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NEW: The Rise of Metallurgy in Eurasia Evolution, Organisation and Consumption of Early Metal in the Balkans by Miljana Radivojević, Benjamin Roberts, Miroslav Marić, Julka Kuzmanović-Cvetković, Thilo Rehren. Paperback; 205x290mm; 698pp; 340 figures; 70 tables (colour throughout). 806 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270425. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270432. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Please note, print copies can be ordered now and will despatch once stock arrives in approx. 3-4 weeks.

The Rise of Metallurgy in Eurasia is a landmark study in the origins of metallurgy. The project aimed to trace the invention and innovation of metallurgy in the Balkans. It combined targeted excavations and surveys with extensive scientific analyses at two Neolithic-Chalcolithic copper production and consumption sites, Belovode and Pločnik, in Serbia. At Belovode, the project revealed chronologically and contextually secure evidence for copper smelting in the 49th century BC. This confirms the earlier interpretation of c. 7000-year-old metallurgy at the site, making it the earliest record of fully developed metallurgical activity in the world. However, far from being a rare and elite practice, metallurgy at both Belovode and Pločnik is demonstrated to have been a common and communal craft activity.

This monograph reviews the pre-existing scholarship on early metallurgy in the Balkans. It subsequently presents detailed results from the excavations, surveys and scientific analyses conducted at Belovode and Pločnik. These are followed by new and up-to-date regional syntheses by leading specialists on the Neolithic-Chalcolithic material culture, technologies, settlement and subsistence practices in the Central Balkans. Finally, the monograph places the project results in the context of major debates surrounding early metallurgy in Eurasia before proposing a new agenda for global early metallurgy studies.

About the Authors
Miljana Radivojević holds the Archaeomaterials Lectureship at the UCL Institute of Archaeology (UK), where she graduated in Archaeometallurgy. She has spent more than 20 years publishing on early metallurgy in the Balkans and southwest Asia and the role of aesthetics in the invention of novel technologies. ;

Benjamin Roberts has spent over 20 years researching and publishing on European Copper and Bronze Age archaeology and frequently metallurgy and metal objects across Europe. He co-edited with Chris Thornton Archaeometallurgy in Global perspective: Methods and Syntheses (2014) and is currently leading Project Ancient Tin. ;

Miroslav Marić is a specialist in the Neolithic-Bronze Age of the central Balkans at the Institute for Balkan Studies, Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Serbia. He is the field director of the Gradište Iđoš project. ;

Julka Kuzmanović-Cvetković was the Senior Custodian (now retired) at the Homeland Museum of Toplica in Prokuplje, Serbia. She spent more than four decades excavating the site of Pločnik, and developed a unique open air archaeo-park on the site that attracts tourists from the region, and across the globe. ;

Prof Thilo Rehren is the A.G. Leventis Professor for Archaeological Sciences and Director of the Science and Technology, Nicosia, Cyprus.
From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 10 Session XXXIII-1&2 edited by Françoise Bostyn, François Giligny and Peter Topping. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 71 figures, 7 tables (colour throughout). 718 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697117. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697124. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age presents the papers from Session XXXIII of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). 23 authors contribute nine papers from Parts 1 and 2 of the Session. The first session ‘Siliceous rocks: procurement and distribution systems’ was aimed at analysing one of the central research issues related to mining, i.e. the production systems and the diffusion of mining products. The impact of extraction on the environment, group mobility and the numbers involved in the exploitation phase were considered; mining products were also examined with a view to identifying local and imported/exported products and the underlying social organization relating to the different fields of activity. The second session ‘Flint mines and chipping floors from prehistory to the beginning of the nineteenth century’ focused on knapping activities. The significance of the identification of knapping workshops in the immediate vicinity of mine shafts and of their presence in villages as well as in intermediary places between the two was considered in the analysis of chaîne opératoire sequences. The potential of product quality and artefact distribution to contribute to the understanding of the social organisation of the communities being studied was also examined.
About the Editors
Françoise Bostyn is currently Professor at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne. She specialises in the European Neolithic and works particularly on lithic industries, from the characterisation of resources and procurement systems, especially from flint mines, to the abandonment of tools within domestic settlements. Through technological and typological approaches, the questions of the organization of production at different scales, the structure of supply and exchange networks, and the emergence of craft specialists are explored from an evolutionary perspective, from the arrival of the first farmers in France until the emergence of the first hierarchical societies. ;

François Giligny has been Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University since 2009. Experienced in preventive archaeology, he conducts research and excavations in the Paris basin. He has created and since 2016 has been co-director of two professional master’s degree courses at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne: Master of Archaeology ‘Archaeological Engineering’ and Master in Heritage and Museums ‘Archaeological Heritage Mediation and Valorisation’. François is Scientific Director of the magazine « Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie » and is engaged in two UISPP Commissions for which he organised the 18th Congress in 2018 in Paris. His research topics include the European Neolithic, ceramic technology, archaeological methodology, digital heritage and digital archaeology. ;

Peter Topping is a Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University. His expertise lies in the analysis of multiperiod landscapes, and his main research interest is the European Neolithic period. Formerly employed by RCHME and English Heritage, he has worked on Neolithic flint mines, causewayed enclosures and the Stonehenge landscape, amongst many others types of site. He has also participated in fieldwork led by the US National Park Service in Ohio and Minnesota, and is currently directing a project on prehistoric quarries in the Northumberland Cheviots, alongside researching European Neolithic mines and quarries for a Prehistoric Society research monograph.
Travelling the Korosko Road: Archaeological Exploration in Sudan’s Eastern Desert edited by W. Vivian Davies and Derek A. Welsby. Hardback; 205x290mm; 252 pages; 493 plates, 74 figures (colour throughout). 688 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 24. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698039. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698046. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume publishes accounts of archaeological exploration carried out during the last 30 years or so in the Sudanese Eastern Desert. It is divided into two related parts.

The first and foremost covers results from the work of the Centro Ricerche sul Deserto Orientale (CeRDO), which is based at Varese in northern Italy. Between 1989 and 2006, CeRDO, directed by the brothers Alfredo and Angelo Castiglioni, ran a pioneering programme of expeditions, which traversed the so-called ‘Korosko Road’ (the main desert route connecting Egypt and Sudan) and followed multiple other tracks throughout the Eastern Desert. They encountered in the process a rich archaeological landscape, hundreds of previously undocumented sites, many frequented over millennia, prominent among them gold-production areas and their associated settlements. The CeRDO record, the photographic database, the material retrieved, to which several of the papers published here are devoted, are now all the more valuable, in that many of these sites have since been badly disturbed and some entirely destroyed by recent goldmining activities.

The second part, introduced by a concise account of the historical usage of the Korosko Road, reports in full on a single, short season of documentation, organized in 2013 under the auspices, and with the support, of the Sudan Archaeological Research Society. Its main aim was detailed recording of a group of pharaonic rock-inscriptions discovered by CeRDO expeditions, most located along the Korosko Road and almost all related to the colonial gold-working industry. The project included also a degree of investigation and mapping of the wider context, as well as the recording and study of associated archaeological material, in particular of ceramic remains. The results complement and usefully extend in part those of CeRDO.

Reviews:
'The Korosko Road serves as the main route through the desert between Egypt and the Sudan. The present volume covers the archeological exploration carried out in the region over the past 30 years in a series of essays by several scholars. The first part explores and documents the region between 1989 and 2006. There are chapters on the archeological remains, pottery finds and on the gold mines—the main reason for colonial penetration into this region otherwise inhospitable to Europeans. The second part of the book, the fruit of a brief season in 2013 by the Sudan Archeologist Research Society, opens with a useful summary of travelers to the region going back to antiquity. The aim is to consolidate the previous survey and document the more than 40 hieroglyphic inscriptions found in the region. The book is beautifully produced with full and detailed academic records of all finds. The hundreds of excellent photographs are of importance, since the recent informal reopening of many mines has led to much looting of archeological sites.'—Caroline Stone, AramcoWorld, May 2021
Stone in Metal Ages Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 6, Session XXXIV-6 edited by Francesca Manclossi, Florine Marchand, Linda Boutoille and Sylvie Cousseran-Néré. Paperback; 205x290mm; 134 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (24 pages in colour). Papers in English and French. 659 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696677. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696684. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Set-up a Standing Order to save 20% on XVIII UISPP World Congress proceedings volumes or save even more by pre-ordering the full set at a special low bundle price. Click here to see full offer details.

Session XXXIV-6 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): ‘Stone in Metal Ages’ was divided in two parts. The first, ‘Late stone talks: Lithic industries in Metal Ages’, was concerned with knapping. The papers dealt with lithic technology, use-wear analyses and the relation between the decline of stone and the development of metallurgy. The second, ‘Let there be rock and metal: l’outillage en pierre des métallurgistes préhistoriques de la mine à l’atelier’, was designed for papers focussing on stone tools used for metallurgy. This publication combines these two parts. Despite the fact that metal took the place of stone in many spheres, the analysis of lithic products created during the Metal Ages has seen progressive development. Objects and tools made of flint, chert and other stone materials remain important components of the archaeological record, and their study has offered new perspectives on ancient societies. Not only have many aspects of the everyday life of ancient people been better understood, but the socioeconomic and cultural systems associated with the production, circulation and use of stone tools have offered new information not available from other realms of material culture.

About the Editors
Francesca Manclossi is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and she is affiliated at the Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem. ;

Florine Marchand is part of an experimental archaeology team investigating the pressure techniques with the collaboration of Archéorient of Jalès (Casteljau-et-Berrias, France). ;

Linda Boutoille held a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship and subsequently a Royal Irish Academy Research Grant, based at Queen’s University Belfast. ;

Sylvie Cousseran-Néré is an archaeologist of the French National Archaeological Research Institute (Inrap).
Early Iron Age metal circulation in the Arabian Peninsula: the oasis of Tayma as part of a dynamic network (poster) Taken from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies 46 (2016) by Martina Renzi, Andrea Intilia, Arnulf Hausleiter & Thilo Rehren. Pages 237-246.Download Full PDF  

The oasis of Tayma, located in north-western Arabia, between the Hijaz mountains and the great Nafud desert, was strategically situated on one of the branches of the main trade routes that connected southern Arabia and the Mediterranean Sea during the first millennium BC. During archaeological excavations at this site — a project carried out by a Saudi Arabian-German team — an architectural complex of public character dated to the Early Iron Age (eleventh–ninth centuries BC) was investigated in Area O, in the southwestern section of the ancient settlement. Among other finds, a significant concentration of luxury goods (i.e. objects made of ivory, wood, bone, and faïence) was discovered there, together with a few iron and several copper-based artefacts. Of this assemblage, fifty-eight copper-based objects have been analysed by portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), while sixteen have undergone trace element and lead isotope analyses. The objects chosen to be analysed included everyday items, such as rivets and fragments of rods, three small metal lumps, and a bracelet. The data on their elemental composition and lead isotope signatures combined to indicate that different metal sources were used, suggesting the existence of a highly dynamic metal trade in the wider region during the Early Iron Age.
The full volume is available in paperback here.
Iron Age metallurgy at Salūt (Sultanate of Oman): a preliminary note (poster) Taken from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies 46 (2016) by Michele Degli Esposti, Martina Renzi & Thilo Rehren. Pages 81-88.Download Full PDF  

Extensive excavations at the Iron Age site of Salūt, near Bisyā in central Oman, revealed a complex architecture, allowing the reconstruction of a long history of building activities and rearrangements. Among the discovered structures, none can clearly be associated to metal production, although a small vertical furnace could be tentatively interpreted as a metallurgical structure, possibly used for small-scale copper/bronze remelting. The presence of charcoalrich deposits, metal scraps, and stored broken objects in its vicinity also points in this direction. A selection of these items, together with some plano-convex ingots from other contexts within the site, has been analysed and the preliminary results are outlined here. The significance of this work is underlined by the current dearth of data on Iron Age metallurgy in the Oman peninsula, compared to comprehensive studies of Bronze Age metal production, when the land of Magan was widely renowned for its wealth of copper ores. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Metallurgical Production in Northern Eurasia in the Bronze Age by Stanislav Grigoriev. 831 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 6 2015 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912758. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912369. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Copper is the first metal to play a large part in human history. This work is devoted to the history of metallurgical production in Northern Eurasia during the Bronze Age, based on experiments carried out by the author and analyses of ancient slag, ore and metal. It should be noted that archaeometallurgical studies include a huge range of works reflecting different fields of activity of ancient metallurgists. Often, all that unites these is the term ‘metallurgy’. This work considers the problems of proper metallurgy, i.e. extracting metal from ore. A number of accompanying operations are closely connected with it, such as charcoal-burning, ore dressing, furnace constructing, and preparation of crucibles. In some instances the author touches upon these operations; however the main topic of the work is the smelting process. The closing stage of the metallurgical production is metalworking including various casting and forging operations, and also auxiliary operations: making of crucibles, casting molds, stone tools for metal forging. These problems are, as a rule, out of frameworks of this research.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

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