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NEW: Ex Asia et Syria: Oriental Religions in the Roman Central Balkans by Nadežda Gavrilović Vitas. Paperback; 205x290mm; 266 pages; 40 figures, 7 maps, illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). 721 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 78. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699135. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699142. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ex Asia Minor et Syria: Religions in the Roman Central Balkans investigates the cults of Asia Minor and Syrian origin in the Roman provinces of the Central Balkans. The author presents, analyzes and interprets all hitherto known epigraphical and archaeological material which attests to the presence of Asia Minor and Syrian cults in that region, a subject which is yet to be the object of a serious scholarly study. Thus the book both reviews previously known monuments and artefacts, many of which are now missing or are destroyed, and adds new finds, exploring their social and geographical context from all possible angles, and focusing on the thoughts and beliefs of the dedicants and devotees of the particular cult in question. New conclusions are presented in a scientific framework, taking account of the latest theoretical developments.

About the Author
Nadežda Gavrilović Vitas obtained her PhD in archaeology from the University of Belgrade. She has worked at the Institute of Archaeology in Belgrade since 1999, mainly focusing on Roman religion, epigraphy, settlements and necropolises. She is the director of the archaeological projects and excavations ‘Mediana – the residence of Constantine the Great’ and ‘Building with octagon in Niš Fortress’ in Niš.
NEW: Excavations at Stanground South, Peterborough Prehistoric, Roman and Post-Medieval Settlement along the Margins of the Fens by William A Boismier, Edmund Taylor and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 120 figures, 91 tables. 716 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698442. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698459. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (formerly Northamptonshire Archaeology) undertook archaeological excavations at Stanground South between September 2007 and November 2009 on behalf of Persimmon Homes (East Midlands) Ltd and in accordance with a programme of works designed and overseen by CgMs Heritage. The site is situated on the south-eastern outskirts of Peterborough, on glacial tills overlooking along the Fen edge. The works comprised five areas of set-piece excavation and a series of strip map and record areas, targeted on areas of archaeological potential identified by previous evaluation works. In total, an area of 70ha was subject to archaeological mitigation.

The excavations recorded archaeological remains dating from the Bronze Age to the medieval period. The earliest features comprised four burnt mounds dating to the early Bronze Age, one of which was associated with two superimposed buildings and a small group of up to six cremations. In the middle Bronze Age there was a substantial unenclosed cemetery (urnfield) comprising 78 cremations (as well as a further possible three outlying cremations to the urnfield). In the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a substantial droveway, up to 65m wide, was constructed leading northwards from the Fen edge to higher ground. A series of post-built roundhouses were later constructed within the confines of the droveway.

In the middle Iron Age, the droveway was partitioned to form a series of enclosures, within one of which a settlement was established adjacent to the Fen edge. This included roundhouses and a number of two-post and four-post structures.

In the later Iron Age, an enclosed settlement had developed to the north-west. This comprised several roundhouses within a substantial rectangular enclosure, which was open at its southern end. It appears that this began as an unenclosed site, which was later enclosed. Removal of cattle horn for working may have been occurring.

In the Roman period (2nd and late 4th centuries AD) a series of small enclosures were constructed on the eastern side of the later Iron Age enclosed settlement. These contained structures and features apparently associated with rural industry, which may have also exported surplus to market. Industries including the processing of hide, late Roman cheese making (with seven presses recovered), late Roman pottery production and some metalworking.

The economy of the site from the later Bronze Age onwards was focussed on pastoralism, with limited evidence for grain cultivation. During the Roman period, this seems to have specialised further towards dairy farming. The environment of the site seems to have undergone little change from the later Bronze Age, being largely open with areas of woodland and wetter areas. Peat growth during the Iron Age resulted in the covering of some of the Bronze Age features.

During the medieval period, large portions of the site were given over to open field cultivation, evidenced by the remains of ridge and furrow cultivation. The area was partitioned in the post-medieval period by the construction of a series of drainage ditches, which form the basis of the current field pattern.

About the Authors
William A Boismier’s professional background includes four university degrees and extensive fieldwork experience across Eastern and Southern England with archaeological remains ranging in date from the Palaeolithic to the medieval and postmedieval periods. He has published reports and other work in monographs, journals and other peer-reviewed outlets and has written a number of ‘grey literature’ reports, project designs and period summaries. He currently works as an archaeological consultant. ;

Edmund Taylor is a Project Manager for the York Archaeological Trust. He gained his degree in Archaeology from the University of Bradford in 2000 and soon after joined Northamptonshire Archaeology (now Mola Northampton)
NEW: Life, Death and Rubbish Disposal in Roman Norton, North Yorkshire by Janet Phillips and Pete Wilson. Paperback; 205x290mm; 296 pages; 209 figures, 54 tables (colour throughout). 712 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 77. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698381. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698398. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Life, Death and Rubbish Disposal in Roman Norton, North Yorkshire: Excavations at Brooklyn House 2015-16 reports on excavations in advance of the development of a site in Norton-on-Derwent, North Yorkshire close to the line of the main Roman road running from the crossing point of the River Derwent near Malton Roman fort to York (Eboracum). The Brooklyn House site provided much information on aspects of the poorly understood ‘small town’ of Delgovicia. The area came to be used for apparently widely-dispersed burials in the mid-3rd century AD. Among these was the bustumtype burial of a soldier, or former soldier, which produced a well-preserved assemblage of military equipment and incorporated some ‘non-standard’ features. In addition, evidence was found for a possible mausoleum. During the late third and fourth centuries the burial activity was succeeded by occupation in the form of substantial stone-founded, or in some cases possibly stone-built buildings fronting onto the Roman road which was the main approach road to the town from the south. These structures could have been related in some way to the Norton Roman pottery industry, the core area of which was located to the east of the site, although no evidence from them suggested this. Following the fairly short-lived occupation, much of the site was used for the disposal of large quantities of rubbish and structural debris that presumably originated from locations closer to or beyond the river crossing, including possibly the Roman fort. The Roman pottery assemblage incorporated in excess of 21,000 sherds and adds considerably to our knowledge of pottery use and production in Roman Malton/Norton. Similarly, the substantial and well-preserved Roman-period finds assemblage provides insights, not only into the bustum burial but also wider aspects of life in Delgovicia. Within the assemblage, there were some unusual and rarely found individual items such as a pair of iron-working tongs, a two-link snaffle bit and a bone needle case, as well as a wide range of other material including military equipment, jewellery, styli and a possible scroll holder. The medieval and later pottery from the site provides a baseline for work on assemblages recovered from Malton/Norton in the future.

About the contributors
Having started in archaeology as a volunteer on the Mary Rose in 1982 John Buglass formed his own company, JB Archaeology Ltd, in 2004. During his career John has worked on a wide range of sites from complex urban ones in London through to rural sites scattered across North Yorkshire. He has also excavated foreshore and submerged remains including 30 historic wrecks as well as having excavated on the Studley Royal/Fountains Abbey World Heritage Site. JB Archaeology has undertaken all of the archaeological works for the Brooklyn House development since the initial desk-based assessment in 2014. John has a BSc (Hons) Biology and an MA Archaeological Science. ;

After earning her MA in Medieval History and Archaeology from St. Andrews University, Janet Phillips began work as an archaeologist in 2007. While working, she gaining a further MA in Archaeology and Heritage from Leicester University. From 2011 Janet worked as a Project Officer on a range of multi-period sites. During that time she ran both phases of the Brooklyn House fieldwork and also developed an interest in finds work becoming a Post Excavation Supervisor in 2018. ;

Pete Wilson worked for English Heritage/Historic England for many years, including as Head of Research Policy (Roman Archaeology), and is now an Independent Consultant. A graduate of Birmingham University, he obtained a PhD from the University of Bradford for a thesis on Roman North Yorkshire. He has published widely on Roman topics including major monographs on Cataractonium (Catterick) (2002) and reports and papers on various subjects
NEW: Rei Cretariae Romanae Fautorum: Acta 46 Congressus tricesimus primus Rei Cretariae Romanae Fautorum Napocae habitus MMXVIII edited by Catarina Viegas. DOI: 10.32028/9781789697483. Hardback; 210x297; 620 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English, Italian and Spanish. 706 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697483. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697490. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Acta 46 comprises 64 articles. Out of the 120 scheduled lectures and posters presented at the 31st Congress of the Rei Cretariæ Romanæ Favtores, 61 are included in the present volume, to which three further were added. Given the location of the conference in Romania it seems natural that the number of articles related to the Balkans and Danube region is the largest (with 20 articles), followed by contributions concerning Italy (15), and the Iberian Peninsula (13). The 'rest of the world' is split between the Roman provinces in the East (eight papers), in North-Africa (six), and in central respectively western Europe (two).
NEW: Discurso, espacio y poder en las religions antiguas edited by Rafael A. Barroso-Romero and José Ángel Castillo Lozano. Paperback; 203x276mm; 212 pages; 12 figures, 1 table; Spanish text. 132 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698848. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698855. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas aims to reflect on how the wielders of power, be they religious, social or political, shape the discourses that justify their power within the framework of a society or a specific group, and how space participates in these discourses. Intellectuals, aristocrats, holy men or even the dead all needed to shape a discourse that would allow them to justify their hierarchies, whether they were internal or common to all of society, to reach a social consensus and to sustain them over time. The forms in which power used religion to express itself were quite diverse, such as ritual violence, martyrdom, sacrifice, or even divine trickery. Sometimes certain spaces became places whose political and religious control brought about conflicts, whose resolution was found through the legitimisation generated by the complex theological discourse, which reinforced the extraordinary qualities of the gods to reaffirm their authority, or through the cohesive value of the rites. This volume analyses these questions through fourteen works by sixteen researchers from different institutions. It includes studies carried out with materials from a wide range of sources: epigraphy, the archaeological record, and literary sources.

About the Editors
Rafael A. Barroso-Romero is a doctoral researcher at the Max-Weber-Kolleg, Universität Erfürt and at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where he lectures as a member of the Department of Ancient History. He is currently developing his doctoral research on materiality, spatiality, and the body in unusual burials in the Roman West. ;

José Ángel Castillo Lozano completed his Doctorate in History at the Universidad de Murcia. He is currently a High School teacher. His area of specialisation lies in the world of Late Antiquity, on which he has published around fifteen papers.

Spanish Description
Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas pretende reflexionar acerca de cómo el poder da forma a los discursos que lo justifican en el marco de una sociedad o de un grupo concreto y cómo el espacio participa de aquellos. Intelectuales, aristócratas, hombres santos o incluso los difuntos, todos ellos necesitaron configurar un discurso que permitiera justificar sus jerarquías −ya fueran internas o comunes a toda la sociedad− consensuarlas socialmente y sustentarlas en el tiempo. Las formas en las que el poder utilizaba a la religión para expresarse fueron muy diversas, como la violencia ritual, el martirio, el sacrificio, o incluso el engaño divino. A veces, determinados espacios se convirtieron en lugares cuyo control político y religioso generaba conflictos, cuya solución se encontró en la legitimación generada por el complejo discurso teológico, que refuerza las cualidades extraordinarias de los dioses para reafirmar su autoridad, o por el valor cohesivo de los ritos. Este volumen analiza tales cuestiones a través de catorce trabajos de dieciséis investigadores procedentes de diversos centros. Recoge investigaciones realizadas con materiales de muy diversa procedencia: la epigrafía, el registro arqueológico o las fuentes literarias.

Rafael A. Barroso-Romero es Graduado en Historia (UCO) y Máster en Ciencias de las Religiones (UCM). Actualmente es investigador predoctoral en el Max-Weber-Kolleg (IGS “Resonant Self- World Relations in Ancient and Modern Socio-Religious Practices”) de la Universität Erfürt y al mismo tiempo en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, donde imparte docencia como miembro del Departamento de Prehistoria, Historia Antigua y Arqueología. ;

José A. Castillo-Lozano (1991) es graduado en Historia en la Universidad de Murcia. En la actualidad es profesor de secundaria (funcionario de carrera) y doctor en historia. Su ámbito de especialización radica en el mundo de la Antigüedad Tardía del cual ha publicado un
NEW: Archaeological Mission of Chieti University in Libya: Reports 2006-2008 by Oliva Menozzi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 350 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 702 2020 RES: Reports, Excavations and Studies of the Archaeological Unit of the University G. d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694468. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694475. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The RES Series (Reports, Excavations and Studies of the Archaeological Unit of the University G. d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara) is dedicated to the projects and the researches of the different teams of the university of Chieti-Pescara working on archaeological projects in Italy and abroad. This first volume is dedicated to the Archaeological Mission in Cyrenaica, starting with the reports and researches of the seasons from 2006 to 2008. Chieti University has been working in Libya with a large international team since 1997. The emphasis of the publication is to present archaeological data to form part of an archive of finds, sites and monuments: a resource and reference point for archaeologists from Libya and elsewhere. At this moment the chora (territory) of Cyrene is facing multiple threats, even the potential loss of important monuments. It is hoped that this publication will contribute to the preservation of the local archaeological heritage.

About the Author
Oliva Menozzi began her studies at Chieti University and completed her doctorate at Oxford in 2001. She has been Researcher and Lecturer in Classical Archaeology and Archaeology of Greek Colonization at the University G.d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara (Italy) since 2002 and is now Associate Professor. She has been Director of the CAAM-Centre of the Athenaeum for Archaeometry and Microanalysis since 2015 and of the Master STARch (Sciences and Technologies for Archaeology at risk) since 2019.
NEW: Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience: Barbarian perspectives and Roman strategies to deal with new threats edited by Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696813. Paperback; 205x290mm; 244 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 699 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 76. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696813. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696820. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience deals with the Roman Empire’s responses to the threats which were caused by the new geostrategic situation brought on by the crisis of the 3rd century AD, induced by the ‘barbarians’ who – often already part of Roman military structures as mercenaries and auxiliaries – became a veritable menace for the Empire. Rome adopted different strategies: they oscillated between inclusion, warfare and other means of exerting influence. The contributions to this volume explore the archaeological evidence for Roman practice and especially the varying strategies of power and influence in the central regions on the one hand, and the south-eastern parts of the European ‘Barbaricum’ on the other. They show how ‘Divide et impera’ functioned as practical policy based on alliances, as well as consequent warfare, and diplomatic initiatives, which are traceable by prestige-goods and subsidia treasures found in the Barbaricum. The comparison of Roman imports in different parts of Iron-Age Europe can help understand better a complex process of shifting power and influence in an emerging new Europe, which transformed the Empire towards medieval ‘Herrschaft’ and social structure.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel holds a PhD in Ancient history and a second one in German literature. He was appointed a senior research fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and associated professor at Cuza University in Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. ;

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is a Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main.

Table of Contents
Preface ;
Beyond the Fringes of Empire: New Approaches concerning Roman Influence and Power in the Barbaricum. An introduction – Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß ;
Roman limes in military campaigns of the Barbarians – Krzysztof Narloch ;
Archaeological footprints of a superpower in hostile territory. Recent research on the traces of Roman military activities in the barbarian region north of the Middle Danube – Claus-Michael Hüssen, Balázs Komoróczy, Ján Rajtár, Marek Vlach ;
Friend or Foe? The political relations between inhabitants of the Upper Tisza region and the Roman Empire at the end of the 2nd and the 3rd century AD, in the light of archaeological and historical sources – Jan Bulas ;
The Limes Germanicus Trade and the Roman Army – Dan-Alexandru Suharoschi, Iulia Dumitrache, Roxana-Gabriela Curca ;
Barbarian brooches in Roman context. Analysis of the finds from the frontier marketplace at Porolissum (Romania) – Coriolan Horațiu Opreanu, Sorin Cociș, Vlad-Andrei Lăzărescu ;
Luxury tableware? Terra sigillata in the coastal region of the northern Netherlands – Annet Nieuwhof (Open Access) ;
Septentrional Encounters – Another Revisit to Roman Vessels in Scandinavian sites – Tove Hjørungdal ;
Westerholt ‘An der Mühle’- A Roman Iron Age Site on the North Sea Coast. A preliminary report – Jan F. Kegler ;
Beyond Hadrian’s Wall: Considerations on the Massive Terrets – Luisa Di Pastena ;
Pierced Roman coins from the ‘Free Dacians’ settlement of Roșiori (Municipality of Dulcești, Neamț County, Romania) – Lucian Munteanu, George Dan-Hânceanu ;
Mars on the River Uecker in Western Pomerania – a further indication of a Roman policy of ‘divide et impera’ in Germania? – Jens-Peter Schmidt and Hans-Ulrich Voß ;
South-eastern Transylvania during the Late Roman Period (3rd-4th centuries AD) – József Puskás ;
Roman type forts in th
NEW: The Mysterious Spheres on Greek and Roman Ancient Coins by Raymond V. Sidrys. Paperback; 175x245mm; 290pp; 90 figures, colour throughout. 690 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697902. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697919. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

This book is not a standard coin catalogue, but it focuses on quantities and percentages of the mysterious 5950 sphere images on Roman (76BC-AD 476) coin reverses, and a few Greek coins. This research identifies which Emperors, Deities and Personifications are most frequently shown with a sphere, during reigns and eras, and determines the political, cultural, religious and propaganda trends associated with the coin sphere images, and provides a variety of new findings. The book has 257 illustrations of spheres shown on Roman and a few Greek coins, as well as 109 images of statues, reliefs, mosaics, and other ancient art. Consider that the ancient Greeks (620 BC-30 BC) had the first astronomers in Europe (influenced by Egyptian and Babylonian astronomy) who created the celestial and terrestrial sphere theories, including the popular geocentric theory (Earth is the centre of the Universe). But at that time the Greeks very rarely showed sphere images on their coins – far less than 1%! In comparison, the later Romans during 76 BCAD 476 issued coin reverse sphere types as 15% of their total coin types, and therefore millions of these important coin sphere types were minted. The author explores Constantine’s BEATA TRANQVILLITAS Sphere Reverses (AD 321 – 324) and offers a new interpretation of Christian Trinity symbolism that opposes Arianism. Starting in the late 4th century, the Roman religion began to transfer to Christianity, and coins promoted Emperors holding a Christian cross on a globe or a winged Victory/Angel also holding a globus cruciger. At the end of the book, the Epilogue shows the continuous worldwide use (from 5th to 21st century) of sphere images on coins, reliefs, sculptures, astronomical models, drawings, paintings and large monuments, and some of them suggest that Imperial Roman sphere coins created a long legacy.

About the Author
Raymond Sidrys was born in Manhattan, New York; received his B.A. (1971) in Anthropology at Northwestern University (also 1969 summer school at Harvard University), and M.A. (1973) and Ph.D. (1976) in Anthropology/Archaeology at UCLA. He lectured at several Universities in southern California and in Lithuania.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction ;
Chapter 2: Sun Disk Images in Ancient Cultures ;
Chapter 3: Greek Concepts of Celestial and Terrestrial Spheres ;
Chapter 4: Early Greek Coins With Few Sphere Symbols (520 BC – 76 BC) ;
Chapter 5: Prior Research on Roman Coin Sphere Symbols ;
Chapter 6: Astrological/Astronomical Sphere Symbols Move to Rome ;
Chapter 7: Winged Victory vs. Sphere Symbols on Roman Coins ;
Chapter 8: First Spheres on Late Republican Coinage (76 BC - 31 BC) ;
Chapter 9: Spheres Frequent on Roman Imperial Coinage ;
Chapter 10: Chronological Trends for Top Coin Sphere Images ;
Chapter 11: General Conclusions ;
Chapter 12: Appendices ;
Bibliography ;
Index ;
List of Figures and Credits ;
Acknowledgements ;
About the Author
FORTHCOMING: Rougga I: Le forum et ses abords (fouilles 1971–1974) edited by Maurice Euzennat† and Hédi Slim†. Paperback; 205x290mm; 518 pages; 214 figures, 54 tables (13 colour plates). French text. Print RRP: £85.00. 706 2020 Archaeology of the Maghreb 2. ISBN 9781789698251. Book contents pageBuy Now

Located in Byzacena, 12 km south-east of Thysdrus / El Jem, the municipality of Bararus / Henchir, Rougga is known for its large Roman cisterns first reported in the 18th century and for the discovery in 1972 of a hoard of Byzantine gold coins. ROUGGA I gives an account of the overall results of the excavations carried out at the site of the forum, from 1971 to 1974, by the Tunisian-French mission under the direction of Maurice Euzennat † and Hédi Slim †.

Situé en Byzacène, à 12 km au sud-est de Thysdrus/El Jem, le municipe de Bararus/Henchir Rougga est connu pour ses grandes citernes d’époque romaine signalées depuis le XVIIIe s. et pour la découverte en 1972 d’un trésor de monnaies d’or byzantines publié en 1982 dans le volume III de la monographie générale du site. Ce volume I, rédigé pour l’essentiel au début des années 90, rend compte du résultat global des fouilles menées à l’emplacement du forum, de 1971 à 1974, par la mission tuniso-française sous la direction de Maurice Euzennat† et Hédi Slim†. L’ouvrage comprend trois parties : tout d’abord, une présentation générale du site par les deux chefs de mission et Pol Trousset ; ensuite, une description de la stratigraphie du forum et du mobilier qui en provient, par Roger Guéry† avec la collaboration de divers spécialistes ; enfin, une étude architecturale extrêmement précise des différents éléments qui composent le centre monumental de la cité : citernes, platea et portiques, xyste et temples, par Gilbert Hallier†. Ces travaux permettent de mieux appréhender la place du municipe de Bararus au centre d’une riche région agricole qui a laissé les traces de cadastration parmi les mieux conservées d’Afrique. Ils mettent en évidence sa longue durée d’occupation, du IIIe s. av. J.-C. (avec quelques traces antérieures remontant à la Préhistoire) jusqu’au XIe s., et l’originalité des partis architecturaux qui ont présidé à la construction de son centre monumental à l’époque flavienne, ses transformations au IIe s. et son abandon à l’époque byzantine.

Maurice Euzennat (1926-2004), Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, Membre de l’Institut. ;

Hédi Slim (1935-2019), Directeur de Recherche à l’Institut National du Patrimoine de Tunis, Directeur de la division du Recensement général et des Études. ;

Roger Guéry (1926-1997), Ingénieur au CNRS, archéologue-céramologue. ;

Gilbert Hallier (1923-2010), Architecte d.p.l.g., Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, architecte-archéologue. ;

Pol Trousset, Directeur de Recherche honoraire au CNRS, archéologue-géographe.

Ouvrage publié avec le concours de l'Institut Français de Tunisie.

Préface de Fathi Bejaoui, Directeur de Recherche à INP.

Postface de Pierre Gros, Membre de l'Institut.
Deposit of Amphorae in the Quarter of St. Theodore, Pula by Alka Starac. Paperback; 205x290mm; 704 pages; 75 figures, 10 tables, 21 graphs plus appendices and illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). Print RRP: £95.00. 695 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 75. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698480. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698497. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £95.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Deposit of Amphorae in the Quarter of St. Theodore, Pula examines a large group of amphorae which were placed in the quarter of St. Theodore in Pula during the construction of the terrace of the Roman temple complex and adjacent public thermae in the mid-1st century BC, in order to enable drainage and levelling of the slope. The total number of amphorae from deposits registered in the 2005-2007 excavations amounted to 2119, of which 1754 were extracted and thoroughly documented.

About the Author
Alka Starac has worked in the fields of Roman archaeology, epigraphy, history and economy since defending her PhD dissertation Roman rule in Histria and Liburnia’in 1996 at the University of Zagreb. She has published more than eighty scholarly papers in international archaeological publications, ten monographs (either as author or editor) and has worked on several archaeological exhibitions dealing with Roman Istria.
Corpus des amphores romaines produites dans les centres de mer Noire Collections des musées de la côte turque de la mer Noire (Ereğli, Amasra, Sinop, Samsun, Giresun, Ordu, Trabzon et Amasya) by Dominique Kassab Tezgör. Paperback; 205x290mm; 198 pages; 4 tables, 48 plates. French text. 689 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 74. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696974. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696981. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Black Sea cities of Turkey's northern coast – Ereğli , Amasra, Sinop, Samsun, Giresun, Ordu, Trabzon, and inland Amasya – are endowed with museums whose holdings include important collections of amphorae. Their state of preservation is also exceptional since the majority were recovered intact from the sea. Most were produced in the big manufacturing centres around the Black Sea during the Roman period, between the 2nd/3rd centuries BCE and the 7th century CE. This Corpus brings them together and analyses them in the light of recent investigations. The production lines of Sinop and Colchis are especially well represented and can be followed without interruption over several centuries. The size of the assemblage – ca. 450 vessels – provides an overview of manufacturing trends for Black Sea amphorae, and brings out the similarities and differences in technique and morphology that distinguished one workshop from another. Research on this corpus has also offered an opportunity to consider questions inherent to amphora studies, such as what commercial goods they contained; how vessel shapes related to the regional resources for which they were designed; standardized volumes; and the use of amphoras in paying the annona.

About the Author
Dominique Kassab Tezgör was the scientific director of the excavation of a workshop of amphorae settled close to the ancient city of Sinope on the Turkish Black Sea coast. A large part of her research has been devoted to the amphorae of Sinop and the Black Sea amphorae of the Roman and Late antiquity periods. She is a professor in the Department of Archaeology of Bilkent University at Ankara (Turkey).

French Description
Les villes d'Ereğli, Amasra, Sinop, Samsun, Giresun, Ordu, et Trabzon qui sont implantées sur la côte nord de la Turquie, ainsi qu'Amasya à l'intérieur des terres, sont dotées d'un musée. Les amphores constituent une part importante de leur collection et sont dans un très bon état de conservation, car elles ont été trouvées en mer. La plupart ont été produites dans les grands centres installés sur le pourtour de la mer Noire à l'époque romaine entre le IIe/IIIe s. et le VIIe s. de nè. Réunies dans ce Corpus, elles sont étudiées à la lumière des recherches les plus récentes. Les productions de Sinope et de la Colchide sont particulièrement bien représentées et peuvent être suivies sur plusieurs siècles sans interruption. Cet assemblage de près de 450 conteneurs offre une vue générale de l'activité amphorique en mer Noire et montre des similitudes et les différences dans les traits techniques et morphologiques d'un atelier à l'autre.Il a également permis d'aborder quelques questions qui sont inhérentes à l'étude des amphores, comme les produits commercialisés, l'association de la forme et des ressources régionales, ou encore la standardisation des volumes et le paiement de l'annona.

Dominique Kassab Tezgör a été la directrice scientifique de la fouille de l'atelier amphorique implanté près de la ville antique de Sinope sur la côte turque de la mer Noire. Une grande partie de ses recherches porte sur les amphores de Sinope et de mer Noire à l'époque romaine et pendant l'antiquité tardive. Elle est professeur au département d'archéologie de l'université de Bilkent à Ankara (Turkey).
The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire A Juridical and Functional Approach to Town Life in Roman Gaul, Germania Inferior and Britain by Frida Pellegrino. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 164 figures (83 pages in colour). 685 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 72. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697742. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697759. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire investigates the development of urbanism in the north-western provinces of the Roman empire. Key themes include the continuities and discontinuities between pre-Roman and Roman ‘urban’ systems, the relationships between cities’ juridical statuses and their levels of monumentality, levels of connectivity and economic integration as illuminated by the geographical distribution of cities and town-like settlements belonging to various size brackets, and the shapes and nature of regional urban hierarchies, as reconstructed on the basis of not only the administrative centres but - crucially - all places that fulfilled urban ‘functions’.

About the Author
Frida Pellegrino graduated with honours in 2008, after completing a BA course in Archaeology at the University of Padua. She then enrolled in the MA course at the University of Padua and spent a year abroad, studying at Southampton University (UK), with the Erasmus project. She graduated summa cum laude in 2011, specialising in Roman archaeology. She completed her PhD at the University of Leiden in 2018.
Carving a Professional Identity: The Occupational Epigraphy of the Roman Latin West by Rada Varga. Paperback; 156x234mm; 126 pages; 13 graphs. 684 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 73. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694642. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694659. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Carving a Professional Identity: The occupational epigraphy of the Roman Latin West presents the results of long-term research into the occupational epigraphy from the Latin-language provinces of the Roman Empire. It catalogues stone epigraphs of independent professionals (thus excluding state workers, imperial slaves, freedmen and military personnel), comprising some 690 people, providing quantitative as well as qualitative analyses of the raw data. A glossary translating the occupational titles is also included. The book reveals a very lively work market, where specialisation responded to demand and brought social and economic status to the worker. The coherence of epigraphic habits and manifestations within a professional group, along with all the other existing clues for a rather unitary use of symbols, endorse once more the existence of a Roman provincial, commercial, middle class.

About the Author
Rada Varga is a researcher at Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania) specialising in Latin epigraphy, digital classics, prosopography and provincial archaeology (co-directing the excavations at the fortress of ala I milliaria Batavorum from Dacia). Her main project is Romans1by1, a prosopographical database for people attested in ancient epigraphy. Currently, Dr Varga is a member of the executive committee of EADH (The European Association for Digital Humanities).
Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest edited by Federica Boschi, Enrico Giorgi, Frank Vermeulen. Paperback; 203x276mm, 230 pages; 96 figures (colour throughout). 121 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696998. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697001. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest: Landscape Archaeology and Material Culture is a coherent collection of papers presented at an International Workshop held in Ravenna (Italy) on 13-14 May 2019. The event, organized by the Universities of Bologna and Ghent and Arcadria, focussed on the transition between Italic culture and Romanised society in the central Adriatic area – the regions ager Gallicus and Picenum under Roman dominance – from the fourth to the second centuries BCE.

By bringing together the experience of international research on this topic, the volume highlights a period that marks a profound transformation in the whole of central Italy by analysing the relationships between the central settlements and their territories and, more generally, by measuring the impact of early Romanization on the territorial structure, social organization and cultural substrata of populations living here. The volume also discusses methodological aspects regarding best practices in fieldwork, landscape investigation and study of material culture, identifying research lines and perspectives for the future deepening of knowledge in this crucial period of central Adriatic archaeology.

About the Editors
Federica Boschi is senior researcher in Methods of Archaeological Research at the University of Bologna. She specialises in non-destructive methods of investigation, in particular geophysics and aerial photography for archaeology. She directs field projects in central Adriatic Italy and is a member of several teams conducting research of international significance. ;

Enrico Giorgi is Associate Professor of Methodology and Landscape Archaeology at the University of Bologna. He is the director of the journal ‘Groma: Documenting Archaeology’ and directs research on Adriatic archaeology. He conducts archaeological missions in Croatia, Albania and Egypt which are already the subject of publications. ;

Frank Vermeulen has been Professor of Roman Archaeology and Archaeological Methodology at Ghent University since 1999 and directed its Department of Archaeology from 2015-2018. He is particularly interested in Roman settlement archaeology and geo-archaeological approaches to ancient Mediterranean landscapes; he has a keen interest in IT applications in archaeology.
A Latin Lexicon: An Illustrated Compendium of Latin Words and English Derivatives by Caroline K. Mackenzie. Illustrations by Amanda Short. Hardback; 156x234mm; 142 pages; colour design throughout, 20 full-colour illustrations. 677 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697629. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697636. £19.99 (Exc. VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A charming compendium of Latin words and English derivatives, encompassing over 365 words required for Latin GCSE, one for each day of the year. Each Latin entry is accompanied by key notes on grammar, translations and some playful and memorable derivatives. A concise introduction and a glossary of Latin in common usage combine to make this a vade-mecum (essential companion) for all learners of Latin as well as cruciverbalists. The text is imaginatively punctuated by 20 full-colour illustrations by Amanda Short.

About the Author
Caroline K. Mackenzie read Classics at Pembroke College, Cambridge. After a legal career in London, she became Head of Classics at a school in Sevenoaks. In 2018 Caroline was awarded distinction in an MA in Classical Art and Archaeology at King’s College London. Caroline offers online private tutoring in Latin and Greek and runs online Classical reading groups for all ages and abilities. Caroline’s first book, Culture and Society at Lullingstone Roman Villa was published by Archaeopress in 2019.

Praise for This Volume:
Carpe verba! (Grasp the words!) A hugely fun and useful tool for Latin learners. I wish I’d had this book when I was learning Latin.’ – Caroline Lawrence, author of The Roman Mysteries. ;

‘The narrator of a recent French historical novel muses: 'My whole life I owe to Greek. If I hadn't known how to conjugate the aorist, where to put the stresses, how to recite -mi verbs, I would never have been able to escape my menial little existence. Declensions proved to be the instrument of my ascent'. Pari passu and mutatis mutandis, that surely is what every reader will say after reading, marking and inwardly digesting Caroline Mackenzie's brilliant Latin Compendium.’ – Professor Paul Cartledge, University of Cambridge. ;

‘A handsome and lively introduction to Latin through its core vocabulary and derivatives. Everyone should have a copy.’ – Dr Daisy Dunn, author of In the Shadow of Vesuvius. ;

‘This delightful, illustrated book will serve two purposes: the straightforward English derivatives will help students remember their Latin vocabulary, and the recondite ones will give a head start for the Scrabble board or cryptic crossword.’ – Dr John Taylor, author of Essential GCSE Latin. ;

‘Latin can be fun, who knew? A real must for anyone learning Latin or interested in language. I genuinely LOVE this book. It is a fantastic idea and looks absolutely beautiful.’ – Celia Rees, author and former English teacher. ;

‘Elegantly presented, entertaining, and educational.’ – Ruth Downie, author. ;

'The perfect book for anyone who, like me, wishes they had understood Latin at school. Why did our teachers tell us it is a "dead language", and not how useful it would be in real life?’ – Janie Hampton, author. ;

‘A thoroughly helpful volume, great for both reference and pleasure, ideal for both the crossword and the classroom.’ – Michelle Lovric, author.

‘This is a well-presented book, packed with information for teachers, students and anyone interested in language, and Latin in particular.’ – Mike Smith, Classics for All, November 2020
The Global Connections of Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the Third International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 18th-19th March, 2019 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696950; Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout. 669 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696950. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696967. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Gandhāran art is often regarded as the epitome of cultural exchange in antiquity. The ancient region of Gandhāra, centred on what is now the northern tip of Pakistan, has been called the ‘crossroads of Asia’. The Buddhist art produced in and around this area in the first few centuries AD exhibits extraordinary connections with other traditions across Asia and as far as the Mediterranean. Since the nineteenth century, the Graeco-Roman associations of Gandhāran art have attracted particular attention. Classically educated soldiers and administrators of that era were astonished by the uncanny resemblance of many works of Gandhāran sculpture to Greek and Roman art made thousands of miles to the west. More than a century later we can recognize that the Gandhāran artists’ appropriation of classical iconography and styles was diverse and extensive, but the explanation of this ‘influence’ remains puzzling and elusive. The Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre was initiated principally to cast new light on this old problem.

This volume is the third set of proceedings of the project’s annual workshop, and the first to address directly the question of cross-cultural influence on and by Gandhāran art. The contributors wrestle with old controversies, particularly the notion that Gandhāran art is a legacy of Hellenistic Greek rule in Central Asia and the growing consensus around the important role of the Roman Empire in shaping it. But they also seek to present a more complex and expansive view of the networks in which Gandhāra was embedded. Adopting a global perspective on the subject, they examine aspects of Gandhāra’s connections both within and beyond South Asia and Central Asia, including the profound influence which Gandhāran art itself had on the development of Buddhist art in China and India.

About the Editors
Wannaporn Rienjang obtained her doctorate in Archaeology from University of Cambridge. She is now Lecturer in Archaeology, Museum and Heritage Studies at the Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University and a project consultant for the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. Her research focuses on the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Indian Ocean Trade and ancient working technologies of stone beads and vessels. ;

Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran a
The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland The British School at Rome’s Tiber Valley Project by Helen Patterson, Robert Witcher and Helga Di Giuseppe. Paperback; 205x290mm; 372 pages; 131 figures, 21 tables (colour throughout). 665 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 70. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696158. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696165. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland presents a new regional history of the middle Tiber valley as a lens through which to view the emergence and transformation of the city of Rome from 1000 BC to AD 1000. Setting the ancient city within the context of its immediate territory, the authors reveal the diverse and enduring links between the metropolis and its hinterland. At the heart of the volume is a detailed consideration of the results of a complete restudy of the pioneering South Etruria Survey (c. 1955–1970), one of the earliest and most influential Mediterranean landscape projects. Between 1998 and 2002, an international team based at the British School at Rome conducted a comprehensive restudy of the material and documentary archive generated by the South Etruria Survey. The results were supplemented with a number of other published and unpublished sources of archaeological evidence to create a database of around 5000 sites across southern Etruria and the Sabina Tiberina, extending in date from the Bronze Age, through the Etruscan/Sabine, Republican and imperial periods, to the middle ages. Analysis and discussion of these data have appeared in a series of interim articles published over the past two decades; the present volume offers a final synthesis of the project results.

The chapters include the first detailed assessment of the field methods of the South Etruria Survey, an extended discussion of the use of archaeological legacy data, and new insights into the social and economic connectivities between Rome and the communities of its northern hinterland across two millennia. The volume as a whole demonstrates how the archaeological evidence generated by landscape surveys can be used to rewrite narrative histories, even those based on cities as familiar as ancient Rome.

Includes contributions by Martin Millett, Simon Keay and Christopher Smith, and a preface by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill.

About the Authors
Helen Patterson is the former Assistant Director (Archaeology) of the British School at Rome and director of the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project (1998–2002). She is a specialist in the archaeology of the late antique and early medieval periods, with particular interests in ceramic production and distribution. She has published a series of edited volumes including Bridging the Tiber (2004), Mercator Placidissimus (with F. Coarelli, 2008) and Veii: the historical topography of the ancient city (with R. Cascino & H. Di Giuseppe, 2012).

Robert Witcher is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University, UK. From 1999 to 2002, he was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. His research interests include landscape archaeology with a particular focus on the pre-Roman and Roman periods in Italy and the wider Mediterranean. He has published on aspects of ancient rural settlement, agriculture, demography and globalization. He is the editor of the world archaeology journal, Antiquity.

Helga Di Giuseppe specialises in Italian archaeology with particular interests in the classical and late antique periods. She has published widely on ancient landscape, Roman villas, and ceramic and textile production, and has edited several major excavation and conference volumes. From 1998 to 2002, she was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. She is currently project manager for Fasti Online with the International Association of Classical Archaeology and editorial manager with the publisher Scienze e Lettere.
A Catalogue of the Sculpture Collection at Wilton House by Peter Stewart with new photography by Guido Petruccioli. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 229x305mm; 438 pages; 14 figures and 154 plates in full colour throughout. 661 2020. ISBN 9781789696554. £90.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Wilton House sculptures constituted one of the largest and most celebrated collections of ancient art in Europe. Originally comprising some 340 works, the collection was formed around the late 1710s and 1720s by Thomas Herbert, the eccentric 8th Earl of Pembroke, who stubbornly ‘re-baptized’ his busts and statues with names of his own choosing. His sources included the famous collection of Cardinal Mazarin, assembled in Paris in the 1640s and 1650s, and recent discoveries on the Via Appia outside Rome. Earl Thomas regarded the sculptures as ancient – some of them among the oldest works of art in existence – but in fact much of the collection is modern and represents the neglected talents of sixteenth-and seventeenth-century artists, restorers and copyists who were inspired by Greek and Roman sculpture.

About half of the original collection remains intact today, adorning the Gothic Cloisters that were built for it two centuries ago. After a long decline, accelerated by the impact of the Second World War, the sculptures have been rehabilitated in recent years. They include masterpieces of Roman and early modern art, which cast fresh light on Graeco-Roman antiquity, the classical tradition, and the history of collecting.

Illustrated with specially commissioned photographs, this catalogue offers the first comprehensive publication of the 8th Earl’s collection, including an inventory of works dispersed from Wilton. It re-presents his personal vision of the collection recorded in contemporary manuscripts. At the same time, it dismantles some of the myths about it which originated with the earl himself, and provides an authoritative archaeological and art-historical analysis of the artefacts.

About the Author
Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. His research ranges across many aspects of Greek and Roman sculpture and the relationships between different artistic traditions. His previous publications include, Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008).

Guido Petruccioli is an Oxford University-trained classical archaeologist and professional photographer with specialist interests in Roman imperial portraiture and the documentation of ancient sculpture.
The Development of an Iron Age and Roman Settlement Complex at The Park and Bowsings, near Guiting Power, Gloucestershire: Farmstead and Stronghold by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 204 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. (RRP: £32.00). 657 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693638. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693645. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This report outlines excavation of a small complex of iron age and Roman settlement near Guiting Power in the Cotswolds. A relatively undefended farmstead of middle iron age date was abandoned, to be followed by an adjacent, more substantial, ditched enclosure of the mid to later iron age, which appears to have been a stronghold of higher status, with less directly agrarian associations. This latter site became dilapidated, or was perhaps slighted, during the latest iron age or early Roman period, with a Romanised farmstead developing over the traditional habitation area, this providing evidence for occupation until the late 4th century AD. The sequence of settlement indicates social, economic, and environmental changes occurring in the area from the ‘proto-Dobunnic’ to late Roman periods.

Excavation of pits at the site has provided the basis for experimental investigation of grain storage.

Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general but not exclusive interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects, which include the following: -application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments, with related experimental work; -structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; -investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and NW’n Europe.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.
Excavations at Chester. The Northern and Eastern Roman Extramural Settlements Excavations 1990-2019 and other investigations by Leigh Dodd. Paperback; 205x290mm; 142 pages; illustrated throughout. 668 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 71. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696271. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696288. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations at Chester: the northern and eastern Roman extramural settlements presents the results of fifteen archaeological investigations carried out within the canabae to the north and east of the Roman legionary fortress at Chester between 1990 and 2019. The results demonstrate that there was sparse development of the canabae to the north of the fortress during the 1st and 2nd centuries; instead, this area was predominantly used for the extraction of building materials⁠ – sandstone and clay. By the 3rd century, the final phase of usage took the form of a small cemetery, the first to be examined in this area. Subject to more constraints, the sites investigated within the eastern canabae close to the fortress produced limited evidence for urban plot divisions, whilst those further east provided evidence for the division and management of agricultural land forming the prata legionis.

About the Author
Leigh Dodd has worked in the commercial sector of archaeology since the early 1990s. During this time he has excavated a wide range of sites including many of the Roman and post-medieval periods, several of which have been published in regional and international journals. Additionally, he has written many finds reports for a wide-range of clients. He is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.

Reviews
'This is a lucid and business-like report on developer-funded digs in the northern and eastern environs of the legionary fortress at Chester. It brings together work by various archaeological contractors, an initiative of synthesis to be applauded, and complements recent publication of work south and west of the fortress.'—Nick Hodgson, Current Archaeology, Issue 370, January 2021
L’Egitto dei Flavi: Sintesi e prospettive d’indagine alla luce della documentazione papirologica ed epigrafica egiziana by Nikola D. Bellucci and Brunella L. Longo. Paperback; 156x234mm; 184 pages. Italian text.. 654 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 69. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696738. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696745. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

L’Egitto dei Flavi, providing synthesis and new prospects of investigation, offers an overall review of the various information obtainable from sources from the Roman province of Egypt in the moment of transition from the Julio-Claudian dynasty to the new Flavian dynasty. Within the investigations, an attempt was made to focus on the province of Egypt during the period of Flavian domination with the aim of providing a compendium and a more balanced examination of the technical and economic organization of the country in a historical period that still would seem complex to want to define in its entirety. This operation made it necessary to start from the various documentary sources (papyrus, ostraka, epigraphs and wooden tablets) which bore testimony of the aspects that were intended to be emphasized. The texts examined were therefore carefully selected in the context of the substantial material available.

About the Authors
Nikola D. Bellucci, master's degree in Classical Philology (Th. Papyrology) and master's degree in Archaeology and Cultures of the Ancient World (Th. Egyptology) at the Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, is today PhD f. and department member of the University of Bern.

Brunella L. Longo, master's degree in Classical Philology (Th. Papyrology) at Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna, currently teaches classical literature at the Filzi State High School in Rovereto (Italy). She has dealt with scientific popularization (with particular reference to Classical Philology and Ancient History).

Italian Description
L’Egitto dei Flavi, fornendo sintesi e nuove prospettive d’indagine, vuole ritenersi un pratico strumento riguardante le molteplici informazioni ricavabili dalle fonti provenienti dalla provincia romana d’Egitto nel momento di passaggio dalla dinastia giulio-claudia alla nuova dinastia flavia proponendo una revisione d’insieme specie di queste ultime. Nel corso delle indagini si è tentato di mettere a fuoco la provincia d’Egitto durante il periodo di dominazione flavia con l’intento di fornire un compendio e un esame più calibrato dell’organizzazione tecnica ed economica del paese in un periodo storico che ancora parrebbe complesso voler definire nella sua completezza. Tale operazione ha reso necessario partire dalle varie fonti documentarie (papiri, ostraka, epigrafi e tavolette lignee) che portavano testimonianza degli aspetti che si intendeva maggiormente porre in rilievo. I testi esaminati sono pertanto stati attentamente selezionati nel contesto del consistente materiale disponibile.

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) e dottore magistrale in Archeologia e Culture del Mondo Antico (Th. Egittologia) presso l’Alma Mater Studiorum – Università di Bologna, è oggi PhD f. presso l’Università di Berna. Autore di numerosi articoli scientifici, è anche membro di alcuni tra i maggiori istituti scientifici internazionali d’antichità.

Brunella L. Longo, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) presso l’Alma Mater Studiorum – Università di Bologna, insegna attualmente Letteratura classica presso il Liceo Filzi di Rovereto. Si occupa inoltre di divulgazione scientifica (specie negli ambiti della Filologia Classica e della Storia Antica).
A Biography of Power: Research and Excavations at the Iron Age 'oppidum' of Bagendon, Gloucestershire (1979-2017) by Tom Moore. Paperback; 205x290mm; 626 pages, illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 621 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695342. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695359. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume explores the changing nature of power and identity from the Iron Age to Roman period in Britain. Presenting detailed excavation results and integrating a range of comprehensive specialist studies, A Biography of Power provides fresh insights into the origins and nature of one of the lesser-known, but perhaps most significant, Late Iron Age oppida in Britain: Bagendon in Gloucestershire.

Combining the results of a large-scale geophysical survey, with analysis of both historic and new excavations, this volume reassesses Iron Age occupation at Bagendon, revealing evidence for diverse artisanal activities and complex regional exchange networks that saw livestock, and people, travelling to Bagendon from west of the Severn. The results of excavation of two morphologically unusual, banjo-like enclosures, and of one of the previously unexamined dykes, has revealed that the Bagendon oppidum had earlier origins and more complex roles than previously envisaged. The volume also provides new insights into the nature of the Iron Age and Roman landscape in which Bagendon was situated. Detailing the discovery of two, previously unknown, Roman villas at Bagendon, this research also demonstrates the continued significance of this landscape in the early Roman province.

This volume redefines Bagendon as a landscape of power, which offers important insights into the changing nature of societies from the Middle Iron Age to Roman period. It calls for a radical reassessment of how we define oppida complexes and their socio-political importance at the turn of the 1st millennium BC.

Contains contributions from Sophia Adams, Michael J. Allen, Sam Bithell, Loïc Boscher, Cameron Clegg, G.B. Dannell, Lorne Elliott, Elizabeth Foulds, Freddie Foulds, Christopher Green, Derek Hamilton, Colin Haselgrove, Yvonne Inall, Tina Jakob, Mandy Jay, Sally Kellett, Robert Kenyon, Mark Landon, Marcos Martinón-Torres, Edward McSloy, Janet Montgomery, J.A. Morley-Stone, Geoff Nowell, Charlotte O’Brien, Chris Ottley, Cynthia Poole, Richard Reece, Harry Robson, Ruth Shaffrey, John Shepherd, Jane Timby, Dirk Visser, D.F. Williams, Steven Willis.

About the Editor
Tom Moore is an Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University. His research focuses on the western European Iron Age and approaches to cultural landscape management. He has published widely on Iron Age social organisation and conducted major field projects at Late Iron Age oppida in Britain and France, including at Bibracte, Burgundy. He is co-author of the textbook: Archaeology: an introduction.

Table of Contents:
Summary ;
Acknowledgements ;
Chapter 1: Research at Bagendon ;
Chapter 2: The wider Bagendon complex: remote sensing surveys 2008-2016 ;
Chapter 3: Before the ‘oppidum’: Excavations at Scrubditch and Cutham enclosures ;
Chapter 4: Revisiting Late Iron Age Bagendon ;
Chapter 5: After the ‘oppidum’. Excavations at Black Grove ;
Chapter 6: Iron Age and Roman ceramics ;
Chapter 7: Brooches ;
Chapter 8: Metalwork ;
Chapter 9: An analytical study of the Iron Age bloomery slag ;
Chapter 10: Coinage ;
Chapter 11: Coin moulds ;
Chapter 12: Miscellaneous material ;
Chapter 13: Radiocarbon dates and Bayesian analysis ;
Chapter 14: Dating the Roman fort at Cirencester ;
Chapter 15: Human Remains ;
Chapter 16: Faunal Remains ;
Chapter 17: Isotopic analysis of human and animal remains ;
Chapter 18: The plant and invertebrate remains (1979-2017) ;
Chapter 19: Putting the Bagendon complex into its landscape setting: the geoarchaeological and land snail evidence ;
Chapter 20: Viewsheds and Least Cost analysis of the Bagendon complex and its environs ;
Chapter 21: Geophysical survey at Hailey Wood Camp, Sapperton, Gloucester
‘Blood Is Thicker Than Water’ – Non-Royal Consanguineous Marriage in Ancient Egypt An Exploration of Economic and Biological Outcomes by Joanne-Marie Robinson. Paperback; 175x245mm; 246 pages; 21 figures, 14 tables (11 colour pages). 646 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 29. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695434. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695441. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Discussions on consanguineous marriage within Egyptology usually focus on brother-sister marriages recorded in census returns from Roman Egypt, or royal sibling marriages amongst the ruling Ptolemies. However, no wide-ranging review exists of non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt despite the economic and biological implications of such relationships. This is the first time that evidence for nonroyal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt has been collated from select sources spanning the Middle Kingdom to the Roman Period and a method created to investigate the potential economic and biological outcomes of these unions, particularly beyond the level of sibling and half-sibling unions. The working definition of consanguineous marriage used throughout this study is that used by clinical geneticists: unions contracted between cousins biologically related as second cousins or closer biological kin. This research argues that for some families, and under certain conditions, consanguineous marriage was a preferred economic strategy in terms of gifts given at marriage and in inheritance, and that families who married consanguineously may have received greater levels of intra-familial support without the expectation of reciprocity. Although there may have been adverse biological outcomes arising from congenital anomalies and genetic disorders in the offspring of consanguineous marriages, the research suggests that it is unlikely that these physical or cognitive disorders were distinguished from other medical disorders in the general health environment of ancient Egypt. The investigation focuses primarily on ancient Egyptian documentary and archaeological sources, including human remains, and is informed by research on consanguinity from a range of disciplines including anthropology, demography, economics and pathology.

About the Author
Joanne-Marie Robinson is a Visiting Scholar at the KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology at the University of Manchester. She has a research interest in non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean, and the socio-cultural and religious factors that influence this choice of marriage partner. Her work also considers the potential biological outcomes of consanguineous marriage and investigates the reception to congenital physical and cognitive anomalies in ancient Egypt. This book presents the outcomes of a research project. The author holds a PhD in Egyptology and has worked as a lecturer, writer and advisor for television and radio programmes focusing on religion and history.
Domi militiaeque: Militär- und andere Altertümer Festschrift für Hannsjörg Ubl zum 85. Geburtstag edited by Günther E. Thüry. 150 figures; 4 tables; 4 plates (86 colour pages). Papers in German (3 in English). 644 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 68. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695328. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695335. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is in honour of the Austrian scholar Prof. Dr Hannsjörg Ubl. It contains a tabula gratulatoria, a bibliography and 24 contributions covering a wide range of topics. The focus being Greek and Roman, the volume includes papers about the Langobards, renaissance replicas of classical sculpture, and the archaeology of World War I. The 'classical' papers deal with Greek and Roman art and art looting; dogs in Greek and Roman warfare; Roman looking-glasses; erotic inscriptions of Gaulish spindle whorls; military equipment and dress accessories; Roman military history and the non-military archaeology of Raetia, Noricum and Pannonia.

Günther E. Thüry is a lecturer at the Department of Classical Studies at Salzburg University, specialising in Roman cultural history, archaeobiology, epigraphy and numismatics. His bibliography includes some 300 publications, including books on ancient coinage, Greek and Roman environmental history, Roman diet and Roman eroticism.

German Description
Dem österreichischen Archäologen Prof. Dr. Hannsjörg Ubl ist diese Festschrift gewidmet. Sie umfasst eine tabula gratulatoria, die Bibliographie des Jubilars und 24 Beiträge, die sich mit einem weiten Spektrum von Themen beschäftigen. Während ihr Schwerpunkt auf der griechischrömischen Antike liegt, widmen sich Aufsätze von Michael P. Speidel auch den Langobarden, von Kurt Gschwantler renaissancezeitlichen Nachbildungen griechisch-römischer Skulpturfunde und von Rupert Gietl und Reinfrid Vergeiner der Archäologie des Ersten Weltkriegs. Die Arbeiten zur klassischen Antike behandeln Themen der griechischen und römischen Kunst (Claudia Lang- Auinger, Erwin Pochmarski); den Kunstraub im Altertum (Ernst Künzl); den Einsatz von Hunden im Krieg (Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry); römische Spiegel (Lawrence Okamura); erotische Inschriften auf gallischen Spinnwirteln (Günther E. Thüry); militärische Ausrüstungs- und Bekleidungsgegenstände (Thomas Fischer, Christian Koepfer, José Remesal Rodríguez, Bernd Steidl, Paula Zsidi); die römische Militärgeschichte (Martin Mosser, Bernhard Palme, Michael A. Speidel, Zsolt Visy, Ekkehard Weber); und die zivile Kultur der Provinzen Rätien, Noricum und Pannonien (Gerald Grabherr, Renate Miglbauer, Beatrix Petznek, Peter Scherrer, Gerhard Waldherr und Magdalena Waser).

Günther E. Thüry ist Lehrbeauftragter am Fachbereich Altertumswissenschaften der Universität Salzburg. Er arbeitet vor allem über Themen der römischen Kulturgeschichte, Archäobiologie, Epigraphik und Numismatik. Zu seinen ca. 300 Veröffentlichungen zählen Bücher über antike Münzkunde, griechische und römische Umweltgeschichte, römische Ernährung und römische Erotik.
Barbaric Splendour: The Use of Image Before and After Rome edited by Toby F. Martin with Wendy Morrison. Paperback; 203x276mm; 152 pages; 38 figures (30 colour pages). 119 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696592. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696608. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Barbaric Splendour: the use of image before and after Rome comprises a collection of essays comparing late Iron Age and Early Medieval art. Though this is an unconventional approach, there are obvious grounds for comparison. Images from both periods revel in complex compositions in which it is hard to distinguish figural elements from geometric patterns. Moreover, in both periods, images rarely stood alone and for their own sake. Instead, they decorated other forms of material culture, particularly items of personal adornment and weaponry. The key comparison, however, is the relationship of these images to those of Rome. Fundamentally, the book asks what making images meant on the fringe of an expanding or contracting empire, particularly as the art from both periods drew heavily from – but radically transformed – imperial imagery.

About the Editors
Toby Martin currently works as a lecturer at Oxford University’s Department for Continuing Education, where he specialises in adult and online education. His research concentrates on theoretical and interpretative aspects of material culture in Early Medieval Europe. Toby has also worked as a field archaeologist and project officer in the commercial archaeological sector and continues to work as a small finds specialist.

Wendy Morrison currently works for the Chilterns Conservation Board managing the NLHF funded Beacons of the Past Hillforts project, the UK’s largest high-res archaeological LiDAR survey. She also is Senior Associate Tutor for Archaeology at the Oxford University Department for Continuing Education. Wendy’s research areas are Prehistoric European Archaeology and Landscape Archaeology. She has over a decade’s excavation experience in Southern Britain, the Channel Islands, and India.
Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the Archaeology and History of Interaction in European Protohistory edited by Roxana-Gabriela Curcă, Alexander Rubel, Robin P. Symonds and Hans-Ulrich Voß. Paperback; 175x245mm; 164 pages; 60 figures (29 colour pages). Print RRP: £32.00. 641 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 67. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691030. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691047. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the archaeology and history of interaction in European protohistory asks the following questions: How did the ‘Barbarians’ influence Roman culture? What did ‘Roman-ness’ mean in the context of Empire? What did it mean to be Roman and/or ‘Barbarian’ in different contexts? The papers presented here explore the concepts of Romanisation and of Barbaricum from a multi-disciplinary and comparative standpoint, covering Germania, Dacia, Moesia Inferior, Hispania, and other regions of the Roman Empire. They deal with issues such as conceptual analysis of the term ‘barbarian’, military and administrative organization, inter-cultural and linguistic relations, numismatics, religion, economy, prosopographic investigations, constructing identities; and they present reflections on the theoretical framework for a new model of Romanisation.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel served at the Goethe Institute and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) in Romania before being appointed Senior Research Fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and Associate Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the Director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. His academic writings include cultural history and literary studies but focus mainly on ancient history and religion as well as on Roman archaeology. These are geographically centered on the fringes of the Empire and the ‘barbarian’ people who lived there.

Roxana-Gabriela Curcă is Assistant Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania and Director of the Department for Long Distance Learning at the Faculty of History. Her academic papers focus on ancient bilingualism, the language of Greek and Latin inscriptions and onomastics. She has been a visiting professor at a number of universities: State University of New York at Buffalo, UCLA, University of West Alabama (USA); National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Flinders University, Adelaide (Australia).

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main. He is responsible for the Iron Age, Roman and Migration Periods, and for editorial work. He is project coordinator of the ‘Corpus of Roman Finds in the European Barbaricum (CRFB)’. From 1985 to 1991 he was Scientific Assistant, at the Central Institute of Ancient History and Archaeology of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR, in the department of Pre- and Protohistory, at Berlin. He conducts research into the proto-history of Central Europe, and is a collaborator of the CRFB project.

Robin P. Symonds is a specialist in Roman ceramics and author of Rhenish Wares: Fine Dark Coloured Pottery from Gaul and Germany (1992). He was employed as a Roman pottery specialist for the Colchester Archaeological Trust (1981–1990), then for the Museum of London Archaeology Service (1991–2004) and thereafter in France at the Institut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (INRAP), based at Dijon. He retired from Inrap in 2015 and moved with his family to eastern Romania in 2017. He has reported on the ceramics from many different international sites, and has published numerous papers and reviews on aspects of Roman pottery research.
Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus by Paweł Gołyźniak. Hardback; 618 pages; fully illustrated catalogue containing 1,015 figures (in colour). 627 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 65. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695397. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695403. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus deals with small, but highly captivating and stimulating artwork – engraved gemstones. Although in antiquity intaglios and cameos had multiple applications (seals, jewellery or amulets), the images engraved upon them are snapshots of people's beliefs, ideologies, and everyday occupations. They cast light on the self-advertising and propaganda actions performed by Roman political leaders, especially Octavian/Augustus, their factions and other people engaged in the politics and social life of the past.

Gems can show both general trends (the specific showpieces like State Cameos) as well as the individual and private acts of being involved in politics and social affairs, mainly through a subtle display of political allegiances, since they were objects of strictly personal use. They enable us to analyse and learn about Roman propaganda and various social behaviours from a completely different angle than coins, sculpture or literature.

The miniaturism of ancient gems is in inverse proportion to their cultural significance. This book presents an evolutionary model of the use of engraved gems from self-presentation (3rd-2nd century BC) to personal branding and propaganda purposes in the Roman Republic and under Augustus (until 14 AD). The specific characteristics of engraved gems, their strictly private character and the whole array of devices appearing on them are examined in respect to their potential propagandistic value and usefulness in social life.

The wide scope of this analysis provides a comprehensive picture covering many aspects of Roman propaganda and a critical survey of the overinterpretations of this term in regard to the glyptic art. The aim is the incorporation of this class of archaeological artefacts into the well-established studies of Roman propaganda, as well as the Roman society in general, brought about by discussion of the interconnections with ancient literary sources as well as other categories of Roman art and craftsmanship, notably coins but also sculpture and relief.

About the Author
Paweł Gołyźniak works as a Research Fellow in the Institute of Archaeology, Jagiellonian University in Krakow. His research interests include engraved gems (ancient and neo-classical), Roman Republican and Augustan numismatics, history of antiquarianism, collecting and scholarship as well as 18th century drawings of intaglios and cameos and the legacy of antiquary and connoisseur Philipp von Stosch (1691-1757).

Reviews
'... this volume—splendidly produced at an extraordinarily low price for what it contains (and actually free to download in PDF format)—is a book of enduring worth. Gołyźniak deserves our gratitude for writing one of the best books on Roman gems to have been published for a very long time.'—Dr Martin Henig, The Journal of Gemmology, Volume 37, No. 3, 2020
Before/After: Transformation, Change, and Abandonment in the Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean edited by Paolo Cimadomo, Rocco Palermo, Raffaella Pappalardo and Raffaella Pierobon Benoit. Paperback; 203x276mm; 126 pages; 39 figures (8 plates in colour). Print RRP: £30.00. 112 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695991. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696004. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Before/After explores various aspects related to transformation and change in the Roman and Late Antique world through the archaeological and historical evidence. The seven chapters of the volume range from the evolution of settlement patterns to spatial re-configuration after abandonment processes. Geographically the volume aims to cover – through case studies – the enlarged Roman world from Spain, to Cyprus, from the Rhine area borderland to the Red Sea. The book is the result of a workshop organized as part of the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference, held in Rome during March 2016.

About the Editors
Paolo Cimadomo is a Post-Doc Research Fellow at the University of Naples ‘Federico II’ (Italy). His main research interests are the Hellenistic and Roman Near East. He has worked in different areas of the Eastern Mediterranean (Israel, Jordan, Syria, Turkey) and is the author of The Southern Levant during the first centuries of the Roman rule (64 BCE-135 CE) (Oxbow Books, 2019) ;

Rocco Palermo is a Researcher and Lecturer at the University of Groningen (Netherlands), and Associate Director of the Erbil Plain Archaeological Survey (Iraqi Kurdistan, Harvard University). He has carried out extensive fieldwork in the Middle East (Syria, Jordan, Iraq), where he explores the formation and development of imperial landscapes through the archaeological record. He is the author of On the Edge of Empires. North Mesopotamia during the Roman Period (Routledge, 2019). ;

Raffaella Pappalardo obtained her PhD in Ancient History from University of Naples ‘Federico II’ (Italy). As a pottery specialist she has taken part in many archaeological projects in Syria, Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon, where she was in charge of the ceramic assemblages. Her publication record reflects her interest in the socio-cultural role of pottery in the ancient world, and specifically in the period between the Late Antique and the Islamic world. ;

Raffaella Pierobon Benoit is associate member of Arts and Sciences Academy of Naples (Italy), and was Professor of Archaeology of the Roman Provinces at the University of Naples ‘Federico II’ until 2015. She has carried out extensive fieldwork in Italy and directed archaeological projects in France (Anderitum/Javols) and Turkey (Mandalya Gulf Survey). She was Associate Director of the Italian Archaeological Expedition at Tell Barry (Syria) from 1989 to 2004, and Project Director since 2005.
The Urban Landscape of Bakchias: A Town of the Fayyūm from the Ptolemaic-Roman Period to Late Antiquity by Paola Buzi and Enrico Giorgi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 120 pages; 76 figures, 6 plates. 624 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 66. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695670. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695687. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Urban Landscape of Bakchias: A Town of the Fayyūm from the Ptolemaic-Roman Period to Late Antiquity summarises the results of field research conducted on the archaeological site of Bakchias, located in the north-eastern part of the Fayyūm region. Historical, historico-religious and papyrological studies are also presented. The book provides a clear and comprehensive overview of the rise and fall of the kome of Bakchias. The settlement was a thriving centre from at least the 26th dynasty up until the ninth or tenth centuries CE, although with differing levels of economic prosperity and urban development. Equal weight is given not only to the archaeological and topographical aspects but also to the historical and the religious, whilst never forgetting the relationship between the urban settlement and other villages of the Arsinoite nomos, which is famously a peculiar exception in Egyptian geography.

About the Author
Paola Buzi is Full Professor of Egyptology and Coptic Studies at the Sapienza University of Rome and Honorary Professor of the same disciplines at Hamburg University. She is President-Elect of the International Association for Coptic Studies. Since 2002, she has been a member of the Archaeological Mission in Bakchias (Fayyūm ) and co-director of the same mission since 2008.

Enrico Giorgi is Associate Professor in Archaeological Research Methodologies at the University of Bologna. Since 1997, he has been a member of the Archaeological Mission in Bakchias (Fayyūm ) and co-director of the same mission since 2008. He is Director of archaeological projects of his university in Agrigento, Butrint, Burnum, Pompei, Paestum, Suasa and Monte Rinaldo.
Middle Bronze Age and Roman Settlement at Manor Pit, Baston, Lincolnshire: Excavations 2002-2014 by Rob Atkins, Jim Burke, Leon Field and Adam Yates. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300 pages; 104 figures, 89 tables (82 plates in colour). 619 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695830. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695847. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Between 2002 and 2014 MOLA Northampton carried out evaluation and excavation work over an area of approximately 49.65ha ahead of mineral extraction for the quarry at the Manor Pit, Baston, Lincolnshire.

The earliest activity dated to the Neolithic with the first occupation dating to the early Bronze Age, but it was within the middle Bronze Age that significant occupation took place within the site. Part of a large co-axial field system was recorded over an area approximately c800m long and up to 310m wide. Cropmarks and the results from other archaeological excavations suggest the field system continued beyond Manor Pit for c4km and was up to 1km wide. The field system was a well-planned pastoral farming landscape at a scale suggesting that cattle and other animals were being farmed for mass trade.

The site was reoccupied in the early 2nd century AD when two adjacent Roman settlements were established. One of the settlements was arranged along a routeway which led from the Car Dyke whilst the other settlement connected to this routeway by a long straight boundary. In both settlements there were a series of fields/enclosures situated in a largely open environment, with some evidence for cultivation, areas of wet ground and stands of trees. Well/watering holes lay within these enclosures and fields indicating that stock management was a key component of the local economy.

In the later medieval period a trackway ran across the site, associated with which was a small enclosure, which perhaps contained fowl. During the early post-medieval period the land was subject to a final period of enclosure, with a series of small rectilinear fields established aligned with Baston Outgang Road, forming the basis of the current landscape.