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NEW: A Vanishing Landscape: Archaeological Investigations at Blakeney Eye, Norfolk by Naomi Field. Paperback; 205x290mm; 240 pages; 65 figures, 76 plates, 71 tables (colour throughout). 769 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698404. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698411. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A Vanishing Landscape: Archaeological Investigations at Blakeney Eye, Norfolk documents the results of several archaeological investigations undertaken on Blakeney Eye on behalf of the Environment Agency after the decision was taken for a managed retreat of the area. The Eye is a part of the north Norfolk coastline that has been under constant pressure of erosion for centuries.

Excavation revealed evidence for multi-period occupation, with abandonments driven by the ever-changing climate. Neolithic features and artefacts were the earliest remains present. Fragmentary remains of an enclosed 13-14th century farmstead were identified, mainly preserved beneath the two-celled flint building of 16th-17th century date (the scheduled monument known locally as Blakeney Chapel). Archaeological evidence for the function of this building is discussed in conjunction with the documentary sources. The archaeological remains throw light on the trading links between the medieval and post-medieval port of Cley and the Continent, as well as the storms and tidal influxes of the past that resulted in repeated abandonments of the area.

Includes contributions from Kathryn Blythe, Michael Clark, Jacqueline Churchill, Jane Cowgill, John Giorgi, Alison Locker, Adrian Marsden, Graham Morgan, Quita Mould, Andrew Peachey, Sara Percival, James Rackham, Ian Rowlandson, Zoe Tomlinson, Alan Vince†, Hugh Willmott, Jane Young.

About the Author
Naomi Field MCIfA has been a Senior Archaeological Consultant at Prospect Archaeology Ltd since 2011. She was Director of Lindsey Archaeological Services Ltd from 1987-2009, the company that undertook the excavations at Blakeney Eye in 2004-5. Her many publications include the Lincolnshire excavations of an Iron Age timber causeway at Fiskerton and the medieval timber-framed building, Gainsborough Old Hall. She was archaeology advisor on the Lincoln Diocesan Advisory Committee for over 30 years and her present interests are focused on the recording of historic buildings.
NEW: The Shaping of the English Landscape: An Atlas of Archaeology from the Bronze Age to Domesday Book by Chris Green and Miranda Creswell. Paperback; 219x297mm; 134 pages; illustrated in colour throughout. 767 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270609. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270616. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Shaping of the English Landscape is an atlas of English archaeology covering the period from the middle Bronze Age (c. 1500 BC) to Domesday Book (AD 1086), encompassing the Bronze and Iron Ages, the Roman period, and the early medieval (Anglo-Saxon) age. It was produced as part of the English Landscape and Identities (EngLaId) project at the University of Oxford, which took place from 2011 to 2016, funded by the European Research Council.

In this book, you will find maps (produced by Chris Green) and discussion of themes including landscape agency, settlement, foodways and field systems, belief and the treatment of the dead, mobility and defence, making things, and material culture. Alongside are artworks (produced by Miranda Creswell) dealing with similar themes and depicting archaeological sites from across England. The authors hope to inspire and encourage debate into the past history of the English landscape.

Includes contributions from Anwen Cooper, Victoria Donnelly, Tyler Franconi, Roger Glyde, Chris Gosden, Zena Kamash, Janice Kinory, Sarah Mallet, Dan Stansbie, John Talbot, and Letty Ten Harkel.

About the Contributors
Chris Green is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the School of Archaeology within the University of Oxford. He worked on English Landscape and Identities throughout the lifespan of the project. Chris specialises in applications of Geographic Information Systems and data science in archaeology. He particularly enjoys making maps. ;

Miranda Creswell is a visual artist based in Oxford. She is currently Artist in Residence at the School of Archaeology and previously worked within the team on English Landscape and Identities, documenting working methods and also creating the Recording England artworks presented in this book.
NEW: Ramla: City of Muslim Palestine, 715-1917 Studies in History, Archaeology and Architecture edited by Andrew Petersen and Denys Pringle. Paperback; 205x290mm; 332 pages; 320 figures, 8 tables (black & white throughout). 754 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697766. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697773. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ramla presents a comprehensive overview of the history, archaeology and architecture of the city of Ramla from the time of its foundation as the capital of Umayyad Palestine around 715 until the end of Ottoman rule in 1917. It begins with a historical outline covering in turn the early Islamic (Robert Hoyland), Crusader (Peter Edbury), Ayyubid-Mamluk (Donald S. Richards) and Ottoman periods (Matthew Elliot). In the archaeological section, Gideon Avni’s synthesis of the results of excavations on the early Islamic city is followed by discussions of the Umayyad-period aqueduct (Amir Gorzalczany) and the historical interpretation of First World War aerial photographs (Benjamin Z. Kedar). Architectural studies include a complete corpus of the surviving Muslim buildings (Andrew Petersen), a reassessment of the remains of the White Mosque (Michael H. Burgoyne), an account of the Christian buildings (Denys Pringle), and an analysis of late Ottoman alterations to the Great Mosque (Katia Cytryn-Silverman). The final section on numismatics and epigraphy includes chapters on the coinage of Umayyad Ramla (Nikolaus Schindel), the Arabic inscriptions (Mehmet Tütüncü) and late medieval Christian pilgrims’ graffiti (Denys Pringle). The volume concludes with three appendices, including a hitherto unpublished report on the White Mosque (1919–20) by K.A.C. Creswell, a gazetteer of settlements in the Crusader lordships of Ramla, Lydda and Mirabel, and the endowment deed for a house dated 1713 (Maher Abu-Munshar).

About the Editors
Andrew Petersen is Professor and Director of Research in Islamic Archaeology at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David. He is currently directing excavations at the eighteenth-century site of Ruwayda in northern Qatar. He has published many articles and several books on Islamic archaeology, including Bones of Contention: Muslim Shrines In Palestine (2018), The Medieval and Ottoman Hajj Route in Jordan; an Archaeological and Historical Study (2012), The Archaeology of Towns in Muslim Palestine (2005), Gazetteer of Medieval and Ottoman Buildings in Muslim Palestine (2001) and A Dictionary of Islamic Architecture (1998). ;

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013). His detailed historical and archaeological study of the town walls of Byzantine, early Islamic and Crusader Ascalon has recently appeared in Ashkelon 8 (2019).

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
Notes on Contributors ;
Preface ;
Chapter 1: Early Islamic Ramla (715-1099) – Robert Hoyland ;
Chapter 2: The Crusader Town and Lordship of Ramla (1099–1268) – Peter Edbury ;
Chapter 3: Ramla in the Ayyubid and Mamluk Periods (1187–1516) – D. S. Richards ;
Chapter 4: Ramla in the Ottoman Period (1516–1917) – Matthew Elliot ;
Chapter 5: Excavations in Ramla, 1990–2018: Reconstructing the Early Islamic City – Gideon Avni ;
Chapter 6: The Gezer Aqueduct to Umayyad Ramla – Amir Gorzalczany ;
Chapter 7: World War I Aerial Photographs of Ramla – Benjamin Z. Kedar ;
Chapter 8: Muslim Buildings – Andrew Petersen ;
Chapter 9: The White Mosque – Michael H. Burgoyne ;
Chapter 10: The Christian Buildings of Ramla – Denys Pringle ;
Chapter 11: The West Door of the Great (al-ʿUmarī) Mosque of Ramla and its Late Ottoman Transformation – Katia Cytryn-Silverman ;
Chap
FORTHCOMING: Interdisciplinary Research into Iron Metallurgy along the Drava River in Croatia The TransFER Project edited by Tajana Sekelj Ivančan and Tena Karavidović. Paperback; 205x290mm; 284 pages; 146 figures, 8 maps, 20 plates, 30 tables (colour throughout). RRP: £45.00. 777 2021. ISBN 9781803271026. Book contents pageBuy Now

Interdisciplinary Research into Iron Metallurgy along the Drava River in Croatia – The TransFER Project presents the results of the scientific project ‘Production of Iron Along the Drava River During Antiquity and Middle Ages: Creation and Transfer of Knowledge, Technology and Commodities - TransFER project (IP – 2016 - 06 - 5047)’ funded by the Croatian Science Foundation. The research presented explores the evidence for and nature of iron production in the lowland area of the central Drava River basin in Croatia during late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages, from the turn of the 4th to the early 9th centuries. The wide-ranging methodology of the project features non-destructive archaeological site identification (surface survey and geophysics), archaeological excavation of sites with attested bloomery iron production and processing along with their associated dwelling and settlement structures, as well as experimental archaeology. The record of bloomery iron production and processing is explored via an interdisciplinary approach which examines the technology used as well as the natural resources (bog iron ores, wood and plant remains) exploited in the production process. The results of the research testify to the importance and longevity of iron production in the area of the Drava river valley.

About the Editors
Tajana Sekelj Ivančan graduated archaeology at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Zagreb where she also obtained her doctorate in 1999. She is a Scientific Advisor – Second Appointment (permanent position) at the Institute of Archaeology in Zagreb, where she has been leading the TransFER project funded by the Croatian Science Foundation. Tajana's scholarly interests include Early Middle Ages, High Middle Ages, settlements, ceramics, smelting workshops, smelting furnaces, and iron ore processing. Tajana received the Josip Brunšmid annual award of the Croatian Archaeological Society for her monograph Podravina in the Early Middle Ages published in 2012. ;

Tena Karavidović graduated archaeology at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. She is currently a doctoral fellow – research assistant at the Institute of Archaeology in Zagreb, and a member of theTransFER Project research group. Her doctoral thesis is related to technological and social aspects of iron production during late Antiquity and early Middle Ages.
FORTHCOMING: Post-Roman and Medieval Drying Kilns Foundations of Archaeological Research by By Robert Rickett. Edited and with an introduction by Mark McKerracher. Paperback; 203x276mm; 156 pages; 45 figures, 1 table (2 figures in colour). Print RRP: £34.00. 143 2021. ISBN 9781803270708. Book contents pageBuy Now

Drying kilns, corn-dryers and malting ovens are increasingly familiar features in post-Roman, Anglo-Saxon and medieval archaeology. Their forms, functions and distributions offer critical insights into agricultural, technological, economic and dietary history across the British Isles. Despite the significance and growing corpus of these structures, exceptionally few works of synthesis have been published. Yet such a foundational study was produced by Robert Rickett as early as 1975: an undergraduate dissertation which, for the first time, assembled a gazetteer of drying kilns from across the British Isles, critically examined this archaeological evidence in the light of documentary research, and established a typology and uniform terminology for drying kiln studies. This pioneering and oft-cited dissertation is here published for the first time, providing a foundation for the future study of drying kilns in Britain, Ireland and beyond. A new introduction and notes by Mark McKerracher set the original work within the context of drying kiln research since 1975.

Contributor information
Robert Rickett became interested in archaeology while he was at school in Stamford, Lincolnshire. After participating in several excavations, he went to University College, Cardiff, to study Archaeology and graduated in 1975. He worked on excavations in East Anglia before becoming a Research Officer for the Spong Hill Project (North Elmham, Norfolk), from 1977 to 1989. This included excavation supervision, archiving and publication work. Meanwhile his work in education with all age groups inspired him to study at U.E.A., Norwich, and from 1991 he taught in Primary Education. ;

Mark McKerracher is a Postdoctoral Researcher in the School of Archaeology at the University of Oxford, where he completed his DPhil – studying Mid Saxon agriculture – in 2014. After working in museum archiving, software development and freelance archaeobotany, he is currently researching medieval farming practices as part of the ERC-funded Feeding Anglo- Saxon England project (FeedSax). His interests include archaeobotany, database development, agricultural production and Anglo-Saxon archaeology.
FORTHCOMING: The Romano-British Villa and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Eccles, Kent A Summary of the Excavations by Alex Detsicas with a Consideration of the Archaeological, Historical and Linguistic Context by By Nick Stoodley and Stephen R Cosh with contributions by Jillian Hawkins and Courtnay Konshuh. Paperback; 205x290mm; 276 pages; 132 figures, 22 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £45.00.ISBN 9781789695878. Buy Now

The Romano-British Villa and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Eccles, Kent presents a study of the central and lower Medway valley during the 1st millennium AD. It takes as its focus the Eccles Roman villa and Anglo-Saxon cemetery, excavated between 1962–1976 and directed by Alec Detsicas. An account of this important villa throughout its long history is outlined, and a re-assessment of the architectural evidence which Detsicas presented, with fresh interpretations, is provided. In the middle of the 7th century, a large Anglo-Saxon cemetery was established south of the villa. It started as a typical ‘Final Phase’ cemetery but continued into the late Saxon period. The evidence from the cemetery is presented as a site report, with a burial catalogue, a discussion of the grave goods and a study of the wider aspects of mortuary practice. The monograph also includes a chapter on some fragmentary Iron Age evidence and a discussion of an Anglo-Saxon timber building and its relationship to the cemetery. The evidence from the villa and Anglo-Saxon cemetery is discussed within the context of the Medway valley, which highlights the important contribution that Eccles makes to archaeological knowledge. The significance of the area is further investigated by studies devoted to the pre-English place-names of the valley and the documentary evidence of the area during the Anglo-Saxon period. The volume concludes with a general discussion, which draws together all the strands of evidence and evaluates the significance of the Medway valley during the 1st millennium AD.

About the Authors
Nick Stoodley was awarded his PhD from the University of Reading and is currently an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Winchester. His research interests concern the archaeology of early Anglo-Saxon England, with a particular interest in the region of Wessex. He has published monographs on Anglo-Saxon cemeteries and contributed papers on aspects of the period’s mortuary ritual to edited volumes. He is the lead archaeologist for the community-based Meon Valley Archaeology and Heritage Group, which is currently investigating settlement patterns in this Hampshire valley. ;

Stephen R. Cosh is an archaeological writer and illustrator specialising on the Roman period. He is the co-author of the four-volume corpus of Romano-British mosaics and has written numerous articles and specialist reports. He was awarded the degree of D Litt from the University of Reading in 2006.
Living Opposite to the Hospital of St John: Excavations in Medieval Northampton 2014 by Jim Brown. Paperback; 205x290mm; 362 pages; 205 figures, 91 tables (colour throughout). 747 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699364. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699371. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Living Opposite to the Hospital of St John: Excavations in Medieval Northampton 2014 presents the results of archaeological investigations undertaken on the site of new county council offices being built between St. John’s street and Angel Street, Northampton in 2014. The location was of interest as it lay directly opposite the former medieval hospital of St. John, which influenced the development of this area of the town.

Initially open ground situated outside the Late Saxon burh, the area was extensively quarried for ironstone during the earlier part of the 12th century, and by the mid-12th century, a few dispersed buildings began to appear. Domestic pits and a bread oven were located to the rear of Angel Street along with a carver’s workshop, which, amongst other goods, produced high-quality antler chess pieces. This workshop is currently without known parallel. The timber workshop was refurbished once and then replaced in stone by the mid-13th century. During the late 12th and early part of the 13th centuries, brewing and baking were undertaken in the two plots adjacent to the workshop. A stone building with a cobbled floor lay towards the centre of the St. John’s street frontage, and behind the building were four wells, a clay-lined tank for water drawn from the well, and several ovens, including at least two bread ovens and three malting ovens. This activity ceased at around the time that the carver’s workshop was replaced in stone, and much of the frontage was cleared.

Subsequently, although there was still one building standing on St. John’s street in the early 15th century, the former cleared ground was gradually incorporated back into the plots, perhaps as gardens adjoining the surviving late medieval tenement. The stone tenement was extended and refurbished in the late 15th century and was occupied until c. 1600. Another building was established on Fetter Street after c. 1450 but had disappeared by c. 1550. However, this is the first archaeological indication for the existence of Fetter Street, and further demarcation occurred in this period with a rear boundary ditch being established along the back of the Angel Street plot, separating the land to the south. In the 17th–18th centuries, the area was covered by the dark loamy soils of gardens and orchards until the construction of stables and terraced buildings on the site, which would stand into the Victorian period and beyond.
Roots of Reform: Contextual Interpretation of Church Fittings in Norfolk During the English Reformation by Jason Robert Ladick. Paperback; 205x290mm; 182pp; 17 black & white figures, 21 tables, 62 colour plates. 746 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697667. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697674. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Roots of Reform provides a thorough examination of the impact of the English Reformation through a detailed analysis of medieval and early modern church fittings surviving at parish churches located throughout the county of Norfolk in England. By utilizing an archaeological approach along with the written record, a deeper and more nuanced understanding of public worship reveals the theological imperatives of the reformers and conformers. This study compiled data from both rural and urban parish churches which provides a regional approach to engaging the issues of visuality, space and identity. Church fittings were selected based on their liturgical function and propensity to feature decorative iconography. This includes baptismal fonts, screens, wall paintings, and sculptures. Through an extensive analysis of church fittings, this research is the first to suggest that the Bible-centric component to Protestant theology provided the framework which contributed to the success of the Reformation. The religious identity of England was transformed as visual continuity enabled an entire generation to continue their religious experience in a traditional context despite the moderate alteration to liturgy and comprehensive transformation of doctrine. This criterion eased the transition, as liturgical continuity and selective iconoclasm forged a new physical religious environment that retained enough elements to satiate traditionalist. Furthermore, an assessment of post-Reformation innovations reveals the use of vernacular Biblical text as a preferred mode of decoration, with an increase in the use of secular heraldry and commemoration directly on church fittings.

Jason Robert Ladick is an independent researcher and public library administrator in Long Island, NY. Ladick recently completed his PhD and MA in Historical Archaeology from the University of Leicester and MS in Library and Information Science from Long Island University. His research interests lie in the late medieval/early modern period and historical archaeology, with a particular interest in the archaeology of standing buildings and the transformation of religious architecture in the period following the 16th-century Protestant Reformation.
Chios dicta est… et in Aegæo sita mari: Historical Archaeology and Heraldry on Chios by Ioanna N. Koukouni. Paperback; 205x290mm; 330 pages; 18 figures, 6 maps, 125 plates. 743 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697469. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697476. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £54.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Historical Archaeology and Heraldry on Chios presents the results of research into the island’s medieval period, a terra incognita in the contemporary scholarly record. It is the first to be devoted to this topic in more than 100 years, following the publication of the seminal History of Chios by G. Zolotas in the 1920s. The book discusses the archaeology and history of Chios during the Byzantine and Genoese periods, focusing on Mount Amani, the region on the north-western part of the island. Harsh, remote, and poor, Mount Amani is nevertheless surprisingly rich in material for the landscape archaeologist and the student of historical topography, yet unknown in scholarly literature. Different types of evidence—both tangible and intangible—are used to discuss aspects of the local history and culture, from the evolution of the Byzantine settlement pattern, the rural economy, communications by land and sea and the chain of watchtowers, to the genealogy, the prosopography and the insignia of the local aristocracy, with many stone carvings illustrated for the first time.

About the Author
Ioanna N. Koukouni is a medieval archaeologist and expert in Cultural Heritage Digitisation, a graduate of the National & Kapodistrian University of Athens and the University of Birmingham. After holding a European research fellowship, she co-founded the Centro degli Studi sui Genovesi in Oltremare – NPO together with Professors Sandra Origone and Gabriella Airaldi, aiming to promote and disseminate research on the medieval Genoese network overseas.
Santuari e spazi confessionali nell’Italia tardoantica by Alessandro Luciano. Paperback; 205x290mm; 274 pages; 274 black & white figures. Italian text. 742 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697544. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697551. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The cult of relics, encouraged by, among others, the emperor Constantine, Pope Damasus and the bishops Ambrose of Milan and Paulinus of Nola, led to the transformation of the Late Antique Italian landscape, and of suburban areas in particular. The process of gradual enhancement of the martyrs' tombs led to the creation of extensive sanctuaries, generally composed of funerary and cultic buildings, as well as service structures, pilgrims' lodgings and monasteries. The most important sanctuaries, such as those of Saints Peter in the Vatican, Paul on the Ostiense, Erasmus in Formia, Alexander in Nomentum, Felix in Cimitile, Gennaro in Naples, Felix in Venosa, Marcianus in Syracuse, and the Apostles in Concordia Sagittaria, became so popular that they justified Jerome's phrase: movetur urbs sedibus suis et currit ad martyrum tumulos. Between the 5th and 6th century, sanctuaries spread also in rural areas, usually along important roads, as documented by the site of San Canzian d'Isonzo. Analysing hypogeal and subdial contexts, Santuari e spazi confessionali nell’Italia tardoantica outlines the evolution of loca sancta, in a process that led the venerated tombs to become first memoriae, then places of worship and finally articulated sanctuaries. For the first time, the contexts of Rome are organically compared with those of the rest of Italy.

About the Author
Alessandro Luciano works at the National Archaeological Museum of Naples and has a PhD in the Science of Antiquity. His main scientific interests lie in the transition between Antiquity and the Middle Ages. He has published dozens of articles in specialist and popular journals and presented the results of his research at national and international conferences. He has published several books, including further academic studies alongside works of historical fiction.

Italian Description
Il culto delle reliquie, incentivato tra gli altri dall’imperatore Costantino, da papa Damaso e dai vescovi Ambrogio di Milano e Paolino di Nola, ha determinato la trasformazione del paesaggio italiano tardoantico, delle aree suburbane in particolare. Il processo di graduale valorizzazione delle tombe martiriali, infatti, condusse alla nascita di estesi santuari, generalmente composti da edifi ci funerari e cultuali, oltre che da strutture di servizio, alloggi per pellegrini e monasteri. I santuari più importanti, come quelli dei santi Pietro in Vaticano, Paolo sull’Ostiense, Erasmo a Formia, Alessandro a Nomentum, Felice a Cimitile, Gennaro a Napoli, Felice a Venosa, Marciano a Siracusa, nonché degli Apostoli a Concordia Sagittaria, divennero così popolari da giustifi care la locuzione di Girolamo: movetur urbs sedibus suis et currit ad martyrum tumulos. Tra V e VI secolo i santuari si diff usero anche in aree rurali, di solito lungo importanti percorsi viari, come documenta il sito di San Canzian d’Isonzo. Analizzando contesti ipogei e subdiali, il volume delinea l’evoluzione degli spazi santifi cati da reliquie, in un processo che portò le tombe venerate a divenire dapprima memoriae, quindi luoghi di culto e infi ne articolati santuari. Per la prima volta nella storia degli studi, i contesti di Roma sono messi organicamente a confronto con quelli del resto d’Italia.

Alessandro Luciano, nato nel 1980, lavora al Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli ed è dottore
Tres usurpadores godos: Tres estudios sobre la tiranía en el reino visigodo de Toledo by Rafael Barroso Cabrera, Jorge Morín de Pablos and Isabel Mª. Sánchez Ramos. Paperback; 203x276mm; 446 pages; 112 figures (colour throughout). Spanish text with English summaries. 138 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699593. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699609. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Tres usurpadores godos is a study of three famous usurpations of the Visigothic period. It first examines the nature of the uprising of Prince Hermenegild (579-585), the civil war and the complex political context of the time, as well as the important implications of the conflict. The second study deals with the rebellion of Duke Argimundo at the beginning of the reign of Recaredo and the consequences it had on the newly conquered Suebi kingdom. A prominent member of the Aula Regia and doge prouinciae, Argimundus started a rebellion in the province of Gallaecia that could have ruined the political endeavours of Leovigild and Recaredo. Finally, it analyses the figure of Duke Theudemirus, one of the great magnates of the kingdom of Toledo at the end of the 7th century, his actions within the complicated Visigothic political situation and the role he played in the transmission of power between Visigoths and Arabs after the fall of the kingdom of Toledo.

About the Authors
Rafael Barroso Cabrera (Madrid, 1963) holds a degree in Prehistory and Archaeology from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. He is a specialist in studies on the Visigothic kingdom of Toledo, a period to which he has devoted much of his research work and numerous publications. ;

Jorge Morín de Pablos (Madrid, 1967) holds a PhD in Archaeology from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and is director of the Department of Archaeology, Palaeontology and Cultural Resources at AUDEMA. He has directed more than 300 archaeological excavations at different sites in Spain and abroad, with chronologies ranging from the Palaeolithic to contemporary times. ;

Isabel Sánchez Ramos (Córdoba, 1977) holds a PhD in Archaeology, specialising in the historical period of Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Her main scientific interest has been the study of phenomena related to urban societies in transformation between the Roman period and the High Middle Ages in the western Mediterranean, the spaces and architectures of power linked to the elites, and the impact they had on the evolution of urban landscapes.

Spanish Description
Tres usurpadores godos es un estudio sobre tres famosas usurpaciones de época visigoda. Se analiza en primer lugar la naturaleza del levantamiento del príncipe Hermenegildo (579-585), la guerra civil y el complejo contexto político del momento, así como las importantes implicaciones que se derivaron del conflicto. El segundo estudio aborda la rebelión del duque Argimundo a comienzos del reinado de Recaredo y las consecuencias que ésta tuvo en el recién conquistado reino suevo. Destacado miembro del Aula Regia y dux prouinciae, Argimundus inició una rebelión en la provincia Gallaecia que pudo haber arruinado la obra política construida por Leovigildo y Recaredo. Por último, se analiza la figura del duque Theudemirus, uno de los grandes magnates del reino de Toledo de finales del siglo VII, su actuación dentro de la complicada situación política visigoda y el papel que desempeñó en la transmisión del poder entre visigodos y árabes a la caída del reino de Toledo.

Rafael Barroso Cabrera (Madrid, 1963) es Licenciado en Prehistoria y Arqueología por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Es especialista en estudios sobre el reino visigodo de Toledo, periodo al que ha dedicado buena parte de su labor investigadora y numerosas publicaciones. ;

Jorge Morín de Pablos (Madrid, 1967) es Doctor en Arqueología por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid y director del Departamento de Arqueología, Paleontología y Recursos Culturales de AUDEMA. Ha dirigido más de 300 excavaciones arqueológicas en diferentes yacimientos de España y el extranjero, con cronologías que van desde el Paleolítico hasta época contemporánea. ;

Isabel Sánchez Ramos (Córdoba, 1977) es doctora en Arqueología especialista en el periodo histórico de la Ant
Pits and Boots: Excavation of Medieval and Post-medieval Backlands under the Bon Accord Centre, Aberdeen by Michael Roy. Paperback; 205x290mm; 368 pages; 170 figures, 43 tables. 735 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694871. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694888. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Pits and Boots derives from excavations carried out in 2007-8, in advance of an extension to the Bon Accord Centre in Aberdeen, that uncovered the backlands of an area that would have formed part of the industrial quarter of the medieval town. The site is well-dated by dendrochronology, augmented by artefactual evidence, and indicates activity from the late 12th century AD into the early modern period, with a particularly intensive period in the 13th century. Structural evidence consists primarily of the backland boundaries, hearth/ovens, several wood-lined wells and many large pits. It is the contents of these pits and wells which forms the core of this monograph. The waterlogged conditions within the pits and wells has meant that a remarkable assemblage of organic remains including leather, wooden artefacts, textiles, animal pelts, fibres, and cordage has survived. The leather assemblage is the largest ever to be found in Scotland and has revealed a range of activities associated with the use of animal hides, from hide processing to tanning and shoemaking. The wood assemblage is also extensive and includes bowls, platters, coopered vessels and tools. Metalwork, crucibles, clay mould fragments and ceramics all testify to the industrial nature of the area, while the large quantities of animal and fishbone demonstrate that butchery on an industrial scale took place in the area. The excavation charts the changing nature of this once-peripheral area of Aberdeen, from an industrial zone in the medieval period, to horticultural and domestic spaces in post-medieval times, and has thus greatly enhanced our knowledge of Scottish urban development.

About the Author
Michael Roy currently works as a Project manager in the Post-Excavation sector at AOC Archaeology Group. After graduating from the University of Cambridge in 1993 and the University of Leicester in 1994, Michael has worked in archaeology across the UK, working for several years for the Scottish Urban Archaeological Trust and Essex County Council’s Field Archaeology Unit. Joining AOC Archaeology in 2004, he has directed substantial urban excavations in Edinburgh (Parliament House), Aberdeen (Bon Accord) and Dunbar, in addition to working in their Consultancy sector.
Crimes in the Past: Archaeological and Anthropological Evidence edited by Tatyana Shvedchikova, Negahnaz Moghaddam and Pier Matteo Barone. Paperback; 205x290mm; 264 pages; 102 figures, 5 tables. 733 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697780. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697797. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Crimes in the Past: Archaeological and Anthropological Evidence aims to discuss the possible examples of crimes in the archaeological past, their detection and interpretation with the help of modern scientific methods, and how interdisciplinary approaches can be conducted in further research concerning ‘crimes of the past.’ The idea to create this publication was born after organizing Session #169 Past Crimes during the 25th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA 2019) in Bern. In this book, readers will find cases of historic and prehistoric ‘crimes scenes’ known from various contexts, including the findings of (pre)historic (mass) graves and lethal violent acts related to warfare, ritual killings, or possible murder cases. In order to get to the bottom of the possible archaeological crime scenes, contemporary interdisciplinary approaches will be used, which allow us to extend the frames of classical archaeological study.


About the Editors
Tatyana Shvedchikova completed her studies in Social Anthropology at the Russian State University for the Humanities in Moscow. From 2010 she has worked as a research fellow at the Department of Theory and Methods at the Institute of Archaeology, Russian Academy of Sciences. Dr Shvedchikova’s main research interests lie in the fields of forensic anthropology and archaeology, in particular bone tissue degradation processes and multidisciplinary approaches to the study and identification of human remains. ;

Negahnaz Moghaddam completed her studies in Human Genetics and Physical Anthropology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Germany. Since 2017 she has been head of the forensic anthropology research group at the Unit of Forensic Imaging and Anthropology (UIAF) and the Swiss Human Institute of Forensic Taphonomy (SHIFT). Her activities on archaeological excavations, laboratory analyses including stable isotope research, and forensic case work have allowed her to bridge the gaps between various disciplines. ;

Pier Matteo Barone is a full-time lecturer in the Archaeology and Classics Department of the American University of Rome. He teaches Forensic Geoscience with particular regard to geophysical prospections, remote sensing, GIS, and archaeology applied to crime scene investigations and to crimes in antiquity.
Bioarchaeology and Dietary Reconstruction across Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages in Tuscany, Central Italy by Giulia Riccomi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 192 pages; 95 figures, 26 maps. 726 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698657. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698664. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Bioarchaeology and Dietary Reconstruction across Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages in Tuscany, Central Italy presents the results of the first multidisciplinary bioarchaeological analysis to reconstruct living conditions in Tuscany between Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. This was done through the examination of stress markers, including adult stature, periosteal reaction, cranial porosities, and linear enamel hypoplasia, and through palaeodietary reconstruction in order to explore the effects of socio-cultural and environmental factors in a diachronic perspective.

The shift from Classical to Medieval times has long left its mark on the European historical consciousness. Nevertheless, the impact of this transition on living conditions and dietary practices remains a subject of debate, with a prevailing perception of these ‘Dark Ages’ as an impoverished phase following the collapse of the Roman agrarian villa system, particularly in the Mediterranean area. This volume analyses bioarchaeological data from three sites in Tuscany, in the former core of the western Roman Empire and potentially most vulnerable to the major socio-political constraints of the first millennium AD, to provide a corrective view, which begins to show how communities perceived and reacted to changes during the passage to post-Classical times.

About the Author
Giulia Riccomi received an MSc in Archaeology at the University of Pisa and a PhD in Classical Studies and Archaeology at the same institution. As a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Division of Palaeopathology (University of Pisa), she is committed to conducting multidisciplinary research programmes focussing on human bioarchaeology and palaeodiets of Italian Etruscan and Medieval osteological collections. Giulia has several international, peer-reviewed publications concentrating mainly on osteoarchaeology and palaeopathology.
From Edessa to Urfa: The Fortification of the Citadel by Cristina Tonghini. Paperback; 205x290mm; 270 pages; 190 figures, 6 tables, 39 plates (colour throughout). 725 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697568. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697575. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From Edessa to Urfa: the Fortification of the Citadel is the outcome of an archaeological research project focused on a specific monumental area in the city of Urfa: its citadel. Urfa is better known to the general reader by its ancient name, Edessa. Three seasons of fieldwork were carried out (2014-2016), concentrating on the study of the evidence preserved above ground and employing the methods of stratigraphic analysis to identify the building sequence of the citadel and to characterise the various building phases. Transformation of the relative sequence into absolute chronology depended primarily on inscriptions in situ, but also on typological elements (masonry type, decorative elements, specific architectural forms). Data from the written sources also contributed relevant information regarding the development of the fortification works and the establishment of an absolute sequence.

About the Author
Cristina Tonghini (PhD, SOAS, London) is an archaeologist specialising in the Arab world during the Islamic period. Her publications concern the Islamic pottery production of the Levant, the fortified architecture of the Eastern Mediterranean and, more recently, landscape archaeology in Iraq. She teaches Islamic Archaeology at the Università Ca’ Foscari of Venice.
St Gregory's Minster, Kirkdale, North Yorkshire: Archaeological Investigations and Historical Context by Philip Rahtz and Lorna Watts. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 140 figures, 39 tables, 21 plates. 611 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694826. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694833. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

St Gregory’s Minster, Kirkdale, North Yorkshire: Archaeological Investigations and Historical Context is the result of c.20 years of work on and around the Anglo-Saxon church of St Gregory’s Minster, Kirkdale, North Yorkshire. It is primarily concerned with material relating to approximately the late 8th century onwards, detailing the fabric as well as excavations around the church and in the fields immediately adjacent. A succession of three church buildings are linked to a putative focus on the north side of the church, to which, it is argued, pre-Conquest elite burials were orientated. A pre-Conquest ‘building site’ to the north of the churchyard overlay an area of earlier burials. While the building is best-known for its mid-11th century inscription, the report extends the time-period of this isolated site, particularly for the post-Roman to middle Saxon period, but also as an earlier probably religious landscape. The volume integrates archaeological, landscape, place-name and historical approaches to consider the church in its wider setting, exploring the changing character of lordship from post-Roman to Anglo-Saxon and proposing an explanation for the long use of this non-settlement locale.

About the Authors
Professor Philip Rahtz† was founder of the Department of Archaeology at the University of York, where he was primarily interested in equipping students with techniques that would enable them to be able to excavate and produce reports on all periods.

Lorna Watts has worked as a freelance archaeologist since the 1970s.
Offa's Dyke Journal: Volume 2 for 2020 edited by Howard Williams and Liam Delaney. Paperback; 176x250mm; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 2 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698527. £35.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

As the first and only open-access peer-reviewed academic journal about the landscapes, monuments and material culture of frontiers and borderlands in deep-time historical perspective, the Offa’s Dyke Journal (ODJ) has a concerted focus on the Anglo-Welsh borderlands given its sponsorship from the University of Chester and the Offa’s Dyke Association in support of the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory. Yet ODJ also provides a venue for original research on frontiers and borderlands in broader and comparative perspective. While Offa’s Dyke and Wat’s Dyke remain key foci, the contents of volumes 1 and 2 together illustrate the wider themes, debates and investigations encapsulated by ODJ concerning boundaries and barriers, edges and peripheries, from prehistory through to recent times, as well as considerations of the public archaeology and heritage of frontiers and borderlands.

Table of Contents
Collaboratory, Coronavirus and the Colonial Countryside – Howard Williams ;
Two Chimeras in the Landscape – Mark Bell ;
The ‘Wall of Severus’: Pseudoarchaeology and the West Mercian Dykes – Keith Fitzpatrick-Matthews ;
Saxon Kent versus Roman London? Presenting Borderland Heritage at the Faesten Dic in Joyden’s Wood, Kent – Ethan Doyle White ;
Living after Offa: Place-Names and Social Memory in the Welsh Marches – Howard Williams ;
Offa’s and Wat’s Dykes – David Hill ;
Grim’s Ditch, Wansdyke, and the Ancient Highways of England: Linear Monuments and Political Control – Tim Malim
Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History 22 edited by Helena Hamerow. DOI: 10.32028/9781789697865. Paperback; 210x297mm; 140 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 22 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697865. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697872. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £56.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History (ASSAH) is an annual journal concerned with the archaeology and history of England and its neighbours during the Anglo-Saxon period (circa AD 400-1100). ASSAH offers researchers an opportunity to publish new work in an inter- and multi-disciplinary forum that allows for a diversity of approaches and subject matter. Contributions placing Anglo-Saxon England in its international context are as warmly welcomed as those that focus on England itself.

About the Editor
Helena Hamerow is Professor of Early Medieval Archaeology at the School of Archaeology, University of Oxford. Her research interests include the archaeology of northwest Europe from AD 400-1000, Early medieval rural settlements and economy, the archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England, and the links between England and mainland Europe c.400-700.

Table of contents
ForewordHelena Hamerow (Open Access) ;

Human faces with pointed ears: exploring lycanthropy in Early Anglo-Saxon EnglandLisa Brundle ;

A Seventh-Century High-Status Settlement at Long Wittenham, OxfordshireAdam McBride, Helena Hamerow and Jane Harrison ;

Early Medieval Great Hall Complexes in England: Temporality and Site BiographiesChristopher Scull and Gabor Thomas ;

The excavation of a Mid Anglo-Saxon malthouse at Sedgeford, Norfolk: An interim reportNeil Faulkner and Eleanor Blakelock ;

Anglo-Saxon SundialsElizabeth Okasha ;

Sites of Power and Assembly in the Thames Valley in the Middle AgesAlex Sanmark (Open Access)
Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 5 2020 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). DOI: 10.32028/9781789697926. Paperback; 205x290mm; 652 pages; colour throughout. 5 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697926. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697933. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Volume 5 is perhaps the richest and most diverse volume of the Journal of Greek Archaeology so far offered to readers. The editors have kept to the journal's core brief to cover all the major periods of Greek Archaeology in a literal sense, with articles from the Neolithic through Greco-Roman times and the Middle Ages and up to the 19th century AD. Geographically, papers range from Sicily through the Aegean to Turkey.

A major novelty is the inclusion of two Colloquia, one on the economics of Greek Protohistoric to Archaic ‘colonisation’ edited by Lieve Donnellan, the second on Byzantine landscape archaeology edited by Effie Athanassopoulos.

Alongside a wealth of period-based papers on settlements, ceramics, lithics and urban infrastructure, the volume also presents a major report on the nature and future of surface survey in Mediterranean lands, a group article – the fruit of some twenty years of twice-yearly conferences by the International Mediterranean Survey Workshop community.

The review section also ranges through prehistory to the recent past, including the historiography of research which includes and extensive and enlightening (but disturbing) review article by Margriet Haagsma on discrimination against female scholars in early 20th century Classical Archaeology.

Animal Husbandry and Hunting in the Central and Western Balkans Through Time edited by Nemanja Marković and Jelena Bulatović. Paperback; 205x290mm; 198 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 687 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696936. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696943. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Herding and hunting, along with farming, represented the economic basis of subsistence of communities in the past. The strategies of animal husbandry and hunting were diverse and different between communities, whilst they also changed over time. The differences and variations were sometimes caused by local or regional environmental conditions, but were also the result of social, cultural, political, and even religious factors.

Animal Husbandry and Hunting in the Central and Western Balkans Through Time brings new results of research on animal herding and hunting in the central and western Balkans during prehistoric and historic periods. The investigations presented here cover a wide range of topics related to animal exploitation strategies; they range from broad syntheses to specific case studies and, moreover, include interdisciplinary studies that use zooarchaeological and historical data, iconographic representations and modern laboratory analysis.

About the Editors
Nemanja Marković is a research associate, zooarchaeologist at the Institute of Archaeology, Belgrade (Serbia). The focus of his research is the reconstruction of past human-animal relationships, mainly in the field of animal economy, strategies in animal husbandry and palaeopathology. ;

Jelena Bulatović is a research associate at the Laboratory for Bioarchaeology, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade (Serbia). Her research interests focus on zooarchaeology, studying human-animal interrelationships in the central and western Balkans from the Early Neolithic to the Late Iron Age.
Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing Patterns of Travel to the Middle East from Medieval to Modern Times edited by Paul and Janet Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; 422 pages; Illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (91 pages in colour). 686 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697520. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697537. Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing patterns of travel to the Middle East from medieval to modern times comprises a varied collection of seventeen papers presented at the biennial conference of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) held in York in July 2019, which together will provide the reader with a fascinating introduction to travel in and to the Middle East over more than a thousand years.

As in previous ASTENE volumes, the material presented ranges widely, from Ancient Egyptian sites through medieval pilgrims to tourists and other travellers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The papers embody a number of different traditions, including not only actual but also fictional travel experiences, as well as pilgrimage or missionary narratives reflecting quests for spiritual wisdom as well as geographical knowledge. They also reflect the shifting political and cultural relations between Europe and the Near and Middle East, and between the different religions of the area, as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region over the centuries. The men and women travellers discussed travelled for a wide variety of reasons — religious, commercial, military, diplomatic, or sometimes even just for a holiday! — but whatever their primary motivations, they were almost always also inspired by a sense of curiosity about peoples and places less familiar than their own. By recording their experiences, whether in words or in art, they have greatly contributed to our understanding of what has shaped the world we live in. As Ibn Battuta, one of the greatest of medieval Arab travellers, wrote: ‘Travelling — it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller!’

Table of Contents (provisional)
Introduction – Paul and Janet Starkey ;
1. Pilgrimage as Travel – Jacke Phillips ;
2. Ibn Jubayr’s Riḥla Reconsidered – Paul Starkey ;
3. ‘Gardens of Paradise’ – Janet Starkey ;
4. ‘Wady Ghrásheca’: an unknown Christian site in Sir Gardner Wilkinson’s unpublished manuscripts from the Eastern Desert – Jan Ciglenečki & Blaž Zabel ;
5. Exploring the Ottoman Empire: the travels of Peter Mundy (1597–c.1667) in Turkey 1617–1620 – Jennifer Scarce ;
6. With a radius most accurately divided into 10,000 parts: John Greaves and his scientific survey of Egypt in 1638–1639 – Ronald E. Zitterkopf ;
7. Dimitrie Cantemir, the ‘Orpheus of the Turkish Empire’ (1673– 1723) – Cristina Erck ;
8. The Artist William Page (1794–1872) and his travels in Greece and western Turkey in the first half of the nineteenth century – Brian J. Taylor ;
9. Jacob Röser: a Bavarian physician travelling the Ottoman Empire in 1834–1835 – Joachim Gierlichs ;
10. Publishing with ‘Modern Taste and Spirit’ – Paulina Banas ;
11. ‘Mr and Mrs Smith of England’: a tour to Petra and east of Jordan in 1865 – David Kennedy ;
12. Anton Prokesch-Osten Jr (1837–1919) – Angela Blaschek ;
13. William Wing Loring, George Brinton McClellan and Ulysses S. Grant: American Civil War Generals in Egypt during the 1870s – Mladen Tomorad ;
14. Consular Agents and Foreign Travellers in Upper Egypt in the Nineteenth Century – Terence Walz ;
15. A Luxor Room with a View at Pagnon’s Hotels – Sylvie Weens ;
16. Richard A. Bermann, the Desert and the Mahdi: an Austrian writer’s fascination with Egypt and the Sudan – Ernst Czerny ;
17. Unlawful Acts and Supernatural Curses: the fictional traveller in Bram Stoker’s The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903) – Rebecca Bruce ;
Notes on Contributors ;
Index
Racconto d’Egitto: Trascrizione e traduzione del manoscritto di ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī (con brevi note di commento) by Ahmed F. Kzzo and Nikola D. Bellucci. Paperback; 156x234mm; 218pp; 3 maps; transcript of the original Arabic text; translation, commentary and additional material in Italian. 679 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697827. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697834. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Kitāb al-ʾifādah wa al-ʾiʿtibār fī al-ʾumur al-mušāhadah wa al-ḥawādiṯ al-muʿāyanah bi-arḍ Miṣr, by ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī (1162-1231 AD) is a fascinating work; it represents one of the best known and most important manuscripts concerning Egypt during the period between the twelfth and thirteenth centuries AD. The author, through his gaze and with a clear and shrewd use of language and style, describes several characteristic aspects of the Nile country: the landscape, the animals, the plants, the monuments, the boats, the peculiar dishes, without forgetting the effects of the famine, or the misery caused by the ailments and hunger that hit the country between 1200 and 1202 AD.

Translated into German (1790), Latin (1800), French (1810), and more recently into English (1965), there was, until now, still no translation into Italian of this masterful work. This omission prompted the authors to work over a period of several years on the present volume which, in addition to providing the first Italian translation (accompanied by the transcription of the original Arabic manuscript), provides essential and necessary commentary notes aimed at explaining different passages of the manuscript. Some preliminary chapters also attempt to focus on themes, the author and his philosophy in order to provide the reader with a wider image of the conceptions of the period in which he lived and what this description represented and still represents: a masterpiece of realism which continues to stir the imagination in the modern age.

Italian Description
Davanti ad un’opera come quella del Kitāb al-ʾifādah wa al-ʾiʿtibār fī al-ʾumur al-mušāhadah wa al-ḥawādiṯ al-muʿāyanah bi-arḍ Miṣr di ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī è difficile non rimanere affascinati. Esso infatti rappresenta uno dei più noti ed importanti manoscritti riguardanti l’Egitto durante il periodo a cavallo fra il dodicesimo e il tredicesimo secolo d. C. L’autore, attraverso il suo sguardo e con un linguaggio e uno stile chiaro e accorto descrive diversi aspetti caratteristici del paese del Nilo: il paesaggio, gli animali, le piante, i monumenti, le imbarcazioni, le pietanze peculiari senza dimenticare gli effetti della carestia e della miseria dei malanni e della fame che si abbatterono sul paese tra gli anni 1200 e 1202 d.C.

Tradotta in tedesco (nel 1790), latino (nel 1800), francese (nel 1810), e a metà del secolo passato in inglese (nel 1965), di tale opera magistrale non esisteva ancora traduzione in lingua italiana. Proprio tale mancanza ci ha spinto ad iniziare diversi anni addietro tale lavoro che qui si presenta e che oltre a fornire la prima traduzione italiana (accompagnata dalla trascrizione del manoscritto arabo originale) è corredata da essenziali ma necessarie note di commento volte a spiegare diversi passi del manoscritto. Alcuni capitoli preliminari tenteranno inoltre di mettere a fuoco la tematica, l’autore e la sua filosofia al fine di fornire al lettore una più ampia immagine del pensiero del periodo in cui egli visse e cosa rappresentò e ancora oggi rappresenta tale descrizione. Un capolavoro di realismo che tuttavia continua a suscitare la fantasia dei moderni.

Ahmed F. Kzzo è un archeologo specializzato in antico Medio Oriente. Dottore di ricerca presso l’Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, ha partecipato a vari progetti archeologici, tra cui scavi ad al-Bimarestan al-Nuri (Aleppo), Ebla (Siria) e Çatalhöyük (Turchia). È stato Post-doc presso l’Università di Berna ed è attualmente membro del Columbia Global Center Amman (Columbia University). ;

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) e dottore magistrale in Archeolo
El Palacio: Historiography and new perspectives on a pre-Tarascan city of northern Michoacán, Mexico edited by Marion Forest. Paperback; 203x276mm; 314 pages; 143 figures, 52 tables; papers in English and Spanish. 125 2020 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 53. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697964. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697971. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

In the centuries that preceded the European conquest in 1521, the central-northern region of the state of Michoacán, West Mexico, was a place of significant socio-political changes materialized by important transformations of settlement pattern and material culture. The archaeological site of El Palacio (also known as La Crucita or Mich. 23), located in the Zacapu Basin, constituted a major center throughout these regional events. The site has been mentioned in the archaeological literature as early as the end of the nineteenth century, and dispersed subsequent research has documented changes in site morphology, function, and degree of integration into interregional networks of cultural interaction. The present volume offers the first monographic publication about El Palacio. It is composed of a series of eleven contributions looking at both legacy and archive data (1896–1995) and results derived from recent archaeological investigations (2012–2017). The systematic review and analysis of the chrono-stratigraphy, material culture, urbanism, and economic and ritual practices at the site yields critical information that allows discussion of the role of El Palacio and the context of its development at both local and extra-local scales, between A.D. 850 and 1521. Beyond this central concern, this volume provides extended material for cultural comparisons with West, Northwest and Central Mexico during this time period, as well as for broader discussions about the complex social mechanisms involved in the rise, transformation, and fall of premodern urban centers.

About the Editor
Marion Forest received her PhD in archaeology from the University Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Anthropology of Brigham Young University. She specializes in urbanization processes in western and central Mexico. Her current research includes a survey and excavation field project at Teotihuacan and further developments in the integration of LiDAR data in archaeology.

Spanish Description
En los siglos que precedieron a la conquista española de 1521, la región centro-norte del estado de Michoacán, occidente de México, fue el escenario de cambios sociopolíticos importantes, materializados a través de transformaciones significativas en el patrón de asentamiento y la cultura material a escala regional. El sitio arqueológico de El Palacio (también conocido como La Crucita o Mich. 23), localizado en la cuenca de Zacapu, constituye un centro mayor que fue ocupado entre 850 y 1521 d. C y transformado de manera continua a lo largo de su historia ocupacional. El Palacio atrajo la atención de diversos investigadores desde finales del siglo diecinueve y fue sujeto a investigaciones subsecuentes. Si bien las intervenciones en el sitio fueron dispersas, éstas permitieron documentar ciertos cambios en la morfología del asentamiento, su función, y su grado de integración en las redes de interacción culturales a larga distancia. El presente volumen constituye la primera publicación monográfica sobre El Palacio. Se compone de once contribuciones enfocadas tanto en la reevaluación de la información existente del sitio (obtenida entre los años 1896 y 1995) como en el estudio de los datos adquiridos durante las investigaciones recientes (de 2012 a 2017). La revisión y análisis sistemático de la cronoestratigrafía, la cultura material, el urbanismo, y las prácticas rituales y económicas que caracterizan la ocupación prehispánica del sitio, produjeron una documentación que permite discutir el papel de El Palacio y su contexto de desarrollo en una escala local y regional. El presente volumen ofrece, asimismo, un contenido con material extensivo útil para ser retomado en estudios comparativos, sobre todo con respecto a las regiones Oeste, Noroeste y Central de México durante los periodos Epiclásico y Postclásico. Finalmente esta obra contribuye a generar una reflexión en tor
The Later Saxon and Early Norman Manorial Settlement at Guiting Power, Gloucestershire: Archaeological Investigation of a Domesday Book Entry by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 124 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 658 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693652. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693669. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This report outlines investigation of the early manor at Guiting Power, a village in the Cotswolds with Saxon origins, lying in an area with interesting entries in the Domesday Survey of 1086.

Excavation has shown that, during the later Saxon period, a lightly defended compound contained a principal area of habitation, with an adjacent, more open ‘working area’ partly divided by ditched sub-enclosures, perhaps related to subsidiary settlement, or other economic activity. This complex may have formed the main estate-centre for a more extensive land-holding, scattered over the northern Cotswolds, and leased from the king, its last Saxon tenant being one ‘Alwin’, as sheriff of the county a thegn of some standing.

During the major economic and social changes following the Conquest, under a change to Norman lordship, the manorial perimeter was reinforced, and a small apsidal church was constructed within it, now restored as a standing monument. Subsequently, a new complex of manorial buildings was established on a fresh site within the enclosure, the precursor of the present parish church was constructed nearby, with further development of manor and village into the full medieval period.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.
The Archaeology of Medieval Towns: Case Studies from Japan and Europe edited by Simon Kaner, Brian Ayers, Richard Pearson and Oscar Wrenn. Paperback; 210x297mm; 154pp; 111 black & white figures. 649 2020 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694260. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694277. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In recent years, major new archaeological discoveries have redefined the development of towns and cities in the Japanese archipelago. The uncovering of the plans of major port towns such as Sakai, Kusado Sengen and Ichijōdani, and the revealing of early phases in the development of cities such as Kamakura and Hakata provide an important new resource in understanding the cultural and economic processes which shaped medieval Japan.

This fully illustrated book provides a sampler of these findings for a western audience. The new discoveries from Japan are set in context of medieval archaeology beyond Japan by accompanying essays from leading European specialists.

The global significance of Japanese medieval archaeology is assessed through comparing the development of towns in Japan and northern Europe. The medieval period in Japan and northwest Europe saw urban growth with towns not only providing centres of administration but also fostering economic development. The pressures which led to such growth, however, be they political or social, were universal in character. following basic requirements of food, shelter, security and spiritual nourishment, towns provided commercial infrastructures, transport and storage facilities, and the setting for trade, craft specialists and art.

Chapters include ‘The archaeology of medieval towns in Japan and europe: an introduction’ (Brian Ayers and Simon Kaner); ‘Permanent urban frameworks (‘armature’) and economic networks in northern France c.700 – c.1000’ (Henri Galinié); ‘Medieval urbanism and culture in the cities of the Baltic: with a comparison between Lübeck, Germany, and Sakai, Japan’ (Manfred Gläser); ‘The development of Hakata as a medieval port town’ (Ōba Kōji); ‘The establishment and transformation of Japan’s medieval capital, Kamakura’ (Oka Yōichirō); ‘Ichijōdani: the archaeology of a Japanese medieval castle town’ (Ono Masatoshi); ‘Japanese medieval trading towns: Sakai and Tosaminato’ (Richard Pearson); and ‘Medieval ceramic production in the aegean, 1100 – 1600 AD: some considerations in an east-west perspective’ (Joanita Vroom).

About the Editors
Simon Kaner is Executive Director of the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures where he is also Head of the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage, and Director of the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia. His publications include The Power of Dogu: Ceramic Figures from Ancient Japan and An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology.

Brian Ayers served as Honorary Secretary of the Society of Antiquaries of London, and Chief Executive of the Butrint Foundation and County Archaeologist for Norfolk. A specialist in medieval urban archaeology, his publications include Norwich: A Fine City and The German Ocean: Medieval Europe around the North Sea.

Richard Pearson is Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia and Senior Research Adviser to the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures. His publications include Ancient Ryukyu: An Archaeological Study of Island Communities and Ōsaka Archaeology.

Oscar Wrenn is Academic Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures.

Reviews
'...in general, it is superbly translated, well-supported by maps, diagrams, illustrations, and some photographs of the European case studies. The book is accessible without losing detail, and will be of interest to archaeologists and historians of both West and East.' - Philip Garrett, Current World Archaeology #109
Le commerce régional et international au Xe siècle en Syrie d'après le trésor monétaire de Buseyra et d'autres trésors de l'époque by Alaa Aldin Al Chomari. Paperback; 205x290mm; 420pp; 82 figures, 44 tables and illustrated catalogue. French text. 648 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695298. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695304. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The treasure of Buseyra is preserved in the museum of Deir az-Zour in Syria. The coins in the hoard cover a large period from the Sassanian Sovereign Khusrô II (590/1-628) until the terminal date 331H/ 941. These coins offer precious information, not only about a large number of mints but about the periods and quantities of minting activity.

This treasure is important because it is the first complete hoard of the 10th century discovered in the al-Djazīra area. According to Tomas Noonan, the Middle East and Central Asian hoards only amount to ten per cent of the treasures found in northern and eastern Europe and the Nordic countries. In comparing contemporaneous 10th-century silver hoards, and especially the relation between the numbers of coin dies and their representation of their products, we can obtain insights into the flows of money and the balance of payments for each area and each minting city.

Alaa Aldin Al Chomari is a visiting scholar at the Forschungsstelle für Islamische Numismatik, Tübingen University, developing a database for the recording of North Syrian coin finds in a project funded by the Gerda Henkel Foundation. Previously he was Professor of Islamic Archeology and History at the University of Aleppo and at the University of Damascus, Suwaida Branch.

French Description
Le trésor monétaire de Buseyra couvre une grande période étalée de la période du souverain sassanide Khusrô II (590/1-628) jusqu’à l’année 331H/941. La composition générale de ce trésor de 3108 dirhams, dont 531 sont fragmentaires, est la suivante : 3 pièces Sassanides, un dirham Arabo-sassanide, 3 pièces Umayyades réformées, 2 pièces Umayyades d’Espagne, 2762 pièces ʿAbbāsides, un dirham Ṭūlūnide, un dirham Ḥamdānide, 9 pièces Dulafides, 45 pièces Ṣaffārides, 40 pièces banū Bānīdjūr, 201 pièces Sāmānides, 2 pièces Sādjides, 2 pièces Zaydites en Djurdjān, 36 monnaies indéterminées ( monnaies totalement usées ou flans non frappés). Le trésor de Buseyra est l’un des trésors du Xème siècle découvert dans le domaine du califat ʿabbāside qui nous fournit le nombre entier des fragments qu’il contient. Ce trésor est conservé au musée de Deir az-Zour en Syrie. La quantité des pièces qu’il renferme offre d’utiles renseignements tant sur la diversité des ateliers monétaires que sur les années de frappe, dont certaines sont rares, voire inédites. Le fait qu’un grand nombre de pièces ont été frappées au même atelier, permet des observations d’ordre statistique sur la métrologie. Il faut mentionner la grande importance de ce trésor, car il est le premier trésor du dixième siècle, découvert dans la région d’al-Djazīra.
Ricerche Archeologiche a Sant’Andrea di Loppio (Trento, Italia): L'Area della Chiesa by Barbara Maurina and Carlo Andrea Postinger. Paperback; 205x290mm; 316 pages; 366 figures; Italian text. 647 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695366. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695373. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Fifteen centuries ago, the island of Saint Andrew (Isola di Sant’Andrea), located in the basin of Lake Loppio, drained in 1956, was the seat of a fortified settlement, and in the Middle Ages a church dedicated to St. Andrew was built on its top. After sporadic discoveries beginning in the 19th century, in 1998 the Archaeology Department of the Rovereto Civic Museum began a research and study project on the site, comprising a series of summer excavation campaigns. The archaeological investigations, completed in 2017, have brought to light a multi-layered archaeological site with finds ranging from the prehistoric age to Late Antiquity, medieval times and even until the First World War. While the first volume (published in 2016) was about the results of the research concerning the 5th-7th century castrum, this second work takes into consideration the results of the archaeological research in the area of the church (Sectors C and C1).

Contains contributions by Milena Anesi, Maurizio Battisti, Cinzia Borchia, Roberto Cabella, Florence Caillaud, Sabrina Calzà, Claudio Capelli, Simone Cavalieri, Anna Maria Fioretti, Luca Gardumi, Stefano Marconi, Marco Morghen, Michele Piazza, Alberta Silvestri, Eleonora Tomasini, Fabiana Zandonai.

About the Authors:
Barbara Maurina is the Archaeological Conservator at the Rovereto Civic Museum Foundation. Since 1988 she has been part of archaeological campaigns in Italy and abroad, and from 1998 to 2017 she was the excavation leader at the site of Loppio-Sant’Andrea.

Carlo Andrea Postinger is a freelance medievalist who graduated in Medieval Archaeology from the University of Pisa in 1993. At the site of Loppio-Sant'Andrea, he assisted Barbara Maurina in the direction of the excavation of Sector C.

Italian Description:
L’isola di Sant’Andrea, situata nell’alveo del Lago di Loppio, prosciugato nel 1956, quindici secoli fa ospitò un insediamento fortificato e in epoca medievale, sulla sommità, una chiesa dedicata a Sant’Andrea. In seguito a segnalazioni e rinvenimenti sporadici susseguitisi fin dal XIX secolo, nel 1998 la Sezione Archeologica del Museo Civico di Rovereto avviò un progetto di ricerca e di studio del sito, concretizzatosi in una serie di campagne di scavo estive. Le indagini archeologiche, concluse nel 2017, hanno portato alla scoperta di un contesto archeologico pluristratificato, con testimonianze che vanno dalla preistoria all'epoca tardoantica, a quella medievale, per giungere fino alla Grande Guerra. Mentre il primo volume (pubblicato nel 2016) è stato dedicato ai risultati delle ricerche nel castrum di V-VII secolo, questo secondo volume prende in considerazione i risultati delle ricerche archeologiche condotte nell’area della chiesa (Settori C e C1).

Barbara Maurina è conservatrice per l’archeologia presso la Fondazione Museo Civico di Rovereto. Sin dal 1988 partecipa a campagne archeologiche in Italia e all’estero; nel 1998 ha iniziato gli scavi nel sito di Loppio – Sant’Andrea, conclusi nel 2017.

Carlo Andrea Postinger, laureato con tesi in archeologia medievale presso l'Università di Pisa nel 1993, da allora esercita la libera professione come medievista. Nel sito di Loppio-Sant'Andrea ha affiancato Barbara Maurina nella direzione dello scavo del Settore C.
Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 50 2020 Papers from the fifty-third meeting of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held at the University of Leiden from Thursday 11th to Saturday 13th July 2019 edited by Daniel Eddisford. Paperback; 206x255mm; 364 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (127 colour plates). PSAS50 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696530. £69.00 (No VAT). £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £78.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies is the principal international academic forum for research on the Arabian Peninsula. First convened in 1968 it is the only annual academic event for the study of the Arabian Peninsula that brings together researchers from all over the world to present and discuss current fieldwork and the latest research. The Seminar covers an extensive range of subjects that include anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, numismatics, theology, and more besides, from the earliest times to the present day or, in the fields of political and social history, to around the end of the Ottoman Empire (1922).

The 53rd Seminar for Arabian Studies was hosted by the University of Leiden and took place in the Lipsius Building from Thursday IASA. In total sixty-five papers and twenty-three posters were presented at the three-day event. On Friday 12 July a special session on the stone tools of prehistoric Arabia was held, the papers from this session are published in a supplement to the main Seminar Proceedings.
Ecclesiastical Landscapes in Medieval Europe: An archaeological perspective edited by José C. Sánchez-Pardo, Emmet H. Marron and Maria Crîngaci Țiplic. Paperback; 205x290mm; 246 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 651 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695410. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695427. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

By presenting case studies from across eastern and western medieval Europe, Ecclesiastical Landscapes in Medieval Europe aims to start a Europe-wide debate on the variety of relations and contexts between ecclesiastical buildings and their surrounding landscapes between the 5th and 15th centuries AD. The book contains 16 papers dealing with 11 very diverse regions: Transylvania, Western Bohemia, Switzerland, Tuscany, the Po Valley, Central Spain, Galicia, England, Scotland, the Isle of Man, and Ireland. The volume is divided into two main thematic sections. ‘Ecclesiastical Topographies’ comprises works exploring the spatial dimension of ecclesiastical architecture during the Middle Ages, particularly regarding the creation of the parish system and the relationship between churches and cemeteries. In ‘Monastic Landscapes’ medieval monasteries provide an especially interesting case study because of their recognised capacity to modify the surrounding environment. As a result of the convergence of these perspectives, the hope is that this book will offer researchers ample comparative evidence for understanding the universal elements of ecclesiastical landscapes which transcend both chronological and geographical limits.

About the Editors
José Carlos Sánchez-Pardo is Senior Researcher in Medieval Archaeology at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain). His research focuses on early medieval landscapes, with special attention to northwest Spain. He has a Master’s degree in medieval archaeology from the University of Siena (Italy) (2004) and a PhD in medieval history from the University of Santiago (2008). He was a postdoctoral research associate at the University College London between 2009 and 2014; he also led the Marie Curie CIG project ‘Early Medieval Churches: History, Archaeology and Heritage’ between 2013-2017, focussed on early medieval churches in Galicia.

Emmet Marron is Visiting Fellow at the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at Newcastle University. During his Marie Skłodowska-Curiefunded Individual Fellowship he considered ‘The Character of Monastic Landscapes in Early Medieval Europe’ (ChroMoLEME). He interrogated the image, commonly presented in hagiographical texts, that the earliest monastic foundations in the post-Roman West were founded in a ‘desert’ or wilderness location, through the application of landscape analysis and the adaptation of historical landscape characterisation to a continental context.

Maria Crîngaci Țiplic is Senior Researcher at the Institute of Social Sciences and Humanities of the Romanian Academy in Sibiu. She was awarded a PhD in medieval history from the ‘Lucian Blaga’ University of Sibiu in 2008. She has been the author and editor of several monographs, and has contributed academic papers, on the medieval history of Transylvania and church archaeology. Her current research focuses on the spread of Christianity and the medieval church in Transylvania.

Reviews
'This volume includes many interesting and thought-provoking papers that help to expand our understanding of the monastic landscape within Europe.'—Ulster Archaeological Society Newsletter, Winter 2020/21

'The editors have obviously taken great care in compiling a cohesive and comprehensive collection of papers that work towards providing a new academic narrative in the area - an achievement that is to be commended as, unfortunately, that is not always the case with conference volumes.'—Kathryn Krakowka, Current Archaeology, September 2021
Le verre de Sabra al-Mansuriya - Kairouan, Tunisie - milieu Xe-milieu XIe siècle : Production et consommation: vaisselle - contenants - vitrages by Danièle Foy with a contribution by Ian Freestone; preface by Faouzi Mahfoudh. Paperback; 300 pages; 111 figures; French text with abstract in English and Arabic. 650 2020 Archaeology of the Maghreb 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696615. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696622. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Islamic glass and its craftsmanship in the Medieval period are known almost exclusively from Middle Eastern literature. The study of the structures of the workshop and the very rich glass assemblage from Sabra al-Mansuriya (Kairouan), the Fatimid capital founded in 947/948 and destroyed in 1057, proves that Ifriqiya followed the technological evolutions of glass craftsmanship.

An examination of the furnaces and the various artefacts discovered highlights the double vocation of a palatial factory: to produce glass and glazed ceramics. From this particular workshop, installed in the wing of a palace, we found everyday glassware as well as more luxurious types, some with very specific forms, others reproducing models known throughout the Islamic world. These productions are local and imported – distinguished through morphological and chemical analyzes – and form the basis of a first typology of glass used in Ifriqiya from the 10th to 11th century.

Architectural glass, partly made on site, is also abundant. The crown-glass of different colours, used whole or in small fragments, adorned the openwork panel walls with various carvings. The windows and their glass offered a rich polychrome and a complex decorative syntax, reflecting significant technical mastery and the desire to display economic and political power.

About the Author
Danièle Foy is Emeritus Research Director at CNRS, Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en-Provence, France). Her work concerns crafts, trade and consumption of glass in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the pre-industrial period in the Mediterranean area.

Le verre islamique et son artisanat à l’époque médiévale sont presque exclusivement connus par la documentation du Proche-Orient. L’étude des structures de l’atelier et du très riche mobilier en verre de Sabra al-Mansuriya (Kairouan), capitale fatimide fondée en 947/948 et détruite en 1057, prouve que l’Ifriqiya n’est pas resté en retrait de l’essor de l’artisanat verrier. L’examen des fours et des différents artefacts mis au jour met en évidence la double vocation d’une fabrique palatiale : produire du verre et de la céramique glaçurée. De cet atelier particulier, installé dans l’aile d’un palais, sortaient des verres communs et d’autres plus luxueux, certains de formes spécifiques, d’autres reproduisant des modèles connus dans l’ensemble du monde islamique. Ces productions locales et les importations, distinguées par l’étude morphologique et les analyses chimiques, forment la base d’une première typologie des verres utilisés dans l’Ifriqiya des Xe-XIe siècle.

Le verre architectural, en partie fabriqué sur place, est également abondant. Les cives de différentes couleurs, utilisées entières ou en menus fragments, garnissaient des claustras de plâtre très ajourés et aux découpes variées. Les fenêtres et leurs vitraux offraient une riche polychromie et une syntaxe décorative complexe, traduisant une grande maîtrise technique et la volonté d’exprimer un pouvoir économique et politique.

Danièle Foy est directrice de recherches émérite au CNRS, Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en- Provence, France). Ses travaux concernent l’artisanat, le commerce et la consommation du verre dans l’Antiquité, le Moyen Age et la période pré-industrielle dans l’espace méditerranéen. Ses publications sur le verre islamique portent sur le mobilier de Fustat-Le Caire, Hadir et Damas en Syrie et Sharma au Yémen. En Tunisie, elle a principalement étudié le verre d’époque romaine provenant de Carthage, Pupput, Sidi Jdidi et Nabeul.