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NEW: Going Underground: The Meanings of Death and Burial for Minority Groups in Israel by Talia Shay. Paperback; 156x234mm; 106 pages; 16 colour figures, 3 tables. 715 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696196. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696202. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Going Underground: The Meanings of Death and Burial for Minority Groups in Israel is about the attitudes towards death and burial in contemporary society. It provides information on the attitudes of several minority groups living in Israel today, including four communities of Russian Jews, an ultra-religious Jewish community and a Palestinian-Christian community. ‘Going Underground’ has a double meaning: it refers to the actions taken by archaeologists to inquire about the past and present and involves digging and recording. Second, it considers the challenges and protests launched by the groups of immigrants and minorities mentioned in the book, against state-control over death.

About the Author
Talia Shay has a PhD in archaeology from Tel Aviv University and MA degrees from UCLA and UNAM, Mexico. Her research encompasses both early and contemporary periods. She has published articles on art, urban space, general archaeology, and death and burial in several international journals and has co-edited ‘The Limitation of Archaeological Knowledge’. During her academic career, her primary affiliation was with the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology.
NEW: Excavations at Stanground South, Peterborough Prehistoric, Roman and Post-Medieval Settlement along the Margins of the Fens by William A Boismier, Edmund Taylor and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 120 figures, 91 tables. 716 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698442. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698459. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

MOLA (formerly Northamptonshire Archaeology) undertook archaeological excavations at Stanground South between September 2007 and November 2009 on behalf of Persimmon Homes (East Midlands) Ltd and in accordance with a programme of works designed and overseen by CgMs Heritage. The site is situated on the south-eastern outskirts of Peterborough, on glacial tills overlooking along the Fen edge. The works comprised five areas of set-piece excavation and a series of strip map and record areas, targeted on areas of archaeological potential identified by previous evaluation works. In total, an area of 70ha was subject to archaeological mitigation.

The excavations recorded archaeological remains dating from the Bronze Age to the medieval period. The earliest features comprised four burnt mounds dating to the early Bronze Age, one of which was associated with two superimposed buildings and a small group of up to six cremations. In the middle Bronze Age there was a substantial unenclosed cemetery (urnfield) comprising 78 cremations (as well as a further possible three outlying cremations to the urnfield). In the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a substantial droveway, up to 65m wide, was constructed leading northwards from the Fen edge to higher ground. A series of post-built roundhouses were later constructed within the confines of the droveway.

In the middle Iron Age, the droveway was partitioned to form a series of enclosures, within one of which a settlement was established adjacent to the Fen edge. This included roundhouses and a number of two-post and four-post structures.

In the later Iron Age, an enclosed settlement had developed to the north-west. This comprised several roundhouses within a substantial rectangular enclosure, which was open at its southern end. It appears that this began as an unenclosed site, which was later enclosed. Removal of cattle horn for working may have been occurring.

In the Roman period (2nd and late 4th centuries AD) a series of small enclosures were constructed on the eastern side of the later Iron Age enclosed settlement. These contained structures and features apparently associated with rural industry, which may have also exported surplus to market. Industries including the processing of hide, late Roman cheese making (with seven presses recovered), late Roman pottery production and some metalworking.

The economy of the site from the later Bronze Age onwards was focussed on pastoralism, with limited evidence for grain cultivation. During the Roman period, this seems to have specialised further towards dairy farming. The environment of the site seems to have undergone little change from the later Bronze Age, being largely open with areas of woodland and wetter areas. Peat growth during the Iron Age resulted in the covering of some of the Bronze Age features.

During the medieval period, large portions of the site were given over to open field cultivation, evidenced by the remains of ridge and furrow cultivation. The area was partitioned in the post-medieval period by the construction of a series of drainage ditches, which form the basis of the current field pattern.

About the Authors
William A Boismier’s professional background includes four university degrees and extensive fieldwork experience across Eastern and Southern England with archaeological remains ranging in date from the Palaeolithic to the medieval and postmedieval periods. He has published reports and other work in monographs, journals and other peer-reviewed outlets and has written a number of ‘grey literature’ reports, project designs and period summaries. He currently works as an archaeological consultant. ;

Edmund Taylor is a Project Manager for the York Archaeological Trust. He gained his degree in Archaeology from the University of Bradford in 2000 and soon after joined Northamptonshire Archaeology (now Mola Northampton)
NEW: Searching for the 17th Century on Nevis: The Survey and Excavation of Two Early Plantation Sites by Robert A. Philpott, Roger H. Leech and Elaine L. Morris. Paperback; 205x290mm; 238 pages; 118 figures; 14 tables. 711 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698862. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698879. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Searching for the 17th Century on Nevis is the first of a series of monographs dedicated to the archaeological investigation of the landscape, buildings and artefacts of the Eastern Caribbean by the Nevis Heritage Project. This volume presents the results of documentary research and excavation on two sugar plantation sites on the island of Nevis. Upper Rawlins, located high on Nevis mountain, was occupied in the late 17th and early 18th century and abandoned early. Fenton Hill was occupied from the mid-17th to the mid-19th century and originated with an earthfast timber building, probably a dwelling house, later converted to a kitchen and encapsulated in stone about 1700. The adjacent main house was probably destroyed in the French raid of 1706 and rebuilt in timber. The final occupation was by Portuguese Madeiran labourers, who were introduced to fill a labour force shortage in the 1840s.

Detailed reports on the finds assemblage include discussions of the handmade, bonfired Afro-Caribbean pottery made by enslaved African women, imported European ceramics and glass, clay tobacco pipes, metalwork and building materials. The dominance of imported goods from south-western England demonstrates the strong mercantile links between Nevis and Bristol, but local Nevis production of ceramics adds new insights into the estatebased ceramic production on European lines.

Includes contributions by David Barker, Clive Gamble, Jerzy Gawronski, Sheila Hamilton-Dyer, David A. Higgins, Linda Mitchell, Sebastiaan Ostkamp and Jaco Weinstock.

About the Authors
Dr Robert Philpott MCIfA FSA is a researcher at the University of Liverpool, with interests in post-medieval archaeology of colonial settlement in the Caribbean, material culture and the Roman and later archaeology of North West England. ;

Professor Roger Leech MCIfA FSA, formerly Head of Archaeology for the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, now Visiting Professor in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Southampton, has published widely on urban archaeology and architecture, and the historical archaeology of the Caribbean. ;

Dr Elaine L. Morris MCIfA FSA is Visiting Fellow at the University of Southampton (UK) with interests in prehistoric and colonial archaeology in the Caribbean and prehistoric ceramics in Britain.
NEW: Heritage in the Making: Dealing with the Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany edited by Flaminia Bartolini. Paperback; 210x297mm; 158 pages; colour throughout. 5 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698732. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The fifth volume of Ex Novo has the pleasure to host Flaminia Bartolini as guest editor for the special issue titled Heritage in the Making. Dealing with Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany. This collection of peer-reviewed papers stems in part from the successful workshop held at McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge in December 2018 under the aegis of the DAAD-Cambridge Hub. The event gathered several international heritage experts and professionals from both Germany and Italy to explore the complexities of handling Heritage related to Fascism and National Socialism.

The selection of papers contribute much to the debate on the shifting conditions of the reception of dictatorial regimes, and more specifically the fate of fascist material legacies from the aftermath of WWII to the present day.

The second part of this volume includes an additional contribution by Aydin Abar which keeps in with the broad theme of political reappropriation of the past lying at the core of Bartolini’s collection of papers but strays away from their geographical focus by extending the analysis to the exploitation of Achaemenian material legacies in reinforcing nationalist narratives in nineteenth and twentieth century Iran.
NEW: Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past. Volume 2 A biography of a Soviet archaeologist (1960s – 1980s) by A. K. Konopatskii, translated by Richard L. Bland and Yaroslav V. Kuzmin. Paperback; 148x210mm; 576 pages; 29 figures. 705 2021 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697070. £34.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697087. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past (Volume II) is about the life and works of Aleksei P. Okladnikov (1908–1981), a prominent archaeologist who spent more than 50 years studying prehistoric sites in various parts of the Soviet Union and in Mongolia. This part of Okladnikov’s biography concentrates on his works in 1961–1981, when he was organiser (1961–1966) and since 1966 the Director of the Institute of History, Philology, and Philosophy, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences, in Novosibirsk. This institute was a part of large-scale project of Akademgorodok (Academic Town) built in 1957– 1964, the unique phenomenon of Soviet science. In Novosibirsk, Okladnikov continued active fieldworks in Siberia, Russian Far East, Central Asia and Mongolia, and writing of books and articles on different subjects of archaeology and history. He also created the Novosibirsk school of archaeologists who continue to work in Siberia and the neighbouring regions of Asia until today. In 1974, Okladnikov with four colleagues participated in joint US–Soviet expedition to the Aleutian Islands, where W. S. Laughlin and he directed the excavations of early sites. The book is for archaeologists, historians, and everyone who is interested in the history of scholarship (particularly the humanities) in the twentieth century.

About the Contributors
Aleksander K. Konopatskii joined the Institute of History, Philology and Philosophy, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences in 1972 where he was closely associated with Aleksei P. Okladnikov, assisting in fieldwork, travel and the preparation of scientific reports. Since 1998 he has been an assistant professor at the Novosibirsk General Military Academy where he teaches humanities. ;

Richard L. Bland studied Alaskan prehistory in the 1970s – 1990s (PhD 1996, University of Oregon). He has translated numerous books and articles on the archaeology of Northeastern Siberia and the Russian Far East, helping to bring the rich Soviet/Russian records of prehistory and early history to the international scholarly community. ;

Yaroslav V. Kuzmin has been studying geoarchaeology of the Russian Far East, Siberia and neighbouring Northeast Asia since 1979 (PhD 1991; DSc. 2007). He has also assisted in translating and editing books on the archaeology of eastern Russia.
NEW: The World of Disney: From Antiquarianism to Archaeology by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 156x234mm; 154 pages; 44 figures. 700 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698275. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698282. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dr John Disney (1779-1857) was the benefactor of the first chair in archaeology at a British university. He also donated his major collection to the University of Cambridge. The sculptures continue to be displayed in the Fitzwilliam Museum.

The Disney family traced its origins back to the Norman invasion of England, and the family home was at Norton Disney in Lincolnshire. Disney’s father, the Reverend John Disney DD (1746-1816) left the Church of England to become a minister at the Unitarian Essex Street Chapel in London. A major sponsor of the chapel was Thomas Brand-Hollis of The Hyde, Essex, who bequeathed the house and his Grand Tour collection (formed with Thomas Hollis) on his death in 1804 to the Reverend John Disney. Disney inherited part of the classical collection of his uncle and father-in-law Lewis Disney-Ffytche, owner of the 18th century pleasure gardens, Le Désert de Retz, outside Paris. Disney’s brother-in-law was Sir William Hillary, founder of the RNLI. Disney was instrumental in the creation of the Chelmsford Museum through the Chelmsford Philosophical Society, and the formation of the Essex Archaeological Society.

About the Author
Professor David Gill is Honorary Professor in the Centre for Heritage at the University of Kent, and Academic Associate in the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage in the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures at the University of East Anglia (UEA). He is a Fellow of the RSA and the Society of Antiquaries. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.
NEW: Vernacular Buildings and Urban Social Practice: Wood and People in Early Modern Swedish Society by Andrine Nilsen. Paperback; 205x290mm; 336 pages; illustrated throughout. 698 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696776. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696783. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Wooden buildings housed the majority of Swedish urban populations during the early modern era, but many of these buildings have disappeared as the result of fire, demolition, and modernisation. They were built during periods of urban transformation; disdained for their rural look and for the fire hazard they represented they were nevertheless valued for being warm, affordable and movable. This study reveals the fundamental role played by the wooden house in the formation of urban Sweden and Swedish history. Wooden buildings were particularly suited to mass production and relocation, which helped to realise the ideal town plan in the transformation of Swedish urban space. Early modern wooden houses feature more as archaeological remains and less as preserved buildings every year, thus examination and comparison of these two distinct datasets combined with historical records is important in this study. The author establishes how log construction, timber framing and post and plank buildings were used for a wide range of functions in both central and peripheral locations, and within all strata of society. New strategies were developed to create affordable warm housing while the housing stock featured both change and continuity of layout; the storeyed house contributed to evolution of the multiple unit structure. Surprisingly, this study establishes that timber-framing was more prevalent geographically and functionally than previous research indicated.

About the Author
Andrine Nilsen has historical urban buildings archaeology as a special interest and undertook her doctoral studies at the Department of Historical Studies at the University of Gothenburg. Before this she worked in the project The early modern town - between the local and the global publishing on the subject of medieval wooden houses and early modern town plans.
The Land of the Anka Bird A Journey through the Turkic Heartlands by Caroline Eden, Photography by Ergun Çağatay. Paperback; 240x240mm; 152 pages; full colour photography throughout.ISBN 9780995756625. £25.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The Land of the Anka Bird: A journey through the Turkic heartland is a reflective visual essay introducing the powerful photographs of Ergun Çağatay. The book explores the cultural landscape and geography of the vast Turkic-speaking lands, from the mercantile cities of Uzbekistan to little-explored pockets of the Baltic. It is clear that while divided by distance, the diverse Turkic share far more than a linguistic heritage. Deep cultural connections highlight great mobility across many landscapes and centuries. Spanning both the nomadic and settled worlds, this book challenges assumptions about an intriguing swathe of our planet while celebrating its wildly varied traditions and environment.

About the Contributors
Caroline Eden is a writer contributing to the travel, food and arts pages of the Guardian, Financial Times and the Times Literary Supplement. The author of two books, Samarkand (Kyle Books, 2016) and Black Sea (Quadrille, 2018), she is currently working on a new travelogue with recipes entitled Red Sands to be published by Quadrille in autumn 2020. Twitter and Instagram: @edentravels.

Ergun Çağatay (1937–2018) began working on Central Asia in 1993 as a photographer after surviving a near-fatal bomb attack in Paris ten years earlier. Over the following decade, he travelled more than 100,000 miles and took more than 40,000 photographs, from Lithuania in the west to Yakutia in eastern Siberia. These became the basis of ‘The Turkic Speaking Peoples: 2,000 Years of Art and Culture from Inner Asia to the Balkans’ (Prestel, 2006), a book that combined his images with scholarly essays on the history, culture, cuisine and landscape of the broader Turkic world. His photographs, most of them unpublished, form a unique archive for anyone wishing to understand the complexities of Central Asia and the vast surrounding region since the Cold War. Çağatay died in 2018, just as he was embarking on a project to capture the Crimean Tatars, the peoples of the Balkans and the Uighurs of western China.
Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing Patterns of Travel to the Middle East from Medieval to Modern Times edited by Paul and Janet Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; 422 pages; Illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (91 pages in colour). 686 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697520. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697537. Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing patterns of travel to the Middle East from medieval to modern times comprises a varied collection of seventeen papers presented at the biennial conference of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) held in York in July 2019, which together will provide the reader with a fascinating introduction to travel in and to the Middle East over more than a thousand years.

As in previous ASTENE volumes, the material presented ranges widely, from Ancient Egyptian sites through medieval pilgrims to tourists and other travellers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The papers embody a number of different traditions, including not only actual but also fictional travel experiences, as well as pilgrimage or missionary narratives reflecting quests for spiritual wisdom as well as geographical knowledge. They also reflect the shifting political and cultural relations between Europe and the Near and Middle East, and between the different religions of the area, as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region over the centuries. The men and women travellers discussed travelled for a wide variety of reasons — religious, commercial, military, diplomatic, or sometimes even just for a holiday! — but whatever their primary motivations, they were almost always also inspired by a sense of curiosity about peoples and places less familiar than their own. By recording their experiences, whether in words or in art, they have greatly contributed to our understanding of what has shaped the world we live in. As Ibn Battuta, one of the greatest of medieval Arab travellers, wrote: ‘Travelling — it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller!’

Table of Contents (provisional)
Introduction – Paul and Janet Starkey ;
1. Pilgrimage as Travel – Jacke Phillips ;
2. Ibn Jubayr’s Riḥla Reconsidered – Paul Starkey ;
3. ‘Gardens of Paradise’ – Janet Starkey ;
4. ‘Wady Ghrásheca’: an unknown Christian site in Sir Gardner Wilkinson’s unpublished manuscripts from the Eastern Desert – Jan Ciglenečki & Blaž Zabel ;
5. Exploring the Ottoman Empire: the travels of Peter Mundy (1597–c.1667) in Turkey 1617–1620 – Jennifer Scarce ;
6. With a radius most accurately divided into 10,000 parts: John Greaves and his scientific survey of Egypt in 1638–1639 – Ronald E. Zitterkopf ;
7. Dimitrie Cantemir, the ‘Orpheus of the Turkish Empire’ (1673– 1723) – Cristina Erck ;
8. The Artist William Page (1794–1872) and his travels in Greece and western Turkey in the first half of the nineteenth century – Brian J. Taylor ;
9. Jacob Röser: a Bavarian physician travelling the Ottoman Empire in 1834–1835 – Joachim Gierlichs ;
10. Publishing with ‘Modern Taste and Spirit’ – Paulina Banas ;
11. ‘Mr and Mrs Smith of England’: a tour to Petra and east of Jordan in 1865 – David Kennedy ;
12. Anton Prokesch-Osten Jr (1837–1919) – Angela Blaschek ;
13. William Wing Loring, George Brinton McClellan and Ulysses S. Grant: American Civil War Generals in Egypt during the 1870s – Mladen Tomorad ;
14. Consular Agents and Foreign Travellers in Upper Egypt in the Nineteenth Century – Terence Walz ;
15. A Luxor Room with a View at Pagnon’s Hotels – Sylvie Weens ;
16. Richard A. Bermann, the Desert and the Mahdi: an Austrian writer’s fascination with Egypt and the Sudan – Ernst Czerny ;
17. Unlawful Acts and Supernatural Curses: the fictional traveller in Bram Stoker’s The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903) – Rebecca Bruce ;
Notes on Contributors ;
Index
Lost Worlds of Ancient and Modern Greece Gilbert Bagnani: The Adventures of a Young Italo-Canadian Archaeologist in Greece, 1921-1924 by D. J. Ian Begg. Hardback; 380pp; 14 figures; 5 maps. 604 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694529. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694536. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

By day, young Gilbert Bagnani studied archaeology in Greece, but by night he socialised with the elite of Athenian society. Secretly writing for the Morning Post in London, he witnessed both antebellum Athens in 1921 and the catastrophic collapse of Christian civilisation in western Anatolia in 1922. While there have been many accounts by refugees of the disastrous flight from Smyrna, few have been written from the perspective of the west side of the Aegean. The flood of a million refugees to Greece brought in its wake a military coup in Athens, the exile of the Greek royal family and the execution or imprisonment of politicians, whom Gilbert knew.

Gilbert’s weekly letters to his mother in Rome reveal his Odyssey-like adventures on a voyage of discovery through the origins of western civilisation. As an archaeologist in Greece, he travelled through time seeing history repeat itself: Minoan Knossos, Byzantine Constantinople and Ottoman Smyrna were all violently destroyed, but the survivors escaped to the new worlds of Mycenaean Greece, Renaissance Venice and modern Greece.

At Smyrna in the twentieth century, history was written not only by the victors but was also recorded by the victims. At the same time, however, the twentieth century itself was so filled with reports of ethnic cleansings on such a scale that the reports brutalized the humanity of the supposedly civilized people reading about them, and the tragedy of Smyrna disappeared from public awareness between the cataclysmic upheavals of the First and Second World Wars.

About the Author
Ian Begg studied archaeology in Greece at the America School of Classical Studies in Athens. For this book, the author retraced Gilbert Bagnani's footsteps around Greece, the Aegean, Turkey and Libya. He has not only participated in excavations in Sicily, Greece, Crete and Egypt but also initiated a survey on the island of Karpathos especially for the chapter in this volume.

Reviews
Gilbert Bagnani, the subject of Ian Begg’s book, was unknown to me, and I am glad to have made his acquaintance. The book covers the period 1921-1924. Gilbert comes across as a fascinating character, who encountered the Levant at a critical time for both the Greece of Eleftherios Venizelos and the Turkey of Mustapha Kemal Atatürk. He was bilingual in Italian (from his father) and English (from his mother): an archaeologist but always more than that. He knew and was helped by the excellent William Miller, which led to his contributing incisive articles about the politics of Greece and the Levant to the Morning Post in London. As a member of the Italian School of Archaeology in Athens he travelled around Greece and the islands and found himself in Asia Minor at a critical phase of the Greek occupation and Kemal’s war of independence. All this and much more is described in Gilbert’s letters to his mother. His grasp of local and international politics was impressive. He and Begg paint sparkling pen pictures of personalities such as Bosdari, the Italian ambassador during the Great War, and later Governor of the Dodecanese, Prince Demidoff the Russian ambassador, Harold Lamb the British Consul at Smyrna and family, Greek personalities such as Stratos, Kalapothakis, Karapanos, and colleagues at the Italian School. Gilbert emerges as clever, sometimes arrogant, fascinated by people especially from high society, and with a weakness for royalty. Begg does him justice in a well sourced book. This is a lively account of a formidable personality, scholar and archaeologist in the making. The black and white photographs by Gilbert himself are excellent. – Sir Michael Llewellyn Smith, British Ambassodor to Greece 1996 – 1999 ;

Gilbert Bagnani, of Italian and Canadian extraction, arrived in Greece at the age of 21, already well-connected through his parents’ social and professional circles. He was ostensibly studying Greek A
Architecture militaire du Deccan: Une réponse défensive face à la guerre moderne Deccan Military Architecture: A response to early modern warfare by Nicolas Morelle. Paperback; 203x276mm; 428pp; 168 figures. French text with English introduction and conclusion. 124 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697445. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697452. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Architecture militaire du Deccan focuses on the Deccan region in central India between the medieval and modern period, a period at the interface between local Indian culture and the Persian world, followed by relations with the colonial enterprise European in Asia. This period was marked by many conflicts, but also by an inventive adaptation of new military technologies in response to new forms of modern warfare in India, with the arrival of artillery.

Using the most recent investigative techniques, such as photogrammetry and 3D modeling, this volume presents a wealth of new data. The author’s meticulous approach encompasses the study of urban maps, architectural plans and detailed descriptions of walls, bastions, moats, towers, gates, horsemen, granaries, hydraulic éléments, and more.

Through the study of four representative fortified sites, the author synthesizes the evolution of the military architecture of the Deccan.

One can only hope that this volume will inspire other scholars to work on other Indian fortified sites, not limited to the Deccan. Thus, a more complete understanding of the phases of evolution of Indian military architecture can emerge.

About the Author
Nicolas Morelle is an archaeologist, specialising in India (associated researcher of LA3M CNRS in France). After studies on crusaders fortifications and influences between East and West in terms of building techniques and military Architecture, he studied technical interactions in Indian fortifications as part of his PhD thesis on the evolution of Military Architecture in the four Deccan forts. In this context, he collaborated with many Indian and international institutions.

French description: L’extraordinaire conservatoire de fortifications que constitue l’Inde centrale enrichit la connaissance de l’architecture militaire de la période moderne. Les spécificités indiennes en matière de défense constituent un apport non négligeable sur le développement original des organes défensifs du Deccan.

En utilisant les techniques d’investigation les plus récentes, telles que la photogrammétrie et la modélisation 3D, Nicolas Morelle découvre une richesse de données jusqu’alors inconnues. Il présente ainsi une approche méticuleuse à travers des cartes urbaines, des plans d’architecture et des descriptions détaillées de murs, bastions, douves, tours, portes, cavaliers, greniers, éléments hydrauliques, …

Dans ce volume, Nicolas Morelle se concentre sur la région du Deccan dans le centre de l’Inde entre la période médiévale et moderne, période à l’interface entre la culture indienne locale et le monde persan, suivi des relations avec l’entreprise coloniale européenne en Asie. Cette période a été marquée par de nombreux conflits, mais aussi par une adaptation inventive, de nouvelles technologies militaires en réponse aux nouvelles formes de guerre moderne en Inde, avec l’arrivée de l’artillerie.

A travers l’étude de quatre sites fortifiés représentatifs, l’auteur élabore une synthèse de l’évolution de l’architecture militaire du Deccan.

On ne peut qu’espérer que le présent volume inspirera d’autres chercheurs à travailler sur d’autres sites fortifiés indiens, sans se limiter au Deccan. Ainsi, une compréhension plus complète des phases d’évolution de l’architecture militaire indienne pourra émerger.

Tiré d’une recherche doctorale récente, cet ouvrage est en français. Plusieurs parties sont traduites en anglais, dont la synthèse, afin d’améliorer sa diffusion vers le public international.

Nicolas Morelle est archéologue, spécialiste de l’Inde (chercheur associé du LA3M CNRS en France). Après des études sur les fortifications des croisades et les influences entre Orient et Occident dans l’architecture militaire, il a étudié les interactions techniques dans les fortifications indiennes dans le cadre de sa thèse de doctorat sur
A Catalogue of the Sculpture Collection at Wilton House by Peter Stewart with new photography by Guido Petruccioli. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 229x305mm; 438 pages; 14 figures and 154 plates in full colour throughout. 661 2020. ISBN 9781789696554. £90.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Wilton House sculptures constituted one of the largest and most celebrated collections of ancient art in Europe. Originally comprising some 340 works, the collection was formed around the late 1710s and 1720s by Thomas Herbert, the eccentric 8th Earl of Pembroke, who stubbornly ‘re-baptized’ his busts and statues with names of his own choosing. His sources included the famous collection of Cardinal Mazarin, assembled in Paris in the 1640s and 1650s, and recent discoveries on the Via Appia outside Rome. Earl Thomas regarded the sculptures as ancient – some of them among the oldest works of art in existence – but in fact much of the collection is modern and represents the neglected talents of sixteenth-and seventeenth-century artists, restorers and copyists who were inspired by Greek and Roman sculpture.

About half of the original collection remains intact today, adorning the Gothic Cloisters that were built for it two centuries ago. After a long decline, accelerated by the impact of the Second World War, the sculptures have been rehabilitated in recent years. They include masterpieces of Roman and early modern art, which cast fresh light on Graeco-Roman antiquity, the classical tradition, and the history of collecting.

Illustrated with specially commissioned photographs, this catalogue offers the first comprehensive publication of the 8th Earl’s collection, including an inventory of works dispersed from Wilton. It re-presents his personal vision of the collection recorded in contemporary manuscripts. At the same time, it dismantles some of the myths about it which originated with the earl himself, and provides an authoritative archaeological and art-historical analysis of the artefacts.

About the Author
Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. His research ranges across many aspects of Greek and Roman sculpture and the relationships between different artistic traditions. His previous publications include, Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008).

Guido Petruccioli is an Oxford University-trained classical archaeologist and professional photographer with specialist interests in Roman imperial portraiture and the documentation of ancient sculpture.
Archaeogaming Una introducción a la arqueología en y de los videojuegos by Andrew Reinhard. Paperback; 148x210mm; 298 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text. 30 2020. ISBN 9788416725083. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Video games are an example of material objects, resources and spaces that people use to define their culture. They also serve as archaeological sites in their traditional sense of place. Places where evidence of past activity is preserved and archaeological methodology can be applied. This book serves as a general introduction to archaeogaming: it describes the intersection between archaeology and video games, and applies archaeological theory and method to understand video games as sites as well as artifacts. It is also history, sociology and ontology; and everything that is necessary to define a culture, that of videogames, that is no longer emerging, but has been completely established in the humanity of the Anthropocene and late capitalism. What makes its valuation and cataloging more necessary as digital heritage.
La guerra del fenicio Arqueología, política y turismo en el último rincón de Europa by Raúl Asensio. Paperback; 148x210mm; 286 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text. 28 2020. ISBN 9788416725250. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

In the midst of the crisis, Cádiz's Phoenician past became the axis of a project of economic, political and cultural transformation that aroused both adherence and discontent. The objective was to move from an industrial city to a model of urban development based on tourism. The three thousand years of history of the city should be the pillar on which the future was built. In this endeavour, politicians, journalists, archaeologists, intellectuals, businessmen and experts of all kinds were involved in endless polemics and controversies, alluding to the past and present of the city.

Hay ciudades que pueden ser muchas cosas y otras, en cambio, que sólo puede ser ellas mismas. En plena crisis, el pasado fenicio de Cádiz se convirtió en el eje de un proyecto de transformación económica, política y cultural que suscitó tanto adhesiones como descontentos. El objetivo era pasar de una ciudad industrial a un modelo de desarrollo urbano basado en el turismo. Los tres mil años de historia de la ciudad debían ser el pilar sobre el que se construyera el futuro. En este empeño, políticos, periodistas, arqueólogos, intelectuales, empresarios y expertos de todo tipo se vieron envueltos en polémicas y controversias sin fin, que aludían al pasado y al presente de la ciudad. Las "guerras patrimoniales" gaditanas, señala el autor, son un caso singular, pero al mismo tiempo también son un ejemplo de lo que ocurre en múltiples ciudades de la periferia europea, que en tiempos de globalización y deslocalización se ven obligadas a reinventarse a sí mismas en un esfuerzo por no perder su esencia.
Wholesome Dwellings: Housing Need in Oxford and the Municipal Response, 1800-1939 by Malcolm Graham. Paperback; 205x255mm; 124 pages; 40 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £30.00. 663 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697353. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697360. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A shortage of affordable new housing, builders choosing to build larger, more profitable houses, and a diminishing stock of cheap houses for rent. All this sounds very familiar today, but at the end of the Great War, scarcely any houses had been built for four years and there was political pressure to build ‘Homes for Heroes’, impelled to a degree by fear of revolution. Council housing, supported by central government funding, was the chosen solution in 1919, and this study by Malcolm Graham, a leading Oxford local historian for many years, examines the consequences in Oxford, then a university city on the cusp of change. Behind the city’s Dreaming Spires image, housing for the working population was already in short supply, but an economy-minded and largely non-political City Council had always been reluctant to intervene in the housing market. In 1919, there was no hint of the city’s industrial future, and the City Council saw the replacement of substandard houses as its main challenge. The meteoric rise of the local motor industry in the early 1920s led to rapid population growth and created a massive new demand for cheap housing. Dr Graham examines the uneasy partnership between the City Council and Whitehall which led to the building of over 3,000 council houses in Oxford between the Wars. The provision of these ‘wholesome dwellings’ was a substantial, and lasting, achievement, but private builders were in fact catering for most housing need in and around the city by the 1930s. The notorious Cutteslowe Walls, built to exclude council tenants from an adjoining private estate, reflected the way in which the growing city was being socially segregated. Dr Graham provides a fascinating insight into how modern Oxford evolved away from the university buildings and college quadrangles for which the city is internationally renowned.

About the Author
Malcolm Graham gained a B.A. in History at Nottingham University and an M.A. in English Local History at Leicester. A qualified librarian, he became Oxford City’s first full-time local history librarian in 1970 and has been hugely active in Oxford and Oxfordshire local history ever since. He completed a PhD at Leicester University in 1985, and was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London in 1999.

Reviews
'This attractively presented book is packed with facts and figures about the ‘other Oxford’ and the housing of the working classes. Amply illustrated with estate maps, dwelling plans, and archive photos, the author, Malcolm Graham, former Head of the Centre for Oxfordshire Studies, has made a valuable contribution to the historiography of municipal housing.'—Robert Ernest Brown, Midland History, 2020
A Classical Archaeologist’s Life: The Story so Far An Autobiography by John Boardman. Paperback; 156x234mm; 271 pages; 43 illustrated plates, 28 in colour. (RRP: £25.00). 656 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693430. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693447. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A Classical Archaeologists’s Life: The Story so Far shows that a scholar’s life is not all scholarship, though much of this book is devoted to the writing of books and, especially, travel to classical and other lands. Boardman is a Londoner, born in Ilford and attending school in Essex (Chigwell). His teenage years were spent often in air raid shelters rather than with ‘mates‘ (all evacuated). There are distinctive ‘aunties’, the rituals of daily life in a London suburb. The non-scholarly figures live large in this account of his life, marriage, children, new houses. At Cambridge he learned about classical archaeology as a necessary addition to reading Homer and Demosthenes, even being obliged to recite the latter. And those were the days of Bertrand Russell’s lectures in a university reawakening after the war. Thence to the British School at Athens to learn about excavation (Smyrna, Knossos, later Libya). His return from Greece was to Oxford, not Cambridge, at first in the Ashmolean Museum, then as Reader and Professor. A spell in New York gives an account of the city before the troubles, when Petula Clark’s Down Town was dominant. There is much here to reflect on university life and teaching, and on the reasons for and problems with the writing of his many books (some 40), with reflection on the university, colleges and their ways. Travels are well documented – a notable trip through Pakistan and China, in Persia, Egypt, Turkey – with comment on what he saw and experienced beyond archaeology. A lecture tour in Australia provides comment beyond the academic. He visited Israel often, lecturing and publishing for the Bible Lands Museum. Several tours in the USA took him to most of their museums and universities as well many other sights, from glaciers to alligators.

This book is a mixture of scholarly reminiscence, reflection on family life, travelogue, and critique of classical scholarship (not all archaeological) worldwide, illustrated with pictures of travels, friends, home life, and, for a historian, a reflection on experiences of over 90 years.

About the Author
Sir John Boardman is one of the foremost experts on ancient Greek art. Having served as Assistant Director of the British School at Athens (1952-1955), he was Assistant Keeper at the Ashmolean Museum and later Lincoln Professor of Classical Archaeology and Art at the University of Oxford (1978-1994). He continues to work in Oxford, at the Classical Art Research Centre, where he is mainly preoccupied with the study of ancient gems.

Reviews
'Few who have investigated the world of classical archaeology over the past 60 years can have failed to benefit from consulting John Boardman’s many and varied publications. His central position continues to be paramount, and in this book we have his spirited account of his career, the researches he has carried out, the travels he has undertaken, and the home life and friendships he has enjoyed over the past 90 years.'—Brian A. Sparkes, Classics for All, August 2020

'From his hilarious reminisces about his relatives growing up as a child, to his experiences during World War 2, to his young adulthood travelling the world as an archaeologist, there's something for everyone in this book. It also illuminates the culture he lived in, from his very beginnings in Essex, to becoming a knight, it's all in here. This is by far the best book I have read in this genre; you will not be able to put it down.'—Mr. S. P. Pyatt, Amazon, September 2020
Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 50 2020 Papers from the fifty-third meeting of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held at the University of Leiden from Thursday 11th to Saturday 13th July 2019 edited by Daniel Eddisford. Paperback; 206x255mm; 364 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (127 colour plates). PSAS50 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696530. £69.00 (No VAT). £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £78.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies is the principal international academic forum for research on the Arabian Peninsula. First convened in 1968 it is the only annual academic event for the study of the Arabian Peninsula that brings together researchers from all over the world to present and discuss current fieldwork and the latest research. The Seminar covers an extensive range of subjects that include anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, numismatics, theology, and more besides, from the earliest times to the present day or, in the fields of political and social history, to around the end of the Ottoman Empire (1922).

The 53rd Seminar for Arabian Studies was hosted by the University of Leiden and took place in the Lipsius Building from Thursday IASA. In total sixty-five papers and twenty-three posters were presented at the three-day event. On Friday 12 July a special session on the stone tools of prehistoric Arabia was held, the papers from this session are published in a supplement to the main Seminar Proceedings.
Old Oswestry Hillfort and its Landscape: Ancient Past, Uncertain Future edited by Tim Malim and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; 254 pages; 117 figures, 34 plates, 5 tables. Print RRP £45.00. 637 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696110. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696127. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Old Oswestry is considered to be one of England's most precious archaeological jewels, described by Sir Cyril Fox in the 1930s as 'the outstanding work of the Early Iron Age type on the Marches of Wales', and its design is unique amongst hillforts in the UK. Located on the edge of the Shropshire Plain and just a kilometre north of the market town of Oswestry, the hillfort (and its hinterland landscape) can trace activity through artefactual evidence back at least 5000 years, with the last 3000 years evident as earthworks. The reader will notice that little in the way of archaeological investigation has occurred within the hillfort, and indeed, more excavation took place when its internal space became a training ground for trench warfare during World War I than through any academic endeavour.

Old Oswestry Hillfort and its Landscape: Ancient Past, Uncertain Future, organised into 14 well-crafted chapters, charts the archaeology, folklore, heritage and landscape development of one of England's most enigmatic monuments, from the Iron Age, through its inclusion as part of an early medieval boundary between England and Wales, to its role during World War I when, between 1915 and 1918, over 4000 troops (including Oswestry's own great war poet Wilfrid Owen), were being trained at any one time for the Western Front.

This book also discusses in detail the recent threats to the monument's special landscape from insensitive development and its alternative potential to act as a heritage gateway for the recreational and economic benefit of Oswestry and surrounding communities.

About the Editors
Tim Malim is a graduate of the Institute of archaeology, London, and has worked in many parts of the UK and abroad as an archaeologist during a 40-year career. After working for Cambridge University and English Heritage as part of the Fenland Survey in the 1980s, he set up and directed the Archaeological Field Unit of Cambridgeshire County Council in the 1990s and was a course director at Cambridge University’s extra-mural department, Madingley Hall. Currently, he is head of the heritage team at SLR Consulting, a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and Chairman of the Federation of Archaeological Managers and Employers. He has excavated a wide range of sites, and his main research interests include British prehistory and the Anglo-Saxons, with specialist knowledge of the fens, wetland archaeology and its preservation, ancient routeways, and Anglo-Saxon dykes. He has published eight books and over 50 other articles, and is a resident of Oswestry, having moved to Shropshire in 2002.

George Nash is an Associate Professor at Geosciences Centre of Coimbra University ITM (Earth and Memory Institute), Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (IPT), Portugal, as well as working for SLR Consulting, an environmental planning consultancy based in the UK. His academic specialisms include the study of prehistoric and contemporary art, prehistoric architecture, mortuary practices, and buildings. In 2014 he was part of a successful HLF bid to excavate two sections of the practice trenching at Walney Island, Cumbria. For SLR Consulting, George has undertaken a number of projects for BAE Systems and the MoD including building assessments at six former Royal Ordnance Factories, the World War II Tank Factory at Manston Road, Leeds, and more recently, at former RAF Abingdon (now the British Army’s Dalton Barracks, west of Oxford). Since 2012, George has been an active member of the protest group HOOOH and has made an extensive study of the practice trenches in and around the hillfort.

Reviews
'Articles about the region and other forts (in one the intervisiblity of sites is mapped impressively onto tribal boundaries), Old Oswestry's setting, links to Arthurian myths, tribal identity in the Roman-contact era and more, should encourage further research and local affection,
Barbaric Splendour: The Use of Image Before and After Rome edited by Toby F. Martin with Wendy Morrison. Paperback; 203x276mm; 152 pages; 38 figures (30 colour pages). 119 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696592. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696608. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Barbaric Splendour: the use of image before and after Rome comprises a collection of essays comparing late Iron Age and Early Medieval art. Though this is an unconventional approach, there are obvious grounds for comparison. Images from both periods revel in complex compositions in which it is hard to distinguish figural elements from geometric patterns. Moreover, in both periods, images rarely stood alone and for their own sake. Instead, they decorated other forms of material culture, particularly items of personal adornment and weaponry. The key comparison, however, is the relationship of these images to those of Rome. Fundamentally, the book asks what making images meant on the fringe of an expanding or contracting empire, particularly as the art from both periods drew heavily from – but radically transformed – imperial imagery.

About the Editors
Toby Martin currently works as a lecturer at Oxford University’s Department for Continuing Education, where he specialises in adult and online education. His research concentrates on theoretical and interpretative aspects of material culture in Early Medieval Europe. Toby has also worked as a field archaeologist and project officer in the commercial archaeological sector and continues to work as a small finds specialist.

Wendy Morrison currently works for the Chilterns Conservation Board managing the NLHF funded Beacons of the Past Hillforts project, the UK’s largest high-res archaeological LiDAR survey. She also is Senior Associate Tutor for Archaeology at the Oxford University Department for Continuing Education. Wendy’s research areas are Prehistoric European Archaeology and Landscape Archaeology. She has over a decade’s excavation experience in Southern Britain, the Channel Islands, and India.
EurASEAA14 Volume II: Material Culture and Heritage Papers from the Fourteenth International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists edited by Helen Lewis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; 164 figures, 27 tables. 115 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695939. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695946. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

EurASEAA14: Material Culture and Heritage is the second of two volumes comprising papers originally presented at the EurASEAA14 (European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists) conference in 2012, updated for publication. The aim of the EurASEAA is to facilitate communication between different disciplines, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research. This international initiative aims to foster international scholarly cooperation in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology, art history and philology.

This volume focuses substantially on topics under the broad themes of archaeology and heritage, material culture, environmental archaeology, osteoarchaeology, historic and prehistoric archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and long-distance contact, trade and exchange.

About the Editor
Helen Lewis is an associate professor at University College Dublin School of Archaeology. Her research in Southeast Asia has mostly focused on cave sites in Laos, Malaysian Borneo, and the Philippine island of Palawan, where she co-directs the Palawan Island Palaeohistory Research Project. She chaired the EurASEAA14 Conference in Dublin in 2012.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editorial introduction to EurASEAA14 Volumes 1 and 2 – Helen Lewis ;
Ceramics from the Musi riverbed – John N. Miksic ;
The social dynamics of porcelain trade in the eleventh to sixteenth centuries CE Philippines: a chemical composition study – Rory Dennison and Laura Junker ;
The kilns of Myinkaba – for pottery or glass? – Don Hein and W. Ross H. Ramsay ;
The iron smelting technology of the Bujang Valley, Malaysia – Naizatul Akma Mokhtar and Mokhtar Saidin ;
Guide to understanding Khmer stoneware characteristics, Angkor, Cambodia – Chhay Rachna, Tho Thon and Em Socheata ;
New data on the chronology of Khmer stonewares – Armand Desbat ;
The conical rollers of Ban Non Wat, northeastern Thailand – Christina Sewall ;
Late Pleistocene/Holocene ecological and cultural transition in the Philippines – Jonathan H. Kress ;
Middle Pleistocene sites in Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Perak, Malaysia – Nor Khairunnisa Talib, Mokhtar Saidin and Jeffrey Abdullah ;
Metabolism, mythology, magic or metaphor? Animals in the rock art of Thailand – Lauren Winch ;
Tooth blackening and betel nut chewing at the Early Iron Age sites of Gò Ô Chùa (Vietnam) and Prohear (Cambodia) – Simone Krais, Michael Francken and Andreas Reinecke ;
The cultural and biological context of the Song Keplek 5 specimen, East Java: implications for living conditions and human-environment interactions during the later Holocene – Sofwan Noerwidi, Harry Widianto and Truman Simanjuntak ;
Probable prehistoric Southeast Asian influences in New Guinea? New archaeological and anthropological approaches to former axioms – Henry Dosedla ;
Ancient settlement in the lakes area of East Java Province, Indonesia: the potential for archaeological research with public benefits – Gunadi Kasnowihardjo ;
The relevance of archaeology to contemporary concerns: the Department of Agriculture of the Philippines and ancient foodways – Michelle S. Eusebio ;
Toward an understanding of cultural heritage and sustainable management: a case study from Phrae Province, Thailand – Mizuho Ikeda ;
Bibliography
Wonders Lost and Found: A Celebration of the Archaeological Work of Professor Michael Vickers edited by Nicholas Sekunda. Paperback; 205x290mm; 230 pages; 152 figures (82 pages in colour). 608 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693812. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693829. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Wonders Lost and Found: A celebration of the archaeological work of Professor Michael Vickers comprises, in all, twenty-one contributions, all on archaeological themes, written by friends and colleagues of Professor Michael Vickers, commemorating his contribution to archaeology. The contributions, reflecting the wide interests of Professor Vickers, range chronologically from the Aegean Bronze Age, to the use made of archaeology by dictators of the 19th and 20th centuries. Seven contributions are related to the archaeology of Georgia, where the Professor has worked most recently, and has made his home.

About the Editor
Nicholas Sekunda was born in 1953 and lived in England for the first part of his life, completing his studies at Manchester University. He has held research positions at Monash University in Melbourne and at the Australian National University in Canberra. He then worked for a British Academy research project as sub-editor for the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names in Oxford, and later taught ancient history for a year at Manchester University. Since 1994 Nicholas has lived in Poland, where his father was born. He has taught at the Nikolaus Copernicus University, Toruń, and currently holds the post of Head of Department of Mediterranean Archaeology at Gdansk University. He has participated in excavations in England, Poland, Iran, Greece, Syria and Jordan, and now co-directs excavations at Negotino Gradište in the Republic of North Macedonia. He is the author of a number of books concerning Greek Warfare.
Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco y su entorno edited by Idoia Grau Sologestoa and Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+306 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (68 pages in colour). 106 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694383. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694390. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Post-medieval archaeology is currently going through a critical phase of consolidation and disciplinary redefinition across Europe, where mere proposals or ambitions are becoming tangible scientific and disciplinary realities. This renovation is most evident in Southern Europe, where, until recently, these studies have been treated as somewhat marginal. The convergence of new actors and disciplines (historical archaeology, archaeology of the post-medieval centuries, professional archaeology, ethnoarchaeology or archaeological sciences), the promotion of new patrimonialization initiatives, and the creation of new action frameworks as a result of the deep economic crisis of the years 2007-2008 are some of the factors that have shaped current approaches to the archaeology of the Modern Age. Focussing on archaeological studies of the Modern Age located in the Basque Country, Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco y su entorno recognises the main themes investigated (cities, rural spaces, funeral spaces, consumption and production, communications systems, maritime archaeology), detects some of the strengths and weaknesses, and proposes new lines of action and disciplinary consolidation. In short, this volume aims to provide a summary of the current archaeological framework for investigations of the Modern Age in the Basque Country, and to make proposals for developing these practices in the future.

Las arqueologías postmedievales atraviesan en la actualidad una fase critica de consolidación y redefinición disciplinar en casi toda Europa, donde han pasado de ser meras propuestas o ambiciones para convertirse en realidades científicas y disciplinares tangibles. Esta renovación es más evidente en el sur de Europa, donde estos estudios han tenido hasta ahora un peso más bien marginal. La convergencia de nuevos actores y disciplinas (arqueología histórica, arqueología de los siglos postmedievales, arqueología profesional, etnoarqueología o las ciencias arqueológicas), el impulso de nuevas iniciativas de patrimonialización, y la creación de nuevos marcos de actuación como consecuencia de la profunda crisis económica de los años 2007-2008, son algunas de las causas que explican por qué se han ido definiendo con mayor claridad los contornos de la Arqueología de la Edad Moderna. A partir del ejemplo del País Vasco, este volumen realiza un diagnóstico sobre las principales temáticas indagadas (ciudades, espacios rurales, espacios funerarios, consumo y producción, sistemas de comunicaciones, arqueología marítima), detecta algunas de las fortalezas y debilidades de la arqueología de la Edad Moderna y propone nuevas líneas de actuación y de consolidación disciplinar. En definitiva, este libro pretende mostrar qué es la Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco en la actualidad y qué puede llegar a ser.

About the Editors
Idoia Grau Sologestoa is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the Integrative Prehistory and Archaeological Science (IPAS/IPNA) department, University of Basel. Previously, she worked at the universities of Sheffield, Nottingham and the Basque Country. Her main research interest is human and animal relationships in historical periods, from Roman to modern times. She is currently editing a book on innovations in the rural world during the Early Modern Era. ;

Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo is a Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country and Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology (University College London). He is the director of the Heritage and Cultural Landscapes Research Group of the University of the Basque Country and the Rural Medieval Research Group, CSIC-UPV/EHU. His principal interests lie in the study of the archaeology of landscapes, the archaeology of rural societies, Mediterranean archaeology, the archaeology of architecture, and the study of social c
Redonner vie à une collection: les terres cuites communes du fort La Tour by Julie Toupin. Paperback; xviii+248 pages; 19 tables, 1 graph, 13 figures, fully illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). French text. (Print RRP £54.00). 101 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693836. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693843. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Research on common earthenware from the first half of the 17th century is very elementary, when it exists at all. This study seeks to bring back to life the ceramics, the inhabitants and the site where the objects were used. The collection includes 1602 fragments from 277 common earthenware objects coming from the period of occupation of Fort La Tour (1631-1645) in Portland Point, New Brunswick. These pieces were mostly made in France, but some are probably of English origin.

Mostly through the visual identification of the features included in the ceramic body, a classification system was developed with four main groups, 28 types, and 10 variations. With this classification system, earthenware objects were able to be grouped based on the activities for which they were used and related to their uses and functions. This process enabled links to be established with the daily use of the earthenware objects on a French site in the first half of the 17th century.

French description
Les recherches portant sur les terres cuites communes datant de la première demie du XVIIe siècle sont pratiquement inexistantes ou sont très élémentaires. Cette recherche se veut une étude qui permettra de redonner vie aux objets cérames ainsi qu’aux habitants et au site sur lequel ces objets furent utilisés. Notre collection comprend un ensemble de 1 602 tessons regroupés en 277 objets de terres cuites communes provenant de la phase d'occupation du fort La Tour (1631-1645) à Portland Point au Nouveau-Brunswick (BhDm-7). Ces pièces sont majoritairement de facture françaises, mais quelques objets sont probablement anglais.

Nous avons élaboré, principalement par l’identification visuelle des inclusions comprises dans la pâte, une typologie céramique comprenant quatre grandes familles, 28 types et 10 variantes. À partir de cette classification, les objets en terre cuite commune furent regroupés à l'intérieur d’activités fonctionnelles qui ont été reliées aux usages et aux fonctions de ces céramiques. Cette démarche a permis d’établir des liens avec l’utilisation quotidienne des terres cuites communes sur un site français de la première demie du XVIIe siècle.
The Buckley Potteries: Recent Research and Excavation by Nigel Jones. Paperback; x+122 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 551 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692228. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692235. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Peter Davey, Leigh Dodd, Richard Hankinson, Bob Silvester and Sophie Watson.

The small town of Buckley, in Flintshire, has been the focus for a regional pottery industry for at least 600 years, from the medieval period to the mid-20th century. However, despite Buckley’s impressive industrial past, a visit to the town today reveals little evidence to suggest the extent and importance of what was once a major industry supplying traditional earthenware.

This book is based on the results of recent research and excavation which has enhanced our understanding of the Buckley potteries, identifying over 30 individual production sites from documentary and cartographic sources. It considers the factors that influenced the siting and development of the industry, how it changed through time and the reasons for its eventual demise.

Few of the potteries have been the subject of archaeological excavation, and of those none have previously been published in detail. The book presents the results from excavations on the sites of four potteries, and includes a review of the evidence for others, including a gazetteer detailing the evidence for all of the potteries currently known.

About the Author
NIGEL JONES is the Principal Archaeologist at the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust, where he has worked since the early 1980s. During this time he has excavated a wide range of archaeological sites from the Neolithic to industrial, the more significant of which have been published in regional and national journals. His career has focused principally on field archaeology, including numerous excavations, surveys of earthwork monuments and wider landscapes, building surveys and aerial photography. He is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.

Table of Contents
Introduction; Geology of the Buckley Area - By Richard Hankinson; Buckley Potteries and their relationship with Buckley Mountain Common – cartographic evidence - By Bob Silvester; History and Significance of the Buckley Potteries - By Peter Davey; Brookhill Pottery (Site 1), 2016 - By Richard Hankinson; Taylor’s Pottery (Site 3), 2005 - By Leigh Dodd; Lewis’s Pottery (Site 5), 2000 - By Leigh Dodd; Price’s Pottery (Site 11), 2014-15 - By Sophie Watson; A Gazetteer of Buckley Potteries; Bibliography

Reviews
'Nigel Jones and the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust are to be congratulated on drawing together the resultant information on this important industry and for laying the basis for informed decisions on the recovery of more in the future.'—Peter Webster, Archaeologia Cambrensis, Vol. 169, 2020
Conflict Landscapes: An Archaeology of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War by Salvatore Garfi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 530 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691344. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691351. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is an archaeological exploration of a conflict landscape encountered by the volunteers of the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War of 1936-39. A great deal is known about the Brigades in terms of inter-world war geopolitics, their history and make-up, but less is known about the materiality of the landscapes in which they lived, fought, and died.

The Spanish Civil War was a relatively static conflict. As in the First World War, it consisted of entrenched Republican government lines facing similarly entrenched Nationalist (rebel) lines, and these ran north to south across Spain. Fighting was intermittent, so the front line soldiers had to settle in, and make what was an attritional war-scape, a place to live in and survive. This research examines one such war-scape as a place of ‘settlement’, where soldiers lived their daily lives as well as confronting the rigours of war – and these were the volunteers of the International Brigades, both foreign and Spanish, who occupied a section of lines southeast of Zaragoza in Aragón in 1937 and 1938.

This research draws, not only on the techniques of landscape archaeology, but also on the writings of international volunteers in Spain – in particular, George Orwell – and it incorporates historical photography as a uniquely analytical, archaeological resource.

About the Author
Salvatore Garfi has been a professional archaeologist since 1974, working on a range of projects from the prehistoric to the contemporary. Besides working in Britain, he has worked in Egypt, Southern Arabia, and elsewhere in the Middle East. Since 2010, he has specialised in the archaeology of modern conflict, and his doctoral research was on the late 20th Century conflict in Western Sahara. He was a post-doctoral Leverhulme Fellow in the School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, University of Nottingham (2015-2018), and co-founder of the International Brigades Archaeological Project (IBAP), which ran from 2014 to 2015.

Reviews
'Salvatore Garfi's book is one of the most compelling accounts by far of a bloody 20th-century conflict. It provides the reader with an all-important historic context to the war, and records the archaeology associated with the trench positions of the International Brigades and Republican forces, where both civilians and combatants bore the brunt of the evils of civil war.' — George Nash, Current World Archaeology #99, January 2020

'This is an expert, informative, and often intriguing investigation of a historically recent battle-zone landscape by an archaeologist whose innovatory approach deploys photographs, maps, and historical (and literary) background context to make a powerful contribution to modern conflict archaeology.' — Nicholas Saunders, Military History Matters, Issue 116 (June/July 2020)

'Garfi’s volume is novel and challenges the traditional presentation of war as a grand narrative, exploring instead the harsh and visceral experience of a war lived on the battlefield.' — Claire Nesbitt, Antiquity 2020 Vol. 94

'... this volume is an essential contribution to archaeology studies of the Spanish Civil War... Garfi’s application of nonintrusive archaeological survey techniques is praiseworthy, and the multiplicity of the sources used, beyond the fieldwork, makes this volume pertinent for anyone interested in the history of the Spanish conflict of 1936–1939.'—Luis Antonio Ruiz Casero, Historical Archaeology, Volume 54, 2020
Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past. Volume I A biography of a Soviet archaeologist (1900s - 1950s) by A. K. Konopatskii, translated by Richard L. Bland and Yaroslav V. Kuzmin. Paperback; 148x210mm; xxiv+410 pages; 30 black & white figures. (Print RRP: £24.99). 547 2019 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692044. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692051. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past is about the life and works of Aleksei P. Okladnikov (1908– 1981), a prominent archaeologist who spent more than 50 years studying prehistoric sites in various parts of the Soviet Union—mainly in Siberia and Central Asia as well as in Mongolia. Okladnikov made numerous fascinating discoveries in the 1930s, including the first Neanderthal remains in the USSR at Teshik Tash (Uzbekistan) and unique figurines at the Upper Palaeolithic site of Buret’ in the Angara River basin (Eastern Siberia). His research and achievements are presented on the background of ideological campaigns inspired by the Communist Party in the 1920s–1950s, a subject that is very rarely described in non-Russian sources. Particular attention is given to the debunking of the ‘Japhetic theory’ and the ‘new doctrine of language’ developed by Nikolai Y. Marr, an Oriental scholar and specialist in languages who in the 1920s–early 1930s was a formal leader of Soviet archaeology. Marr’s principles of linguistic studies were mechanically transmitted to several fields of the humanities, including archaeology, and were mandatory for every Soviet scholar. In 1950 an abrupt end to Marr’s theories was enacted by Josef Stalin. Details of these events—important for development of archaeology, ancient history, and linguistics in the USSR—were never previously described.

The book is for archaeologists, historians, and everyone who is interested in the history of scholarship (particularly the humanities) in the twentieth century.

Contributors to this volume:
Aleksander K. Konopatskii was born in 1951 in Tambovka County, Amur Province, USSR. After graduating from Suvorov’s Military Boarding School in Ussuriisk (Maritime Province), he met Aleksei P. Okladnikov in 1969. Konopatskii became a cadet at the Novosibirsk Military-Political Academy but dropped out in 1972 and joined the Institute of History, Philology and Philosophy, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences. Since this time, he was closely associated with Okladnikov, assisting in fieldwork, travel and preparation of scientific reports. In 1974, Konopatskii graduated from Kemerovo State University in History (including archaeology). In the 1970s, he studied prehistoric sites on the shore of Lake Baikal in Siberia, and gained the Candidate of Sciences (PhD-equivalent) degree in 1979; in the 1980s and early 1990s, he excavated ancient sites in the lower course of the Amur River (Russian Far East). Since 1998, Konopatskii has been an Assistant Professor of the Novosibirsk General Military Academy where he teaches humanities.

Richard L. Bland studied Alaskan prehistory in the 1970s – 1990s (PhD 1996, University of Oregon). He has translated numerous books and articles on the archaeology of Northeastern Siberia and the Russian Far East, helping to bring the rich Soviet/Russian records of prehistory and early history to the international scholarly community.

Yaroslav V. Kuzmin has been studying geoarchaeology of the Russian Far East, Siberia and neighbouring Northeast Asia since 1979 (PhD 1991; DSc. 2007). He has also assisted in translating and editing books on the archaeology of eastern Russia.

Reviews
'This biography of Okladnikov sheds light on both his adventurous life and Soviet archaeology in general, which is still little known in the West.'—Stephen Leach, Antiquity 2020 Vol. 94
Yellow Beach 2 after 75 Years The Archaeology of a WWII Invasion Beach on Saipan and its Historic Context in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands by Boyd Dixon, Brenda Tenorio, Cherie Walth and Kathy Mowrer with contributions by Isla Nelson and Robert Jones. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+128 pages; 88 figures, 10 tables (50 colour pages). 92 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692587. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692594. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

After 75 years, this story presents archaeological evidence, archival records, and respected elders’ accounts from WWII and the most catastrophic period in Pacific Basin history, and then into modern times on Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. On June 15, 1944, Afetna Point was called ‘Yellow Beach 2’ by the U.S. Marines and Army infantry braving Japanese resistance to establish a beachhead before capturing As Lito airfield the following days. The beachhead then served as a resupply landing for the next two weeks or more as U.S. forces slowly cleared the island of enemy strongpoints, and removed wounded Americans and battle weary civilians to off-shore medical treatment. At the end of the battle Chamorro, Carolinian, Okinawan, and Korean residents were relocated into stockades for their separation from Japanese soldiers until liberation on July 4, 1946. American military and eventual civilian administration of the San Antonio area transformed the agrarian landscape into a busy corridor of residential, industrial, and then tourist development. Once again in the 21st century, competition for regional tourism and investment makes Saipan a nexus of geopolitical intrigue and economic speculation where the past is not forgotten.

About the Authors
Boyd Dixon is Senior Archaeologist for the Cardno GS office in Guam and the CNMI. With over 40 years of archaeological experience in North America, Latin America, Western Europe, and the Pacific Basin, his interests are equally varied. They embrace prehistoric and historic patterns of settlement, subsistence, interaction, power, and conflict. Boyd holds a BA from the University of Alabama, with MA and PhD in Anthropology from the University of Connecticut. He has also been a research associate in the Micronesian Area Research Center at the University of Guam.

Brenda Y. Tenorio has played a role in shaping US/CNMI relations, has worked with, represented and advised leadership in the CNMI executive and legislative branches of government in negotiations with the U.S. and in the process developed public policy on a variety of issues locally. Over the years, Ms. Tenorio has also provided research/consulting services for proposed multi-million dollar private development projects and a number of firms in the gaming, construction and energy fields. As staff for CNMI Covenant negotiators, Ms. Tenorio worked on issues ranging from the labor and immigration to bonds and financial assistance packages to the CNMI. As a CNMI Covenant negotiator Ms. Tenorio addressed CNMI concerns over citizenship by birth and ownership of submerged land. Ms. Tenorio has a Bachelor’s Degree in History and Philosophy from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Cherie Walth is a Project Manager, Principal Investigator, and Bioarchaeologist for SWCA Environmental Consultant’s Albuquerque Office. Cherie has worked in such diverse regions as the Rocky Mountains, the U.S. Southwest, the Pacific West, Micronesia, and North Africa. Her experience is in all levels of prehistoric and historic archaeological investigations and includes human and non-human osteological analysis (bioarchaeology). In her 30+ years of experience in cultural resource management, the analysis of human remains has remained her passion. Cherie has an M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Colorado and her thesis reported on human remains from her fieldwork in Tunisia, North Africa.

Kathy Mowrer is an Archaeologist and Bioarchaeologist for SWCA Environmental Consultant’s Albuquerque Office. Kathy has 20 years of archaeological experience in the U. S. Southwest, Pacific Coast, Plains, and CNMI, Saipan. She has been the consulting osteologist for Crow Canyon Archaeological Center in Cortez, Colorado for 13 years. Kathy’s experience includes prehistoric and historic data recovery, survey, and research. Kathy holds a B.A .from Fort Lewis College with a major in Anthropol
Mediterranean Landscapes in Post Antiquity New frontiers and new perspectives edited by Sauro Gelichi and Lauro Olmo-Enciso. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+200 pages; illustrated throughout (87 colour pages). 555 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691900. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691917. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Mediterranean Landscapes in Post Antiquity: New frontiers and new perspectives highlights the fact that the study of landscape has in recent years been a field for considerable analytical archaeological experimentation. This new situation has made it possible to rethink the orientation of some theoretical approaches to the subject; equally these methods have been profitably used for the formation of a new theoretical and conceptual framework. These analytical trends have also featured in the Mediterranean area. Although the Mediterranean is the home of classicism (which also defines a particular archaeological methodology), it has seen the implementation of projects of this new kind, and in regions of Spain and Italy, after some delay, the proliferation of landscape archaeology studies. There are examples of more-or-less sophisticated postcolonial archaeological work, albeit conducted at the same time as examples of unreconstructed colonial archaeology. It is not easy to resolve a situation like this which requires the full integration of the different national archaeological cultures into a truly global forum. But some reflection on the cultural differences between the various landscape archaeologies, at least in the West is required. These considerations have given rise to the idea of this book which examines these themes in the framework of the Mediterranean area.

About the Editors
Sauro Gelichi is Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of Ca’ Foscari, Venice. He is main editor of Archeologia Medievale. His recent research interests and publications focus on the settlement in the Adriatic sea (i.e. Venice, Comacchio), particularly in the early medieval period. He has published proceedings of the International Conferences (From one Sea to Another. Trading Places in the European and Mediterranean Early Middle Ages, Turnhout 2012); Venice and its Neighbors from the 8th to the 10th Century. Through Renovation and Continuity, Leiden 2018) and archaeological editions of the archaeological excavations (Nonantola 6. Monaci e contadini. Abati e re. Il monastero di Nonantola attraverso l’archeologia (2002-2009), Florence 2018).

Lauro Olmo-Enciso is Professor of Archaeology at the Department of History and Philosophy, University of Alcalá, (Alcalá de Henares, Madrid). His lines of research and interests focuse on Medieval Archaeology, Historical Archaeology, Landscape Archaeology and Heritage. He directs archaeological excavations in different medieval sites, such as the Visigothic royal foundation of Recópolis; he was in charge of intervention projects in Spain-UNESCO World Heritage sites such as the ones related to the historical buildings of the University of Alcalá and the city of Segovia. He co-directs an Ecuadorian-Spanish project about the impact of colonialism on indigenous populations in Manabí (Ecuador). He has written and published many essays, editorial works, books, book chapters and articles in national and international scientific journals.
The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Text and Archaeology by Justin L. Kelley. Paperback; 175x245mm; 47 figures, 1 table (Black & white throughout). (Print RRP £48.00). 489 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690569. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690576. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, was built by the Byzantine emperor Constantine I to commemorate the Passion of Jesus Christ. Encased within its walls are the archaeological remains of a small piece of ancient Jerusalem ranging in date from the 8th century BC through the 16th century AD, at which time the Turkish Ottoman Empire ushered Jerusalem into the modern period. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was the subject of extensive archaeological investigation between 1960 and 1981 during its restoration. With the development of non-destructive techniques of archaeological research, investigation within the church has continued, which led to the restoration and conservation of the shrine built over the Tomb of Jesus in 2017. The first part of this monograph focuses on the archaeological record of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, surveying past excavations as well as recent research carried out within the church over the past three decades. The archaeological survey provides historical context for the second part of the book—a collection of primary sources pertinent to the history of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The texts included here range in date from the 1st century AD to the mid-19th century and are presented in their original languages with English translation.

About the Author
JUSTIN L. KELLEY teaches classes in Christian history and biblical studies at Life Pacific College. Justin specializes in the history and culture of the ancient Near East and spent several years as a student in Israel, where he studied biblical historical geography and archaeology at Jerusalem University College and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
La defensa de la ciudad de Valencia 1936-1939 Una arqueología de la Guerra Civil Española by José Peinado Cucarella. Paperback; 203x276mm; 236 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (51 colour pages). Spanish text. 87 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692020. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692037. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This publication presents the defense of the city of Valencia during the years 1936-1939 under two premises; whether Valencia was strategically bombed and which were the targets. The second premise is whether the city was efficiently organized to protect its civilians.

The methodological proposal is based on the use of the classical parameters of the archaeological intervention, with the possibility of elaborating catalogs of goods, thematic, temporary, etc. Those derived in tools for urban planning, archaeological charts, and other documents.

It also carries out a comparative analysis of the current legislative framework at national and regional level (Murcia, Valencia and Catalonia). A classification is made of the elements that make up the different heritages and their main characteristics.

It Analyzes the documentation from 1936 to 1939 collected in the different archives: the Municipal of Valencia, the Diputación, the Historical Military of Ávila, the Intermediate Military of Valencia, the Military Library "Center of Cultures", the Hemeroteca Municipal and The Library of the City of Valencia.

All this is done through extensive prospecting and GPS, with planimetric surveys of the localized remains and the digitalization of the entire planimetry of the time. A planimetric map of all shelters in the city is elaborated and the village of Puig. Moreover, a glossary of military terminology is added with the purpose of helping the reader, in addition to a daily list of the bombings that the city suffered during the years 1937 to 1939.

Esta publicación nos muestra la defensa de la ciudad de Valencia durante los años de 1936-1939 bajo dos premisas; una que es saber cuales fueron los más sensibles y bombardeados y si responden a la idea de un bombardeo estratégico. La segunda premisa es si la ciudad dispuso de una organización eficiente para proteger a su población civil. La propuesta metodológica se basa en la utilización de los parámetros clásicos de la intervención arqueológica, con la posibilidad de elaborar catálogos de bienes, temáticos, temporales, etc... que puedan derivar en herramientas para el planeamiento urbanístico, en cartas arqueológicas, y demás documentos.

En ella también se realiza una análisis comparativo del marco legislativo actual tanto a nivel nacional como autonómico (Murcia, Valencia y Cataluña). Se realiza una clasificación de los elementos que conforman los distintos patrimonios y sus principales características con el fin de disponer de una base teórica donde situar los restos arqueológicos y documentales localizados, distinguiendo su naturaleza en activa (militar) centros de Resistencias, Defensa de Costa y aeródromos, y por otra la pasiva (civil) como los refugios.

Se han analizado la documentación referente a 1936 a 1939, recogida en los diferentes archivos, el Municipal de Valencia, el de la Diputación, el Histórico Militar de Ávila, el Militar Intermedio de Valencia, La Biblioteca Militar ‘Centro de Culturas’, la Hemeroteca Municipal y La Biblioteca Valenciana.

Todo ello se realiza mediante la prospección extensiva y mediante GPS, con levantamientos planimétricos de los restos localizados y la digitalización de toda la planimetría de la época. Se establece como unidad gestora de la documentación el GvSIG, un software libre, que permite combinar datos geográficos, bases de datos con datos vectoriales y raster. Y se elabora una cartoteca planimétrica de todos los refugios conocidos en la ciudad de Valencia, y de los elementos más esenciales de la defensa activa del municipio del Puig. Así como un glosario de terminología militar con el objeto que ayude al lector y un listado diario de los bombardeos que sufrió la ciudad durante los años 1937 a 1939.

About the Author
JOSÉ PEINADO is a PHD in archaeology in the University of Valencia and with a degree in History and an extensive experience i