin working on his dissertation on Bronze and Iron Age pottery from Taymāʾ. ;

Martina Trognitz is member of the Austrian Centre of Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage at the Austrian Academy of Sciences.
NEW: La industria lítica del núcleo urbano maya de La Blanca, Petén, Guatemala Tecnología y tipología by Ricardo Torres Marzo. Paperback; 203x276mm; 188pp; 123 black & white figures, 8 tables. 144 2021 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 54. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270289. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270296. Institutional Price £10.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The ancient Maya used mainly stone tools, made of either ground stone and chipped stone, to achieve their extraordinary development. However, works focused on this aspect are still rare. This book presents the techno-typological analysis of lithic materials from La Blanca, a Mayan archaeological site located in the heart of the Southern Lowlands, which was mainly inhabited during the Late Classic and Terminal Classic periods. In addition, a general methodology for the techno-typological analysis and classification of Mayan lithic artefacts is presented, which is complemented by an extensive graphic section that includes the technical drawings of most of the chipped stone tools.

Ricardo Torres Marzo received his Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Valencia, Spain, in 2014 and is currently a teacher of archaeology at the Postgraduate Program in Mesoamerican Studies at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). His research focuses on Lowland Maya archaeology with an emphasis on technical and typological analysis of lithic artifacts. He has directed and collaborated in different archaeological projects in Mexico, Guatemala and Spain.

Los antiguos mayas emplearon fundamentalmente herramientas de piedra, tanto tallada como pulida, para lograr su extraordinario desarrollo. Sin embargo, los trabajos centrados en este aspecto todavía son poco frecuentes. En este trabajo se presenta el análisis tecno-tipológico de los materiales líticos de La Blanca, un sitio arqueológico maya situado en el corazón de las Tierras Bajas del Sur, cuyo momento de ocupación más destacado se sitúa entre los períodos Clásico Tardío y Terminal. Además, se plantea una metodología general para el análisis tecno-tipológico y la clasificación de artefactos líticos mayas, que se ve complementada por un amplio apartado gráfico en el que se incluyen los dibujos técnicos de la mayor parte de los artefactos tallados.

Ricardo Torres Marzo es doctor en Historia del Arte por la Universidad de Valencia, España, desde 2014 y actualmente es tutor y profesor de arqueología en el Posgrado en Estudios Mesoamericanos de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Sus trabajos de investigación se han centrado fundamentalmente en la arqueología de las Tierras Bajas mayas y más concretamente en el estudio tecnológico y tipológico de los materiales líticos. Asimismo, ha participado como director y colaborador en numerosos proyectos arqueológicos en México, Guatemala y España.
NEW: La necropoli romana di Melano (Canton Ticino – Svizzera) by Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess. Paperback; 203x276mm; 118 pages; 20 colour figures, 6 black & white figures, 12 black & white plates. Italian text. 140 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699784. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699791. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Roman necropolis of Melano (Canton Ticino, Switzerland), excavated in 1957 and 1979, is one of the few from this period discovered in the Sottoceneri region, where the findings are mostly isolated burials or those in small groups. It consists of 26 cremation and inhumation tombs and stands out for its variety of types and the materials used in their construction. Cremation burials, the most numerous, range from the simplest, single-chamber burials, up to double-chamber and multiple cinerary niches. Inhumation tombs, generally belonging to children or adolescents, have yielded clues as to the use of wooden boxes as coffins or the placement of the body on a cot or stretcher. The grave goods include all the main material classes of the Roman period typical of the region, together with finds that bear the imprint of a centre that developed along the shores of Lake Ceresio and activities related to it, such as fishing. The stratigraphy of the necropolis and the grave goods indicate continuous use from the 1st to the 3rd century AD.

About the Author
Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess graduated in 1990 from the University of Zurich, majoring in Classical Archaeology, Egyptology and Ancient History. In 2001, she completed her PhD thesis, ‘Aspects of Roman Pottery in Canton Ticino (Switzerland)’, at the University of Nottingham (UK). She has pursued various studies in Classical and medieval archaeology, focusing in particular on Roman pottery and since 2000 has taken part in the excavation of the multi-period site of Tremona-Castello.

in italiano
La necropoli romana di Melano (Canton Ticino – Svizzera), scavata nel 1957 e nel 1979, costituisce a tutt’oggi una delle poche di quest’epoca scoperte nel Sottoceneri dove i rinvenimenti sono invece perlopiù sepolture isolate o riunite in piccoli gruppi. È costituita da 26 tombe fra cremazioni e inumazioni e si distingue per la loro varietà a livello tipologico e per i materiali impiegati nella loro costruzione. Fra le sepolture a cremazione, le più numerose, vi sono quelle più semplici, a vano singolo, fino a quelle a doppia camera e a loculo cinerario multiplo. Le tombe a inumazione, generalmente pertinenti a bambini o adolescenti, hanno restituito indizi riguardo all’uso di deporre il corpo in cassa lignea o su un lettino o barella. Nei corredi funerari sono presenti tutte le principali classi materiali d’epoca romana tipiche della regione unitamente a reperti che recano l’impronta di un centro sviluppatosi lungo le rive del lago Ceresio e dedito a particolari attività ad esso collegate, come la pesca. La stratigrafia verticale della necropoli e gli oggetti di corredo ne indicano un uso continuato dal I al III sec. d.C.

Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess si è laureata nel 1990 all’Università di Zurigo, specializzandosi in Archeologia classica, Egittologia e Storia antica. Nel 2001 ha completato la sua tesi di dottorato Aspetti della ceramica romana nel Canton Ticino (Svizzera) presso l’Università di Nottingham (GB). Ha svolto diversi studi di archeologia classica, in particolare sulla ceramica romana, e medievale. Dal 2000 partecipa agli scavi archeologici del sito multiperiodico di Tremona-Castello.
NEW: Big Data and Archaeology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 15, Session III-1 edited by François Djindjian and Paola Moscati. Paperback; 205x290mm; 106 pages; 33 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. 761 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697216. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697223. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Big Data and Archaeology presents the papers from two sessions of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018): Session III-1 (CA): ‘Big data, databases and archaeology’, and Session III-1 (T): ‘New advances in theoretical archaeology’. The advent of Big Data is a recent and debated issue in Digital Archaeology. Historiographic context and current developments are illustrated in this volume, as well as comprehensive examples of a multidisciplinary and integrative approach to the recording, management and exploitation of excavation data and documents produced over a long period of archaeological research. In addition, specific attention is paid to neoprocessual archaeology, as a new platform aimed at renewing the theoretical framework of archaeology after thirty years of post-modernism, and to the refinement of the concept of archaeological cultures, combining processual, contextual and empirical approaches.

About the Editors
François Djindjian is ancien professeur at the University of Paris I Pantheon Sorbonne (chair of archaeological methods and theory) and associate member of the CNRS UMR 7041. He is President of the International Union for Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP), member of the executive committee of the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH) of Unesco, and delegate member of the International Academic Union (UAI).

Paola Moscati is research director at the Institute of Heritage Science of the National Research Council of Italy. As an archaeologist, specialised in computer applications in archaeology, she is Vice President of the UISPP Commission IV, editor in chief of the international journal ‘Archeologia e Calcolatori’ and scientific coordinator of the international project ‘The Virtual Museum of Archaeological Computing’, jointly promoted with the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei.
NEW: Studies on the Palaeolithic of Western Eurasia Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 14, Session XVII-4 & Session XVII-6 edited by György Lengyel, Jarosław Wilczyński, Marta Sánchez de la Torre, Xavier Mangado, Josep Maria Fullola. Paperback; 205x290mm; 262 pages; 109 figures, 34 tables (54 pages in colour). Papers in English (one in French). 760 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697179. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697186. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Studies on the Palaeolithic of Western Eurasia presents the papers from Sessions XVII-4 and XVII-6 of the 18th UISPP World congress (Paris, June 2018). The geographic areas discussed in the Session 4, Central and Eastern Europe, are prehistorically strongly articulated, their cultural successions are highly similar, and they share several common archaeological issues for investigation. The papers disseminate a wealth of archaeological data from Bavaria to the Russian Plain, and discuss Aurignacian, Gravettian, Epigravettian, and Magdalenian perspectives on lithic tool kits and animal remains. The papers of Session 6 are concerned with lithic raw material procurement in the Caucasus and in three areas of the Iberian peninsula.

About the Editors György Lengyel an associate professor at the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology of the University of Miskolc, Hungary, and research associate at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He graduated at the University of Miskolc, and received a PhD degree from the University of Haifa, Israel. His main field of research is the Upper Palaeolithic of Central Europe. The focus of his research is hunter-gatherer subsistence strategy and the formation of the corresponding archaeological record. He conducts research projects on the Upper Palaeolithic of the Levant and Central Europe. ORCID: 0000-0002-7803-3043 ;

Jarosław Wilczyński is head of the Department of Vertebrate Zoology of the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He graduated in archaeology at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, and received his PhD in archaeozoology at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences. His interests are two-pronged, including studying Upper Palaeolithic and Neolithic lithic inventories, as well as Pleistocene and Holocene faunal assemblages. He conducts research projects on the Gravettian and the Epigravettian of Central Europe. ORCID: 0000-0002-9786-0693 ;

Marta Sánchez de la Torre is currently a Beatriu de Pinós postdoctoral researcher at the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona. Her research has mainly focused on the analysis of lithic raw materials by Palaeolithic groups settled in the Pyrenean region by the use of traditional approaches as well as geochemical methods. She is currently directing archaeological seasons at several sites in NE Iberia and participates in different projects in France and Spain. ;

Xavier Mangado is a professor in prehistory at the University of Barcelona and researcher at the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona. He specialise in the analysis of lithic raw materials, mostly by using petrographic and micropalaeontological tools. His research is mainly focused on the study of Palaeolithic groups settled in NE Iberia and he has also participated in several international projects at Portugal, France and Jordan. ;

Josep Maria Fullola has been a professor in prehistory at the University of Barcelona since 1985. In 1986 he created the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona, a research group that promotes advanced research in prehistoric archaeology, being since its creation the main director. He has directed archaeological seasons in several Palaeolithic sites in NE Iberia, but he has also been involved in international projects in Baja California, France and Portugal.
NEW: Die Gräber von Bat und Al-Ayn und das Gebäude II in Bat by Stephanie Döpper. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699494. Hardback; 210x297mm; 394pp; 357 figures, 256 tables, 21 plates (colour throughout). Print RRP: £80.00. 741 2021 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699494. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699500. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Early Bronze Age in third-millennium-BC Eastern Arabia was a period of fundamental change, which is apparent in the development of social complexity, the exploitation of new resources and the emergence of new modes of life. Hallmarks of this period include monumental structures, so-called towers, and stone-built circular tombs.

The second volume of the series Arabia Orientalis is dedicated to the archaeological investigation of the Early Bronze Age necropolises of the UNESCO world heritage sites Bat and Al-Ayn in the Sultanate of Oman, as well as the monumental tower structure Building II at Bat. It encompasses detailed reports on the architecture and stratigraphy, as well as the find assemblages from the excavated buildings, including pottery and small finds, along with anthropological as well as anthracological studies. The publication presents insights into changing burial customs, as well as the function of the monumental tower structures. Three out of the four excavated Hafit- and Umm an-Nar-period tombs in the necropolises featured evidence for reuse at later times, especially during the Samad period, where new inhumations were placed into the Bronze Age tombs. The early Umm an-Nar tower Building II is surrounded by a large ditch system that might have served as protection against flooding from the nearby wadi.

About the Author
Stephanie Döpper is a postdoctoral researcher at Goethe University Frankfurt with an interest in mobile and sedentary communities of the Bronze Age in Eastern Arabia, as well as the reuse of prehistoric tombs and early modern mud-brick villages in the region. To facilitate public engagement with archaeological sites, she co-developed the ArchaeoTrail app for self-guided smartphone tours at archaeological sites.

German Description
Die frühe Bronzezeit im dritten Jahrtausend v. Chr. in Südostarabien ist eine Zeit grundlegender Veränderungen, die sich in der Entwicklung sozialer Komplexität, der Ausbeutung neuer Ressourcen und dem Aufkommen neuer Lebensformen zeigt. Kennzeichen dieser Epoche sind monumentale Bauwerke, sogenannte Türme, und aus Stein gebaute runde Gräber.

Der zweite Band der Reihe Arabia Orientalis widmet sich der archäologischen Untersuchung der frühbronzezeitlichen Nekropolen der UNESCO-Welterbestätten Bat und Al-Ayn im Sultanat Oman sowie dem monumentalen Turm Gebäude II in Bat. Er umfasst ausführliche Abhandlungen zur Architektur und Stratigraphie sowie zu den Fundeassemblagen aus den ausgegrabenen Bauwerken, darunter Keramik-, Kleinfunde-, anthropologische sowie anthrakologische Untersuchungen. Die Publikation präsentiert Einblicke in sich verändernde Bestattungssitten und die Funktion des monumentalen Turms. Drei der vier ausgegrabenen Hafit- und Umm an-Nar-zeitlichen Gräber in den Nekropolen belegen spätere Nachnutzungen, vor allem in der Samad-Zeit, in der neue Bestattungen in die bronzezeitlichen Gräber eingebracht wurden. Das Gebäude II aus der frühen Umm an-Nar-Zeit ist von einer großen Grabenanlage umgeben, die möglicherweise als Schutz vor Überschwemmungen des nahen Wadis diente.

Stephanie Döpper ist wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt und beschäftigt sich mit mobilen und sesshaften Gesellschaften der Bronzezeit in Südostarabien sowie der Nachnutzung prähistorischer Gräber und frühneuzeitlicher Lehmziegeldörfer in dieser Region. Um der Öffentlichkeit den Zugang zu archäologischen Stätten zu erleichtern, hat sie die ArchaeoTrail-App für selbstgeführte Smartphone-Touren an archäologischen Stätten mitentwickelt.