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NEW: Plant Food Processing Tools at Early Neolithic Göbekli Tepe by Laura Dietrich. Paperback; 205x290mm; 245pp; 103 figures, 62 tables, 33 plates (colour throughout). 798 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270920. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270937. Download Full PDF   Buy Now

Plant Food Processing Tools at Early Neolithic Göbekli Tepe reconstructs plant food processing at this key Pre-Pottery Neolithic (9600-8000 BC) site, with an emphasis on cereals, legumes and herbs as food sources, on grinding and pounding tools for their processing, and on the vessels implied in the consumption of meals and beverages. Functional investigations on grinding and pounding tools and on stone containers through use-wear and residue analyses are at the core of the book. Their corpus amounts to more than 7000 objects, constituting thus the largest collection published so far from the Neolithic of Upper Mesopotamia. The spectrum of tools and of processed plants is very broad, but porridges made of cereals, legumes and herbs, and beers predominate over bread-like food. The find contexts show that cooking took place around the well-known monumental buildings, while the large quantity of tools suggests feasting in addition to daily meals.

About the Author
NEW: Qatar: Evidence of the Palaeolithic Earliest People Revealed by Julie Scott-Jackson. Paperback; 240x270mm; 258 pages; 94 figures (colour throughout). Full text in English and Arabic. 766 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270500. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270517. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Qatar: Evidence of the Palaeolithic Earliest People Revealed, with full text in both English and Arabic, tells the story of the long and difficult search to discover the identity of the first people to inhabit the sovereign State of Qatar, which is situated on a peninsula, that extends into the Arabian Gulf. The book synthesises the results of extensive fieldwork by the PADMAC Unit with the many diverse historical records and reports of investigations, beginning with Holgar Kapel’s, in the early 1950s.

The archaeology of the State of Qatar is an important part of the cultural heritage of the world. The loss of archaeological sites to urban and industrial development since the 1950s has been inevitable but the loss of over 30 years of Palaeolithic research in Qatar, an area of prehistoric significance, as a result of academic dissension, is certainly regrettable. The work of the PADMAC Unit in Qatar now marks the end of this Palaeolithic research hiatus.

About the Author
Julie Scott-Jackson is the Director of the PADMAC Unit, based at Kellogg College, University of Oxford, where she also completed her doctorate In Palaeolithic Geoarchaeology. She has been studying Palaeolithic sites on high levels In the Middle East and Southern England since the 1990s.
NEW: Proceedings of the 3rd Meeting of the Association of Ground Stone Tools Research edited by Patrick Nørskov Pedersen, Anne Jörgensen-Lindahl, Mikkel Sørrensen and Tobias Richter. Paperback; 203x276mm; 274 pages. 149 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694789. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694796. Institutional Price £9.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Download Full PDF   Buy Now

Ground Stone Tools and Past Foodways brings together a selection of papers presented at the 3rd meeting of the Association of Ground Stone Tools Research, which was held at the University of Copenhagen in 2019. Ground stone artefacts are one of the most enduring classes of material culture: first used by Palaeolithic gatherer-hunters, they are still used regularly by people in many parts of the world to grind, mash and pulverize plants, meat and minerals. As such, ground stone artefacts provide a well preserved record at the nexus of interaction between humans, plants and animals. The papers in this volume focus especially on the relationship between ground stone artefacts and foodways and include archaeological and ethnographic case studies ranging from the Palaeolithic to the current era, and geographically from Africa to Europe and Asia. They reflect the current state of the art in ground stone tool research and highlight the many ways in which foodways can be studied through holistic examinations of ground stone artefacts.

About the Editors
Patrick Nørskov Pedersen is a PhD-student in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Copenhagen. His research specializes in ground stone tool technology, currently focusing on the ground stone assemblages from Shubayqa 1 and 6, two late Epipalaeolithic-early Neolithic sites in eastern Jordan. ;

Anne Jörgensen-Lindahl is a PhD student at the department of Cross-Cultural and Regional Studies, University of Copenhagen. Her PhD project researches the chipped stone assemblage from Natufian-PPNA Shubayqa 1 and 6 (Jordan) using micro-wear analysis to understand the role of the tools in terms of food procurement, processing and disposal during the early stages of the transition from hunting-gathering to agriculture in southwest Asia. ;

Mikkel Sørrensen is Associate Professor of prehistoric archaeology at the SAXO Institute, University of Copenhagen. His main areas of research are prehistoric hunter-gatherer societies of northern Europe and the eastern Arctic, climate change research in human science, lithic technology and the chaîne opératoire approach. ;

Tobias Richter is Associate Professor in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Copenhagen. His research focuses on the material culture, economy, social organisation and development of gatherer-hunter-cultivator-fishers during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene in southwest Asia.
La industria lítica del núcleo urbano maya de La Blanca, Petén, Guatemala Tecnología y tipología by Ricardo Torres Marzo. Paperback; 203x276mm; 188pp; 123 black & white figures, 8 tables. 144 2021 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 54. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270289. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270296. Institutional Price £10.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The ancient Maya used mainly stone tools, made of either ground stone and chipped stone, to achieve their extraordinary development. However, works focused on this aspect are still rare. This book presents the techno-typological analysis of lithic materials from La Blanca, a Mayan archaeological site located in the heart of the Southern Lowlands, which was mainly inhabited during the Late Classic and Terminal Classic periods. In addition, a general methodology for the techno-typological analysis and classification of Mayan lithic artefacts is presented, which is complemented by an extensive graphic section that includes the technical drawings of most of the chipped stone tools.

Ricardo Torres Marzo received his Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Valencia, Spain, in 2014 and is currently a teacher of archaeology at the Postgraduate Program in Mesoamerican Studies at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). His research focuses on Lowland Maya archaeology with an emphasis on technical and typological analysis of lithic artifacts. He has directed and collaborated in different archaeological projects in Mexico, Guatemala and Spain.

Los antiguos mayas emplearon fundamentalmente herramientas de piedra, tanto tallada como pulida, para lograr su extraordinario desarrollo. Sin embargo, los trabajos centrados en este aspecto todavía son poco frecuentes. En este trabajo se presenta el análisis tecno-tipológico de los materiales líticos de La Blanca, un sitio arqueológico maya situado en el corazón de las Tierras Bajas del Sur, cuyo momento de ocupación más destacado se sitúa entre los períodos Clásico Tardío y Terminal. Además, se plantea una metodología general para el análisis tecno-tipológico y la clasificación de artefactos líticos mayas, que se ve complementada por un amplio apartado gráfico en el que se incluyen los dibujos técnicos de la mayor parte de los artefactos tallados.

Ricardo Torres Marzo es doctor en Historia del Arte por la Universidad de Valencia, España, desde 2014 y actualmente es tutor y profesor de arqueología en el Posgrado en Estudios Mesoamericanos de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Sus trabajos de investigación se han centrado fundamentalmente en la arqueología de las Tierras Bajas mayas y más concretamente en el estudio tecnológico y tipológico de los materiales líticos. Asimismo, ha participado como director y colaborador en numerosos proyectos arqueológicos en México, Guatemala y España.
Studies on the Palaeolithic of Western Eurasia Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 14, Session XVII-4 & Session XVII-6 edited by György Lengyel, Jarosław Wilczyński, Marta Sánchez de la Torre, Xavier Mangado, Josep Maria Fullola. Paperback; 205x290mm; 262 pages; 109 figures, 34 tables (54 pages in colour). Papers in English (one in French). 760 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697179. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697186. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Studies on the Palaeolithic of Western Eurasia presents the papers from Sessions XVII-4 and XVII-6 of the 18th UISPP World congress (Paris, June 2018). The geographic areas discussed in the Session 4, Central and Eastern Europe, are prehistorically strongly articulated, their cultural successions are highly similar, and they share several common archaeological issues for investigation. The papers disseminate a wealth of archaeological data from Bavaria to the Russian Plain, and discuss Aurignacian, Gravettian, Epigravettian, and Magdalenian perspectives on lithic tool kits and animal remains. The papers of Session 6 are concerned with lithic raw material procurement in the Caucasus and in three areas of the Iberian peninsula.

About the Editors György Lengyel an associate professor at the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology of the University of Miskolc, Hungary, and research associate at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He graduated at the University of Miskolc, and received a PhD degree from the University of Haifa, Israel. His main field of research is the Upper Palaeolithic of Central Europe. The focus of his research is hunter-gatherer subsistence strategy and the formation of the corresponding archaeological record. He conducts research projects on the Upper Palaeolithic of the Levant and Central Europe. ORCID: 0000-0002-7803-3043 ;

Jarosław Wilczyński is head of the Department of Vertebrate Zoology of the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He graduated in archaeology at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, and received his PhD in archaeozoology at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences. His interests are two-pronged, including studying Upper Palaeolithic and Neolithic lithic inventories, as well as Pleistocene and Holocene faunal assemblages. He conducts research projects on the Gravettian and the Epigravettian of Central Europe. ORCID: 0000-0002-9786-0693 ;

Marta Sánchez de la Torre is currently a Beatriu de Pinós postdoctoral researcher at the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona. Her research has mainly focused on the analysis of lithic raw materials by Palaeolithic groups settled in the Pyrenean region by the use of traditional approaches as well as geochemical methods. She is currently directing archaeological seasons at several sites in NE Iberia and participates in different projects in France and Spain. ;

Xavier Mangado is a professor in prehistory at the University of Barcelona and researcher at the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona. He specialise in the analysis of lithic raw materials, mostly by using petrographic and micropalaeontological tools. His research is mainly focused on the study of Palaeolithic groups settled in NE Iberia and he has also participated in several international projects at Portugal, France and Jordan. ;

Josep Maria Fullola has been a professor in prehistory at the University of Barcelona since 1985. In 1986 he created the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona, a research group that promotes advanced research in prehistoric archaeology, being since its creation the main director. He has directed archaeological seasons in several Palaeolithic sites in NE Iberia, but he has also been involved in international projects in Baja California, France and Portugal.
Classification of Lithic Artefacts from the British Late Glacial and Holocene Periods by Torben Bjarke Ballin. Paperback; 205x290mm; 100 pages; 128 figures. 730 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698695. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698701. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

A system for the hierarchical Classification of Lithic Artefacts from the British Late Glacial and Holocene Periods is offered in this book. It is hoped that it may find use as a guide book for archaeology students, museum staff, non-specialist archaeologists, local archaeology groups and lay enthusiasts. To allow the individual categories of lithic objects to be classified and characterised in detail, it was necessary to first define a number of descriptive terms, which forms the first part of this guide. The main part of the book is the lithic classification section, which offers definitions of the individual formal debitage, core and tool types. The basic questions asked are: what defines Object X as a tool and not a piece of debitage or a core; what defines a microlith as a microlith and not a knife or a piercer; and what defines a specific implement as a scalene triangle and not an isosceles one? As shown in the book, there are disagreements within the lithics community as to the specific definition of some types, demonstrating the need for all lithics reports to define which typological framework they are based on.

The eBook edition of this publication is available in Open Access, supported by Historic Environment Scotland.

About the Author
After having worked as an archaeological specialist and Project Manager in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Norway, Torben Ballin relocated to Scotland in 1998. Since then, he has worked as an independent lithics specialist in Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland, representing the consultancy Lithic Research. Torben’s special interests have been lithic terminology and typology, lithic technology, chronological frameworks, raw material studies, intra-site spatial analyses, prehistoric territories and exchange networks, and Scotland’s Late Upper Palaeolithic and Early Mesolithic industries. His interest in lithic terminology and typology led to the production and publication of a number of works on general lithic typology within and outwith Britain.
From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 10 Session XXXIII-1&2 edited by Françoise Bostyn, François Giligny and Peter Topping. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 71 figures, 7 tables (colour throughout). 718 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697117. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697124. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age presents the papers from Session XXXIII of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). 23 authors contribute nine papers from Parts 1 and 2 of the Session. The first session ‘Siliceous rocks: procurement and distribution systems’ was aimed at analysing one of the central research issues related to mining, i.e. the production systems and the diffusion of mining products. The impact of extraction on the environment, group mobility and the numbers involved in the exploitation phase were considered; mining products were also examined with a view to identifying local and imported/exported products and the underlying social organization relating to the different fields of activity. The second session ‘Flint mines and chipping floors from prehistory to the beginning of the nineteenth century’ focused on knapping activities. The significance of the identification of knapping workshops in the immediate vicinity of mine shafts and of their presence in villages as well as in intermediary places between the two was considered in the analysis of chaîne opératoire sequences. The potential of product quality and artefact distribution to contribute to the understanding of the social organisation of the communities being studied was also examined.
About the Editors
Françoise Bostyn is currently Professor at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne. She specialises in the European Neolithic and works particularly on lithic industries, from the characterisation of resources and procurement systems, especially from flint mines, to the abandonment of tools within domestic settlements. Through technological and typological approaches, the questions of the organization of production at different scales, the structure of supply and exchange networks, and the emergence of craft specialists are explored from an evolutionary perspective, from the arrival of the first farmers in France until the emergence of the first hierarchical societies. ;

François Giligny has been Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University since 2009. Experienced in preventive archaeology, he conducts research and excavations in the Paris basin. He has created and since 2016 has been co-director of two professional master’s degree courses at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne: Master of Archaeology ‘Archaeological Engineering’ and Master in Heritage and Museums ‘Archaeological Heritage Mediation and Valorisation’. François is Scientific Director of the magazine « Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie » and is engaged in two UISPP Commissions for which he organised the 18th Congress in 2018 in Paris. His research topics include the European Neolithic, ceramic technology, archaeological methodology, digital heritage and digital archaeology. ;

Peter Topping is a Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University. His expertise lies in the analysis of multiperiod landscapes, and his main research interest is the European Neolithic period. Formerly employed by RCHME and English Heritage, he has worked on Neolithic flint mines, causewayed enclosures and the Stonehenge landscape, amongst many others types of site. He has also participated in fieldwork led by the US National Park Service in Ohio and Minnesota, and is currently directing a project on prehistoric quarries in the Northumberland Cheviots, alongside researching European Neolithic mines and quarries for a Prehistoric Society research monograph.
Current Perspectives in Sudanese and Nubian Archaeology A Collection of Papers Presented at the 2018 Sudan Studies Research Conference, Cambridge edited by Rennan Lemos and Samantha Tipper. Paperback; 203x276mm; 126 pages; 39 figures, 14 tables. 133 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698978. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698985. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Current Perspectives in Sudanese and Nubian Archaeology brings together papers presented at the 2nd Sudan Studies Research Conference, held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge. Scholars from various institutions around the world gathered to discuss the most recent trends in the field of Sudanese and Nubian archaeology, ranging from recent fieldwork in Sudan to scientific analysis of material culture and current theoretical approaches. The papers collected here focus on early administrative and mortuary material culture in the Nile valley and adjacent areas; religious beliefs and practices at Kerma; the adoption and local use of imported objects in the New Kingdom colonial period; and the role of Sudan and East Africa in human population history. Together, all papers represent the diversity of current approaches to the archaeology of Sudan and Nubia in various periods.

About the Author
Rennan Lemos is an ERC postdoctoral research fellow at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. He recently completed his PhD in Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology at the University of Cambridge, specialising in mortuary material culture in New Kingdom Nubia. ;

Samantha Tipper is a senior lecturer at the University of Lincoln. She is a bioarchaeologist and paleopathologist with experience working in both the commercial and academic sectors in human osteology, paleopathology and forensic anthropology.
Bronze Age microliths at Saruq al-Hadid, Dubai by Mark W. Moore, Lloyd Weeks, Charlotte M. Cable, Yaaqoub Youssef Al-Ali, Mansour Boraik & Hassan Zein. Pages 149-166 from Stone Tools of Prehistoric Arabia: Papers from the Special Session of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held on 21 July 2019 edited by K. Bretzke, R. Crassard and Y.H. Hilbert. PSAS. Download Full PDF  

Excavations at Saruq al-Hadid, Dubai, have recovered a large assemblage of stone artefacts, including backed microliths, from a dense midden of animal bone deposited during the mid-second millennium BC. Stoneworkers at Saruq al-Hadid combined simple core reduction methods with sophisticated backing techniques to produce the microliths. Unstandardized flake blanks were backed directly, or were truncated into segments which were subsequently backed. The final stage of backing was carefully controlled and was probably accomplished using a pressure technique; the backed surface on many microliths is distinctively domed in profile. Most microliths are asymmetrical in shape and many display a distinctive scalene triangle morphology. The microliths probably functioned as armatures for arrows, although other functions are possible. Here we contextualize microlith production at Saruq al-Hadid through a review of late prehistoric microlith traditions in south-eastern Arabia and neighbouring regions of Asia and Africa. This raises intriguing but unresolved issues related to preceding technological traditions, cultural connections, and group identity.
Stone in Metal Ages Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 6, Session XXXIV-6 edited by Francesca Manclossi, Florine Marchand, Linda Boutoille and Sylvie Cousseran-Néré. Paperback; 205x290mm; 134 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (24 pages in colour). Papers in English and French. 659 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696677. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696684. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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Session XXXIV-6 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): ‘Stone in Metal Ages’ was divided in two parts. The first, ‘Late stone talks: Lithic industries in Metal Ages’, was concerned with knapping. The papers dealt with lithic technology, use-wear analyses and the relation between the decline of stone and the development of metallurgy. The second, ‘Let there be rock and metal: l’outillage en pierre des métallurgistes préhistoriques de la mine à l’atelier’, was designed for papers focussing on stone tools used for metallurgy. This publication combines these two parts. Despite the fact that metal took the place of stone in many spheres, the analysis of lithic products created during the Metal Ages has seen progressive development. Objects and tools made of flint, chert and other stone materials remain important components of the archaeological record, and their study has offered new perspectives on ancient societies. Not only have many aspects of the everyday life of ancient people been better understood, but the socioeconomic and cultural systems associated with the production, circulation and use of stone tools have offered new information not available from other realms of material culture.

About the Editors
Francesca Manclossi is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and she is affiliated at the Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem. ;

Florine Marchand is part of an experimental archaeology team investigating the pressure techniques with the collaboration of Archéorient of Jalès (Casteljau-et-Berrias, France). ;

Linda Boutoille held a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship and subsequently a Royal Irish Academy Research Grant, based at Queen’s University Belfast. ;

Sylvie Cousseran-Néré is an archaeologist of the French National Archaeological Research Institute (Inrap).
Quebrando rocas, una aproximación metodológica para el estudio del cuarzo en contextos arqueológicos de Córdoba (Argentina) by Eduardo Pautassi. Paperback; 175x205mm; vi+214 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (73 plates in colour). Spanish text. 68 2018 South American Archaeology Series 30. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690095. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690101. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This book offers a valuable contribution to the development of a methodology to address the study of archaeological quartz artifacts, combining various analytical tools to study these objects so that we might better understand the technological strategies of hunting societies who made use of this raw material.

La meta de este libro es aportar al desarrollo de una metodología para abordar el estudio de artefactos arqueológicos de cuarzo, focalizándose en la combinación de diversas herramientas analíticas que permitan estudiar estos utensilios y contribuir así a una mejor comprensión de las estrategias tecnológicas de las sociedades cazadoras recolectoras que hicieron uso de esta materia prima. Ello implica, por un lado, evaluar el potencial de dicha roca para la producción de instrumentos líticos, considerando las distintas técnicas de talla, así como analizar las propiedades y cualidades de los filos para la realización de diversas actividades de incidencia sobre la materia en general, considerando a las de corte y raspado, en particular. Con el fin de someter a prueba esta propuesta, es que se abordarán como caso de estudio las estrategias tecnológicas implementadas por los grupos cazadores-recolectores que habitaron en el Valle de Calamuchita (provincia de Córdoba) durante el Holoceno medio y tardío, estudiando allí el rol cumplido por el cuarzo como materia prima, así como el uso y manufactura de artefactos de cuarzo en dicho contexto particular. Consta de tres partes principales: la primera de ellas aborda el enfoque metodológico y consta de cinco capítulos; la segunda parte comprende los resultados obtenidos luego de la aplicación de estos desarrollos metodológicos a través de programas experimentales tanto de manufactura como de uso de instrumentos sobre cuarzo ; por último, la tercer parte incluye la aplicación de los resultados obtenidos en el análisis de un caso de estudio en sitios arqueológicos de Calamuchita.
Technologie du harponnage sur la côte Pacifique du désert d’Atacama (nord du Chili) by Benjamín Ballester Riesco. Paperback; 203x276mm; 78 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (25 plates in colour); French text, Abstracts in English and Spanish, Foreword in Spanish. 67 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 52. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690279. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690286. Download Full PDF   Buy Now

These objects do not have a single purpose. This is the central premise that guides the research within this book. Throughout the volume the reader will follow a representation of a marine hunter-gatherer society, a projection deriving from one of its iconic and most important material assets, the harpoon. This very technical object will be studied not only for its most evident function - hunting at sea – and the work delves into the structural, symbolic, technological and world-building aspects of the human societies that used them. To achieve this goal the text begins with a judgment about the role of marine hunting, its prey, and the agents involved in different coastal societies on the American continent, in order to create a comprehensive framework of reference for the subject. It continues by focussing on clarifying, defining and discussing the concept of harponage from technology compared with other historical and ethnographic cases of marine hunters across the globe. A typology of harpoon points from the Atacama Desert is presented, with classification based on their technical attributes, constituent units, composition features and articulation mechanisms, in order to evaluate the chronological scope and geographical distribution of each one of the types of harpoon heads from the last 7000 years of coastal history. The text then explores the multiple values and meanings of the harpoons of the Atacama Desert. The book finally examines the social reasons that influenced the development of an incredibly sophisticated and complex technology of marine hunting. Inferences that take it out of the sea and away from hunting, towards hypotheses that seek answers in the cultural determinism stemming from technical decisions, to utilise technology as another mechanism to establish and strengthen social bonds in the construction of worlds between different agents and collectives, and no longer as a simple tool to satisfy subsistence needs.

Les objets n’ont pas un seul objectif. Prémisse centrale qui guide le dénouement de ce livre. Dans les pages suivantes le lecteur trouvera une réflexion sur une société des chasseurs-collecteurs marins à partir d’un de ces biens matériaux iconiques et un des plus importantes, le harpon. Cet objet technique sera étudié hors de sa fonction la plus évidente, au-delà de la chasse marine, pour pénétrer les aspects structurels, symboliques, technologiques et de construction du monde de ces collectifs humains. Pour entreprendre ce défi, le texte nous submerge dans un premier temps dans une révision critique sur le rôle de la chasse marine, leurs proies et les agents impliqués dans ces activités et dans différentes sociétés côtières du continent américain, afin de pourvoir un cadre de référence adéquate sur cette thématique. Dans un deuxième moment, nous nous centrons dans l’éclaircissement, la définition et la concrétisation du concept de harponnage depuis la technologie comparée avec d’autres cas historiques et ethnographiques de chasseurs-cueilleurs du monde. Une typologie de têtes de harpon pour le désert d’Atacama est ensuite présentée, fondée sur leurs solutions techniques, leurs unités constitutives, leurs normes de composition et leurs mécanismes d’articulation, pour évaluer ensuite la portée chronologique et la distribution géographique de chaque type au cours des dernières 7000 années d’histoire littorale. Par la suite, le texte tente d’explorer les multiples valeurs et significations des harpons du désert d’Atacama. Dans sa partie finale, notre récit aborde les raisons sociales qui ont permis le développement d’une technologie de chasse marine aussi sophistiquée et complexe. Interprétations qui nous emmènent hors de la mer et loin de la chasse, vers des hypothèses qui cherchent des réponses sur les contraintes culturelles qui se trouvent derrière les décisions techniques, pour concevoir à la technologie comme un mécanisme employé afin d’établir les liens sociaux dans la construction
Rockshelter Excavations in the East Hamersley Range, Pilbara Region, Western Australia edited by Dawn Cropper and W. Boone Law, foreword by Maitland Parker and Slim Parker, Martidja Banyjima Elders. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+454 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £90.00). 458 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919764. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919771. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Rockshelter Excavations in the East Hamersley Range offers a detailed study of six exceptional rockshelter sites from the inland Pilbara Region of Western Australia. It provides highly descriptive, chapter-length accounts of archaeological investigations at Jundaru, Djadjiling, HS-A1, HD073APAD13, PAD 3, and HD073A03 rockshelters, which were excavated as part of a mitigative salvage program conducted at the Hope Downs 1 mine between 2007 and 2010. The research findings show that early Aboriginal peoples initially occupied the area ca. 45,000 years ago, demonstrating that the east Hamersley Range contains some of the oldest known Aboriginal archaeological sites in the Australian arid zone. The story of the Pleistocene and Holocene Aboriginal occupation at Hope Downs 1 is long and complex. Using an extensive radiocarbon and OSL chronology that spans from >47,000 years ago to the recent past, the story of the Aboriginal archaeological record is explored via prominent changes in lithic technology, artefact use-wear/residues, combustion features, faunal remains, rockshelter geomorphology, archaeomagnetism, and pollen/phytolith analysis. The work investigates the early occupation of the region and examines the archaeological evidence for occupation during the last glacial maximum. It chronicles significant changes in Aboriginal stone artefact technology over time with its analysis of more than 35,000 chipped stone artefacts.

Consisting of 18 chapters, the volume is rich with colour photographs, illustrations, and figures, including high-resolution images of the rockshelter sites, excavations, stratigraphic sections, cultural features, and artefacts. It includes a foreword by the Martidja Banyjima elders, who contextualise the cultural importance of this work to Banyjima Peoples and Traditional Owners of the region. The monograph also includes comprehensive synthesis of the regional archaeological record by the editors and a chapter on Banyjima culture and traditions by consulting anthropologists Dr Nadia Butler, Dr Neale Draper, and Fiona Sutherland. Many specialist studies were commissioned for the Hope Downs work, including an archaeomagnetism report by Dr Andy Herries (LaTrobe University), a faunal analysis study by Dr. Matthew McDowell (University of Tasmania), a phytolith analysis by Dr Lynley Wallis (University of Notre Dame Australia), a palynological study by Dr Simon Haberle, Feli Hopf, and Dr Phil Roberts (Australian National University), artefact usewear/residue analysis by Dr Richard Fullagar (University of Wollongong), optically stimulated luminescence dating by Frances Williams (University of Adelaide), and a rockshelter geomorphological study by Prof Martin Williams (University of Adelaide).

About the Editors
DAWN CROPPER is the Director of Archaeology at leading consulting company, New Zealand Heritage Properties, which has branches in Dunedin, Christchurch, and Invercargill. As Director, Dawn’s responsibilities include the management of all archaeology teams across the branches, development of process and training, as well as the development of proprietary methodology for archaeological risk management across large areas. She also specialises in heritage impact assessments and is a leading expert in the management of large-scale archaeological projects throughout New Zealand. Dawn holds a PhD in Archaeology from the University of Sydney (Australia) and a Master’s in Archaeology from the University of Saskatchewan (Canada), with a focus on technological analysis of flaked stone tools. From 2007 to 2013 she worked as a senior archaeologist and lithic specialist for Australian Cultural Heritage Management Pty Ltd, co-managing and supervising the Hope Downs 1 rockshelter excavations with W. Boone Law.

W. BOONE LAW is a scientist and heritage professional that specialises in the Aboriginal archaeology of the Australian Arid Zone. His qualifications include a BA in Anthr
Reindeer hunters at Howburn Farm, South Lanarkshire A Late Hamburgian settlement in southern Scotland – its lithic artefacts and natural environment by Torben Bjarke Ballin with contributions by Alan Saville, Richard Tipping, Tam Ward, Rupert Housley, Lucy Verrill, Matthew Bradley, Clare Wilson, Paul Lincoln and Alison MacLeod. Hardback; 205x290mm; xx+124 pages; 47 illustrations, 25 tables (13 plates in colour). 433 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919016. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919023. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume presents the lithic assemblage from Howburn in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, which at present is the oldest prehistoric settlement in Scotland (12,700-12,000 BC), and the only Hamburgian settlement in Britain. The site also included a scatter from the Late Upper Palaeolithic Federmesser- Gruppen period (12,000-10,800 BC), as well as lithics from the Mesolithic, Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. The book focuses on the Hamburgian finds, which are mainly based on the exploitation of flint from Doggerland, the then dry bed of the North Sea. The Hamburgian tools include tanged arrowheads, scrapers, piercers, burins, and other implement forms which show similarities with tools of the same age on the European continent. The shape of one scatter suggests that the Palaeolithic settlers lived in tent-like structures. The Palaeolithic finds from Howburn shed light on several important general trends, such as the ‘acclimatization’ of pioneer settlers, as well as the development of regional differences following the initial Late Glacial recolonization of Scotland. Palaeo-environmental work focused on whether there was a small lake (‘Loch Howburn’) in front of the terrace on which the camp was situated, and it was concluded that there was indeed a lake there, but it was neither contemporary with the Hamburgian, nor the Federmesser-Gruppen settlement. Most likely, ‘Loch Howburn’ dates to the Loch Lomond stadial.

About the Author
After having worked as a specialist and Project Manager in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Norway, Torben Ballin relocated to Scotland in 1998. Since that year, he has worked as an independent lithics specialist in Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland, and he is an Honorary Fellow at the University of Bradford. Torben’s special interests have been lithic terminology and typology, lithic technology, chronological frameworks, raw material studies, intra-site spatial analyses, prehistoric territories and exchange networks, and – not least – Scotland’s Late Upper Palaeolithic (LUP) and Early Mesolithic industries. While still active in Denmark, he briefly worked with Jørgen Holm at the Hamburgian/Federmesser-Gruppen site of Slotseng in Southern Jutland, and one of his academic theses was on the refitting and spatial analysis of the LUP Brommian settlement of Højgård on Zealand. While in Norway, he led the Farsund Project and the Oslofjord Crossing Project, where he analysed a large number of Norwegian Early, Middle and Late Mesolithic sites and assemblages. Since 1998, Torben has dealt with numerous Mesolithic sites and assemblages from all parts of Scotland, and lately he has focused on the discovery of Scottish LUP sites, assemblages, and individual finds and, with the late Alan Saville of National Museums Scotland he published the Federmesser-Gruppen site of Kilmelfort Cave, Argyll; with Hein Bjerck, University of Trondheim, the unique LUP Fosna-Hensbacka point from Brodgar on Orkney; and with Headland Archaeology Ltd. the LUP site of Milltimber, Aberdeenshire. Torben has recently published a number of papers in which he discussed how to recognize individual LUP finds and assemblages on the basis of their technological attributes, when no diagnostic types are present.

The following co-authors took part in the production of the Howburn monograph: The late Alan Saville, National Museums Scotland; Richard Tipping, University of Stirling; Tam Ward, Biggar Archaeology Group; Rupert Housley, Royal Holloway, University of London; Lucy Verrill, University of Stirling; Matthew Bradley, University of Stirling; Clare Wilson, University of Stirling; Paul Lincoln, University of Portsmouth; and Alison MacLeod, University of Reading.

Reviews
‘This fascinating volume focuses on a Scottish settlement site that has its origins in the Late Upper Palaeolithic (LUP), inhabited at a time when the glaciers in northern Europe were in retreat. The book presents the r
La industria lítica bifacial del sitio en cantera Chipana-1 Conocimiento y técnica de los grupos humanos del Desierto de Atacama, norte de Chile al final del Pleistoceno by Katherine A. Herrera. Paperback; 203x276mm; viii+106 pages; 60 illustrations; 8 tables (55 colour plates). Spanish text with English Abstract (Print RRP £34.00). 55 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 51. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919115. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919122. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The site of Chipana-1 is located in the middle of the Atacama Desert, in the Pampa del Tamarugal (PdT), 1200 m asl. The site is a good example of past societies adaptation to hyper-arid environments, and provides new insights into the early human occupations of South America. The well-preserved stratigraphic record, together with 13 radiocarbon dates, show that the site was occupied around 11,480 cal BP. Chipana-1 is a lithic raw-material extraction and workshop site, of a silicified rock of good quality, mainly related to the production of bifacial tools (façonnage), and to a lesser extent, of flakes (débitage) on surface. This is the first site in northern Chile that provides information on the first stages of lithic production, such as raw-material selection and reduction (dégrossissage). In addition, flakes resulting from façonnage (shaping method) suggest the local elaboration of large bifacial pieces that have not been recovered on site, indicating that part of the production was probably exported elsewhere, within and outside the borders of the PdT. Some smaller flakes also suggest a local production of “Tuina” type projectile points, a morphotype well-known in the regions south of the Atacama Desert. One can highlight the presence of flakes of allochthonous raw-materials, imported from other areas, which have been flaked at Chipana-1 in order to produce bifacial tools. Chipana-1 was an important location for Late Pleistocene hunter-gatherer groups, poorly known until now, for the gathering of raw-materials and lithic production in the Atacama Desert. The site was integrated within a broader network of mobility that we are just starting to discover.

Spanish description: El sitio Chipana-1, situado en pleno corazón del Desierto de Atacama en la Pampa del Tamarugal (PdT) a 1200 msnm, refleja la adaptación de antiguas sociedades humanas a un ambiente hiper-árido, y aporta nuevos datos al debate sobre las primeras ocupaciones humanas en América del Sur. La buena conservación estratigráfica y 13 dataciones 14C muestran que el sitio fué frecuentado alrededor de los 11.480 cal BP. Chipana-1 es un sitio de producción lítica esencialmente de façonnage (modelado) bifacial, con un mínimo de débitage (desbaste) de lascas, observables en la superficie de esta gran cantera-taller de roca sílicificada de buena calidad. Este tipo de sitio es inédito dentro del norte de Chile, debido a que permite observar las etapas iniciales de elaboración como la selección cualitativa de la materia prima y su preparación (dégrossissage). Además, lascas del façonnage indican la elaboración de grandes piezas bifaciales no encontradas en el sitio, probablemente fueron exportadas a otras áreas dentro y fuera de la PdT. Algunas lascas más pequeñas señalan la producción de una punta de proyectil tipo “Tuina”, conocida en tierras altas hacia el sur del Atacama. Destacamos también la presencia de lascas de façonnage bifacial de materias primas alóctonas, que fueron importadas a la cantera como productos ya trabajados en otros sitios. Así Chipana-1 fue, para grupos de cazadores recolectores aún desconocidos al final del Pleistoceno, un punto importante de adquisición de roca tallable y de producción lítica en el Desierto de Atacama, insertado en un circuito de movilidad que recién comenzamos a develar.
Disponibilidad y explotación de materias primas líticas en la costa de Norpatagonia (Argentina) Un enfoque regional by Jimena Alberti. xxii+196 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text. 22 2016 South American Archaeology Series 27. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784914806. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914813. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The present book aims to study the use of lithic raw materials on the coast of the San Matías gulf (Río Negro, Argentina) during the middle and late Holocene. The understanding of this aspect of human group technology is of fundamental importance as the main archaeological materials recovered at the surface sites of the study area are lithic artefacts made from different types of rock. Thus, understanding how these were selected, reduced and finally discarded will contribute to the understanding of the way of life of the hunter-gatherer groups that inhabited the area during this period.

Spanish Description:
El presente libro tiene como objetivo estudiar el uso de las materias primas líticas en la costa del golfo San Matías (Río Negro, Argentina) durante el Holoceno medio y tardío. El entendimiento de este aspecto de la tecnología de los grupos humanos es de fundamental importancia ya que los principales materiales arqueológicos recuperados en los sitios de superficie del área de estudio son los artefactos líticos fabricados a partir de diferentes tipos de rocas. Así, entender la forma en que éstas fueron seleccionadas, reducidas y finalmente descartadas aportará a la comprensión del modo de vida de los grupos cazadores-recolectores que habitaron el área en el período mencionado.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point.
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‘A Mersshy Contree Called Holdernesse’: Excavations on the Route of a National Grid Pipeline in Holderness, East Yorkshire Rural Life in the Claylands to the East of the Yorkshire Wolds, from the Mesolithic to the Iron Age and Roman Periods, and beyond edited by Gavin Glover, Paul Flintoft, Richard Moore. xii+286 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 225 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913137. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913144. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Twenty sites were excavated on the route of a National Grid pipeline across Holderness, East Yorkshire. These included an early Mesolithic flint-working area, near Sproatley. In situ deposits of this age are rare, and the site is a significant addition to understanding of the post-glacial development of the wider region. Later phases of this site included possible Bronze Age round barrows and an Iron Age square barrow. Elsewhere on the pipeline route, diagnostic Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age flints, as well as Bronze Age pottery, provide evidence of activity in these periods.

Iron Age remains were found at all of the excavation sites, fourteen of which had ring gullies, interpreted as evidence for roundhouse structures. The frequency with which these settlements occurred is an indication of the density of population in the later Iron Age and the large assemblage of hand-made pottery provides a rich resource for future study. Activity at several of these sites persisted at least into the second or early third centuries AD, while the largest excavation site, at Burton Constable, was re-occupied in the later third century. However, the pottery from the ring gullies was all hand-made, suggesting that roundhouses had ceased to be used by the later first century AD, when the earliest wheel-thrown wares appear. This has implications for understanding of the Iron Age to Roman transition in the region.

Late first- or early second-century artefacts from a site at Scorborough Hill, near Weeton, are of particular interest, their nature strongly suggesting an association with the Roman military.

Un estudio de tecnología lítica desde la antropología de las técnicas: el caso del Alero Deodoro Roca ca. 3000 AP, Ongamira, Ischilín, Córdoba by José María Caminoa. x+246 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text. 12 2016 South American Archaeology Series 26. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913496. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913502. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

As part of a series of research projects on the Archaeology of hunter-gatherers societies in the Southern Pampean Hills this presents, among other things, the study of various aspects of the organization of lithic technology and strategies for the use of lithic resources by prehistoric populations. This is in order to understand the social aspects that allow us to recognize and describe habitus or ways of doing things. In this book we studied lithic assemblages, in the manner described above from stratigraphic levels of the Alero Deodoro Roca (Deodoro Roca Rockshelter) comprising chronologies between ca. 3000 years BP to ca. 3600 years BP. We propose that behind the technical movements, organization of the production, distribution of activities in space, the selection of raw materials and any other technological activity, there are people and groups who make decisions based on the context, needs, history and knowledge. We ask ourselves: What affected material selection for the production of stone tools rocks? Was there a differential selection depending on the desired end product? And if so, was it different in diachronic moments? What techniques were used in the production of what instruments? What productive activities were conducted in Alero Deodoro Roca and which were not? What role did the tools produced have?

This study aims to produce relevant and new information that expands our knowledge of technological strategies used by the human groups in order to compare them with those produced in other areas of the Sierras. It will contribute to a process of constructing knowledge about hunter-gatherers of the valleys of Cordoba province, by studying lithic technology and therefore raising new questions for further studies.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £45.00.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Found: the Palaeolithic of Qatar Taken from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies 45 (2015) by Julie E. Scott-Jackson, Jeffrey I. Rose, William Scott-Jackson & Faisal al-Naimi. Pages 329–336; colour and black & white illustrations. PSAS. Download Full PDF  

The seeming lack of evidence for a Palaeolithic presence in Qatar has been enigmatic. This has now changed. Here we report on discoveries made by the PADMAC Unit during 2013/2014 and the far-reaching implications of these findings. Our preliminary analysis of the Qatar lithic assemblages — QSS25, QSS29 (PADMAC Unit collection) and A-group Site I and A-group Site III (Kapel collection) — revealed the presence of large chopping tools and crude ‘Abbevillian’ cores, both indicative of an early stage within the lower Palaeolithic period, while the absence of classic Acheulean hand axes might even suggest a date exceeding one million years. Furthermore, the particular suite of technological traits we identified in Umm Taqa ‘B-group’ Site XXXIV (Kapel collection) lithic assemblage, are characteristic of middle–upper Palaeolithic transitional industries found in the Levant, Nile Valley, and southern Arabia. Hence, we tentatively assign the ‘Taqan’ industry to the upper Palaeolithic. Specific lithics from the QSS32 (PADMAC Unit collection) assemblage, allude to further ‘Taqan’ sites in southern Qatar.
Bell Beaker in Eastern Emilia (Northern Italy) Taken from Around the Petit-Chasseur Site in Sion (Valais, Switzerland) and New Approaches to the Bell Beaker Culture by Nicola Dal Santo, Alessandro Ferrari, Gabriella Morico and Giuliana Steffè. Pages 205-236.Download Full PDF  

This paper presents recent pre-Bell Beaker groups and other groups contemporary to Bell Beaker, such as the final stages of Spilamberto Group, the Castenaso facies and the Marzaglia facies, recently recognised after rescue excavations. New Bell Beaker settlements and some aspects of recent and final Bell Beaker Culture are discusssed. In Emilia Romagna the final stages of Beaker phenomenon, here called Late Bell Beaker, are well documented and they are contemporary to the development of Early Bronze Age communities in the southern fringe of central Pre-Alps (Polada Culture).

This paper is taken from Around the Petit-Chasseur Site in Sion (Valais, Switzerland) and New Approaches to the Bell Beaker Culture: Proceedings of the International Conference (Sion, Switzerland – October 27th – 30th 2011) edited by Marie Besse, Archaeopress 2014. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Kenyan Stone Age: the Louis Leakey Collection Chapter 3 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Ceri Shipton. 35-51.Download Full PDF  

This chapter begins by briefly outlining Leakey’s early career, from which the PRM collections largely derive (3.2). It then outlines the unprovenanced and mixed assemblages (3.3), and Neolithic (3.4), Late Stone Age (LSA) (3.5), Middle Stone Age (MSA) (3.6), and Early Stone Age (ESA) material. A Conclusion (3.8) considers the significance and potential of the Kenyan material. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Oxfordshire Chapter 13 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Matthew Nicholas and Dan Hicks. 279-301.Download Full PDF  

The Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM) holds c. 3,241 objects from Oxfordshire that are currently defined as archaeological.1 This represents just c. 11% of the archaeological collections from the UK, and just c. 2.4% of the Museum’s world archaeological collections as a whole. However, such is the quantity of British material, and the international distribution of the collections as a whole, that collections from only 10 of the 134 countries represented in the ‘archaeological’ collections are larger than those from Oxfordshire. Thus, even if leaving the ‘ethnographic’ collections aside, the Oxfordshire archaeological material represents a significant element of the Museum’s collections. Some 2,852 (c. 88%) of these objects from Oxfordshire are prehistoric stone tools. Less than half were obtained through excavation, most being recovered through field-walking or collected during gravel extraction, and many more being collected during building works (Figure 13.1). Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
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