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NEW: Proceedings of the 3rd Meeting of the Association of Ground Stone Tools Research edited by Patrick Nørskov Pedersen, Anne Jörgensen-Lindahl, Mikkel Sørrensen and Tobias Richter. Paperback; 203x276mm; 274 pages. 149 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694789. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694796. Institutional Price £9.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Download Full PDF   Buy Now

Ground Stone Tools and Past Foodways brings together a selection of papers presented at the 3rd meeting of the Association of Ground Stone Tools Research, which was held at the University of Copenhagen in 2019. Ground stone artefacts are one of the most enduring classes of material culture: first used by Palaeolithic gatherer-hunters, they are still used regularly by people in many parts of the world to grind, mash and pulverize plants, meat and minerals. As such, ground stone artefacts provide a well preserved record at the nexus of interaction between humans, plants and animals. The papers in this volume focus especially on the relationship between ground stone artefacts and foodways and include archaeological and ethnographic case studies ranging from the Palaeolithic to the current era, and geographically from Africa to Europe and Asia. They reflect the current state of the art in ground stone tool research and highlight the many ways in which foodways can be studied through holistic examinations of ground stone artefacts.

About the Editors
Patrick Nørskov Pedersen is a PhD-student in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Copenhagen. His research specializes in ground stone tool technology, currently focusing on the ground stone assemblages from Shubayqa 1 and 6, two late Epipalaeolithic-early Neolithic sites in eastern Jordan. ;

Anne Jörgensen-Lindahl is a PhD student at the department of Cross-Cultural and Regional Studies, University of Copenhagen. Her PhD project researches the chipped stone assemblage from Natufian-PPNA Shubayqa 1 and 6 (Jordan) using micro-wear analysis to understand the role of the tools in terms of food procurement, processing and disposal during the early stages of the transition from hunting-gathering to agriculture in southwest Asia. ;

Mikkel Sørrensen is Associate Professor of prehistoric archaeology at the SAXO Institute, University of Copenhagen. His main areas of research are prehistoric hunter-gatherer societies of northern Europe and the eastern Arctic, climate change research in human science, lithic technology and the chaîne opératoire approach. ;

Tobias Richter is Associate Professor in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Copenhagen. His research focuses on the material culture, economy, social organisation and development of gatherer-hunter-cultivator-fishers during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene in southwest Asia.
NEW: ArcheoFOSS XIV 2020: Open Software, Hardware, Processes, Data and Formats in Archaeological Research edited by Julian Bogdani, Riccardo Montalbano and Paolo Rosati. Paperback; 174x245mm; 204pp; Illustrated in colour throughout. Papers in Italian and English. 796 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271248. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271255. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

ArcheoFOSS XIV 2020: Open software, hardware, processes, data and formats in archaeological research collects the proceedings of the fourteenth ArcheoFOSS international conference, held online due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The book gathers seventeen papers on three principal topics, the main sessions of the conference: use and application of free/libre and open-source (FLOS) tools in archaeology; creation, use and promotion of open data and open formats in archaeology; and development and customization of FLOS software and hardware solutions for cultural heritage. Forty-one scholars of very diverse age, academic affiliation and geographic location, but all actively involved in the promotion of FLOS culture, open data and open science in digital archaeology and humanities, contribute. The volume is completed by a critical analysis of the contribution of these important annual meetings to the scientific and cultural activity of the ArcheoFOSS community. The opportunity offered by the pandemic-related difficulties to widen the geographical scope of the conference has been further boosted by the decision to adopt the English language for most of the papers, with the hope that this will extend the work of the ArcheoFOSS community far beyond the Italian national borders.

About the Editors
Julian Bogdani is an assistant professor at Sapienza University of Rome, where he teaches Digital Archaeology and Digital Humanities. The main focus of his research is the theoretical and practical issues related to the application of Computer Science to the archaeological and historical domain. He is the developer of Bradypus, a cloud-based database for archaeology. He directs the archaeological mission of Sapienza at Çuka e Ajtoit, a Hellenistic, Roman and Late Antique site in Albania. ;

Riccardo Montalbano is an archaeologist, specialist in ancient topography. He is currently GIS expert and Data Manager at Parco Archeologico di Ercolano (Naples) and Adjunct Professor at the University Uninettuno. As GIS expert, he is involved in several fi eld projects in Italy and abroad, and he is a member of the core team of the SITAR Project (Superintendency of Rome) and a research fellow of MAGOH Project (University of Pisa). ;

Paolo Rosati received his PhD in 2016 from L’Aquila University for research on the economic sustainability of software in archaeology and the development of FLOSS methods in Humanities (philology, archaeology, history, topography). Today he is a researcher at the Sapienza University of Rome as part of the ERC project PAThs (http:// paths.uniroma1.it).
Book Review Section: Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 6 2021 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). DOI: 10.32028/9781789698886-16. Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 6 2021, pp 391-447.ISBN 9781789698886-16. Download Full PDF  

Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 6: Editorial – John Bintliff ;

Method and Theory ;
Farming on the Fringe: Diachronic Changes in Land-Use Patterns and Agricultural Strategies in Ancient Nemea – Christian F. Cloke ;

Prehistoric and Protohistoric ;
The Thessalian Mesolithic: Evidence from Theopetra Cave – Nina Kyparissi-Apostolika ;
Middle Helladic Tombs at Nydri Plain, Lefkas Island. An Archaeological and Paleoanthropological Study – Vivian Staikou, Panagiotis D. Sianis, Despoina Vassou, Nikolaos Psonis, Morten E. Allentoft and George Iliopoulos ;
A New Minoan-Type Peak Sanctuary on Stelida, Naxos? – Tristan Carter, Kristine Mallinson, Vagia Mastrogiannopoulou, Daniel A. Contreras, Charlotte Diffey, Claudette Lopez, Marie N. Pareja, Georgia Tsartsidou and Dimitris Athanasoulis ;
Langurs in the Aegean Bronze Age? A Review of a Recent Debate on Archaeoprimatology and Animal Identification in Ancient Iconography – Julia Binnberg, Bernardo Urbani and Dionisios Youlatos ;
Public vs Private: The Four Categories of Open-Air Spaces at the Late Minoan IIIC Middle Settlement at Monastiraki–Halasmenos (­Ierapetra, Crete) – David W. Rupp ;
Reinterpreting the Diachronic Variations in the Numbers of Burials Known from Early Iron Age Athens – Maximilian F. Rönnberg ;

Archaic to Hellenistic ;
Shedding Light on the Matter: Evaluating Changing Patterns of Object Dedication in Ionian Sanctuaries (7th/6th – 5th/4th centuries BC) with Lexicometrical Analysis – Michael Loy and Anja Slawisch ;
Continuity or Rupture? Further Thoughts on the ‘Classical Revolution’ (2500+ Years after Salamis) – Andrew Stewart ;
Sicilian Theatres with Paraskenia Scene Buildings: An Updated Framework for their Chronological Integration – Maria Panagiotonakou ;
Echoes of the Tragic in the Sacred Landscape of Ancient Salamis: A Geospatial Analysis of Hero Cult – Michael Delacruz ;

Roman and Late Roman ;
Geographies, Institutions, and Agencies: Ceramic and Socio-Economic Regions and Regionality in (Late) Hellenistic-Late Roman Boeotia, Central Greece (c. 150 BC-AD 700) – Dean Peeters ;
Port and Harbour Networks in Crete during Late Antiquity (4th – mid-7th c. AD): A Modern Approach – Konstantinos Roussos ;

Medieval and Post-Medieval ;
Church Construction as a Proxy for Economic Development: the Medieval Settlement Expansion Phase in the Peloponnese – Maria Papadaki ;

BOOK REVIEWS ;

Prehistory and Protohistory ;
Sarah C. Murray, The Collapse of the Mycenaean Economy. Imports, Trade and Institutions 1300–700 BCE / Chrysanthi Gallou, Death in Mycenaean Laconia. A Silent Place /James C. Wright and Mary K. Dabney (with contributions by Phoebe Acheson, Susan F. Allen, Kathleen M. Forster, Paul Halstead, S.M.A. Hoffman, Anna Karabatsoli, Konstantina Kaza-Papageorgiou, Bartłomiej Lis, Rebecca Mersereau, Hans Mommsen, Jeremy B. Rutter, Tatiana Theodoropoulou, and Jonathan E. Tomlinson), The Mycenaean Settlement on Tsoungiza Hill (Nemea Valley Archaeological Project III) – Oliver Dickinson ;
Gioulika-Olga Christakopoulou, To Die in Style! The Residential Lifestyle of Feasting and Dying in Iron Age Stamna, GreeceJohn Bintliff ;

Archaic to Hellenistic ;
Oliver Hülden, Das griechische Befestigungswesen der archaïschen Zeit. Entwicklungen – Formen – FunktionenHans Lohmann ;
Peter van Alfen and Ute Wartenberg (eds) (with Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert, Haim Gitler, Koray Konuk, and Catharine C. Lorber), White Gold: Studies in Early Electrum CoinageKeith Rutter ;
Marta González Gonz
Taymāʾ II: Catalogue of the Inscriptions Discovered in the Saudi-German Excavations at Taymāʾ 2004–2015 by Michael C. A. Macdonald. Hardback; 210x297mm; 264 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 717 2020 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698763. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698770. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Taymāʾ II is a Catalogue which contains all the inscriptions discovered during the 24 seasons of the Saudi- German excavations at Taymāʾ from 2004–15 which were funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The 113 objects carry inscriptions in different languages and scripts, illustrating the linguistic diversity of the oasis through time. Although the majority are fragmentary, they provide an important source for the history of the oasis in ancient and mediaeval times.

The Babylonian cuneiform inscriptions in this volume confirm for the first time the ten-year sojourn at Taymāʾ of the last Babylonian king Nabû-na’id (556–539 BC). In addition, Imperial Aramaic inscriptions dated by the reigns of Lihyanite kings, based at Dadan (modern al-ʿUlā), reveal for the first time that they ruled Taymāʾ at a period in the second half of the first millennium BC.

As well as editing the volume, Michael C. A. Macdonald edited the Imperial Aramaic inscriptions found from 2010–15, plus those in the form of the Aramaic script which developed in Taymāʾ, and the Nabataean, Dadanitic, and Taymanitic texts. In addition, Hanspeter Schaudig edited the cuneiform inscriptions; Peter Stein, the Imperial Aramaic texts found from 2004–09; and Frédéric Imbert, the Arabic inscriptions. Arnulf Hausleiter and Francelin Tourtet provided archaeological contributions, while Martina Trognitz curated the virtual edition of many of the texts recorded by RTI. The indexes contain the words and names from all known texts from the oasis, including those in the Taymāʾ Museum and other collections which will be published as Taymāʾ III.

About the Author
Michael C. A. Macdonald is an Honorary Fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford, and Fellow of the British Academy. He works on the languages, scripts and ancient history of Arabia and directs the Online Corpus of the Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia (http://krc.orient.ox.ac.uk/ociana/). He has been working at Taymāʾ since 2010. ;

With contributions by:
Arnulf Hausleiter is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula. He has been co-directing the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 with Ricardo Eichmann. ;

Frédéric Imbert is Professor at the Institut de recherches et d’études sur les mondes arabes et musulmans, Aix-Marseille University. ;

Hanspeter Schaudig is Associate Professor of Assyriology at the Seminar für Sprachen und Kulturen des Alten Orients at the University of Heidelberg. ;

Peter Stein is Associate Professor for Semitic studies at the Faculty of Theology / Ancient Languages Division at the University of Jena. ;

Francelin Tourtet is a PhD candidate at the Freie Universität Berlin working on his dissertation on Bronze and Iron Age pottery from Taymāʾ. ;

Martina Trognitz is member of the Austrian Centre of Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage at the Austrian Academy of Sciences.
Barāqish/Yathill (Yemen) 1986-2007 Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration / Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies edited by Sabina Antonini and Francesco G. Fedele. DOI: 10.32028/9781789694703. Paperback; 205x290mm; 2 volumes: 398pp & 546pp; 700 figures, tables and plates. Contributions in English, Italian, and French. Chapter abstracts in English and Arabic. 732 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694703. £98.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694710. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The walled town of Barāqish in interior Yemen – ancient Yathill of the Sabaeans and Minaeans – was for Alessandro de Maigret (1943-2011) ‘one of the archaeological marvels not just of Yemen, but of the entire Near East’. Established as an oasis settlement in the semi-desert depression of the Jawf, it became in the 1st millennium BCE a thriving caravan station on the ‘incense’ route and a famed place of worship, controlled by rich rulers and merchants. Topography and trade made it a crucible of South Arabian and foreign traditions, and on several occasions, it was a border town disputed between rival powers. A sustained archaeological effort to investigate the site and area began in 1986 by the Italian Archaeological Mission, led by de Maigret, and developed in two phases. In 1989-1992 the temple of the patron god was excavated, while between 2003-2007 a range of new excavations were undertaken, including a second temple, a sounding, a dissection of the tell's edge outside the Minaean wall, and a cemetery.

Presented across two volumes, Volume 1: Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration is particularly devoted to the temple of god ʿAthtar dhu-Qabḍ (Temple B), dated to the second half of the 1st millennium BCE. Six chapters fully illustrate its excavation, architecture, restoration, findings, inscriptions, and dating. The contribution of this work and monument to regional history transcends its local significance. The report is framed by ten chapters detailing the historiography of research on Barāqish, the initial surveys carried out in 1986-1987, the architecture and restoration of Temple A together with the extramural excavation at the adjacent curtain wall, the cultic equipment, and radiocarbon datings. The nine contributors are leading scholars in the above fields and include recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

The core of Volume 2: Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies is a final report on Area C, an exploratory dissection through the western edge of the Barāqish mound outside the curtain wall, and a unique operation for Yemen until now. Eight chapters detail the excavation, stratigraphy, and geoarchaeology (from about 800 BCE to the present), in addition to radiocarbon chronology, cultural finds, animal and plant remains, economy, major historical events, and unique evidence for trade. Four further chapters offer a glimpse of settlement archaeology for Sabaean Yathill and the survey of a religious centre to the west, together with a first typology of Minaean pottery and an epigraphic and political-historical overview for Barāqish and the Jawf. The contributors are recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

About the Editors
Sabina Antonini heads the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen c/o Monumenta Orientalia (Rome). Since 1984 she has taken part in archaeological surveys and excavations of prehistoric sites in Khawlān al-Ṭiyāl and Ramlat al-Sabʿatayn and of South Arabian sites, including Yalā, Tamnaʿ, Ḥayd ibn ʿAqīl, and Barāqish. She is a specialist in South Arabian archaeology and history of art. Her contribution, ‘The Italian Archaeological Mission at Šibām al-Ġirās, Yemen’, has appeared in Festschrift in honour of Professor Mikhail Piotrovsky (2019). ;

Francesco G. Fedele has been Professor of Anthropology and Prehistoric ecology at the Università di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Naples, until retirement in 2011. As a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen since 1984 he has conducted excavations in Khawlān al- Ṭiyāl and at Barāqish, with a particular focus on site geoarchaeology and archaeofaunas. His recent publications include ‘New data on domestic and wild camels in Sabaean and Minaean Yemen’ in Archaeozoology of the Near East 9 (2017).
New Frontiers in Archaeology: Proceedings of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference 2019 edited by Kyra Kaercher, Monique Arntz, Nancy Bomentre, Xosé L. Hermoso-Buxán, Kevin Kay, Sabrina Ki, Ruairidh Macleod, Helena Muñoz-Mojado, Lucy Timbrell and Izzy Wisher. Paperback; 203x276mm; 308 pages; illustrated throughout (83 pages of colour). Print RRP: £48.00. 127 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697940. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697957. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume is the result of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference (CASA), held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research from September 13–15, 2019. CASA developed out of the Annual Student Archaeology Conference, first held in 2013, which was formed by students at Cambridge, Oxford, Durham and York. In 2017, Cambridge became the home of the conference and the name was changed accordingly. The conference was developed to give students (from undergraduate to PhD candidates) in archaeology and related fields the chance to present their research to a broad audience.

The theme for the 2019 conference was New Frontiers in Archaeology and this volume presents papers from a wide range of topics such as new geographical areas of research, using museum collections and legacy data, new ways to teach archaeology and new scientific or theoretic paradigms. From hunting and gathering in the Neolithic to the return of artefacts to Turkey, the papers contained within show a great variety in both geography and chronology. Discussions revolve around access to data, the role of excavation in today’s archaeology, the role of local communities in archaeological interpretation and how we can ask new questions of old data. This volume presents 18 papers arranged in the six sessions with the two posters in their thematic sessions.
IKUWA6. Shared Heritage: Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress for Underwater Archaeology 28 November–2 December 2016, Western Australian Maritime Museum Fremantle, Western Australia edited by Jennifer A. Rodrigues and Arianna Traviglia. Paperback; 205x290mm; 698 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 666 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916428. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916435. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Celebrating the theme ‘Shared heritage’, IKUWA6 (the 6th International Congress for Underwater Archaeology), was the first such major conference to be held in the Asia-Pacific region, and the first IKUWA meeting hosted outside Europe since the organisation’s inception in Germany in the 1990s. A primary objective of holding IKUWA6 in Australia was to give greater voice to practitioners and emerging researchers across the Asia and Pacific regions who are often not well represented in northern hemisphere scientific gatherings of this scale; and, to focus on the areas of overlap in our mutual heritage, techniques and technology. Drawing together peer-reviewed presentations by delegates from across the world who converged in Fremantle in 2016 to participate, this volume covers a stimulating diversity of themes and niche topics of value to maritime archaeology practitioners, researchers, students, historians and museum professionals across the world.

About the Editors
Jennifer Rodrigues graduated as an archaeologist in Australia before specialising her training at the University of Southampton’s Centre for Maritime Archaeology, England, in 2000, after which she joined the Mary Rose Trust. Upon returning to Australia, she worked as a heritage consultant in Victoria and New South Wales, investigating Indigenous heritage sites, before joining the Western Australian Museum as Curator, Collections Manager then Exhibitions Project Manager over 16 years. She completed her doctorate at the University of Western Australia in 2011, and was Editor of the Australasian Journal for Maritime Archaeology from 2012 to 2015. In 2019 she joined the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as Senior Curator of the Centre for Indigenous Knowledges.

Arianna Traviglia is the Coordinator of the IIT Centre for Cultural Heritage Technology (Italy). Trained as an archaeologist, her work primarily focuses on mediating the inclusion of digital technology within the study of archaeological landscapes, especially waterscapes and lagoon environments. From 2006 to 2015 she held positions as Postdoctoral Fellow in Australia at Sydney and Macquarie Universities, before re-entering European academia as recipient of a Marie Curie Fellowship in 2015. She is Co- Editor of the Journal of Computer Application in Archaeology (JCAA) and currently a member of the Management Committee of the EC COST Action Arkwork, and a PI on the H2020 NETCHER project focused on protection of endangered Cultural Heritage.
EurASEAA14 Volume I: Ancient and Living Traditions Papers from the Fourteenth International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists: Volume I edited by Helen Lewis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 244 pages; 170 figures, 13 tables. (Print RRP: £45.00). 114 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695052. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695069. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

EurASEAA14: Ancient and Living Traditions is the first of two volumes comprising papers originally presented at the EurASEAA14 (European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists) conference in 2012, updated for publication. The aim of the EurASEAA is to facilitate communication between different disciplines, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research. This international initiative aims to foster international scholarly cooperation in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology, art history and philology.

This volume focuses substantially on topics under the broad themes of archaeology and art history, epigraphy, philology, historic archaeology, ethnography, ethnoarchaeology, ethnomusicology, materials studies, and long-distance trade and exchange.

About the Editor
Helen Lewis is an associate professor at University College Dublin School of Archaeology. Her research in Southeast Asia has mostly focused on cave sites in Laos, Malaysian Borneo, and the Philippine island of Palawan, where she co-directs the Palawan Island Palaeohistory Research Project. She chaired the EurASEAA14 Conference in Dublin in 2012.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editorial introduction to EurASEAA14 Volumes 1 and 2 – Helen Lewis ;
Events in the Life of the Buddha: Pagan sculptures in the Hermitage collection and their context in the art of mainland Southeast Asia – Olga Deshpande and Pamela Gutman† ;
A note on two peculiar stone pedestals in the form of atlas dwarfish figures (yakṣas) – Valérie Zaleski ;
Representations of the female in Thai Buddhist manuscript paintings – Jana Igunma ;
Prajñāpāramitā in thirteenth century Java and Sumatra: two sculptures disconnected by textile designs – Lesley S Pullen ;
Islamic calligraphy, re-interpreted by local genius in Javanese mosque ornamentation, Indonesia (fifteenth century CE to present) – Hee Sook Lee-Niinioja ;
Understanding the Champa polity from archaeological and epigraphic evidence – a critical stocktaking – Bishnupriya Basak ;
A tale of two Khmer bronzecasting families, the Chhem and the Khat: how traditional bronzecasting revived in the area around Phnom Penh after the Khmer Rouge (1975-1979), and the expansion and modernization of that tradition in the 1990s: a preliminary report – Jane P. Allison ;
The history and distribution of the free-reed mouth-organ in SE Asia – Roger Blench ;
The ethnoarchaeology of Southeast Asian foragers: resiliency in Ata indigenous knowledge and cultural expression in the pre-Hispanic and Hispanic Philippines – Larissa Smith ;
Megalithic rituals of the Maram tribe of Manipur – Binodini Devi Potshangbam ;
The hidden, unique, bronze battleship from Mt. Dobo, East Flores, Indonesia, assumed to date to the Dong-So’n period – Herwig Zahorka† ;
Kattigara of Claudius Ptolemy and Óc Eo: the issue of trade between the Roman Empire and Funan in the Graeco-Roman written sources – Kasper Hanus and Emilia Smagur ;
Cowries in southwestern China, and trade with India and Myanmar in ancient and modern times – Xiao Minghua ;
The source of the seashells and ivories found in southwest China in the pre-Qin Period – Duan Yu ;
Southeast Asia and the development of advanced sail types across the Indian Ocean – Tom Hoogervorst ;
Mediaeval Fansur: a long-lost harbor in Aceh – Edmund Edwards McKinnon and Nurdin A.R. ;
‘The world turned upside down’: sago-palm processors in northeast India and the origins of Chinese civilization – Roger Blench ;
Bibliography
Farmsteads and Funerary Sites: The M1 Junction 12 Improvements and the A5–M1 Link Road, Central Bedfordshire Archaeological investigations prior to construction, 2011 & 2015–16 by Jim Brown. Hardback; 205x290mm; xxiv+596 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £120.00). 556 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692600. £120.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692617. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

With major contributions by Paul Blinkhorn, Dana Challinor, Andy Chapman, Chris Chinnock, Joanne Clawley, Olly Dindol, Claire Finn, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Sarah Inskip, James Ladocha, Phil Mills, Stephen Morris and Jane Timby.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook extensive excavations during the construction of two separate, but adjacent road schemes, some 4.5km apart near Houghton Regis and Toddington, in south Central Bedfordshire. Taken as a whole, the excavations provide a detailed multi-period dataset for regional and national comparison.

The first evidence for occupation occurred in the middle/late Bronze Age comprising pits and clusters of postholes, including four-post and six-post structures. Two pit alignments, more than 2km apart, also indicate that land divisions were being established, and in the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a significant new settlement emerged in the valley bottom. Parts of a further contemporary earlier-middle Iron Age settlement lay at the top of the valley but neither settlement extended into the Roman period. In the late Iron Age or early Roman period three or four new settlements emerged with occupation continuing into the late Roman period in at least one of these. Of particular interest was the recovery of two significant Aylesford-Swarling type cemeteries as well as a third cemetery which largely comprised unurned burials, including some busta, but with few accompanying grave goods.

In the late 7th-century a small probable Christian conversion open-ground inhumation cemetery was established with burials accompanied by a range of objects, including a rare work box, knives, brooches, chatelaine keys and a spearhead. Parts of three medieval settlements were uncovered including one with a potters' working area.
Public Archaeology: Arts of Engagement edited by Howard Williams, Caroline Pudney and Afnan Ezzeldin. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+270 pages; 82 figures, 5 tables (101 pages in colour). 99 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693737. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693744. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

How should communities be engaged with archaeological research and how are new projects targeting distinctive groups and deploying innovative methods and media? In particular, how are art/archaeological interactions key to public archaeology today?

This collection provides original perspectives on public archaeology’s current practices and future potentials focusing on art/archaeological media, strategies and subjects. It stems from the 2nd University of Chester Archaeology Student Conference, held on 5 April 2017 at the Grosvenor Museum, Chester: Archaeo-Engage: Engaging Communities in Archaeology.

About the Editors
Howard Williams is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester and researches mortuary archaeology, archaeology and memory, the history of archaeology and public archaeology. He regularly writes an academic blog: Archaeodeath.

Caroline Pudney is a Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Chester with research interests in Iron Age and Roman Britain, material culture, public archaeology and applied archaeology.

Afnan Ezzeldin graduated with a BA (Hons) Archaeology degree in 2017 from the University of Chester. Subsequently, in 2018, she completed the MA Archaeology of Death and Memory from the University of Chester, with a thesis focused on manga mortuary archaeology.
Why Did Ancient States Collapse? The Dysfunctional State by Malcolm Levitt. Paperback; 203x276mm;56 pages; 4 tables, 1 diagram (black & white throughout). 93 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693027. £18.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693034. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Ancient states were rooted in agriculture, sedentism and population growth. They were fragile and prone to collapse, but there is no consensus on the causes or meaning of collapse, and there is an ongoing debate about the importance, nature and even existence of state-wide collapse.

Explanations of collapse in terms of the competing mono-causal factors are found inferior to those incorporating dynamic, interactive systems. It is proposed that collapse should be explained as failure to fulfil the ancient state’s core functions: assurance of food supplies, defence against external attack, maintenance of internal peace, imposition of its will throughout its territory, enforcement of state-wide laws, and promotion of an ideology to legitimise the political and social status quo.

To fulfil these functions certain necessary conditions must be met. The legitimacy of the political and social status quo, including the distribution of political power and wealth, needs to be accepted; the state should be able to extract sufficient resources to fulfil its functions such as defence; it must be able to enforce its decisions; the ruling elite should share a common purpose and actions; the society needs to reflect a shared spirit (asibaya) and purpose across elites and commoners who believe it is worthy of defence.

Weaknesses and failure to meet any condition can interact to exacerbate the situation: maladministration, corruption and elite preoccupation with self-aggrandisement can induce fiscal weakness, reduced military budgets and further invasion; it can induce neglect of key infrastructures (especially water management). Inequality, a commonly neglected factor despite ancient texts, can erode asibaya and legitimacy and alienate commoners from the defence of the state.

These themes are explored in relation to the Egyptian Old Kingdom, Mycenae, the Western Roman Empire (WRE), and the Maya. They all exhibit, to varying degrees, weaknesses in meeting the above conditions necessary for stability.

About the Author
Malcolm Levitt held posts as lecturer in economics at Liverpool and Hallsworth Fellow at Manchester University (where his interest in state collapse originated) before joining HM Treasury where he became Senior Economic Adviser. He then moved to the OECD and later served as Chef de Division in the European Commission.

Since completing his MA in Archaeology at the UCL Institute of Archaeology in 2018 he has concentrated on deepening the theoretical basis of his dissertation on why ancient states collapsed.
Objects of the Past in the Past: Investigating the Significance of Earlier Artefacts in Later Contexts edited by Matthew G. Knight, Dot Boughton and Rachel E. Wilkinson. Paperback; 203x276mm; 77 figures, 11 tables (43 pages in colour). 89 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692488. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692495. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

How did past communities view, understand and communicate their pasts? And how can we, as archaeologists, understand this? In recent years these questions have been approached through studies of the extended occupation and use of landscapes, monuments and artefacts to explore concepts of time and memory. But what of objects that were already old in the past? Interpretations for these items have ranged from the discard of scrap to objects of veneration. Evidence from a range of periods would suggest objects of the past were an important part of many later societies that encountered them, either as heirlooms with remembered histories or rediscovered curiosities from a more distant past.

For the first time, this volume brings together a range of case studies in which objects of the past were encountered and reappropriated. It follows a conference session at the Theoretical Archaeological Group in Cardiff 2017, in which historians, archaeologists, heritage professionals and commercial archaeologists gathered to discuss this topic on a broad (pre)historical scale, highlighting similarities and contrast in depositional practices and reactions to relics of the past in different periods. Through case studies spanning the Bronze Age through to the 18th century AD, this volume presents new research demonstrating that the reappropriation of these already old objects was not anomalous, but instead represents a practice that recurs throughout (pre)history.

About the Editors
Matthew G. Knight is the curator of the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age collections at National Museums Scotland and Chair of the Later Prehistoric Finds Group. He specialises in the production, use and deposition of Bronze Age metalwork and completed his PhD on the deliberate destruction of metalwork in south-west England in 2018. He continues to be fascinated by destructive practices across Europe and is currently preparing a monograph on the subject. Matt’s MA thesis concerned out-of-time Bronze Age metalwork and he is frequently distracted by the relationship people in the past held with their own pasts and their treatment of already old material culture in the Bronze Age, or indeed any other time period.

Dot Boughton originates from Germany and is a prehistoric metalwork specialist who now works as a freelancer and translator in Cumbria. Dot did her undergraduate degree at the Freie Universität Berlin and moved to England in 1999, where she completed an MSt (2000) and MPhil (2001) in Anglo-Saxon Archaeology at the University of Oxford. In 2015 she completed her PhD dissertation on Early Iron Age socketed axes in Britain at the University of Central Lancashire. Dot was the Portable Antiquities Scheme’s Finds Liaison Officer for Lancashire and Cumbria from 2005–2017 and the Curator of Archaeology for Lancashire Museums 2017–2018. She worked for Oxford Archaeology (North) as their Finds, Archives and Environmental Officer from 2018–2019. Dot is now a freelance small finds specialist, writing metalwork reports for units and museums. She also translates historical German documents into English and vice versa.

Rachel E. Wilkinson is an archaeologist and numismatist and her AHRC-funded PhD examined the Iron Age metalwork object hoards from Britain (800 BC – AD 100), creating a national database for Iron Age object hoards which examined their contents, regional distribution and interaction with coin hoards. Previous positions during her PhD include Documentation Assistant and Project Curator: Romano-British collections at the British Museum, she currently freelances as a small finds specialist, editor and historical consultant.
Early Maritime Cultures in East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean Papers from a conference held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (African Studies Program) 23-24 October 2015, with additional contributions by Akshay Sarathi. Paperback; 203x276mm; viii+228 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 plates in colour). 66 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917128. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917135. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The East African coast and the Western Indian Ocean are regions of global historical significance. This volume contains papers first presented at the conference, Early Maritime Cultures of the East African Coast, held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 23-24, 2015. Rather than limiting publication to the proceedings of the conference, additional contributions were solicited to expand the scope of the research presented and to place East Africa in its broader geographic and cultural contexts. The resulting volume focuses broadly on East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean and unites the papers under the general themes of movement and connection.

These papers represent a multi-disciplinary effort to examine East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean. Multiple lines of evidence drawn from linguistics, archaeology, history, art history, and ethnography come together in novel ways to highlight different aspects of the region’s past and offer innovative avenues for future research. The papers cover a diverse array of topics, including but not limited to: subsistence, watercraft traditions, trade and exchange (especially concerning the Silk Routes), migration, food ways, and familial relationships. This volume is unique in that it includes some speculative research as well, intended to present novel methods to deal with data-poor topics and to start important conversations about understudied topics.

The goal of this volume is to showcase aspects of the complex cultures and histories of this vast region and to emphasize its importance to world history. Ideally, it will generate scholarly and popular interest in the histories and cultures of the region and bring to the fore Africa’s and the Western Indian Ocean’s important (yet often overlooked) role in world historical narratives. It may also serve as a more advanced introduction to East Africa’s and the Western Indian Ocean’s history of interaction with other regions of the Old World and as a survey of methods used to understand the region’s past.

About the Editor
AKSHAY SARATHI is a graduate student of Archaeology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include the zooarchaeology of maritime adaptations, Indian Ocean trade and exchange, and East African coastal archaeology. More specifically, his current research project focuses on the island of Zanzibar, where he has excavated the sites of Unguja Ukuu, Kizimkazi Dimbani, and Kuumbi Cave. Data from these sites will form the basis of his dissertation, which will examine how dietary preferences changed over time at each site in response to various stimuli over time. He currently resides in Madison, WI (USA) with his two feline overlords.

Reviews
'Overall the book represents a useful resource for those interested in understanding the role of East Africa and the Red Sea in global networks, acknowledges the contribution of hinterland communities in the success of these exchanges, and documents how these networks can be examined from different perspectives.'—Annalisa C. Christie, Journal of Maritime Archaeology, Volume 15 (2020)

'Ultimately, the editor should be commended for pulling together a diverse and compelling collection of chapters. So, too, should Archaeopress be commended for the Access Archaeology initiative, which enables such eclectic volumes to find a publisher and a readership.'—Matthew Pawlowicz, African Archaeological Review, Volume 38, 2021
Eastern Sudan in its Setting The archaeology of a region far from the Nile Valley by Andrea Manzo. viii+82 pages; illustrated throughout with 38 colour plates. 24 2017 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 94. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915582. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915599. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Eastern Sudan, like other regions far away from the Nile valley, has often been overlooked historically on account of a kind of prejudice towards areas lacking in monumental or urban remains or evidence of any literary production. Despite the relevance of the deserts and marginal areas becoming increasingly evident in the last year or so, in Sudan only a few research projects have been conducted in these regions. The ongoing research project in Eastern Sudan by the University ‘L’Orientale’ has provided a preliminary reconstruction of the history of the region from c. 6000 BC to AD 1500. This publication outlines this reconstruction and also considers the more general setting known for the other regions of northeastern Africa. Several issues remain to be clarified and understanding of some phases is still limited, nevertheless it can be safely stated that Eastern Sudan, was in ancient times, as it is now, a crossroads between the Nile basin, Eastern Desert, the Ethio-Eritrean highlands and the Red Sea, represented a crucial region in several respects: the spread of domestic crops and animals towards the Ethio-Eritrean highlands, the spread of the Sahelian crops towards India via the Red Sea and Arabia, as well as the long-distance trade network characterizing northeastern Africa in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

About Bakr Awa Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Peter A. Miglus. Pages 229-239.Download Full PDF  

The site of Bakr Awa (35°13’14”N, 45°56’26”E) situated on the outskirts of the city of Halabja is one of the biggest ancient settlements in the western foothills of the Zagros in Iraqi Kurdistan (AAI 1970, 335 no. 54; AASI 1975-76, map 77 no. 14). It consists of a c. 800 x 600 m large lower city (max. +579 m a.s.l.) and a steep citadel mound (max. +595 m a.s.l.) dominating the plain (approx. +565 m a.s.l.). The citadel is crowned by an earthen parapet wall while the mound is surrounded by a moat dug probably in the Islamic period (Fig.1).
Tell Barri/Kahat (al Hassake) Taken from A History of Syria in One Hundred Sites by Raffaella Pierobon Benoit. Pages 304-308.Download Full PDF  

Tell Barri is located in western Jazira, on the left bank of the river JaghJagh, a tributary of the Habur. The river was fully navigable in antiquity and permitted easy communications as far as the Euphrates. The river supplied water, used not only for drinking but for crops and artisanal activities; cuneiform tablets provide evidence that fishing was also practised. This part of the Jazira was, in any case, favourable to settlements thanks to sufficient rainfall for the development of semi-arid agriculture. Its products, especially grains, combined with intense animal husbandry, notably sheep, formed the mixed economy that seems to have characterized all phases of the life of the site. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
History of Archaeology: International Perspectives Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain). Volume 11 / Sessions A8b, A4a and A8a organised by the History of Archaeology Scientific Commission edited by Géraldine Delley, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, François Djindjian, Victor M. Fernandez, Alessandro Guidi and Marc-Antoine Kaeser. viii+237 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Papers in English and French. 253 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913977. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913984. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Sale: Save 20% on XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) volumes - RRP: £38, Sale Price: £38.

The present volume gathers the communications of the three sessions organized under the auspices of the Commission ‘History of Archaeology’ at the XVII UISPP World Congress, Burgos 2014. The first part deals precisely with ‘International relations in the history of archaeology’. The eleven contributions tackle a particularly productive topic in the field today. In actual fact, this seminal research field currently echoes in a way the strong trend of scholarship about the influence of nationalism on the discipline, which since the end of the 1980s, has greatly contributed to the takeoff and overall recognition of the history of archaeology. The second part, entitled ‘The Revolution of the Sixties in prehistory and protohistory’, is the outcome of a partnership with the Commission ‘Archaeological Methods and Theory’. The seven contributions strive to document and analyse a recent past, which is still often burdened with the weight of teleological and presentist appraisals. The inclusion in this volume of this session significantly dedicated to the genealogy of schools of thought and to the study of complex methodological and technical issues illustrates the editors’ commitment to tackling historical issues as well, which are closely linked to current theoretical debates within archaeology. Such is also the aim of the third part, which addresses ‘Lobbying for Archaeology’. As shown by the five contributions of this session, archaeology has not only been instrumentalised by political powers and ideological interests. It has also found fruitful alliances with economic agents or bodies, where mutual advantages were gained on practical, technical bases. This volume suggests a reflexive, critical approach to these various forms of lobbying should ensure a useful awareness regarding the structural problems archaeology faces today, regarding its funding methods.

About the Editors:

Géraldine Delley (Dr. phil.) is a historian of archaeology. She published Au-delà des chronologies. Des origines du radiocarbone et de la dendrochronologie à leur intégration dans les recherches lacustres suisses (2015). She works in the project History of motorway archaeology in Switzerland (1958-2010) at the University of Neuchâtel. Her research interests concern the history of collaborations between archaeology and laboratory sciences, the epistemology and the politics of archaeology in the 20th century.

ICREA Professor, Margarita Díaz-Andreu is a prehistoric archaeologist based at the University of Barcelona (Spain), where she moved in 2012 after 16 years at Durham University (UK). She has been teaching, supervising PhD thesis and researching on history of archaeology for two decades. Her research interests lay on the relationship between nationalism and archaeology, the history of archaeological tourism and international relations in the history of archaeology.

Professor of prehistory at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Víctor M. Fernández has directed several archaeological excavations: Nubia (1978-1981), Spanish region of La Mancha (1984-1991), Central Sudan (1989-2000), Western Ethiopia (2001-2005) and Central Ethiopia (2006-2014). He published: Early Meroitic in Northern Sudan (1984), The Blue Nile Project (2003), Schematic rock art, rain-making and Islam in the Ethio-Sudanese borderlands (2011), Una arqueología crítica (2006), Los años del Nilo (2011). He is co-author of The archaeology of the Jesuit missions in Ethiopia, 1557-1632 (Brill, in press).

Alessandro Guidi is Professor of Prehistory at Roma Tre University. His research interests include the origin of the State in protohistoric Italy and the history of prehistoric archaeology. In 2011 he organized a congress on the hi
Current Investigations into the Early Neolithic of the Zagros Foothills of Iraqi Kurdistan Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Roger Matthews, Wendy Matthews, Kamal Rasheed Raheem and Kamal Rauf Aziz. Pages 219-228.Download Full PDF  

One of the most significant transformations in history took place after the last Ice Age, from c. 12,000 BC (all dates calibrated BC), when human communities changed from being mobile hunter-foragers to more settled farmers and stock-keepers, with domesticated crops and animals. This Neolithic transformation was a fundamental development in the human condition across much of the world and led ultimately, through surplus accumulation and social differentiation, to the emergence of towns, cities, and empires, shaping the modern world. The full volume is available in paperback here.
In the Neo-Assyrian Border March of the Palace Herald: Geophysical Survey and Salvage Excavations at Gird-i Bazar and Qalat-i Dinka (Peshdar Plain Project 2015) Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Karen Radner, Andrei Ašandulesei, Jörg Fassbinder, Tina Greenfield, Jean-Jacques Herr, Janoscha Kreppner and Andrea Squitieri. Pages 353-367.Download Full PDF  

The Peshdar Plain is situated in the province of Sulaymaniyah, district of Raniyah (also known as Raparin district), in the Kurdish Autonomous Region of Iraq, directly at the border with Iran on the upper reaches of the Lower Zab. The regional centre is the town of Qaladze (Qalat Dizeh), in the northwest of the plain, whose impressive settlement mound (36° 11’ 7” N, 45° 6’ 53” E) demonstrates that the site has held this position since antiquity. The Peshdar Plain Project was inaugurated in 2015 with the goal of investigating the region in the Neo-Assyrian period and focuses on two sites: tiny Gird-i Bazar (36° 8’ 18” N, 45° 8’ 28” E; henceforth Bazar), a shallow mound (altitude: 539 m) of only 1.5 ha situated in the plain, and the more impressive Qalat-i Dinka (36° 8’ 12” N, 45° 7’ 57” E; henceforth Dinka), looming high over the Lower Zab on the imposing terminal outcrop of a crescent-shaped mountain range along the northern river bank. This first report will briefly detail the geophysical survey (section 1) and the excavations (section 2) conducted in 2015 before introducing the bioarchaeological sampling strategy (section 3) and presenting a first assessment of the sites and more generally of the significance of our work in the regional setting of the Peshdar Plain and within the Neo-Assyrian Empire and its client states (section 4). The full volume is available in paperback here.
Magnetic investigations in the Shahrizor Plain: Revealing the unseen in survey prospections Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Simone Mühl and Jörg Fassbinder. Pages 241-248.Download Full PDF  

Prospection by magnetometer in urban environments outside the limits of excavation offers the possibility to unveil the layout of entire settlements, including street networks and residential and other architectural features, without the use of a spade. Questions about city planning, the use of built and open space and the organization of religious and other architecture at sites can all be addressed (cf. Fassbinder 2002; Fassbinder et al. 2005; Benech 2007). Magnetic prospections of sites in the Shahrizor Plain, which have been conducted since October 2013, have the potential to provide insights into the diachronic use of rural space in the region. This paper will focus on the results of investigations which were carried out at Gird-i Shatwan (bečuk – ‘the small mound Shatwan’; SSP-51 & 52), a small Parthian site in the rural environment of Wadi Shamlu in the center of the Shahrizor Plain. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Satu Qala: an Assessment of the Stratigraphy of the Site Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Cinzia Pappi. Pages 297-307.Download Full PDF  

The view of historical developments within the area of Idu, identified with Sâtu Qalâ on the Lower Zāb in Iraqi Kurdistan (Van Soldt 2008), and its hinterland have so far been closely connected to available information on the imperial expansion of Assyria in the region. Through the support of the Directorate of Antiquities of the Kurdish Regional Government of Iraq, an international team consisting of the universities of Leiden (2010-12), Leipzig (2010-14), the Salahaddin University of Erbil (2010-12), and the University of Pennsylvania (2013) was able to conduct several seasons of fieldwork at Sâtu Qalâ. Data from this fieldwork can now provide a much wider historical sequence for the settlement. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
The Crowded Desert: a multi-phase archaeological survey in the north-west of Qatar Taken from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies 46 (2016) by Jose C. Carvajal Lopez, Laura Morabito, Robert Carter, Richard Fletcher & Faisal Abdullah al-Naimi. Pages 45-62.ISBN 9781784913632. Download Full PDF  

This paper introduces the conception, development, and results of the first campaign of the Crowded Desert Project, an archaeological survey of the area of Mulayhah (aka Mleiha), Umm al-Ma in north-west Qatar. The project aims to develop basic research on desert settlement and on processes of nomadism and sedentarization over a long timescale in Qatar. The first season has focused on two areas, the most important of which is the Mulayhah Depression, a geological silt trap with a well, around which there is documented occupation ranging from the Hellenistic period up to the present day. As expected, the seasonal flooding of the depression can offer potential stratigraphic sequences that can be combined with other methods of dating to establish a basic sequence of occupation of the area. In the survey more than 600 features were mapped, including campsites, Islamic and pre-Islamic cemeteries, and mosques of different sizes. This is the first multi-phasic intensive survey of the area in which an attempt to offer a long-term interpretation of settlement patterns has been undertaken. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
SOMA 2013. Proceedings of the 17th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology Moscow, 25-27 April 2013 edited by Sergei Fazlullin, Mazlum Mert Antika. 262 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 5 2015 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912673. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912291. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Papers from the 17th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology, SOMA 2013 held in Moscow, 25-27 April 2013.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

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