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NEW: Rock Art Studies: News of the World VI edited by Paul G. Bahn, Natalie Franklin and Matthias Strecker. Paperback; 205x290mm; 370 pages; 149 figures, 3 tables (colour throughout). 772 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699623. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699630. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rock Art Studies: News of the World VI, like the previous editions in the series, covers rock art research and management all over the world over a five-year period, in this case, the years 2015 to 2019 inclusive. The current volume once again shows the wide variety of approaches that have been taken in different parts of the world and reflects the expansion and diversification of perspectives and research questions. One constant has been the impact of new techniques of recording rock art. This is especially evident in the realm of computer enhancement of the frequently faded and weathered rock imagery. As has been the case in past volumes, this collection of papers includes all of the latest discoveries, including in areas hitherto not known to contain rock art. While relatively little has happened in some areas, a great deal has occurred in others. Rock art studies continue to go through a period of intense scientific and technological development, but at the same time – due to the problems of preservation and vandalism – it is crucial to educate local people and the young about the importance of this fragile heritage.

About the Editors Paul G. Bahn studied archaeology at Cambridge and wrote his doctoral thesis on the prehistory of the French Pyrenees. He then held postdoctoral fellowships at Liverpool and London, plus a Getty postdoctoral fellowship in the History of Art and the Humanities. Since the mid-80s, he has devoted himself to writing and editing books on archaeology and lecturing on numerous archaeological tours. His main speciality is prehistoric art, especially rock art of the world, most notably Palaeolithic art, as well as Easter Island. ;

Natalie Franklin is an internationally renowned rock art specialist. She has published widely in academic journals, co-edited the previous three volumes of Rock Art News of the World and contributed chapters to the entire series. She has extensive experience in recording rock art and developing management plans for rock art sites. Natalie currently works as a cultural heritage consultant in Brisbane, Australia. ;

Matthias Strecker is an educator and rock art expert. Both in Bolivia and internationally, Strecker has contributed signifi cantly to the knowledge, appreciation and conservation of rock art. He has carried out fi eldwork in Mexico, Bolivia and Peru and has published numerous studies of rock art in Latin America. Since 1987 he has been Secretary of the Sociedad de Investigación del Arte Rupestre de Bolivia (SIARB) and editor of its publications.
Visual Culture, Heritage and Identity: Using Rock Art to Reconnect Past and Present edited by Andrzej Rozwadowski and Jamie Hampson. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 90 illustrations (colour throughout). 750 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698466. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698473. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Visual Culture, Heritage and Identity: Using Rock Art to Reconnect Past and Present sets out a fresh perspective on rock art by considering how ancient images function in the present. In recent decades, archaeological approaches to rock paintings and engravings have significantly advanced our understanding of rock art in regional and global terms. On the other hand, however, little research has been done on contemporary uses of rock art. How does ancient rock art heritage influence contemporary cultural phenomena? And how do past images function in the present, especially in contemporary art and other media? In the past, archaeologists usually concentrated more on reconstructing the semantic and social contexts of the ancient images. This volume, on the other hand, focuses on how this ancient heritage is recognised and reified in the modern world, and how this art stimulates contemporary processes of cultural identity-making. The authors, who are based all over the world, off er attractive and compelling case studies situated in diverse cultural and geographical contexts.

About the Editors
Andrzej Rozwadowski is Associate Professor at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, where he also completed his PhD. He is also an honorary Research Fellow of the Rock Art Research Institute of Wits in Johannesburg and has been involved in rock art research since the 1990s. ;

Jamie Hampson is a Senior Lecturer in the Humanities Department at the University of Exeter. He has a PhD and MPhil in archaeology from the University of Cambridge. He has written more than forty articles on Indigenous rock art and heritage.

Reviews
'This is a fascinating book that breathes new life into a subject dominated so long by traditional exegetic interpretations of prehistoric rock art which have achieved little collective consensus, although it is fair to say they have advanced our understanding. It is illustrated with beautiful and vibrant images throughout, and its anthropological/ethnoarchaeological approach is highly commended.'—Mark Merrony, ANTIQVVS Volume 3, Issue 4
Indigenous Heritage and Rock Art Worldwide Research in Memory of Daniel Arsenault edited by Carole Charette, Aron Mazel and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; 210 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French. 691 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696899. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696905. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Professor Daniel Arsenault, along with his wife, Nadine Desbiens, and stepson, Jacob Desbiens-Doyle, were sadly taken from this world in 2016 following a tragic car accident. Daniel was the leading exponent in Canadian Shield rock art. Working in the northern part of Quebec, Daniel explored many hundreds of square kilometres of this vast area for rock art. Working with ethnographers and First Nation people, Daniel became a formidable force in promoting this little known assemblage, lecturing all over the world and stimulating audiences wherever he went. Complementing his knowledge of rock art, Daniel also had a deep understanding of the heritage of the people whose ancestors made the images. Shortly before his death, Daniel was made an Erasmus Mundus Professor at Polytechnic Institute of Tomar in Portugal. Here, he was due to share his wealth of knowledge and enthusiasm about rock art and cultural heritage to an attentive audience.

Daniel clearly had much more to offer, and this book is an extension of his ways of thinking. He has left an important legacy that has touched the lives of many, including people who contributed to this volume.

The book has 14 thought-provoking chapters and deals with Daniel’s first love - the archaeology of artistic endeavour. It gathers together both academic colleagues and family who share with the reader elements of Daniel’s life. The book is also a serious academic volume, providing the reader with new ideas about the interpretation and dating of rock art, ethnography, heritage and material culture.

About the Author
Carole Charette holds a PhD in art education and design at Concordia University, Quebec; an MFA in stylistic interpretations in typography and a degree in graphic design at Université Laval, Quebec; a certificate in multimedia at Sheridan College, Ontario; and a diploma in exhibition design at Collège du Vieux-Montréal, Quebec. She was an assistant professor at MacEwan University in Edmonton (2014–2018) and has also been a creative director and editor of several publications about design.

Aron Mazel is a Reader in Heritage Studies in Media, Culture, and Heritage at Newcastle University and a Research Associate in the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand.

George Nash is employed at the Museum of Prehistoric Art (Quaternary and Prehistory Geosciences Centre, Maçao, Portugal [IPT]). George has been an academic and professional archaeologist for the past 35 years and has undertaken extensive fieldwork on prehistoric rock-art in Indonesia, Malaysia, Norway, Sardinia, Spain, Sweden, and more recently, the Negev (Israel).

Table of Contents
Préface / Preface ;
Nécrologie / Necrology - Daniel Arsenault ( 1957–2016 ) ;
Daniel Arsenault : The scholarly legacy gone but not forgotten ;
Dancing in the dark with firelight: the power of shaded paintings in the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg and surrounding areas, southeastern Africa – Aron Mazel ;
Contextualising megalithic rock art on Neolithic chambered tombs: A Welsh perspective – George Nash ;
Understanding landscape composition without rock art: A study of panel/canvas behaviour in the Valcamonica, Lombardy, Northern Italy – George Nash ;
Prehistory of central Portugal: brief panoramic of rock art and archaeometry studies – Sara Garcês, Hugo Gomes, Luiz Oosterbeek, Pierluigi Rosina ;
Pleistocene Art at the Beginnings of the Twentieth-First Century: Rethinking the place of Europe in a Globalised Context – Oscar Moro Abadía and Bryn Tapper ;
A multifaceted approach for contextualising the rock art of the Algonquian First Nations in the Canadian Shield – Daniel Arsenault ;
E=mc0, an equation for studying the timeframes of world rock art – Daniel Arsenault ;
Masters of the Steppe: The Impact of the Scythians and Later Nomad Societies of Eurasia Proceedings of a conference held at the British Museum, 27-29 October 2017 edited by Svetlana Pankova and St John Simpson. Paperback; 802 pages; 604 figures, 21 tables (colour throughout). 632 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696479. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696486. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Masters of the Steppe: the impact of the Scythians and later nomad societies of Eurasia consists of 45 papers presented at a major international conference held at the British Museum in 2017 on the occasion of the BP exhibition Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia, both conference and exhibition being jointly organised with the State Hermitage Museum. There are 58 contributors and co-authors from 16 countries, mostly from Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan, but also America, Britain, France, Germany, China and Mongolia. The papers range from new archaeological discoveries, results of scientific research and studies of museum collections to reconstructions of social elites, the phenomenon of monumental tomb construction, and ‘Animal Style’ art. Most results are presented for the first time in the English language and they throw a completely new light on a huge range of aspects of the lives of Scythians and other ancient nomads of Eurasia, their horses, rock art and the working of precious metals, textiles and other materials.

About the Editors
Svetlana Pankova is a senior researcher and curator of the Altai-Sayan collections in the Department of the Archaeology of Eastern Europe and Siberia in the State Hermitage Museum. Her main academic interests are sites from southern Siberia and central Asia with well-preserved organic materials dating from the 1st millennium BC to the 1st millennium AD. She is currently studying materials from the important Tashtyk-period Oglakhty burialground in the Minusinsk Basin, and textile finds from the Hermitage collection. She was the lead Hermitage curator and co-editor of the catalogue for the BP exhibition Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia (2017/18).

St John Simpson is a senior curator in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum. He has excavated extensively in the Middle East but it was his first experience of travelling across central Asia in 1991 which led him to co-direct nine seasons of excavations at ancient Merv, in present-day Turkmenistan (1992–2000), and develop extensive relations there and in Russia. He was the lead British Museum curator and co-editor of the catalogue for the BP exhibition Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia (2017/18). His previous exhibitions include Afghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World (BM, 2011) and Queen of Sheba: Treasures from Ancient Yemen (BM, 2002), and he also curated the Rahim Irvani Gallery for Ancient Iran at the British Museum (2007).

Reviews
'The main content of the volume comprises some 44 papers based on contributions given at a conference held at the British Museum, 27-29 October 2017. As one would expect of a meeting of this kind, the papers, while relevant to the main conference theme, focus on specialist aspects. The contributions are written by experts and present new material and insights or make accessible data embedded in the more obscure literature. For these reasons, there is a great deal here that is new and exciting, particularly to a western audience—a sufficient reason in itself for supporting the publication.

But as everyone who has had to publish conference proceedings knows, the art lies in transforming what is essentially a collection of disparate, often narrowly focussed, papers into a cohesive volume. The editors have done this with considerable skill and success. All the papers have been translated into English, and they have undertaken the laborious task of compiling a single bibliography, which not only saves space but makes the volume much easier to use. They have also provided an Introduction (5400 words) and a Conclusions (13000 words), both substantial pieces of work, far more than conventional bookends.

The Introduction is a fascinating text in its own right. It sets the scene in a novel way by explaining the philosophy and the process that led to the mounting of
L’arte rupestre nella penisola e nelle isole italiane: rapporti tra rocce incise e dipinte, simboli, aree montane e viabilità Rock art in the Italian peninsula and islands: issues about the relation between engraved and painted rocks, symbols, mountain areas and paths edited by Francesco M. P. Carrera, Renata Grifoni Cremonesi and Anna Maria Tosatti. Paperback; 203x276mm; 484 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 129 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698237. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698244. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

L’arte rupestre nella penisola e nelle isole italiane presents the proceedings of IFRAO 2018 – Session 2H: Rock Art in the Italian Peninsula and Islands: Issues about the Relation between Engraved and Painted Rocks, Symbols, Mountain Areas and Paths. The various papers present a remarkable synthesis of current knowledge on inscriptions, engraved and painted, on the rock walls of the Italian peninsular. In recent years an increasing amount of data has been collected, characterized by a regional and peculiar iconography with some common elements: anthropomorphic figures, weapons, daggers, halberds and other several symbols, all stylised. A peculiarity of this research is the site’s locations within small shelters, inappropriate for habitation or in places suitable for supervising mountain and territory roads; this research demonstrates similarities to that carried out in the Western Mediterranean Sea. A new subject of relates to the possible interpretations of some engravings as solar and stellar symbols related to the measuring of time and to economic, daily and seasonal factors.

L’ouvrage «Art rupestre de la Péninsule italienne, de la Sicile, de la Sardaigne et de la Corse» qui publie les actes du 20ème Congrès International « Rock Art Congres IFRAO 2018 », dont les différentes communications ont été réunies par Francesco Carrera, Renata Grifoni Cremonesi et Anna Maria Tosatti, présente une remarquable synthèse des connaissances actuelles sur les inscriptions gravées et peintes sur les parois rocheuses des régions prises en compte. Le plus souvent très schématiques, difficilement datables, elles correspondent soit à des pictogrammes qui évoquent des objets de la vie courante, soit à des idéogrammes qui transmettent des idées liées à la pensée symbolique des peuples protohistoriques qui les ont réalisées. Quelques articles sont consacrés aux cupules creusées sur des roches en plein air pour récupérer l’eau de pluie, d’autres à des rainures très profondes qui correspondent à des “polissoirs”. – Henry de Lumley - Institut de Paléontologie Humaine, Paris
Places of Memory: Spatialised Practices of Remembrance from Prehistory to Today edited by Christian Horn, Gustav Wollentz, Gianpiero Di Maida, and Annette Haug. Paperback; 205x290mm; 164 pages; 56 figures, colour throughout. 674 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696134. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696141. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Places of Memory takes a new look at spatialised practices of remembrance and its role in reshaping societies from prehistory to today, gathering researchers representing diverse but complementary fields of expertise. This diachronic outlook provides important insights into the great variety of human and social reactions examining memory, encompassing aspects of remembering, the loss of memory, reclaiming memories, and remembering things that may not have happened. The contributions to this volume expand upon Pierre Nora’s concept of lieux des memoire (places of memory) and the notion that memory is not just stored in these places but activated through human engagement. The volume presents a reflection on the creation of memories through the organisation and use of landscapes and spaces that explicitly considers the multiplicity of meanings of the past. Thus, social identities were created, reaffirmed, strengthened, and transformed through the founding, change, and reorganization of places and spaces of memory in the cultural landscape.

About the Editors
Christian Horn is a researcher and lecturer at the Department for Historical Studies at the University of Gothenburg. His scholarship focuses on Scandinavian rock art and prehistoric conflict. He is the current research coordinator of the Swedish Rock Art Research Archives as well as an advisory board member. Currently, he develops Artificial Intelligence approaches to rock art in a project funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfond (Sweden). This project includes conducting fieldwork at UNESCO world heritage site Tanum documenting rock art in 3D. He is a prolific writer in the fields of prehistoric conflict, rock art, and digital archaeology. ;

Gustav Wollentz defended his PhD in the summer of 2018 at the Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Kiel University, Germany, focusing on the relationship between difficult heritage and temporalities. He received his Bachelor and Master degree in Archaeology from Linnaeus University in Sweden. He was previously (2012-2013) involved in a research project led by Cornelius Holtorf and Anders Högberg at Linnaeus University, where he studied future perspectives within heritage management. During a period in 2018 and 2019, he was hired within the AHRC-funded ‘Heritage Futures’ project to co-author a chapter on ‘Toxic heritage’. He is currently project leader/researcher at the Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity. ;

Gianpiero Di Maida, born in Palermo (Italy) in 1980, has completed his Ph.D. at CAU Kiel in 2018, defending a thesis on the Lateglacial rock and mobile art record of Sicily, Italy. This work, recently published, has been awarded with the Johanna Mestorf Price 2019. He is currently serving as the scientific manager of the DISAPALE project at the Neanderthal Museum. ;

Annette Haug is professor for Classical Archaeology at the Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel. Her research interests concern visual culture studies on the one hand, questions of urban lifestyles and urban design on the other. After her habilitation in 2009 in Leipzig, Haug became Heisenberg fellow at the University in Munich (LMU). After receiving the professorship in Kiel in 2012 she became the co-coordinator of the graduate school ‘Human Development in Landscapes’. She has received an ERC Consolidator Grant for research into Decorative Systems in Pompeii and Herculaneum.
Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 50 2020 Papers from the fifty-third meeting of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held at the University of Leiden from Thursday 11th to Saturday 13th July 2019 edited by Daniel Eddisford. Paperback; 206x255mm; 364 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (127 colour plates). PSAS50 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696530. £69.00 (No VAT). £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £78.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies is the principal international academic forum for research on the Arabian Peninsula. First convened in 1968 it is the only annual academic event for the study of the Arabian Peninsula that brings together researchers from all over the world to present and discuss current fieldwork and the latest research. The Seminar covers an extensive range of subjects that include anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, numismatics, theology, and more besides, from the earliest times to the present day or, in the fields of political and social history, to around the end of the Ottoman Empire (1922).

The 53rd Seminar for Arabian Studies was hosted by the University of Leiden and took place in the Lipsius Building from Thursday IASA. In total sixty-five papers and twenty-three posters were presented at the three-day event. On Friday 12 July a special session on the stone tools of prehistoric Arabia was held, the papers from this session are published in a supplement to the main Seminar Proceedings.
Caractérisation, continuités et discontinuités des manifestations graphiques des sociétés préhistoriques Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 3, Session XXVIII-4 edited by Elena Paillet, Marcela Sepulveda, Eric Robert, Patrick Paillet and Nicolas Mélard. Paperback; 205x290mm; 118 pages; 108 figures, 7 tables, 1 plate. French text. Print RRP: £32.00. 640 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696356. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696363. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Set-up a Standing Order to save 20% on XVIII UISPP World Congress proceedings volumes or save even more by pre-ordering the full set at a special low bundle price. Click here to see full offer details.

This volume presents the proceedings of Session XXVIII-4 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France), Caractérisation, continuités et discontinuités des manifestations graphiques des sociétés préhistoriques. Papers address the question of exchange and mobility in prehistoric societies in relation to the evolution of their environments through the prism of their graphic productions, on objects or on walls. This volume offers the opportunity to question their symbolic behaviours within very diverse temporal, chrono-cultural or geographic contexts. It also provides the framework for a discussion on cultural identity and how this was asserted in the face of environmental or social changes or constraints.

French Description
La session du XVIIIème congrès de l’UIPP intitulée « caractérisation, continuités et discontinuités des manifestations graphiques des sociétés préhistoriques » aborde la question des échanges et de la mobilité des sociétés préhistoriques, en prise avec l’évolution de leurs milieux, à travers le prisme de leurs productions graphiques, sur objets ou sur parois. Ce volume offre l’occasion de questionner leurs comportements symboliques, au sein de contextes temporels, chrono-culturels ou géographiques très divers. Il offre aussi le cadre d’une discussion sur l’identité culturelle et de la façon dont ils l’ont affirmée, face aux changements ou aux contraintes environnementales ou sociales. Propulseurs décorés au Magdalénien, ou objets en ivoire du Gravettien, témoignent tour à tour de permanences techniques ou symboliques, et en même temps de singularités locales à l’échelle de l’Europe. La notion d’identité culturelle est abordée à travers la production singulière de l’art mobilier du Taillis des Côteaux, ou de la thématique, rare mais pas secondaire, du félin dans l’art pariétal et mobilier, illustrant des frontières souvent ténues entre sphères fonctionnelle et symbolique. Enfin, la relation entre l’art et son environnement se décline sur des territoires rupestres plus récents mais tout aussi remarquables, le Bassin parisien au Mésolithique, et l’Egypte prédynastique. Les articles de cette session montrent ainsi comment les systèmes de pensées exprimés par des images peuvent ainsi perdurer sur le temps long, et témoigner de pratiques sociales élaborées, dont les rythmes ne sont pas toujours en adéquation avec les productions matérielles du quotidien.

Elena Paillet est conservatrice du Patrimoine au Service régional de l’Archéologie, DRAC Bretagne et UMR 6566 CReAAH Université de Rennes 1.

Marcela Sepulveda est Professeur Associée Escuela de Antropología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Chercheur associée UMR 8096 ArchAm (CNRS-Paris 1) & UMR8220 LAMS (CNRS- Sorbonne Université).

Eric Robert est préhistorien, Maitre de conférences au Museum national d’Histoire naturelle, UMR Hitoire naturelle de l’Homme Préhistorique 7194 (CNRS, MNHN, UPVD).

Patrick Paillet est préhistorien, Maître de conférences HDR (habilité à diriger des recherches) du Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle (Département Homme et Environnement, UMR 7194 « Histoire naturelle de l’Homme préhistorique »).

Nicolas Mélard est conservateur du patrimoine, archéologue, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des musées de France, UMR 7055 Préhistoire et Technologie (CNRS / Université Paris Nanterre).
Peintures et gravures rupestres des Amériques: Empreintes culturelles et territoriales Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 2, Session XXV-3 edited by Brigitte Faugère and Philippe Costa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 108 pages; 66 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). French text. Print RRP: £28.00.. 639 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696332. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696349. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Set-up a Standing Order to save 20% on XVIII UISPP World Congress proceedings volumes or save even more by pre-ordering the full set at a special low bundle price.
Click here to see full offer details.

The rock art of the Americas was produced at very different times and by different cultures, both by hunter-gatherers, fishermen and by farmers from village or state societies. Each group can be characterised by diverse styles and techniques. The function of rock art depended on religious, political or social concerns that referred to a particular context and time. Peintures et gravures rupestres des Amériques: Empreintes culturelles et territoriales presents the proceedings from Session XXV-3 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France). Papers address the following questions: How does the study of rock art make it possible to culturally characterize its authors? What does it tell us about the function of sites? How and under what circumstances does it make it possible to delimit a cultural territory? The six articles in this volume provide case studies from Mexico, El Salvador, Costa Rica, French Guiana and Chile.

Brigitte Faugère is a professor of archaeology at the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Since the 1990s, she has led research projects on the cultures of north-central and western Mexico, in particular in the field of rock art.

Philippe Costa is an archaeologist specializing in Central America and an associate researcher at the Center for Mexican and Central American Studies. Since 2018, he has directed a Franco-German-Costa Rican archaeological project in the Guanacaste mountain range of Costa Rica.

French Description:
L’art rupestre des Amériques a été produit à des époques et par des cultures très différentes, tant par les chasseurs cueilleurs pêcheurs que par les agriculteurs inscrits dans des sociétés villageoises ou étatiques. Chaque groupe ou société a développé des styles d’une grande diversité et utilisé des techniques différentes, qui les caractérisent. La fonction de l’art rupestre dépendait de préoccupations religieuses, politiques ou sociales qui se réfèrent à un contexte et à une époque particulière. Les questions qu’abordent ce symposium organisé lors du XVIIIe colloque annuel de l’IUSPP sont ainsi : En quoi l’étude de l’art rupestre permet-il de caractériser culturellement ses auteurs ? Que nous apprend-il sur la fonction des sites ? En quoi et dans quelles circonstances permet-il de délimiter un territoire culturel ? Les six articles que comptent ce volume permettent d’aborder des études de cas portant sur le Mexique, le Salvador, le Costa Rica, la Guyane française et le Chili. Même si des peintures rupestres sont connues dans tous ces pays, les études proposées dans ce volume concernent en majorité des gravures. Deux grandes options ont été choisies par les auteurs : s’intéresser à une tradition particulière et à sa fonction dans une région donnée (Philippe Costa pour le Salvador, Joseph Mountjoy pour l’Occident du Mexique, Felipe Sol pour le Costa Rica, Françoise Fauconnier pour le Chili) ou bien recenser les différentes traditions présentes sur un territoire et essayer d’interpréter leur diversité (B. Faugère pour le centre-nord du Mexique, Gérald Migeon pour la Guyane française).

Brigitte Faugère est archéologue spécialiste du Mexique et Professeur à l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon- Sorbonne. Elle dirige depuis les années 1990 des projets de recherche sur les cultures du centre-nord et de l’Occident du Mexique, en particulier dans le domaine de l’Art rupestre. Elle est membre sénior de l’Institut Universitaire de France.

Philippe Costa est archéologue spécialiste de l’Amérique Centrale et chercheur as
The Rock-Art Landscapes of Rombalds Moor, West Yorkshire Standing on Holy Ground by Vivien Deacon. Paperback; 205x290mm; 228 pages; 163 figures; 36 tables. 605 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694581. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694598. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This landscape study of the rock-art of Rombalds Moor, West Yorkshire, considers views of and from the sites. In an attempt to understand the rock-art landscapes of prehistory the study considered the environment of the moor and its archaeology along with the ethnography from the whole circumpolar region.

All the rock-art sites were visited, and the sites, motifs and views recorded. The data was analysed at four spatial scales, from the whole moor down to the individual rock. Several large prominent and impressive carved rocks, interpreted as natural monuments, were found to feature in the views from many much smaller rock-art sites. Several clusters of rock-art sites were identified. An alignment was also identified, composed of carved stones perhaps moved into position. Other perhaps-moved carved stones were also identified. The possibility that far-distant views might be significant was also indicated by some of the findings.

The physicality of carving arose as a major theme. The natural monuments are all difficult or dangerous to carve; conversely, the more common, simple sites mostly required the carver to kneel or crouch down. This, unexpectedly for British rock-art, raises comparisons with some North American rock-art, where some highly visible sites were carved by religious specialists, and others, inconspicuous and much smaller, were carved by ordinary people.

About the Author
Vivien Deacon is a Research Associate at the Department of Archaeology, University of York. Following a career in the NHS, she did a BA in Archaeology at York and went on to be awarded a PhD in 2018.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
Preface ;
Chapter One: Background to the study ;
Chapter Two: Encountering Rock-art ;
Chapter Three: Landscapes of Rock-art ;
Chapter Four: Rombalds Moor ;
Chapter Five: Methodology ;
Chapter Six: Results I - The Whole Moor ;
Chapter Seven: Results II - Natural Monuments in their Large Locales ;
Chapter Eight: Results III - Small Locales ;
Chapter Nine: Results IV - The individual carved rock ;
Chapter Ten: Discussion ;
Appendices

Reviews
‘Suffice to say, this publication makes yet another splendid addition to the already burgeoning bookcase of regional rock art studies in the UK.’—Kenneth Lymer, The Prehistoric Society, October 2020
Anthropomorphic Images in Rock Art Paintings and Rock Carvings edited by Terence Meaden and Herman Bender. 606 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693577. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693584. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the realm of rock art, humanlike images appear widely through time and space from the Upper Palaeolithic to the Neolithic and Bronze Ages, and for some continents to later, yet still prehistoric, times. The artworks discussed in Anthropomorphic Images in Rock Art Paintings and Rock Carvings range from paintings, engravings or scratchings on cave walls and rock shelters, images pecked into rocky surfaces or upon standing stones, and major sacred sites (among them Gobekli Tepe, Avebury, Stonehenge, and the Palaeolithic Chauvet Cave) in which the possibility exists of recovery of the meanings intended by the artists and sculptors. Such prospects can relate to known or inferred legends, myths, folklore, rites and ritual, and often allude to matters that recognise the unremitting benefits of human, animal and crop fertility to humankind. Occasionally, relevant art forms are present not in whole but as pars pro toto, in which a part stands for or symbolises the whole. Images or artistic compositions often articulate, in ways more or less manifest, scenes of dramatic action as with hunting and dancing, mating and birthing, ritual and ceremony, some of which may openly or latently express yearnings for the rewards of fruitful fecundity – as with the much-loved worldview known as the hieros gamos or Sacred Marriage.

About the Editors
Terence Meaden has Oxford University degrees in archaeology (MSc) and physics (MA, DPhil). Formerly a physics professor, in retirement he is working full time in fieldwork and landscape archaeology studying aspects of the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods, chiefly in Ireland, Scotland and England. Recent publications include Stonehenge, Avebury and Drombeg Stone Circles Deciphered (2016), contributions to the Edinburgh University Journal of Lithic Studies (2017), and The Origins of the Universe, Earth, Life and Humanity (2018).

Herman Bender is an independent researcher with a background in geology (professional emphasis) and a technical field in industry. An amateur astronomer with decades of experience and approved historical consultant, he has nationally and internationally published in the fields of archeoastronomy, prehistoric trail research, petroform research, applied geophysics, cultural landscape studies and Northern archaic shamanistic traditions.
Imágenes y Paisajes: El Arte Rupestre del Noreste de Catamarca, Argentina by Eva Amanda Calomino. Paperback; ii+280 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English abstract. 102 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693911. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693928. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

In the Argentine Northwest, northeast of Catamarca, there are a set of shelters and caves located in the rainforest with rock art with virtually no background. Little is known about the occupants of these spaces and their past practices. In order to learn more about these, this book addresses the study and systematic analysis of the plastic-thematic-compositional repertoire of the rock art sites of ‘Los Algarrobales’ and their spatial and temporal distribution. In this way, it is possible to approach the understanding of the modalities of appropriation of the people of the inhabited area, the relationship that they would have maintained with the environment, as well as the distinction of various events and uses of different places and, in this way, contribute to the knowledge of the historical, social and cultural development of the area. Throughout the reading, we start to glimpse the archaeological landscapes related to rock art for this sector of the southern Andean area.

About the Author
Eva Amanda Calomino received her Doctorate in Archaeology from Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). She has participated in diverse research in the south Andean area (Argentine Northwest and Bolivia) as well as in Sinai and Luxor (Egypt) and has collaborated with multiple national and international research projects.

Spanish description
En el Noroeste Argentino, al noreste de Catamarca, se encuentran un conjunto de aleros y cuevas emplazados en las yungas con arte rupestre prácticamente sin antecedentes. Poco se conoce sobre los ocupantes de estos espacios y sus prácticas pasadas. Con el in de conocer más sobre éstos, en estas páginas se aborda el estudio y el análisis sistemático del repertorio plástico-temático-compositivo de los sitios con arte rupestre de Los Algarrobales (Catamarca) y su distribución espacial y temporal. De este modo, es posible acercarnos a la comprensión de las modalidades de apropiación de las personas de la zona habitada, la relación que las mismas habrían mantenido con el entorno, así como la distinción de diversos eventos y usos de distintos de los lugares y, de este modo, aportar al conocimiento del desarrollo histórico, social y cultural del área. A lo largo de la lectura, nos acercamos a vislumbrar los paisajes arqueológicos relacionados con el arte rupestre para este sector del área meridional andina.

Sobre el Autor
Doctora en Arqueología por la Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Ha participado en investigaciones en el área Surandina (en el Noroeste argentino y en Bolivia) y en Sinaí y Luxor (Egipto) y ha colaborado con múltiples proyectos de investigación nacionales e internacionales. Se ha desempañado en docencia en dicha universidad, ha publicado artículos y libros sobre sus temas de investigación ha y dictado ponencias y conferencias en Argentina y otros países. En el noreste de la provincia de Catamarca ha desarrollado su investigación doctoral sobre los paisajes arqueológicos rupestres de Los Algarrobales y actualmente desarrolla su investigación posdoctoral sobre el análisis de los small finds, en el del sitio Tell el-Ghaba (Norte de Sinaí, Egipto).
Carving Interactions: Rock Art in the Nomadic Landscape of the Black Desert, North-Eastern Jordan by Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+206 pages; 216 figures, 32 tables (129 colour pages). 577 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693119. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693126. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Safaitic rock art of the North Arabian basalt desert is a unique and understudied material, one of the few surviving traces of the elusive herding societies that inhabited this region in antiquity. Yet little is known about this rock art and its role in the desert societies. Why did these peoples make carvings in the desert and what was the significance of this cultural practice? What can the rock art tell us about the relationship between the nomads and their desert landscape? This book investigates these questions through a comprehensive study of over 4500 petroglyphs from the Jebel Qurma region of the Black Desert in north-eastern Jordan. It explores the content of the rock art, how it was produced and consumed by its makers and audience, and its relationship with the landscape. This is the first-ever systematic study of the Safaitic petroglyphs from the Black Desert and it is unique for the study of Arabian rock art. It demonstrates the value of a material approach to rock art and the unique insights that rock art can provide into the relationship between nomadic herders and the wild and domestic landscape.

About the Author
Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard (PhD, Leiden University) is an archaeologist specialising in rock art studies and social zooarchaeology. Nathalie has worked on excavations in the Netherlands and Germany and on rock art surveys in Jordan and the USA.
Living with Heritage: The Case of Tsodilo World Heritage Site and Neighbouring Localities by Stella Basinyi. Paperback; 203x276mm; 184 pages; 15 figures; 19 tables (13 pages in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 95 2019 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 99. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693041. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693058. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Cultural Heritage Management in most parts of Africa has been concerned and focused on conservation and preservation of cultural and natural heritage and the development of sites for tourism and economic benefit. In this venture, the tangible heritage such as monuments and landscapes become the focus and of primary significance. Therefore, most efforts have failed to grasp the significance and relevance of cultural heritage to the local communities and the existing traditional and cultural attachment to heritage sites beyond the economic gain. Of late, operational guidelines of the WH Conventions have targeted the engagement of communities in the management of their local heritage and shaping visitor experiences. The major challenge is the implementation of these agreements and restoration of cultural pride in local communities. The communities’ interest in heritage areas has been overshadowed by the perceived idea of economic gain and the global agenda for preservation of monuments for future generation as the foremost primary benefit in heritage over cultural rights and entitlement to heritage sites, present day cultural valuation and traditional use.

In 2008 several heritage sites in Botswana were opened for tourism in addition to the Tsodilo World Heritage Site. Furthermore, in June 2014 the Okavango Delta covering a vast range of land occupied by cultural communities was also inscribed on the World Heritage List, becoming the second World Heritage Site in the country. However, insufficient research and analysis has been undertaken to understand how local communities and local cultures respond to these ventures. The study is case study based, presenting an overview of community transformation and responses to universalized heritage value and collective global view that characterize heritage status of cultural materials and the interactions of local cultures and traditions with the concepts of heritage and culture in heritage sites as globalised platforms. In this regard, it is evident through this study that the interlocutors are aware of their community boundaries and value in response to a national and global process of ‘valuation’ of the heritage site that is not theirs.

About the Author
Stella Basinyi obtained a BA (Humanities) degree in Archaeology and French Language (2006-2009) and Postgraduate Diploma in Education (2010-2011) from the University of Botswana. She pursued an MA in Culture and Environment in Africa (2011-2013) and a PhD in disciplines of Cultural Studies and social Sciences which contributes to a critical inspection of the World Heritage Program.
Messages from the Past: Rock Art of Al-Hajar Mountains by Angelo E. Fossati. Paperback; 210x297mm; xxx+304 pages; 398 figures; 10 maps; 1 table (215 colour pages). (Print RRP £58.00). 557 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 4. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692860. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692877. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £58.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Turtles, ibexes, ships, inscriptions... Thousands of engraved and painted figures intrigue visitors in the wadis of Al-Hajar Mountains. Who created these enigmatic figures and when were they made? What are their hidden meanings? For the first time, this volume tries to answer these questions. It is the result of the archaeological surveys and investigations undertaken by the author over the last ten years under the patronage of the Ministry of Heritage and Culture. In this book, the author takes the reader on an in-depth journey into the various themes present in the rock art of Oman. He offers theories on the chronology and interpretation, while exploring the landscape setting of the decorated panels and how best to research these. Several beautiful photographs and scientific tracings of the rock art accompany the text. The volume closes offering to enthusiasts and tourists a series of guided visits with GPS maps to the most interesting and visible rock art sites protected by Royal Decrees of the Sultanate.

About the author
Angelo E. Fossati is an Italian archaeologist specialized in rock art studies. He teaches Prehistory and Protohistory at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan (Italy) and researches mainly on Alpine megalithism and pre-Roman inscriptions. Dr Fossati has conducted rock art documentation and studies in several countries including Italy, France, Portugal and the USA. He has been consultant for the UNESCO Word Heritage Center and is President of «Footsteps of Man» an Italian rock art society member of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations. The author has published several papers and books on various rock art traditions. In Oman, he has conducted numerous surveys and documentation works under the patronage of the Ministry of Heritage and Culture in several areas of Al-Hajar Mountains.
A Painted Ridge: Rock art and performance in the Maclear District, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa by David Mendel Witelson. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+148 pages; 39 figures (31 colour pages). 91 2019 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 98. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692440. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692457. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

A Painted Ridge is a book about the San (Bushmen) practice of rock painting. In it, David Witelson explores a suite of spatially close San rock painting sites in the Maclear District of South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province. As a suite, the sites are remarkable because, despite their proximity to each other, they share patterns of similarity and simultaneous difference. They are a microcosm that reflects, in a broad sense, a trend found at other painted sites in South Africa. Rather than attempting to explain these patterns chiefly in terms of chronological breaks or cultural discontinuities, this book seeks to understand patterns of similarity and difference primarily in terms of the performative nature of San image-making. In doing so, the bygone and almost unrecorded practice of San rock art is considered relative to ethnographically well-documented and observed forms of San expressive culture. The approach in the book draws on concepts and terminology from the discipline of performance studies to characterise the San practice of image-making as well as to coordinate otherwise disparate ideas about that practice. It is a study that aims to explicate the nuances of what David Lewis-Williams called the ‘production and consumption’ of San rock art.

About the Author
David Mendel Witelson is a doctoral candidate with Professor David Pearce at the University of the Witwatersrand’s Rock Art Research Institute. His doctoral research is on hunter-gatherer rock art in the north Eastern Cape Province of South Africa with a focus on the role that image-making plays in establishing spatial connections and social relations. In addition to rock art, his research interests include the Holocene archaeology of southern Africa, archaeological method and theory, and the intersection of mainstream archaeological and rock art research. He has published previously in the fields of rock art and lithic analysis. David lives in Linden, Johannesburg.
El sol, símbolo de continuidad y permanencia: un estudio multidisciplinar sobre la figura soliforme en el arte esquemático de la Provincia de Cádiz by Mercedes Versaci. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+208 pages; 156 figures, 38 tables (151 colour pages); Spanish text. 89 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691948. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691955. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The purpose of this study is to analyze the soliform figures in schematic cave paintings. The author presents research on all the global factors relevant to the study of these figures (technological, typological, stylistic, semiotic, astronomical, anthropological and landscape) and their relationship with the whole of schematic rock paintings and the societies that produced them. The geographical scope of the study is the area of Laguna de la Janda and Campo de Gibraltar (Cadiz).

One of the arguments the author maintains in this research is the shortage of studies conducted in the territory of Cadiz in relation to these figures – and to rock art in general, which has been a central motif in almost all primitive religions or mythologies since the birth of agricultural societies. The recurrence of abstract motifs within the rock art of this area, and its durability over time, could be an indication of common cultural patterns among the different populations that inhabited the province. But these same signs are also repeated in different parts of the world – could it therefore suggest universal aspects of our species?

The interpretation of these symbols has been – and continues to be – subject to intangible or subjective issues; therefore, it is not exempt from possible projections of our own culture. We think that we are able to approach, in a scientific way, the ritual and symbolic aspects of those who elaborated these paintings. In this book, the author proposes an alternative according to the theoretical framework of disciplines such as ethnography, anthropology, landscape archaeology, archaeoastronomy and semiotics.

La finalidad de este estudio es el análisis de la figura soliforme en el arte rupestre esquemático. Presentamos una investigación global atendiendo a todos los factores susceptibles de estudio (tecnológicos, tipológicos, estilísticos, semióticos, astronómicos, antropológicos y paisajísticos) de esta figura y de su relación con el conjunto del arte rupestre esquemático y con las sociedades autoras del mismo. El ámbito geográfico de nuestro estudio será el entorno de la Laguna de la Janda y el Campo de Gibraltar (Cádiz).

Uno de los argumentos que esgrimimos para la realización de esta investigación es la escasa producción de estudios realizados en el territorio gaditano en relación a esta figura- y al arte rupestre en general- que ha sido motivo central en casi todas las religiones o mitologías primitivas desde el nacimiento de las sociedades agropecuarias. La recurrencia de los motivos abstractos dentro del arte rupestre de la zona que nos ocupa, y su perduración en el tiempo, podría ser indicio de patrones culturales comunes entre las diferentes poblaciones que habitaron nuestra provincia. Pero estos mismos signos también se repiten en diferentes partes del mundo. ¿Podríamos estar hablando de aspectos universales de nuestra especie? Somos conscientes que la interpretación de este símbolo ha estado y está sujeta a cuestiones subjetivas o intangibles, por consiguiente, no exenta de posibles proyecciones de nuestra propia cultura. Creemos que estamos en condiciones de aproximarnos de una manera científica a los aspectos rituales y simbólicos de aquellos que elaboraron estas pinturas, proponiendo una alternativa desde los marcos teóricos de disciplinas como la Etnografía, la Antropología, la Arqueología del Paisaje, la Arqueoastronomía y la Semiótica.

About the Author
MERCEDES VERSACI received her Ph.D. from the University of Cádiz in 2018 and she is an active member of the research group HUM 812: Studies in Prehistory, Archeology, Ethnoarchaeology, Anthropology and Cultural Landscape (PAEAPC) at the same institution. Her studies on the rock art of the Province of Cádiz go back to the year 2007, and she has published (in specialist magazines) several researches concerning paintings and funeral customs in recent prehistory. She has participated in vari
Aesthetics, Applications, Artistry and Anarchy: Essays in Prehistoric and Contemporary Art A Festschrift in honour of John Kay Clegg, 11 January 1935 – 11 March 2015 edited by Jillian Huntley and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+170 pages; 100 figures, 5 tables (42 plates in colour). 496 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919986. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919993. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Scholar and artist John Clegg made a pioneering contribution to the study of rock art. He was the first in the Australian academy to teach rock art research as a dedicated subject (Sydney University 1965-2000), supervising the first graduate students with such specialty, subsequently supporting their careers. He is honoured here for much more than his novelty and the contributions in this monograph pay homage to the late John Kay Clegg’s diverse influence. Rock art researchers from around the globe traverses topics such as aesthetics, the application of statistical analyses, frontier conflict and layered symbolic meanings, the deliberate use of optical illusion, and the contemporary significance of ancient and street art. They cover rock art assemblages from Columbia, South Africa, Europe and across Clegg’s beloved Australia. They interrogate descriptive and analytic concepts such as repainting, memorialisation and graffiti, as well as questioning the ethical impactions of research practices touching rock art as a part of its study.

The tributes in this book are necessarily as individual as the man they honour, and John Clegg was certainly an individual. The longevity of ideas and perspectives Clegg brought to the pursuit of rock art research is demonstrated in this collection of works. Clegg’s continued relevance is testament to the value and magnitude of his contribution. He is a deserving subject for a Festschrift.

About the Editors
Dr JILLIAN HUNTLEY is a Research Fellow at the Place Evolution Rock Art Heritage Unit in the Centre for Social and Cultural Research at Griffith University, Australia. She specialises in the physiochemical characterization of rock art and other archaeological pigments and has been privileged in recent years to work on high-profile Australasian finds. A field archaeologist by trade, Jillian has 15 years experience in public archaeology and has worked with Aboriginal peoples across Australia since 2001 recording rock art as part of both research and commercial projects. Best known as an archaeological scientist, Jillian has published on diverse topics relating to rock art from the complex impacts of mining to pseudoarchaeology.

Dr GEORGE NASH is an Associate Professor at the Museum of Prehistoric Art, Quaternary and Prehistory Geosciences Centre, Maçao, Portugal. George has been a professional archaeologist for the past 25 years and has undertaken extensive fieldwork on prehistoric rock-art and mobility art in Chile, Denmark, Indonesia, Malaysia, Norway, Sardinia, Spain and Sweden. Between 1994 and 1997 he directed excavations at the La Hougue Bie passage grave on Jersey, one of Europe’s largest Neolithic monuments and has also directed preliminary excavations at Westminster Hall, London. He has also written, edited and co-edited many books on prehistoric art and monumentality including the most recent book entitled Archaeologies of Rock Art: South American Perspectives (2018). In the past George has been involved in a number of major rock-art recording and interpretation projects, the most recent being in the Central Negev region of southern Israel and in central Andean Chile. In his native Wales, he is convener for the Welsh Rock art Organisation (WRAO). In addition to fieldwork, he has also written and presented programmes on European rock-art and contemporary graffiti for the BBC.
Funerary Archaeology and Changing Identities: Community Practices in Roman-Period Sardinia by Mauro Puddu. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+180 pages; 78 figures, 3 tables (31 plates in colour). 472 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 55. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690002. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690019. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Funerary Archaeology and Changing Identities: Community Practices in Roman-Period Sardinia examines three inter-woven research questions. The first one concerns a theoretical issue of how identities can be inferred from archaeology; the second asks what were the material relationships between communities of Sardinia and the Roman world’s power and culture when based on the burial evidence on the ground; third question asked was how can the interpretive frameworks of today’s world and symbolic structures affect our understanding of the past. These questions are approached through the detailed analysis of the funerary evidence from mostly unpublished burial sites from southern and central Sardinia that can become a key to an alternative interpretation of the island and of other Roman Provinces. The questions are answered throughout the book by drawing on social studies, particularly post-colonial approaches to the history of the past, interpretive frameworks on the Roman world, and semiotic theories. By in-depth look at the archaeological evidence from Sardinia’s burials, the book retrieves the active and creative role played by the local communities in shaping of the Roman world within the specific material and historical conditions they lived in.

About the Author
MAURO PUDDU has spent most of his years as an archaeologist researching Sardinia. After studying at the Università degli Studi di Cagliari for his BA in Cultural Heritage and his first Masters in Classical Archaeology, he decided to broaden his research horizons taking a second Masters at University College, London, in theoretical Archaeology. During his PhD research at the University of Cambridge, Faculty of Classics he applied the knowledge acquired in Italy and the United Kingdom to study the funerary practices of Roman-period Sardinia. In a decade of research, the author has taken part in numerous successful archaeological projects, among which were the excavation of ‘La Sella del Diavolo’, Cagliari, run by the Soprintendenza archeologica di Cagliari; the Al-Mafjar Project in Jericho, Palestine, run by Birzeit University and the Khalili Research Centre, University of Oxford; and the Interamna Lirenas Project, run by the University of Cambridge. In recent years, during research on future projects and publications, Mauro has been working around London and Cambridge on a vast number of projects, which included the excavation of the Westminster School next to Westminster Abbey.

Reviews
'By incorporating a robust theoretical framework, the author joins others […] in rejecting the now-outdated conception of “Romanized” cities along Sardinia's coast versus a “native” rural hinterland… The author is at his strongest when dealing with theory.'—Allison L.C. Emmerson, American Journal of Archaeology, September 2020
Art of the Ancestors: Spatial and temporal patterning in the ceiling rock art of Nawarla Gabarnmang, Arnhem Land, Australia by Robert G. Gunn. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+902 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. 492 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690705. £150.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690712. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume presents a new systematic approach to the archaeological recording and documentation of rock art developed to analyse the spatial and temporal structure of complex rock art panels. Focusing on the ceiling art at Nawarla Gabarnmang, one of the richest rock art sites in Arnhem Land the approach utilised DStretch-enhanced photographs to record 1391 motifs from 42 separate art panels across the ceiling. Harris Matrices were then built to show the sequence of superimpositions for each art panel. Using common attributes, including features identified by Morellian Method (a Fine Art method not previously employed in archaeological rock art studies), contemporaneous motifs within panels were then aggregated into individual layers. The art layers of the various panels were then inter-related using the relative and absolute chronological evidence to produce a full relative sequence for the site as a whole. This provided a story of the art that began some 13,000 years ago and concluded around 60 years ago, with a major change identified in the art some 450 years ago. The method was shown to be invaluable to the resolution of many difficult issues associated with the identification of motifs, their superimpositions and the development of art sequences.

About the Author
Dr Robert Gunn is a consultant archaeologist with over 35 years’ experience and who specialises in the recording and management of Australian Aboriginal rock art. He has published over 50 papers and monographs, mostly on areas of rock art research. He has worked throughout Australia with research interests in Arnhem Land, Central Australia, Western Victoria, south-western regions of Western Australia, and Far Western NSW. This work has involved the collection of both archaeological and ethnographic information and, consequently, he has worked closely with senior Aboriginal custodians and traditional owners. Robert completed his PhD at Monash University, Australia, in 2007. He is currently a Research Fellow affiliated with Monash Indigenous Study Centre, Monash University, and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage.
Narratives and Journeys in Rock Art: A Reader edited by George Nash and Aron Mazel. Paperback; 175x245mm; xiv+686 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (81 plates in colour). 484 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915605. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915612. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £75.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Why publish a Reader? Today, it is relatively easy and convenient to switch on your computer and download an academic paper. However, as many scholars have experienced, historic references are difficult to access. Moreover, some are now lost and are merely references in later papers. This can be frustrating. This book provides a series of papers from all over the world that extend as far back as the 1970s when rock art research was in its infancy. The papers presented in the Reader reflect the development in the various approaches that have influenced advancing scholarly research.

About the Editors
GEORGE NASH is an Associate Professor at Geosciences Centre of Coimbra University (u. ID73-FCT), Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (IPT), Portugal. Dr Nash is a specialist in openair rock art and contemporary street art and has recently undertaken fieldwork and research in Andean Chile, the Negev Desert in southern Israel, central Portugal and Wales.

ARON MAZEL is a Reader in Heritage Studies at Newcastle University, United Kingdom. Dr Mazel has done extensive recording of rock art in the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg (South Africa) and Northumberland (United Kingdom).
Grabados rupestres en La Mancha centro: documentación y estudio de un patrimonio desconocido Rock engravings in La Mancha center: documentation and study of an unknown heritage by Rocío Ramiro Rodero, Víctor Manuel López-Menchero Bendicho, Ángel Marchante Ortega, Ángel Javier Cárdenas Martín-Buitrago, Pedro Miguel García Zamorano and Jorge Onrubia Pintado. Paperback; 203x276mm; 116 pages; illustrated throughout with 67 plates in colour. Spanish text with English abstract. 63 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919962. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919979. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This book deals with the documentation and interpretation of the rock sites located in La Mancha center (Spain), from the detailed study of the symbols that have been engraved in the rock. These sites, from historical times, can provide valuable information for the study of the mentalities and beliefs of the popular classes during the Modern Age, strongly influenced by the atmosphere created after the Counter-Reformation. Crosses, calvaries, orbs, human and animal representations, letters, cup-marks and game boards make up an authentic symbolic universe, of clear Christian roots, whose understanding is possible to achieve even though it requires collaboration between multiple fields of knowledge such as archaeology, theology, numismatics, heraldry, architecture, sculpture, painting...

Unfortunately, researchers have paid scant attention to the issue at hand, assuming paradigms that from our point of view should be reviewed, such as the authorship of the petroglyphs or their chrono-cultural affiliation. The study of the rock formations located in La Mancha center can shed light on these and other subjects, providing a good starting point in order to improve the documentation and interpretation of historical rock engravings in other parts of the world.

El presente libro aborda la documentación e interpretación de las estaciones rupestres localizadas en La Mancha centro (España), a partir del estudio pormenorizado de los símbolos que han sido grabados en la roca. Estas estaciones, de época histórica, pueden proporcionar valiosa información para el estudio de las mentalidades y creencias de las clases populares durante la Edad Media y la Edad Moderna, fuertemente influenciadas por la atmósfera creada tras la Contrarreforma. Cruces, calvarios, orbes, representaciones humanas y de animales, letras, cazoletas y tableros de juego conforman un auténtico universo simbólico, de clara raíz cristiana, cuya comprensión es posible alcanzar aunque requiere de la colaboración entre múltiples ramas del saber como la arqueología, la teología, la numismática, la heráldica, la arquitectura, la escultura, la pintura...

Desafortunadamente, hasta el momento los investigadores han prestado escasa atención al tema que nos ocupa, asumiendo paradigmas que desde nuestro punto de vista deben ser revisados, como la autoría de los petroglifos o su adscripción crono-cultural. El estudio de las estaciones rupestres localizadas en La Mancha centro puede arrojar luz sobre estos y otros temas, proporcionando un buen punto de partida de cara a mejorar la documentación e interpretación de los grabados rupestres de época histórica en otros puntos del mundo.
Giving the Past a Future: Essays in Archaeology and Rock Art Studies in Honour of Dr. Phil. h.c. Gerhard Milstreu edited by James Dodd and Ellen Meijer. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+300 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (96 plates in colour). 61 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919702. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919719. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume celebrates the work of Dr. Phil. h.c. Gerhard Milstreu in his 40th year as director of Tanum Museum of Rock Carving and Rock Art Research Centre, Underslös, Sweden. Here, a feast of scholarly contributions from across Europe, at all levels of study have been collected. Each and every one of the chapters addresses aspects connected to the work Gerhard has done over the last 40 years. Through their words and images, these pay respect to and acknowledge Gerhard’s achievements in the fields of rock art documentation, research, international collaboration and outreach. Gerhard has striven from the outset to: promote the importance of the image within archaeology, increase public interest and involvement with prehistoric art, and to encourage the next generation to continue the work. Thus, many authors think very deeply about the images, how we interpret them and how we record them, particularly in light of recent advances in technology. Others explore how Gerhard has fostered dissemination and public involvement. The range of countries and subjects represented; France, Italy, Holland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and the UK; reflects the success of Gerhard’s focus on international collaboration and dialogue. Given Gerhard’s emphasis on giving the past a future, it is appropriate that leading up and coming scholars, from all levels of higher education, are also present and have the opportunity to present their latest research.

About the Editors
JAMES DODD is currently a PhD scholar at the Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies, Aarhus University, Denmark. Originally educated at Durham University, James is a specialist in the study, analysis and documentation of the prehistoric rock art of Scandinavia. During the past few years, he has worked extensively in the field, becoming versed in the archaeology of the areas with various museums and institutions in the Scandinavian countries, in particular Bornholms Museum, Denmark. His current PhD project investigates the extent of homogeneity or diversity within Southern Tradition rock art. In addition to high-level statistical analyses and GIS, James is undertaking the largest programme of surface-based rock art documentation ever conducted in Denmark, on the island of Bornholm. Advances in technology are brought into the field with processing of image-based models occurring on site using remote access to cluster processing on the Danish e-Infrastructure Collaboration’s High Performance Computer: Abacus 2.0.

ELLEN MEIJER has been working with the documentation of rock carvings for the past 22 years. She has learned the ins and outs of documentation at Tanums Hällristningsmuseum Underslös. Since 2011, she has worked for projects on rock art documentation at the Swedish Rock Art Research Archives and the University of Gothenburg, as a research assistant, as well as a field supervisor teaching courses in rock art documentation organized by University of Gothenburg in collaboration with Swedish Rock Art Research Archives and The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art. She has been jointly responsible for the development and implementation of digital documentation of rock art through Structure from Motion and optical laser scanning within the Tanum World Heritage Area and published in Adoranten, the peer reviewed Rock Art Magazine of The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art.

Both James and Ellen are members of the Board of The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art.
Marcadores gráficos y territorios megalíticos en la Cuenca interior del Tajo: Toledo, Madrid y Guadalajara by Mª Ángeles Lancharro Gutiérrez. 346 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (222 plates in colour). 46 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917975. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917982. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The aim of this work is to analyze Late Prehistoric graphical markers, comprising paintings, engravings, Megalithic elements, and other portable objects. All of them can be described as post-paleolithic or Schematic Art over various surfaces. The chosen area, the inland region of the Tajo inner basin (Spain), was especially appealing for several reasons, such as the lack of scholarship on the subject, the lack of information on the geographical location of the archaeological sites, and the extended ignorance about the sites’ materials and relationships.

The methodology is based on systematic registration of all archaeological sites. This is studied from an Archaeology Landscape perspective through Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis. It tests geographical markers according to their strategic location (pre-eminence and visibility) and their relationship with other funerary, habitable and resources sites. This has allowed parietal surfaces (megaliths, caves, shelters) and mobile pieces to be given coordinate position for the first time in the region, which has demonstrated abundant and complex prehistoric graphical markers. The results achieved allow the extrapolation of settlement models, explained in chapter VI. Generally, shelters divide the territory by geographical units where the settlers have access to a variety of economic resources and transit networks.

About the Author
Dr. María Ángeles Lancharro has a BA in History from the University of Alcalá (Spain) and received her PhD in Prehistory from the same university. Her research interests include landscape archaeology, megalithic territories and their symbolism, Prehistoric Rock Art in the Iberian Peninsula and Late Prehistory in the inner basin of the Tajo river. Additionally, she specialises in databases, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis. Her work is focused on territorial analysis from rock shelters, habitats, necropoli, areas of exploitation and resources. Dr. Lancharro has an extensive teaching experience and has participated in several excavations in Spain and southern France aimed at the compared study of Megalithic and Schematic Art. Her findings have been published in different peer-reviewed journals and books, and she has participated in a number of archaeological conferences.

Spanish description:
El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio de los marcadores gráficos de la Prehistoria Reciente, entre los que se incluyen pinturas, grabados, elementos megalíticos y elementos mobiliares que responden a la descripción de Arte Esquemático o Postpaleolítico sobre diferentes soportes. Se eligió como zona de estudio la cuenca interior del Tajo a su paso por las provincias interiores (España), de especial interés por su carencia de valoraciones conjuntas y desde luego, por la escasa información acerca del posicionamiento geográfico de estos yacimientos y el desconocimiento bastante generalizado de sus contenidos y relaciones contextuales. El método de trabajo se ha fundamentado en la recogida sistemática de todos los yacimientos registrados. El estudio se ha llevado a cabo con nuevas tecnologías como los Sistemas de Información Geográfica (SIG), desde una perspectiva de la Arqueología del Paisaje. Se han efectuado diversos análisis establecidos sobre su posición estratégica (preeminencia y visibilidad) y su relación con otros yacimientos de carácter funerario, habitacional y recursos de explotación. Esto ha permitido que los soportes parietales (abrigos, cuevas y megalitos), así como piezas mobiliares, se hayan georreferenciado por primera vez en la región, dando muestras de la abundancia y complejidad de estas grafías prehistóricas.

Los resultados nos han permitido extrapolar modelos de implantación en el territorio, expuestos en el capítulo VI. En general, existe una tendencia a delimitar el territorio en unidades geográficas caracterizadas, en las que las sociedade
The Cutting Edge: Khoe-San rock-markings at the Gestoptefontein-Driekuil engraving complex, North West Province, South Africa by Jeremy Charles Hollmann. xx+394 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 40 2017 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 97. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917036. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917043. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This book addresses the rock engravings on the wonderstone hills just outside Ottosdal, North West province, South Africa. Wonderstone is remarkable rock that is smooth, shiny and very easy to mark. The wonderstone occurs only on two adjacent farms, Gestoptefontein and Driekuil, and thus the rock art on the wonderstone outcrops is referred to as the Gestoptefontein- Driekuil complex (GDC). This rock art is now the only remaining trace of what must once have been a much larger complex of engravings. Sadly, much of the rock art has been destroyed in the course of mining activities, with very few records. The largest remaining outcrop is still threatened by potential mining activities. The study attempts to bring this disastrous and unacceptable situation to the attention of the public and the heritage authorities, who have so far failed to respond to applications to grant the sites protection. It therefore has two main aims: to locate and record as much of the rock art as possible and to understand the significance of the outcrops in the lives of the people who made them.

Based on the rock art itself, as well as what little historical evidence is available, it is argued that the rock art was made by Khoe-San people during the performance of important ceremonies and other activities. The rock art has two main components: engravings of referential motifs and a gestural, or performative, element. The referential motifs depict a range of things: anthropomorphs and zoomorphs, decorative designs, items of clothing, as well as ornaments and decorations. The gestural markings were made by rubbing, cutting and hammering the soft wonderstone, probably in the course of a range of activities that people carried out on the outcrops.
Le massif de Lovo, sur les traces du royaume de Kongo Volume 1 by Geoffroy Heimlich. xiv+196; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white with 76 plates in colour. French text. 500+ page annex volume available online as a free-to-download PDF. 35 2017 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 95. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916343. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916350. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Unlike the Sahara or Southern Africa, the rock art of Central Africa is still largely unknown today. Despite being reported as early as the 16th century by Diego del Santissimo Sacramento, the rock art of the Kongo Central, an area encompassing parts of modern day Angola, Cabinda, the Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Gabon, has never been widely researched and its age remains uncertain.

Populated by the Ndibu, one of the Kongo subgroups, the Lovo massif is in the north of the ancient kingdom of Kongo. Even though this kingdom has, since 1500 AD, been one of the best documented in Africa, from historical sources as well as ethnographic and anthropological sources for the more recent periods, it remains largely unrecognized archaeologically. With 102 sites inventoried (including 16 ornate caves), it contains the largest concentration of rock art sites in the region, representing more than 5000 rock art images.

Crossing ethnological, historical, archaeological and mythological points of view, this book illustrates that rock art played an important part in Kongo culture. Like historical sources or oral traditions, it can provide historians with important documentation and contribute significantly to the reconstruction of Africa's past.

French description: À la différence des arts rupestres du Sahara ou d’Afrique australe, ceux d’Afrique centrale restent encore aujourd’hui largement méconnus. Bien que signalé dès le XVIe par Diego del Santissimo Sacramento, l’art rupestre du Kongo Central n’a jamais fait l’objet d’une recherche de grande ampleur et son âge reste toujours incertain. Peuplé par les Ndibu, un des sous-groupes kongo, le massif de Lovo se trouve dans le nord de l’ancien royaume de Kongo. Même si ce royaume est, à partir de 1500, l’un des mieux documentés de toute l’Afrique tant par les sources historiques que par les sources ethnographiques et anthropologiques pour les périodes plus récentes, il reste largement méconnu sur le plan archéologique. Avec 102 sites inventoriés (dont 16 grottes ornées), il contient la plus importante concentration de sites rupestres de toute la région, ce qui représente plus de 5000 images rupestres. En croisant les points de vue ethnologique, historique, archéologique et mythologique, j’ai pu montrer que l’art rupestre a bel et bien une part importante dans la culture kongo. Au même titre que les sources historiques ou les traditions orales, il peut apporter aux historiens une documentation de premier plan et contribuer à reconstruire le passé de l’Afrique.

Biographie: Expert au comité de l’ICOMOS pour l’art rupestre (CAR) et pour la gestion du patrimoine archéologique (ICAHM), Geoffroy Heimlich est docteur en archéologie auprès de l’Université Libre de Bruxelles et en histoire auprès de l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Sous la codirection de Pierre de Maret et Jean-Loïc Le Quellec, sa recherche doctorale a porté sur l’art rupestre du Kongo Central, en République démocratique du Congo. Il est actuellement chercheur associé, en France, à l’Institut des mondes africains (IMAF) et, en Belgique, au Centre de recherches en archéologie et patrimoine (CReA-Patrimoine) de l’Université Libre de Bruxelles et au Musée royal de l’Afrique centrale de Tervuren, ainsi qu’en Afrique du Sud, Honorary research fellow au Rock Art Research Institute de l’Université de Witwatersrand, à Johannesburg. Depuis 2016, il est également directeur de la mission archéologique « Lovo » du Ministère français des Affaires étrangères, en République démocratique du Congo et en Angola.
L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative edited by Renata Grifoni Cremonesi & Anna Maria Tosatti. 276 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text. 26 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915568. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915575. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume presents the proceedings of the conference “L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative” that took place in Pisa at the Cantiere delle Navi di Pisa under the aegis of the Soprintendenza Archeologica della Toscana and of the University of Pisa on 15th June 2015. The addressed issues were related to the Post-Pleistocene rock art along the Apennine ridge; in recent years more and more evidence has been identified, which is different from the magnificent evidence found in the Alps such as, for example, the well-known Monte Bego and Val Camonica. This evidence, despite various and peculiar features, can be all related to the iconographic field whose main expressions are anthropomorphic figures, weapons, daggers, halberds and several other symbols, all similarly stylised. A peculiarity of these manifestations is their location in small shelters inappropriate for habitation or in places suitable for supervising mountain and territory roads, bearing comparison to evidence from Western Mediterranean coastal areas. An interpretative possibility has emerged: these sites could have been not only ceremonial places, but also spaces linked to the socio-economic fields or perhaps to the power of communities that occupied these territories.

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Myths about Rock Art by Robert G. Bednarik. ii+218 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 278 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914745. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914752. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rather than considering the myths supposedly depicted in the world’s rock art, this book examines the myths archaeologists and others have created about the meanings and significance of rock art. This vast body of opinions dominates our concepts of the principal surviving cultural manifestations of early worldviews. Here these constructs are subjected to detailed analysis and are found to consist largely of misinterpretations. From the misidentification of natural rock markings as rock art to mistaken interpretations, from sensationalist claims to pareidolic elucidations of iconographies, the book presents numerous examples of myths researchers have created about pre-Historic ‘art’. The claims about a connection between rock art and the neuropathologies of its producers are assessed, and the neuroscience of rock art interpretation is reviewed. The book presents a comprehensive catalogue of falsities claimed about palaeoart, and it endeavours to explain how these arose, and how they can be guarded against by recourse to basic principles of science. It therefore represents a key resource in the scientific study of rock art.

About the Author:
Robert G. Bednarik is the Convener and Editor-in-Chief of the International Federation of Rock Art Organisations and is affiliated with Hebei Normal University, China. His principal research interests are the origins of the human ability to create constructs of reality, the evolution of humans, and in a variety of fields providing supplementary information in that quest, including the world’s rock art. He has produced more than 1350 academic publications.

Reviews
'This book is a worthwhile read for anyone who wants a deeper and more nuanced understanding of rock art. Its strength lies in its analytical approach and the questions it asks of rock art research. Probing and exposing inconsistencies and weaknesses in theories, evidence and methodologies is a vital component of a robust scientific process – something that Bednarik passionately advocates throughout the book.'—Laura Slack, Time and Mind, Volume 12, No. 1
Archaeology with Art edited by Helen Chittock and Joana Valdez-Tullett. xx+176 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout with 7 colour plates. 293 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914929. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914936. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeology with Art is the result of a 2013 Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) conference session that aimed to merge the perspectives of artists and archaeologists on making art. It explores the relationship between archaeology and art practice, the interactions between materials and practitioners, and the processes that result in the objects and images we call ‘art’. The book offers new approaches to the study of creative practices in archaeology, ranging from experimental investigations to philosophical explorations and contains a diverse set of papers that use insights from contemporary art practice to examine the making of past artworks.

About the editors:
Joana Valdez-Tullett is an archaeologist currently finishing a PhD thesis at the University of Southampton, funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT). She has been studying prehistoric art since 2003 in several countries and is currently interested in the social and cultural connections of late prehistoric Atlantic façade, which led to the widespread phenomenon of Atlantic Rock Art.

Helen Chittock is an archaeologist, who has recently finished writing a PhD thesis on decorative practices in Iron Age Britain as the holder of an AHRCfunded Collaborative Doctoral award with the British Museum and University of Southampton. Her wider research interests encompass the study of Celtic Art across northwest Europe.