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NEW: Visual Culture, Heritage and Identity: Using Rock Art to Reconnect Past and Present edited by Andrzej Rozwadowski and Jamie Hampson. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 90 illustrations (colour throughout). 750 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698466. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698473. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Visual Culture, Heritage and Identity: Using Rock Art to Reconnect Past and Present sets out a fresh perspective on rock art by considering how ancient images function in the present. In recent decades, archaeological approaches to rock paintings and engravings have significantly advanced our understanding of rock art in regional and global terms. On the other hand, however, little research has been done on contemporary uses of rock art. How does ancient rock art heritage influence contemporary cultural phenomena? And how do past images function in the present, especially in contemporary art and other media? In the past, archaeologists usually concentrated more on reconstructing the semantic and social contexts of the ancient images. This volume, on the other hand, focuses on how this ancient heritage is recognised and reified in the modern world, and how this art stimulates contemporary processes of cultural identity-making. The authors, who are based all over the world, off er attractive and compelling case studies situated in diverse cultural and geographical contexts.

About the Editors
Andrzej Rozwadowski is Associate Professor at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, where he also completed his PhD. He is also an honorary Research Fellow of the Rock Art Research Institute of Wits in Johannesburg and has been involved in rock art research since the 1990s. ;

Jamie Hampson is a Senior Lecturer in the Humanities Department at the University of Exeter. He has a PhD and MPhil in archaeology from the University of Cambridge. He has written more than forty articles on Indigenous rock art and heritage.
NEW: Visions of the Roman North: Art and Identity in Northern Roman Britain by Iain Ferris. Paperback; 175x245mm; 236pp; 107 figures, colour throughout. 729 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 80. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699050. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699067. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Visions of the Roman North: Art and Identity in Northern Roman Britain is the first book to present an analysis of art from the northern frontier zones of Roman Britain and to interpret the meaning and significance of this art in terms of the formation of a regional identity at this time. It argues that a distinct and vibrant visual culture flourished in the north during the Roman period, primarily due to its status as a heavily militarized frontier zone. Artworks from forts and the frontier-works of Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall, along with funerary monuments from military and civilian cemeteries, are analysed and discussed. The book also explores religious sculpture depicting classical deities, Romano-British gods and goddesses and eastern deities such as Mithras in terms of the use of imagery in various belief systems and in terms of the establishment of individual and group identities.

About the Author
Iain Ferris is an archaeologist living in Pembrey, Carmarthenshire, Wales. He has over forty years of experience working in professional archaeology in Britain and abroad and in teaching archaeology at Birmingham and Manchester universities. His research interests include Roman art and material culture and Romano-British archaeology and artefacts. He has directed major archaeological research excavations in northern and midland England and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries. He has published widely in academic journals and is the author of nine books, all on Roman art and archaeology.

Reviews
‘…this is amongst the very best books on Roman Britain which I have ever read. It engages with what made Northern Britain special and culturally distinct in the Roman Empire. There is a real understanding for Northern Roman Britain here, and an understanding for a unique artistic culture that raises it very high indeed as a book on the provincial art of the Roman Empire.’ – Revd Professor Martin Henig, University of Oxford
NEW: Between the 3rd and 2nd Millennia BC: Exploring Cultural Diversity and Change in Late Prehistoric Communities by Susana Soares Lopes and Sérgio Alexandre Gomes. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699227. Paperback; 205x290mm; 156 pages; 64 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 727 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699227. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699234. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Between the 3rd and 2nd Millennia BC: Exploring Cultural Diversity and Change in Late Prehistoric Communities is a collection of studies on the cultural reconfigurations that occurred in western Europe between the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC. It brings together seven texts focusing on the evidence from the West of the Iberian Peninsula, and one on the South of England. The texts have their origin in a landmark meeting held at the University of Coimbra in November 2018, where scholars explored the grand narratives explaining the differences between what are traditionally considered Chalcolithic (or Late Neolithic) and Bronze Age communities. The contributions look at key aspects of these grand narratives through regional perspectives, asking the following questions: is there clear data to support the idea of an intensification of social complexity towards the emergence of the Bronze Age chiefdoms? What is the role of monumental architecture within this process? How do we best discuss the different levels of architectural visibility during this period? How can we interpret collective and individual burials in relation to the emergence of individual/territorial powers? In answering these questions, the papers explore regional diversity and argue that regional specificities resist a general interpretation of the historical process at stake. In light of this resistance, the book emphasizes that cultural singularities only become visible through contextual, medium, or low-scale approaches. The recognition of singularities challenges grand narratives, but also carries the potential to expand our understanding of the changes that occurred during this key moment of Late Prehistory. The book thus offers readers the opportunity to think about the diversity of archaeological evidence in combination with an exploration of the available range of approaches and narratives. The critical intertwining of multiple points of view is necessary, because it gets us closer to how elusive the cultural differences of prehistoric communities can be. This elusive dimension is precisely what can force us to constantly rethink what we see and what questions we ask.

About the Editors
Susana Soares Lopes is a researcher at CEAACP – University of Coimbra (Portugal). She is a retired full professor in archaeology at the University of Porto (Portugal), where she taught from 1975 to 2013. Her research, focusing on the Late Prehistory of the Iberian Peninsula, has explored archaeological sites in northern Portugal by integrating a variety of theoretical orientations. She uses this plurality to promote and discuss different perspectives on Prehistory.

Sérgio Alexandre Gomes is a researcher at CEAACP - University of Coimbra (Portugal). His main interests lie in the history of archaeology, archaeological methods and theories, as well as the study of the Late Prehistory of the Iberian Peninsula, with a focus on the archaeology of wall enclosures and pit sites.
Présence et influence assyriennes dans le royaume de Hamat by Adonice-Ackad Baaklini. Paperback; 205x290mm; 392pp; 246 figures, 30 tables. French text with English abstract. 723 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696875. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696882. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £58.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The major part of the Near East was conquered by the Neo-Assyrian Empire (934-610BC) in a few centuries. If the geopolitical map of the region was altered, the concrete impact it exerted on the territories with which it came into contact is difficult to appraise. Until recently, there was a general tendency to consider that the Assyrians tightly controlled their whole periphery by maintaining a high number of soldiers and personnel while initiating a process of 'Assyrianization'. Présence et influence assyriennes dans le royaume de Hamat assesses the importance and nature of the Assyrian presence in the kingdom of Hamat (in northwest Syria) to determine whether there is a link between the presence and influence of the Assyrians. The results of an analysis of historical and archaeological sources show that the Assyrian presence in Hamat was much more subtle than what might have been imagined. On the one hand, the Assyrian provincial elite insisted on being legitimized with the natives and cooperating with the local elite rather than using force to maintain the yoke of the Empire. On the other hand, far from indicating Assyrian colonization or a change of culture, the influence of Assyrian culture in Hamat would rather translate into the local elite adopting new objects of prestige that contributed to conspicuous consumption and competitive emulation.

About the Author
Adonice-Ackad Baaklini is an archaeologist specialising in the Ancient Near East. The author received a PhD in Archaeology from Sorbonne University (2019) and a certificate in Akkadian Epigraphy from the Catholic University of Paris (2014). His research focuses on the Levant, and especially the Northern Levant, during the Neo-Assyrian period.

French Description:
L’Empire néo-assyrien (934-610 av. J.-C.) a conquis la majeure partie du Proche-Orient en quelques siècles. S’il modifie la carte géopolitique de la région, l’impact concret qu’il exerce sur les territoires avec lesquels il entre en contact est difficile à cerner. La tendance générale était jusqu’à il y a peu de considérer que les Assyriens contrôlaient étroitement toute leur périphérie par une présence importante de militaires et de fonctionnaires, tout en initiant un processus d’« assyrianisation ». Présence et influence assyriennes dans le royaume de Hamat propose d’évaluer l’importance et la nature de la présence assyrienne dans le royaume de Hamat (nord-ouest de la Syrie) et de déterminer s’il existe un lien entre présence et influence assyriennes. Les résultats d’une analyse des sources historiques et archéologiques montrent que la présence assyrienne à Hamat était bien plus subtile que ce que l’on aurait pu croire. D’une part, l’élite provinciale assyrienne insistait sur sa légitimation auprès des autochtones et sa coopération avec l’élite locale plutôt que sur l’utilisation de la force pour maintenir le joug de l’Empire. D’autre part, loin d’indiquer une colonisation assyrienne ou un changement de culture, l’influence de la culture assyrienne à Hamat se traduirait plutôt par l’adoption par l’élite locale de nouveaux objets de prestige qui contribuaient à la consommation ostentatoire et à l’émulation compétitive.

Spécialiste du Proche-Orient ancien, Adonice-Ackad Baaklini est titulaire d’un doctorat en archéologie soutenu à Sorbonne Université et d’un certificat d’épigraphie akkadienne obtenu à l’Institut Catholique de Paris. Ses recherches portent sur le Levant, et en particulier le Levant Nord, à l’époque néoassyrienne. En parallèle, il poursuit une carrière dans l’archéologie préventive.
Liburnians and Illyrian Lembs: Iron Age Ships of the Eastern Adriatic by Luka Boršić, Danijel Džino and Irena Radić Rossi. Paperback; 175x245mm; 226 pages; 35 figures, 2 tables, 4 maps (colour throughout). 720 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699159. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699166. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Liburnians and Illyrian Lembs: Iron Age Ships of the Eastern Adriatic explores the origins of two types of ancient ship which appear in the written sources connected with the protohistoric eastern Adriatic area: the ‘Liburnian’ (liburna or liburnica) and the southern Adriatic (Illyrian) ‘lemb’. The relative abundance of written sources suggests that both ships played significant roles in ancient times, especially the Liburnian, which became the main type of light warship in early Roman imperial fleets and ultimately evolved into a generic name for warships in the Roman Imperial period and Late Antiquity. The book provides an extensive overview of written, iconographic and archaeological evidence on eastern Adriatic shipbuilding traditions before the Roman conquest in the late first century BC / early first century AD, questioning the existing scholarly assumption that the liburna and lemb were closely related, or even that they represent two sub-types of the same ship. The analysis shows that identification of the Liburnian liburna and Illyrian lemb as more or less the same ship originates from the stereotypical and essentially wrong assumption in older scholarship that the prehistoric indigenous population of the eastern Adriatic shared the same culture and, roughly, the same identities. The main point made in the book is that two different terms, liburna and lemb, were used in the sources depicting these as two different kinds of ship, rather than being interchangeable terms depicting the same ship type.

About the Authors Luka Boršić obtained his first PhD degree in philosophy with emphasis on classical languages and his second PhD degree in the history of philosophy. His main areas of research are ancient philosophy, Renaissance philosophy and the birth of modern science, as well as gender philosophy. He is currently Director, and Senior Research Fellow of the Institute of Philosophy in Zagreb. In 2019 he was a Fulbright Scholar at Columbia University in New York, during which period he completed his contribution to this book. His main approach to the history of ideas and history of philosophy is hermeneutics, the endeavour to understand multifaceted layers of historical texts. ;

Danijel Džino is Senior Lecturer in the Department of History and Archaeology at Macquarie University, Sydney. His books include: Illyricum in the Roman Politics 229 BC – AD 68 (CUP, 2010), Becoming Slav, Becoming Croat: Identity Transformation in Post-Roman and Early Medieval Dalmatia (Brill, 2010), From Justinian to Branimir: The Making of the Middle Ages in Dalmatia (Routledge, 2021); he is co-author of Rimski ratovi u Iliriku: Povijesni antinarativ (Zagreb, 2013). Džino is also co-editor of the volumes: Byzantium, its Neighbors and its Cultures (Australian Association for Byzantine Studies, 2014) and Migration, Integration and Connectivity on the Southeastern Frontier of the Carolingian Empire (Brill, 2018). ;

Irena Radić Rossi graduated from the Department of Archaeology of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences of the University of Zagreb. In 2004 she became Senior Conservator, the highest rank in the Cultural Heritage Conservation Service. In 2009 she moved to the University of Zadar, where she is currently employed as Associate Professor. She is an associated researcher of the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS), an adjunct professor at the Nautical Archaeology Program of the Texas A&M University, and an affiliated scholar of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology. Her main research interests focus on the technological development of Adriatic shipbuilding and seafaring.
Going Underground: The Meanings of Death and Burial for Minority Groups in Israel by Talia Shay. Paperback; 156x234mm; 106 pages; 16 colour figures, 3 tables. 715 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696196. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696202. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Going Underground: The Meanings of Death and Burial for Minority Groups in Israel is about the attitudes towards death and burial in contemporary society. It provides information on the attitudes of several minority groups living in Israel today, including four communities of Russian Jews, an ultra-religious Jewish community and a Palestinian-Christian community. ‘Going Underground’ has a double meaning: it refers to the actions taken by archaeologists to inquire about the past and present and involves digging and recording. Second, it considers the challenges and protests launched by the groups of immigrants and minorities mentioned in the book, against state-control over death.

About the Author
Talia Shay has a PhD in archaeology from Tel Aviv University and MA degrees from UCLA and UNAM, Mexico. Her research encompasses both early and contemporary periods. She has published articles on art, urban space, general archaeology, and death and burial in several international journals and has co-edited ‘The Limitation of Archaeological Knowledge’. During her academic career, her primary affiliation was with the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology.
Masters of the Steppe: The Impact of the Scythians and Later Nomad Societies of Eurasia Proceedings of a conference held at the British Museum, 27-29 October 2017 edited by Svetlana Pankova and St John Simpson. Paperback; 802 pages; 604 figures, 21 tables (colour throughout). 632 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696479. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696486. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Masters of the Steppe: the impact of the Scythians and later nomad societies of Eurasia consists of 45 papers presented at a major international conference held at the British Museum in 2017 on the occasion of the BP exhibition Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia, both conference and exhibition being jointly organised with the State Hermitage Museum. There are 58 contributors and co-authors from 16 countries, mostly from Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan, but also America, Britain, France, Germany, China and Mongolia. The papers range from new archaeological discoveries, results of scientific research and studies of museum collections to reconstructions of social elites, the phenomenon of monumental tomb construction, and ‘Animal Style’ art. Most results are presented for the first time in the English language and they throw a completely new light on a huge range of aspects of the lives of Scythians and other ancient nomads of Eurasia, their horses, rock art and the working of precious metals, textiles and other materials.

About the Editors
Svetlana Pankova is a senior researcher and curator of the Altai-Sayan collections in the Department of the Archaeology of Eastern Europe and Siberia in the State Hermitage Museum. Her main academic interests are sites from southern Siberia and central Asia with well-preserved organic materials dating from the 1st millennium BC to the 1st millennium AD. She is currently studying materials from the important Tashtyk-period Oglakhty burialground in the Minusinsk Basin, and textile finds from the Hermitage collection. She was the lead Hermitage curator and co-editor of the catalogue for the BP exhibition Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia (2017/18).

St John Simpson is a senior curator in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum. He has excavated extensively in the Middle East but it was his first experience of travelling across central Asia in 1991 which led him to co-direct nine seasons of excavations at ancient Merv, in present-day Turkmenistan (1992–2000), and develop extensive relations there and in Russia. He was the lead British Museum curator and co-editor of the catalogue for the BP exhibition Scythians: warriors of ancient Siberia (2017/18). His previous exhibitions include Afghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World (BM, 2011) and Queen of Sheba: Treasures from Ancient Yemen (BM, 2002), and he also curated the Rahim Irvani Gallery for Ancient Iran at the British Museum (2007).

Reviews
'The main content of the volume comprises some 44 papers based on contributions given at a conference held at the British Museum, 27-29 October 2017. As one would expect of a meeting of this kind, the papers, while relevant to the main conference theme, focus on specialist aspects. The contributions are written by experts and present new material and insights or make accessible data embedded in the more obscure literature. For these reasons, there is a great deal here that is new and exciting, particularly to a western audience—a sufficient reason in itself for supporting the publication.

But as everyone who has had to publish conference proceedings knows, the art lies in transforming what is essentially a collection of disparate, often narrowly focussed, papers into a cohesive volume. The editors have done this with considerable skill and success. All the papers have been translated into English, and they have undertaken the laborious task of compiling a single bibliography, which not only saves space but makes the volume much easier to use. They have also provided an Introduction (5400 words) and a Conclusions (13000 words), both substantial pieces of work, far more than conventional bookends.

The Introduction is a fascinating text in its own right. It sets the scene in a novel way by explaining the philosophy and the process that led to the mounting of
Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience: Barbarian perspectives and Roman strategies to deal with new threats edited by Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696813. Paperback; 205x290mm; 244 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 699 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 76. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696813. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696820. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience deals with the Roman Empire’s responses to the threats which were caused by the new geostrategic situation brought on by the crisis of the 3rd century AD, induced by the ‘barbarians’ who – often already part of Roman military structures as mercenaries and auxiliaries – became a veritable menace for the Empire. Rome adopted different strategies: they oscillated between inclusion, warfare and other means of exerting influence. The contributions to this volume explore the archaeological evidence for Roman practice and especially the varying strategies of power and influence in the central regions on the one hand, and the south-eastern parts of the European ‘Barbaricum’ on the other. They show how ‘Divide et impera’ functioned as practical policy based on alliances, as well as consequent warfare, and diplomatic initiatives, which are traceable by prestige-goods and subsidia treasures found in the Barbaricum. The comparison of Roman imports in different parts of Iron-Age Europe can help understand better a complex process of shifting power and influence in an emerging new Europe, which transformed the Empire towards medieval ‘Herrschaft’ and social structure.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel holds a PhD in Ancient history and a second one in German literature. He was appointed a senior research fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and associated professor at Cuza University in Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. ;

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is a Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main.

Table of Contents
Preface ;
Beyond the Fringes of Empire: New Approaches concerning Roman Influence and Power in the Barbaricum. An introduction – Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß ;
Roman limes in military campaigns of the Barbarians – Krzysztof Narloch ;
Archaeological footprints of a superpower in hostile territory. Recent research on the traces of Roman military activities in the barbarian region north of the Middle Danube – Claus-Michael Hüssen, Balázs Komoróczy, Ján Rajtár, Marek Vlach ;
Friend or Foe? The political relations between inhabitants of the Upper Tisza region and the Roman Empire at the end of the 2nd and the 3rd century AD, in the light of archaeological and historical sources – Jan Bulas ;
The Limes Germanicus Trade and the Roman Army – Dan-Alexandru Suharoschi, Iulia Dumitrache, Roxana-Gabriela Curca ;
Barbarian brooches in Roman context. Analysis of the finds from the frontier marketplace at Porolissum (Romania) – Coriolan Horațiu Opreanu, Sorin Cociș, Vlad-Andrei Lăzărescu ;
Luxury tableware? Terra sigillata in the coastal region of the northern Netherlands – Annet Nieuwhof (Open Access) ;
Septentrional Encounters – Another Revisit to Roman Vessels in Scandinavian sites – Tove Hjørungdal ;
Westerholt ‘An der Mühle’- A Roman Iron Age Site on the North Sea Coast. A preliminary report – Jan F. Kegler ;
Beyond Hadrian’s Wall: Considerations on the Massive Terrets – Luisa Di Pastena ;
Pierced Roman coins from the ‘Free Dacians’ settlement of Roșiori (Municipality of Dulcești, Neamț County, Romania) – Lucian Munteanu, George Dan-Hânceanu ;
Mars on the River Uecker in Western Pomerania – a further indication of a Roman policy of ‘divide et impera’ in Germania? – Jens-Peter Schmidt and Hans-Ulrich Voß ;
South-eastern Transylvania during the Late Roman Period (3rd-4th centuries AD) – József Puskás ;
Roman type forts in th
The Land of the Anka Bird A Journey through the Turkic Heartlands by Caroline Eden, Photography by Ergun Çağatay. Paperback; 240x240mm; 152 pages; full colour photography throughout.ISBN 9780995756625. £25.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The Land of the Anka Bird: A journey through the Turkic heartland is a reflective visual essay introducing the powerful photographs of Ergun Çağatay. The book explores the cultural landscape and geography of the vast Turkic-speaking lands, from the mercantile cities of Uzbekistan to little-explored pockets of the Baltic. It is clear that while divided by distance, the diverse Turkic share far more than a linguistic heritage. Deep cultural connections highlight great mobility across many landscapes and centuries. Spanning both the nomadic and settled worlds, this book challenges assumptions about an intriguing swathe of our planet while celebrating its wildly varied traditions and environment.

About the Contributors
Caroline Eden is a writer contributing to the travel, food and arts pages of the Guardian, Financial Times and the Times Literary Supplement. The author of two books, Samarkand (Kyle Books, 2016) and Black Sea (Quadrille, 2018), she is currently working on a new travelogue with recipes entitled Red Sands to be published by Quadrille in autumn 2020. Twitter and Instagram: @edentravels.

Ergun Çağatay (1937–2018) began working on Central Asia in 1993 as a photographer after surviving a near-fatal bomb attack in Paris ten years earlier. Over the following decade, he travelled more than 100,000 miles and took more than 40,000 photographs, from Lithuania in the west to Yakutia in eastern Siberia. These became the basis of ‘The Turkic Speaking Peoples: 2,000 Years of Art and Culture from Inner Asia to the Balkans’ (Prestel, 2006), a book that combined his images with scholarly essays on the history, culture, cuisine and landscape of the broader Turkic world. His photographs, most of them unpublished, form a unique archive for anyone wishing to understand the complexities of Central Asia and the vast surrounding region since the Cold War. Çağatay died in 2018, just as he was embarking on a project to capture the Crimean Tatars, the peoples of the Balkans and the Uighurs of western China.
The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire A Juridical and Functional Approach to Town Life in Roman Gaul, Germania Inferior and Britain by Frida Pellegrino. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 164 figures (83 pages in colour). 685 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 72. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697742. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697759. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire investigates the development of urbanism in the north-western provinces of the Roman empire. Key themes include the continuities and discontinuities between pre-Roman and Roman ‘urban’ systems, the relationships between cities’ juridical statuses and their levels of monumentality, levels of connectivity and economic integration as illuminated by the geographical distribution of cities and town-like settlements belonging to various size brackets, and the shapes and nature of regional urban hierarchies, as reconstructed on the basis of not only the administrative centres but - crucially - all places that fulfilled urban ‘functions’.

About the Author
Frida Pellegrino graduated with honours in 2008, after completing a BA course in Archaeology at the University of Padua. She then enrolled in the MA course at the University of Padua and spent a year abroad, studying at Southampton University (UK), with the Erasmus project. She graduated summa cum laude in 2011, specialising in Roman archaeology. She completed her PhD at the University of Leiden in 2018.
Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest edited by Federica Boschi, Enrico Giorgi, Frank Vermeulen. Paperback; 203x276mm, 230 pages; 96 figures (colour throughout). 121 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696998. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697001. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest: Landscape Archaeology and Material Culture is a coherent collection of papers presented at an International Workshop held in Ravenna (Italy) on 13-14 May 2019. The event, organized by the Universities of Bologna and Ghent and Arcadria, focussed on the transition between Italic culture and Romanised society in the central Adriatic area – the regions ager Gallicus and Picenum under Roman dominance – from the fourth to the second centuries BCE.

By bringing together the experience of international research on this topic, the volume highlights a period that marks a profound transformation in the whole of central Italy by analysing the relationships between the central settlements and their territories and, more generally, by measuring the impact of early Romanization on the territorial structure, social organization and cultural substrata of populations living here. The volume also discusses methodological aspects regarding best practices in fieldwork, landscape investigation and study of material culture, identifying research lines and perspectives for the future deepening of knowledge in this crucial period of central Adriatic archaeology.

About the Editors
Federica Boschi is senior researcher in Methods of Archaeological Research at the University of Bologna. She specialises in non-destructive methods of investigation, in particular geophysics and aerial photography for archaeology. She directs field projects in central Adriatic Italy and is a member of several teams conducting research of international significance. ;

Enrico Giorgi is Associate Professor of Methodology and Landscape Archaeology at the University of Bologna. He is the director of the journal ‘Groma: Documenting Archaeology’ and directs research on Adriatic archaeology. He conducts archaeological missions in Croatia, Albania and Egypt which are already the subject of publications. ;

Frank Vermeulen has been Professor of Roman Archaeology and Archaeological Methodology at Ghent University since 1999 and directed its Department of Archaeology from 2015-2018. He is particularly interested in Roman settlement archaeology and geo-archaeological approaches to ancient Mediterranean landscapes; he has a keen interest in IT applications in archaeology.
Ages and Abilities: The Stages of Childhood and their Social Recognition in Prehistoric Europe and Beyond edited by Katharina Rebay-Salisbury and Doris Pany-Kucera. Paperback; 176x252mm; 264 pages; illustrated throughout. 681 2020 Childhood in the Past Monograph Series 9. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697681. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697698. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Ages and Abilities explores social responses to childhood stages from the late Neolithic to Classical Antiquity in Central Europe and the Mediterranean and includes cross-cultural comparison to expand the theoretical and methodological framework. By comparing osteological and archaeological evidence, as well as integrating images and texts, authors consider whether childhood age classes are archaeologically recognizable, at which approximated ages transitions took place, whether they are gradual or abrupt and different for girls and boys. Age transitions may be marked by celebrations and rituals; cultural accentuation of developmental stages may be reflected by inclusion or exclusion at cemeteries, by objects associated with childhood such as feeding vessels and toys, and gradual access to adult material culture. Access to tools, weapons and status symbols, as well as children’s agency, rank and social status, are recurrent themes. The volume accounts for the variability in how a range of chronologically and geographically diverse communities perceived children and childhood, and at the same time, discloses universal trends in child development in the (pre-)historic past.

About the Editors
Katharina Rebay-Salisbury is an archaeologist with a research focus on the European Bronze and Iron Ages. She directs the research group ‘Prehistoric Identities’ at the Institute for Oriental and European Archaeology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and teaches at the University of Vienna. ;

Doris Pany-Kucera studied biological anthropology at the University of Vienna, focusing on muscle marks and joint changes on skeletal remains to reconstruct occupational stress and labour patterns (PhD 2015). She teaches at the Universities of Vienna and Pilsen.

Reviews
'...the volume fills a gap in the childhood archaeology literature and gives new archaeological perspectives on children's social status, a topic that remains understudied.'—Melie Le Roy, Current World Archaeology, April/May 2021
A Biography of Power: Research and Excavations at the Iron Age 'oppidum' of Bagendon, Gloucestershire (1979-2017) by Tom Moore. Paperback; 205x290mm; 626 pages, illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 621 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695342. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695359. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume explores the changing nature of power and identity from the Iron Age to Roman period in Britain. Presenting detailed excavation results and integrating a range of comprehensive specialist studies, A Biography of Power provides fresh insights into the origins and nature of one of the lesser-known, but perhaps most significant, Late Iron Age oppida in Britain: Bagendon in Gloucestershire.

Combining the results of a large-scale geophysical survey, with analysis of both historic and new excavations, this volume reassesses Iron Age occupation at Bagendon, revealing evidence for diverse artisanal activities and complex regional exchange networks that saw livestock, and people, travelling to Bagendon from west of the Severn. The results of excavation of two morphologically unusual, banjo-like enclosures, and of one of the previously unexamined dykes, has revealed that the Bagendon oppidum had earlier origins and more complex roles than previously envisaged. The volume also provides new insights into the nature of the Iron Age and Roman landscape in which Bagendon was situated. Detailing the discovery of two, previously unknown, Roman villas at Bagendon, this research also demonstrates the continued significance of this landscape in the early Roman province.

This volume redefines Bagendon as a landscape of power, which offers important insights into the changing nature of societies from the Middle Iron Age to Roman period. It calls for a radical reassessment of how we define oppida complexes and their socio-political importance at the turn of the 1st millennium BC.

Contains contributions from Sophia Adams, Michael J. Allen, Sam Bithell, Loïc Boscher, Cameron Clegg, G.B. Dannell, Lorne Elliott, Elizabeth Foulds, Freddie Foulds, Christopher Green, Derek Hamilton, Colin Haselgrove, Yvonne Inall, Tina Jakob, Mandy Jay, Sally Kellett, Robert Kenyon, Mark Landon, Marcos Martinón-Torres, Edward McSloy, Janet Montgomery, J.A. Morley-Stone, Geoff Nowell, Charlotte O’Brien, Chris Ottley, Cynthia Poole, Richard Reece, Harry Robson, Ruth Shaffrey, John Shepherd, Jane Timby, Dirk Visser, D.F. Williams, Steven Willis.

About the Editor
Tom Moore is an Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University. His research focuses on the western European Iron Age and approaches to cultural landscape management. He has published widely on Iron Age social organisation and conducted major field projects at Late Iron Age oppida in Britain and France, including at Bibracte, Burgundy. He is co-author of the textbook: Archaeology: an introduction.

Reviews
'...the excavation results and then the wider discussions are synergetic and demonstrate that the Bagendon project's methodology of a landscape approach is a powerful tool in developing an understanding of the change and continuity that underlies the mechanisms of power and place in the dynamic socio-political landscape of the Late Iron Age and Early Roman interlude. This is a major personal and academic achievement for Tom Moore and for the many organisations who enabled the individual stages of the work through the 'mosaic' funding.'—Tim Copeland, Bristol & Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, March 2021
‘Blood Is Thicker Than Water’ – Non-Royal Consanguineous Marriage in Ancient Egypt An Exploration of Economic and Biological Outcomes by Joanne-Marie Robinson. Paperback; 175x245mm; 246 pages; 21 figures, 14 tables (11 colour pages). 646 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 29. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695434. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695441. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Discussions on consanguineous marriage within Egyptology usually focus on brother-sister marriages recorded in census returns from Roman Egypt, or royal sibling marriages amongst the ruling Ptolemies. However, no wide-ranging review exists of non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt despite the economic and biological implications of such relationships. This is the first time that evidence for nonroyal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt has been collated from select sources spanning the Middle Kingdom to the Roman Period and a method created to investigate the potential economic and biological outcomes of these unions, particularly beyond the level of sibling and half-sibling unions. The working definition of consanguineous marriage used throughout this study is that used by clinical geneticists: unions contracted between cousins biologically related as second cousins or closer biological kin. This research argues that for some families, and under certain conditions, consanguineous marriage was a preferred economic strategy in terms of gifts given at marriage and in inheritance, and that families who married consanguineously may have received greater levels of intra-familial support without the expectation of reciprocity. Although there may have been adverse biological outcomes arising from congenital anomalies and genetic disorders in the offspring of consanguineous marriages, the research suggests that it is unlikely that these physical or cognitive disorders were distinguished from other medical disorders in the general health environment of ancient Egypt. The investigation focuses primarily on ancient Egyptian documentary and archaeological sources, including human remains, and is informed by research on consanguinity from a range of disciplines including anthropology, demography, economics and pathology.

About the Author
Joanne-Marie Robinson is a Visiting Scholar at the KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology at the University of Manchester. She has a research interest in non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean, and the socio-cultural and religious factors that influence this choice of marriage partner. Her work also considers the potential biological outcomes of consanguineous marriage and investigates the reception to congenital physical and cognitive anomalies in ancient Egypt. This book presents the outcomes of a research project. The author holds a PhD in Egyptology and has worked as a lecturer, writer and advisor for television and radio programmes focusing on religion and history.
Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the Archaeology and History of Interaction in European Protohistory edited by Roxana-Gabriela Curcă, Alexander Rubel, Robin P. Symonds and Hans-Ulrich Voß. Paperback; 175x245mm; 164 pages; 60 figures (29 colour pages). 641 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 67. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691030. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691047. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the archaeology and history of interaction in European protohistory asks the following questions: How did the ‘Barbarians’ influence Roman culture? What did ‘Roman-ness’ mean in the context of Empire? What did it mean to be Roman and/or ‘Barbarian’ in different contexts? The papers presented here explore the concepts of Romanisation and of Barbaricum from a multi-disciplinary and comparative standpoint, covering Germania, Dacia, Moesia Inferior, Hispania, and other regions of the Roman Empire. They deal with issues such as conceptual analysis of the term ‘barbarian’, military and administrative organization, inter-cultural and linguistic relations, numismatics, religion, economy, prosopographic investigations, constructing identities; and they present reflections on the theoretical framework for a new model of Romanisation.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel served at the Goethe Institute and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) in Romania before being appointed Senior Research Fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and Associate Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the Director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. His academic writings include cultural history and literary studies but focus mainly on ancient history and religion as well as on Roman archaeology. These are geographically centered on the fringes of the Empire and the ‘barbarian’ people who lived there.

Roxana-Gabriela Curcă is Assistant Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania and Director of the Department for Long Distance Learning at the Faculty of History. Her academic papers focus on ancient bilingualism, the language of Greek and Latin inscriptions and onomastics. She has been a visiting professor at a number of universities: State University of New York at Buffalo, UCLA, University of West Alabama (USA); National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Flinders University, Adelaide (Australia).

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main. He is responsible for the Iron Age, Roman and Migration Periods, and for editorial work. He is project coordinator of the ‘Corpus of Roman Finds in the European Barbaricum (CRFB)’. From 1985 to 1991 he was Scientific Assistant, at the Central Institute of Ancient History and Archaeology of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR, in the department of Pre- and Protohistory, at Berlin. He conducts research into the proto-history of Central Europe, and is a collaborator of the CRFB project.

Robin P. Symonds is a specialist in Roman ceramics and author of Rhenish Wares: Fine Dark Coloured Pottery from Gaul and Germany (1992). He was employed as a Roman pottery specialist for the Colchester Archaeological Trust (1981–1990), then for the Museum of London Archaeology Service (1991–2004) and thereafter in France at the Institut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (INRAP), based at Dijon. He retired from Inrap in 2015 and moved with his family to eastern Romania in 2017. He has reported on the ceramics from many different international sites, and has published numerous papers and reviews on aspects of Roman pottery research.
Before/After: Transformation, Change, and Abandonment in the Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean edited by Paolo Cimadomo, Rocco Palermo, Raffaella Pappalardo and Raffaella Pierobon Benoit. Paperback; 203x276mm; 126 pages; 39 figures (8 plates in colour). Print RRP: £30.00. 112 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695991. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696004. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Before/After explores various aspects related to transformation and change in the Roman and Late Antique world through the archaeological and historical evidence. The seven chapters of the volume range from the evolution of settlement patterns to spatial re-configuration after abandonment processes. Geographically the volume aims to cover – through case studies – the enlarged Roman world from Spain, to Cyprus, from the Rhine area borderland to the Red Sea. The book is the result of a workshop organized as part of the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference, held in Rome during March 2016.

About the Editors
Paolo Cimadomo is a Post-Doc Research Fellow at the University of Naples ‘Federico II’ (Italy). His main research interests are the Hellenistic and Roman Near East. He has worked in different areas of the Eastern Mediterranean (Israel, Jordan, Syria, Turkey) and is the author of The Southern Levant during the first centuries of the Roman rule (64 BCE-135 CE) (Oxbow Books, 2019) ;

Rocco Palermo is a Researcher and Lecturer at the University of Groningen (Netherlands), and Associate Director of the Erbil Plain Archaeological Survey (Iraqi Kurdistan, Harvard University). He has carried out extensive fieldwork in the Middle East (Syria, Jordan, Iraq), where he explores the formation and development of imperial landscapes through the archaeological record. He is the author of On the Edge of Empires. North Mesopotamia during the Roman Period (Routledge, 2019). ;

Raffaella Pappalardo obtained her PhD in Ancient History from University of Naples ‘Federico II’ (Italy). As a pottery specialist she has taken part in many archaeological projects in Syria, Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon, where she was in charge of the ceramic assemblages. Her publication record reflects her interest in the socio-cultural role of pottery in the ancient world, and specifically in the period between the Late Antique and the Islamic world. ;

Raffaella Pierobon Benoit is associate member of Arts and Sciences Academy of Naples (Italy), and was Professor of Archaeology of the Roman Provinces at the University of Naples ‘Federico II’ until 2015. She has carried out extensive fieldwork in Italy and directed archaeological projects in France (Anderitum/Javols) and Turkey (Mandalya Gulf Survey). She was Associate Director of the Italian Archaeological Expedition at Tell Barry (Syria) from 1989 to 2004, and Project Director since 2005.

Reviews
'The volume succeeds in its stated aim of collecting ‘precise analysis of specific case studies’ (p. vi) and is an important reminder that close study of the available data is key to understanding the causes of change, both on local and on regional scales.'—Hallvard R Indgjerd, The Classical Review, April 2021
La naissance des cités-royaumes cypriotes by Thierry Petit. Paperback; 175x245mm; 168pp. 587 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693478. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693485. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Three theories vie to explain the causes, characteristics and chronology behind the emergence of Iron Age Cypriot city-kingdoms: Achaean, Phoenician and autochthonous. Privileged by scholars until as recently as the 1980s, the first linked the emergence of the Cypriot city-state to the great Achaean migrations at the end of the second millennium. Epic foundation myths, telling of cities founded by Achaean heroes returning from Troy, were seen as fabled versions of events unfolding ostensibly at the outset of the Iron Age. The writings of D.W. Rupp cast doubt on the Achaean theory, by placing these developments at a much later date (8th c. BCE) and tracing their origins to the growing influence of the Phoenicians. This hypothesis was hotly contested, giving rise to a third theory, according to which the Cypriot Iron Age was essentially a continuation of the island’s Bronze Age civilisation. The latter theory now holds sway and is scarcely ever contested. The Cypriot city-kingdoms that we observe in the historical period (7th-4th c. BCE) are said to have arisen, after a few decades of instability, as early as the 11th century. Their political and administrative structures would have undergone little more than consolidation in the 8th century, before enjoying their floruit during the Archaic and Classical periods and finally disappearing amid the Wars of the Diadochi at the start of the Hellenistic period.

By recasting these developments within the broader context of the re-emergence of state structures in the eastern Mediterranean, La naissance des cités-royaumes cypriotes reassesses the arguments advanced by champions of the received theory. It likewise situates the phenomenon within a firmer theoretical (i.e. anthropological) framework, intended to establish well-defined distinctions. Furthermore, it proposes a shared typology that can accommodate other political entities, traces of which are found throughout the Geometric period (11th-8th c. BCE). Not only does the archaeological evidence compel us to question whether events unfolded as suggested, it reinforces a more nuanced variant of the Phoenician theory. Various state markers, though abundant in the 8th century (Cypro-Geometric III), seem indeed conspicuously absent during Cypro-Geometric I and II. Excavations at one such city-state, the palace of Amathus, have yielded compelling indications as to when a lasting dynasty originally arose. From them, we can surmise that the Kingdom of Amathus was the first of its kind. While the process no doubt took several decades, under no circumstances did it occur before the 9th century BCE. This coincides, moreover, with the wave of resurgent state-building that swept the eastern Mediterranean and engulfed even more westerly regions like the Aegean.

À propos de l'origine des cités-royaumes cypriotes connues aux époques archaïque et classique (VIIe-IVe s. av.), trois théories s'affrontent, que l'on peut respectivement appeler la « théorie achéenne », la « théorie phénicienne » et la « théorie autochtone ». C'est cette dernière qui actuellement fait consensus. Selon ses défenseurs, les poleis de l'île auraient été constituées en royaumes dès le XIe s. en prenant pour base une organisation politique et socio-économique héritée de l'Âge du Bronze. Dans cet ouvrage, l'auteur entend démontrer que cette vision des choses est erronée et ne se fonde sur aucune évidence archéologique ou textuelle. En dépit d'une certaine hiérarchisation sociale visible dans les ensevelissements, les polities cypriotes du début de l'Âge du Fer (I-II) ne constituent pas des États, mais des entités moins centralisées que l'on peut désigner du terme de « chefferies ». Les différents corrélats anthropologiques de l'État ne sont pas visibles avant la fin du IXe s. C'est surtout au VIIIe s. (Cypro-Géométrique III/ Cypro-Archaïque I) que des changements profonds ont lieu, à la suite des contacts croissants avec les Phéniciens et de leur i
Iron Age Slaving and Enslavement in Northwest Europe by Karim Mata. Paperback; 203x276mm; vi+58 pages; 13 figures. 104 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694185. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694192. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Archaeologists have yet to consider seriously the impact of slaving and enslavement on socio-cultural developments in Iron Age Europe. Commonly treated as a mere byproduct of incessant tribal warfare, it is generally held that slavery was not a significant phenomenon in temperate Europe before the Roman era. This is a curious state of affairs considering the clear cross-paradigmatic recognition of competition and conflict as prime movers of historical transformation. How is it that prehistorians see evidence for social stratification and inter-group conflict in so many contexts, yet grant slavery so little attention?

If slaving and enslavement can be shown to have been significant transformative phenomena in Iron Age Europe, how would this affect the interpretation of (old and new) archaeological evidence, and how would this change ideas about broader socio-cultural developments that have long been considered known by those who have looked at these things through the lens of ‘acculturation’ or ‘complexification’?

Comparative research shows how slavery is a multifaceted phenomenon with complex interrelated material, behavioral, and ideological dimensions. Therefore, any meaningful archaeological study has to take a multi-thread approach whereby a wide range of material categories and domains of social practice are examined, contextually, relationally, and comparatively. In taking such an approach, this exploratory study of the dynamics of Iron Age slaving and enslaving in Northwest Europe contributes to a complex but neglected topic.

About the Author
Karim Mata is a scholar-in-residence at the University of Virginia. He attended the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (MA) and the University of Chicago (MA, PhD), where he studied the history, archaeology, and anthropology of Northwest Europe and the Mediterranean world. He has developed an interdisciplinary interest for theorizing cultural entanglement, social transformation, motivational worldviews, and ideological discourse. This has shaped his doctoral research on the archaeology of values and social transformation in Iron Age and Roman-period Northwest Europe, as well as subsequent research on transcultural discourse, slavery, and cultural theory.
Imágenes, lengua y creencias en Lusitania romana edited by Jorge Tomás García and Vanessa Del Prete. Paperback; 203x276mm; illustrated throughout (51 pages in colour). 94 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692945. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692952. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This publication considers the visual, linguistic and religious culture of the Roman province of Lusitania. Roman influence was especially notable in religion and artistic manifestations. It was in the cities where the Lusitanians acquired Roman civilization: they learned Latin, the Frankish language of the peninsula; they were introduced to the Roman administration and religion; and in the third century, when Rome converted to Christianity, so did the Lusitanians. The Latin language was imposed as the official language, functioning as a binding factor and communication between different peoples. Being a fairly large area and lacking a unified state that promoted a particular language in administration or education, different languages coexisted simultaneously in Hispania. The subjects continued to use their native languages, although official business was conducted in Latin or Greek. Indigenous religions persisted, although sacrifices were offered everywhere for the emperor and the gods of the Roman pantheon. Visual culture also reflected the hybrid character of provincial civilization. Images of a Roman style and subject matter circulated widely, and yet the craftsmen and consumers of the provinces maintained their own traditions, adopting Roman techniques and tastes as they pleased. The papers in this volume establish a broad and generous view of the relationship between images, languages and religious culture within Lusitanian society.

La presente publicación pretende suponer un acercamiento transversal y generoso a la cultura visual, lingüística y religiosa de la provincia romana de Lusitania. La influencia romana fue especialmente notable en la religión y en las manifestaciones artísticas. Las ciudades fueron una de las instituciones más importantes impuestas a Lusitania durante la ocupación romana. Fue en las ciudades donde los lusitanos adquirieron la civilización romana: aprendieron latín, la lengua franca de la península; fueron introducidos a la administración y religión romanas; y en el siglo III, cuando Roma se convirtió al cristianismo, también lo hicieron los lusitanos. La lengua latina se impuso como la lengua oficial, funcionando como factor vinculante y comunicación entre los diferentes pueblos. Al ser un área bastante grande, y al carecer de un estado unificado que promoviera un idioma determinado en la administración o la educación, en Hispania convivieron diferentes lenguas simultáneamente. Los sujetos siguieron usando sus idiomas nativos, aunque los negocios oficiales se realizaron en latín o griego. Las religiones indígenas persistieron, aunque los sacrificios se ofrecían en todas partes para el emperador y los dioses del panteón romano. La cultura visual también reflejó el carácter híbrido de la civilización provincial. Las imágenes del estilo y el mensaje romanos circulaban ampliamente y, sin embargo, los artesanos y los consumidores de las provincias mantenían sus propias tradiciones, adoptando las técnicas y los gustos romanos como les convenía. Este y otros problemas están recogidos en los capítulos de esta obra, que permite establecer una mirada amplia y generosa sobre la relación entre las imágenes, la lengua y la visión religiosa y cultural de la sociedad lusitana. Los autores de este volumen tratan así de entender este panorama tan complejo, utilizando con gran énfasis las imágenes y el lenguaje, fuentes de relevancia para acometer una visión transversal de la cultura y religión de Lusitania.

About the Editors
Jorge Tomás García PhD (Murcia, 2010) is Professor of Ancient Art at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Art History Department).

Vanessa Del Prete Mainer PhD (Madrid, 2016), is Chief Editor of the academic journal Gods and Men (interdisciplinary studies regarding the sciences of religions), launched in 2018.
Funerary Archaeology and Changing Identities: Community Practices in Roman-Period Sardinia by Mauro Puddu. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+180 pages; 78 figures, 3 tables (31 plates in colour). 472 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 55. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690002. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690019. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Funerary Archaeology and Changing Identities: Community Practices in Roman-Period Sardinia examines three inter-woven research questions. The first one concerns a theoretical issue of how identities can be inferred from archaeology; the second asks what were the material relationships between communities of Sardinia and the Roman world’s power and culture when based on the burial evidence on the ground; third question asked was how can the interpretive frameworks of today’s world and symbolic structures affect our understanding of the past. These questions are approached through the detailed analysis of the funerary evidence from mostly unpublished burial sites from southern and central Sardinia that can become a key to an alternative interpretation of the island and of other Roman Provinces. The questions are answered throughout the book by drawing on social studies, particularly post-colonial approaches to the history of the past, interpretive frameworks on the Roman world, and semiotic theories. By in-depth look at the archaeological evidence from Sardinia’s burials, the book retrieves the active and creative role played by the local communities in shaping of the Roman world within the specific material and historical conditions they lived in.

About the Author
MAURO PUDDU has spent most of his years as an archaeologist researching Sardinia. After studying at the Università degli Studi di Cagliari for his BA in Cultural Heritage and his first Masters in Classical Archaeology, he decided to broaden his research horizons taking a second Masters at University College, London, in theoretical Archaeology. During his PhD research at the University of Cambridge, Faculty of Classics he applied the knowledge acquired in Italy and the United Kingdom to study the funerary practices of Roman-period Sardinia. In a decade of research, the author has taken part in numerous successful archaeological projects, among which were the excavation of ‘La Sella del Diavolo’, Cagliari, run by the Soprintendenza archeologica di Cagliari; the Al-Mafjar Project in Jericho, Palestine, run by Birzeit University and the Khalili Research Centre, University of Oxford; and the Interamna Lirenas Project, run by the University of Cambridge. In recent years, during research on future projects and publications, Mauro has been working around London and Cambridge on a vast number of projects, which included the excavation of the Westminster School next to Westminster Abbey.

Reviews
'By incorporating a robust theoretical framework, the author joins others […] in rejecting the now-outdated conception of “Romanized” cities along Sardinia's coast versus a “native” rural hinterland… The author is at his strongest when dealing with theory.'—Allison L.C. Emmerson, American Journal of Archaeology, September 2020
The Politics of the Past: The Representation of the Ancient Empires by Iran’s Modern States by Maryam Dezhamkhooy, Leila Papoli-Yazdi. Illustrations by Ali Roustaeeyanfard. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+148 pages; 15 figures, 1 table (8 plates in colour). 503 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690934. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690941. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Politics of the past: The Representation of the Ancient Empires by Iran’s Modern States examines the highly problematic politics of the past surrounding the archaeology of ancient empires in Iran. Being indigenous, the authors regard the relations between archaeological remains, (negative) heritage, and modern strategies of suppression. The chapters provide a detailed analysis of how the practice of archaeology could be biased and ideologically charged. Discussing their own personal and professional experiences, the authors exemplify the real (ethical) dilemmas that archaeologists confront in the Middle East, calling for reflectivity and awareness among the archaeologists of the region. The text is accompanied by visual deconstruction of ancient rock reliefs to indicate the possibility of alternative histories.

About the Authors
MARYAM DEZHAMKHOOY is Alexander von Humboldt alumna. She was assistant professor in archaeology at University of Birjand. She is a historical archaeologist with broad interest in theory. Since 2003 she has concentrated on the ‘archaeology of recent past’ with emphasis on political archaeology as the main theme, including conflicts, colonialism, gender, nationalism, etc. Maryam published mostly in scholarly anthropological and archaeological journals such as Archaeologies, International Journal of Historical Archaeology, World Archaeology, and Sexuality & Culture as well as chapters in edited volumes. She is a member of Gap End, a working group for Iranian-engaged archaeologists. Interested in gender and sexuality, she is also a member of AGE, Archaeology and Gender in Europe. Her work on gender in Sasanian Iran can be considered as pioneering in Iran. Her last publication, with Leila Papoli-Yazdi, was a monograph on gender, in Persian.

LEILA PAPOLI-YAZDI is Alexander von Humboldt alumna. In 2010, due to political issues, Leila was suspended of her post as assistant professor in archaeology at University of Neyshabour. She is an archaeologist of recent past. Starting in 2003 she has concentrated on disaster archaeology of Bam, a city located in southeastern Iran which was dramatically damaged by an earthquake. Afterwards she directed several projects in Pakistan, Kuwait and Iran. The main themes of all of her projects are oppression, gender, colonialism, nationalism, etc. Her work on political opposition and nationalism from an archaeological viewpoint can considered as pioneering in Iran. Leila published mostly in scholarly anthropological and archaeological journals such as World Archaeology, Archaeologies and International Journal of Historical Archaeology and also as well as chapters in edited volumes or as monographs in Persian. She is a member of Gap End, a working group for Iranian-engaged archaeologists. She is also a member of AGE, Archaeology and Gender in Europe. She is the co-author of a monograph on gender and hegemony in Persian.
Playing with Things: The archaeology, anthropology and ethnography of human–object interactions in Atlantic Scotland by Graeme Wilson. Paperback; 175x245mm; vi+150 pages; 6 colour figures, 2 black & white figures. 494 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690750. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690767. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book addresses the nature of play and its relationships with the world, as well as the relationships between people and objects. It begins with an account of ethnographic fieldwork among chess and card players in Edinburgh and Orkney and moves on to consider the findings in the light of archaeological sources. The work carried out amongst chess and card players led towards a more cognitive appreciation of these activities: how can the relationships between player and pieces be understood? It is suggested here that they are an example of ‘active externalism’, where cognition is not contained within the person but distributed in the immediate environment.

The consideration of the role of gaming pieces leads towards an examination of the ways in which the manipulation of objects during play brings new and unexpected discoveries to the participants. The discussion addresses this theme in terms of bricolage and considers the placement of things singly and in sets.

The archaeological review focusses for the most part on the first millennium AD in Atlantic Scotland. The nature of the evidence, and of our expectations of where play should be found, is examined critically.

This study represents a reappraisal of the relationship between play — an activity which is most often understood in terms of something ‘set apart’ — and everyday life; it leads towards the conclusion that play is not in fact so separate as is often assumed.

About the Author
Graeme Wilson has a background in Scottish archaeology and since founding EASE Archaeology in 1993 has undertaken fieldwork in the Northern and Western Isles. Much of this work has been related to coastal erosion, in one form or another, and includes extensive coastline survey together with the excavation of numerous threatened sites, predominantly in Orkney and Shetland, many of which are published. Since 2006 he has directed the large scale rescue excavation at Links of Noltland, Westray, Orkney on behalf of Historic Environment Scotland. His interests include the prehistory of the Northern Isles, human - object relationships and gaming and play in prehistory. He lives with his family on the island of Westray, Orkney.
Rural Cult Centres in the Hauran: Part of the broader network of the Near East (100 BC – AD 300) by Francesca Mazzilli. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+208 pages; 43 figures, 3 maps, 5 tables (3 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 464 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 51. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919542. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919559. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rural Cult Centres in the Hauran: Part of the broader network of the Near East (100 BC–AD 300) challenges earlier scholars’ emphasis on the role played by local identities and Romanisation in religion and religious architecture in the Roman Empire through the first comprehensive multidisciplinary analysis of rural cult centres in the Hauran (southern Syria) from the pre-Roman to the Roman period. The Hauran is an interesting and revealing area of study because it has been a geographical cross-point between different cultures over time. Inspired by recent theories on interconnectivity and globalisation, the monograph argues that cult centres, and the Hauran itself, are part of a human network at a macro level on the basis of analysis of archaeological, architectural, sculptural and epigraphic evidence and landscape. As a result of this multi-disciplinary approach, the text also re-assesses the social meaning of these sanctuaries, discusses the identity of the elite group that contributed financially to the building of sanctuaries, and attempts to reconstruct ritual and economic activities in cult centres. This book re-evaluates the significance of contacts between the elite of the Hauran and other cultures of the Near East in shaping cult sites; it includes a first catalogue of rural cult centres of the Hauran in the appendix.

About the Author
FRANCESCA MAZZILLI is a Roman pottery specialist at the Cambridge Archaeological Unit, University of Cambridge (since March 2015). She holds a PhD in Archaeology at the University of Durham for her thesis Beyond Religion: Cultural Exchange and Economy in Syria. Over the last ten years she has worked as an archaeologist in England, Italy and Jordan. Her main research interests are Roman religion, architecture, landscape, theory and pottery. She has presented papers covering these topics in various international conferences in Europe. Together with Dies Van Der Linde she is currently co-editing a book entitled Dialectics of Religion in the Roman World. She has been a member of the Theoretical Roman Archaeological Conference (TRAC) standing committee and of the Theoretical Roman Archaeological Journal (TRAJ) editorial team since March 2017.

Reviews
'The volume analyzes an admirable quantity of data...F. Mazzilli's synthesis will be of great service because it brings together considerable documentation and poses important questions which the scientific community will continue to address.' — Corinne Bonnet, Bryn Mawr Classical Review, May 2020
Archaeology and Ethnography Along the Loango Coast in the South West of the Republic of Congo by Gerry Wait and Ibrahima Thiaw with Tim Copeland and Elizabeth Gardner. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+108 pages; 72 figures, 5 tables (100 colour plates). 471 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919948. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919955. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In 2011 and 2012, Dr Gerry Wait (then Nexus Heritage) and Dr Ibrahima Thiaw (Institute Fundamental d’Afrique Noire: IFAN, Dakar) undertook an Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) project in Kouilou Department in the southwest region of the Republic of the Congo. The initiative had been commissioned by SRK Consulting UK for Elemental Minerals Ltd relating to a proposed potash mine. These landscapes were little known in terms of the sites and monuments from the distant and more recent past. That the area was important in the understanding of migrations along the African coast had been demonstrated in a pioneering set of excavations by Denbow (2012 and 2014). This base line study was undertaken to identify and evaluate cultural resources which might need further investigation. The second part of the study reports on ethnographic surveys undertaken in the same defined area, treating intangible cultural heritage as equally as important parts of the Congo’s cultural heritage and identity. The baseline studies were systematic in that they employed standard best-practice survey techniques but structured on a landscape level. By building upon Denbow’s extensive surveys and small-scale investigations from 30 years earlier the studies have enabled a richer and more nuanced understanding of the Atlantic Coast of Congo during the past millennium.

About the Authors
GERRY WAIT has over 35 years of experience as an archaeologist and anthropologist specialising in heritage assessments for Environmental and Social Impact Assessments (ESIAs). He has worked in over 30 countries, in Europe, Asia and Africa. Gerry has been active in the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists and in the Committee on Professional Associations in Archaeology of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA). He is on the editorial board of the Society of American Archaeology’s Advances in Archaeological Practice Journal. He is on the Register of Professional Archaeologists (USA) and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London.

IBRAHIMA THIAW is one of the leading practitioners in Africanist archaeology, heritage and in Environmental and Social Impact Assessments (ESIAs). He leads in the Laboratoire d’Archéologie at the Institut Fondamental d’Afrique Noire (IFAN) at the-Université Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar Senegal. He has worked extensively in the upper Senegal River basin where he conducted multiple Environmental and Social Impact Assessments. He is equally well known for his work on the UNESCO World Heritage site of Goree Island (Dakar). Ibrahima is a very strong advocate of students’ training, community engagement and the decolonization of Archaeological practice in Africa. He has pioneered marine archaeology in Senegal. He is also an active member in Africanist Archaeologists organizations including the PanAfrican Archaeology Association but also on the editorial board of a number of Professional Journals.

Gerry and Ibrahima have worked together on many projects in Sub-Saharan archaeology and ethnography since 2009, notably at Sabodala Senegal (published by Archaeopress Publishing in 2016) in Sierra Leone, and in Burkino Faso.

ELIZABETH GARDNER has been an archaeological illustrator since 2005. Her work includes all aspects of archaeological dissemination and publication. She is a full Member of both the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (CIfA) and the Institute of Archaeologists of Ireland (IAI). Alongside commercial archaeological work, Elizabeth has been involved in monograph projects such as Glastonbury Abbey (University of Reading, AHRC, Society of Antiquaries (London)), Bathwick, Bath (Context One Archaeological Services) and Godmanchester (Historic England and Oxford Archaeology) as well as populist publications such as Glendalough (Christiaan Corlett). She is active in CIfA as the graphics specialist assessment officer for membership validation.

TIM COPELAND is a
At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion Papers in Memory of Carin M. C. Green edited by Sinclair W. Bell and Lora L. Holland. Paperback; 175x245mm; xxiv+276 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 plates in colour. 468 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690132. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690149. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

At the Crossroads of Greco-Roman History, Culture, and Religion brings together recent research from a range of upcoming and well-established scholars to demonstrate the richness of the cross-cultural exchange of ideas around the ancient Mediterranean along with the reception of and continuing dialogues with these ideas in the medieval and modern worlds. The crossroads theme both honours the memory of our late colleague and friend Carin M. C. Green, who published an important book on the cult of Diana—one of whose aspects was Trivia, the goddess of crossroads—and emphasizes how each encounter of new topic or genre forces the reader to pause and think before proceeding down the new path.

The contents are arranged accordingly under three headings: (1) Greek philosophy, history, and historiography; (2) Latin literature, history, and historiography; and (3) Greco-Roman material culture, religion, and literature. These papers also coincide in myriad ways across the three headings, tracing themes such as friendship, leadership, and the reception of ideas in the arenas of philosophy, historiography, manuscript studies, poetry, medicine, art, and war. Within this delimited framework, the volume’s diversity of topics and approaches to a range of genres in the Greco- Roman world is intended both to appeal to the general scholar with varied interests and to offer students a wide scope through which to consider those genres.

About the Editors
SINCLAIR W. BELL is a classical archaeologist and art historian who teaches at Northern Illinois University. He is the co-editor of ten books, the Associate Editor of Etruscan and Italic Studies, and the author of numerous works on Etruscan and Roman art and archaeology. He is a recipient of fellowships from the American Academy in Rome, the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, and the George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation.

LORA L. HOLLAND chairs the department of Classics at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. Her main area of research is the religions of the Roman Republic but she has published on a wide range of topics, including Greek tragedy, Roman comedy, and the history of women in Roman religion. She is a former Blegen Research Fellow at Vassar College, Visiting Fellow in Greek and Roman Religion at the Center for Hellenic Studies, and Visiting Scholar at the American Academy in Rome.
Une archéologie des provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo edited by Bernard Clist, Pierre de Maret and Koen Bostoen. Paperback; 205x290mm; 500pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (approx. 205 plates in colour). French text throughout. 465 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919726. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919733. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Of all the great kingdoms that flourished in Africa, the Kongo is one of the most famous. It remains an important historical and cultural reference for Africans and their diaspora. The KongoKing inter-university project (2012-2016), funded by the European Research Council, aimed, through an interdisciplinary approach, to understand the origin of the kingdom and to shed light on the phenomena of political centralization, economic integration and linguistic evolution that took place there. This book presents in detail the results of archaeological research carried out by the KongoKing project in the former northern provinces of the Kongo Kingdom, currently located in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

French Description: De tous les grands royaumes qui fleurirent en Afrique, le royaume Kongo est l’un des plus célèbres. Il reste une référence historique et culturelle importante pour les Africains et leur diaspora. Entraînés très tôt dans le commerce de traite, les esclaves originaires de la région font que du Brésil à New York, en passant par les Caraïbes, la culture Kongo a laissé de nombreuses traces.

Le projet interuniversitaire KongoKing (2012-2016), financé par le Conseil Européen de la Recherche a été coordonné par Koen Bostoen, tandis que Bernard Clist et Pierre de Maret en ont dirigé le volet archéologique. Ce projet visait par une approche interdisciplinaire à comprendre l’origine du royaume et à éclairer les phénomènes de la centralisation politique, d’intégration économique et d’évolution linguistique qui s’y sont déroulés .

Cet ouvrage présente de façon détaillée les résultats des recherches archéologiques menées par le projet KongoKing dans les anciennes provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo, situées actuellement en République Démocratique du Congo. Dans une première partie on présente le contexte général, l’évolution du milieu, l’histoire du groupe linguistique kikongo et ce que l'on sait des périodes qui précèdent le royaume, ainsi que des informations récoltées dans diverses sources historiques sur ces provinces. Les prospections et fouilles des différents sites étudiés sont ensuite présentées. Puis vient le bilan des recherches archéologiques avec une synthèse des datations, une esquisse de la séquence chrono-culturelle de la poterie kongo et les études systématiques des différents types de vestiges récoltés. Pour conclure, on présente la synthèse de l'ensemble de ces découvertes et la façon dont celles-ci viennent compléter les données issues des autres disciplines pour éclairer d'un jour nouveau l'histoire du royaume Kongo.

BERNARD CLIST est actuellement professeur invité de l’Université de Gand (UGent). Il est archéologue depuis 38 ans, spécialiste de l’Afrique centrale où il a dirigé des projets de recherches notamment en Angola, Cameroun, Gabon et Guinée-Equatoriale. Entre 1985 et 1995 il a été le responsable du Département d’Archéologie du CICIBA au Gabon qu’il a créé. Il a aussi réalisé de nombreuses Etudes d’Impact Environnemental pour des sociétés américaines, britanniques, françaises au Gabon et en Zambie. Pendant toutes ces années, il a publié ou co-publié plus de 130 articles et 8 ouvrages. Entre 2015 et 2016, il a contribué à la version finale du dossier de classement par l’UNESCO du centre historique de Mbanza Kongo au Patrimoine Mondial de l’Humanité, chose acquise en juillet 2017.

PIERRE DE MARET est professeur d’anthropologie et d’archéologie à l’Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) dont il a été le recteur, et Honorary professor à l’University College de Londres. Il poursuit depuis plus de 45 ans des recherches sur le terrain en Afrique centrale et est l’auteur de nombreuses publications sur l’histoire précoloniale, l’anthropologie économique et appliquée, et la gestion culturelle. Membre de l’Académie Royale de Belgique, il est aussi président du conseil scientifique du Musée Royal de l’Afrique Centrale (MRAC)
Perspectives on materiality in ancient Egypt – agency, cultural reproduction and change edited by Érika Maynart, Carolina Velloza and Rennan Lemos. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+110 pages; illustrated throughout with 8 plates in colour. 62 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919337. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919344. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Perspectives on materiality in ancient Egypt – agency, cultural reproduction and change expresses the authors’ broad theoretical interest on materiality and how it helps us to understand the crucial role of material culture in ancient Egyptian society in a more complex way. In the volume, mainly young scholars in Brazil, France, Germany and the UK approach the potential of materiality based on several case studies covering a wide range of topics such as Egyptian art, recent perspectives on sex and gender, hierarchies, and the materiality of textual sources and images.

The idea of gathering young scholars to discuss ‘materiality’ first took place in the form of a colloquium organised in São Paulo, but soon after became a more encompassing project aspiring to produce a publication. The editors’ aimed to include researchers from various places, which makes the volume a materialisation of fruitful collaborations between individuals coming from different scholarly traditions. The combination of different ways of looking at the ancient material culture can hopefully contribute to the renovation of theory and practice in Egyptology. The editors believe that the emphasis on diversity— of background histories, national traditions and mind-sets—is one the main elements that can be used to boost new perspectives in a connected, globalised and hopefully less unequal world.
Hercules’ Sanctuary in the Quarter of St Theodore, Pula by Alka Starac. Paperback; vi+126 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (42 colour plates). 431 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 40. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918736. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918743. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Hercules’ Sanctuary in the Quarter of St. Theodore in Pula deals with many aspects of the Roman sanctuary erected at the spring in Pula as well as with objects of cult dated to the Hellenistic period. The site was in use from the late fourth century BC to the fall of the Western Roman Empire, a date that approximately coincides with the demolition of the temple. Research focuses on Roman foundations which trace the ground plan of the temple that was surrounded by portico. Architectural fragments found at the site, as well as those kept in the collection of Pula Museum, were used to form proposals for a hypothetical reconstruction of the temple. The discovery of a relief club is the only reliable link with a particular deity i.e. Hercules. The continuity of the cult of Hercules has been recognised at the spring from the Histrian to Roman periods. Hercules was considered a founder and patron of the Roman colony of Pola. Nearness of the assumed umbilicus of the colony offers additional reasons to reconsider sacred rituals of the foundation of the colony. Traces of ritual desacralization, purification and storing of sacrificial remnants could be recognised at the site. A hypothetical reconstruction of the Roman sanctuary is followed by calculations of construction costs.

About the Author
ALKA STARAC (born 15 April 1966 in Pula) defended PhD thesis Roman Rule in Histria and Liburnia in 1996 at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Philosophy. During her studies, Alka obtained Rector’s award of the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb for year 1986/1987. She was the winner of scholarship of CNRS France for scholarly research (duration six months) at Centre Pierre Paris, Bordeaux, in 1994. She worked as Head of Roman Archaeology Department and was senior curator in the Archaeological Museum of Istria, Pula (Croatia) and at the University of Juraj Dobrila, Pula. She is the author of some eighty scholarly papers published in archaeological journals with international review, as well as of eight monographs and of exhibitions in the field of Roman archaeology, epigraphy, history and economy.
Estudios sobre el África romana Culturas e Imaginarios en transformación edited by Fabiola Salcedo Garcés with Estefanía Benito Lázaro and Sergio España-Chamorro. Paperback; 205x290mm; xvi+352 pages; illustrated throughout black & white with 2 plates in colour. Spanish text with English preface and abstracts. 430 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 39. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919078. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919085. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This collective work, carried out by both senior and beginning researchers, is for those scholars who have their gaze fixed on the fascinating mosaic of cultures that was the North-African world from the moment Rome appeared in the region. Even before this date, the arrival of Phoenicians on the continent and their subsequent spread throughout the north of it, initiated a rich process of contacts, interchanges and relations with the Libyan-Berber populations that inhabited the zone from time immemorial. To this scene of ancient cultural diversity –which also included an Egyptian component– Rome brought its own riches, generating in the region new episodes of cultural and religious syncretism.

All these subjects are treated in the present book through some specific scientific contributions whose geopolitical frame is the whole Proconsular Africa. Most of the articles in this volume are dedicated to the world of images, but others also treat many other issues as Historiography, Archaeology of Architecture, Libyan-Berber ethnicities and even cultural parallels between North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula.

About the Editors
FABIOLA SALCEDO GARCÉS is Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Complutense University of Madrid. In 1991 she moved to Rome to write her doctoral thesis about the Iconography of the Roman provinces, in particular, the province of Africa, at the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología de Roma (EEHAR, CSIC). The result of that research was the book Africa. Iconografía de una provin¬cia romana (Rome-Madrid, CSIC, 1996). During her long stay in Rome, she began to work in the Tusculum project, developed also by the EEHAR, as well as the Soprintendenza Archeologica per il Lazio. In this case, she was specifically devoted to the study of the collection of sculptural materials belonging to the city and to the villas of the Tusculan surroundings. Due to this research she published the volume Tusculana Marmora. Escultura clásica en el antiguo Tusculano (CSIC, Madrid, 2016). She has worked in Pompeii («Casa de la Diana Arcaizante» project) and she currently directs several investigations focusing on Roman Africa studies. Her works have been diffused in prestigious publications, internationally (Ostraka, Antiquités Africaines, LIMC), and nationally (Archivo Español de Arque¬ología, Lucentum, Studia Historica, Iberia, among others).

ESTEFANÍA BENITO LÁZARO is researcher of the Arqueología Africana Group and of others investigation projects developed at the Complutense University of Madrid. She is specialist in the Libyan-Berber world, subject to which she dedicates her current doctoral thesis. She has carried out several stays of research in Tunisia and in relevant scientific European institutions, as the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) and the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (EEHAR, CSIC).

SERGIO ESPAÑA CHAMORRO is Doctor in Ancient World Studies by the Complutense University of Madrid. He currently works as postdoctoral researcher at the Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (EEHAR, CSIC) and Associated Professor of the Isabel I University. His investigations are focused on Landscape Archaeology in the Baetica, Africa and Italy, besides his participation in research projects on domestic spaces in Pompeii and the Roman sculpture of Carthage. He has also worked in prestigious scientific institutions, as the University of Southampton, the centre CIL of the Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, the “Aldo Moro” University of Bari and the Musei dei Fori Imperiali-Mercati di Traiano (Rome).

Spanish Description
Esta obra colectiva, llevada a cabo por investigadores seniors y jóvenes, va dirigida a aquellos estudiosos con la mirada puesta en el fascinante mosaico de culturas que fue el mundo norteafricano cuando Roma hizo su aparición en la región. Ya antes de esa fecha, la llegada de fenicios
Social Interactions and Status Markers in the Roman World edited by George Cupcea and Rada Varga. xii+168 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (21 plates in colour). 407 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 37. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917487. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917494. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In 2016, in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, some forty scholars from around the world attended the People of the Ancient World conference. This was organized within the framework of the Romans 1 by 1 project, and its main focus was on improving knowledge on ancient populations, employing a variety of methodologies, tools and research techniques. The presentations provided the editors with ten papers to be further developed and reunited under these covers. They encompass diverse approaches to Roman provincial populations and the corresponding case-studies highlight the multi-faceted character of Roman society.

The volume takes four main directions: prosopography (from Italy to Spain); ancient professions and professionals (merchants in Noricum, Lower Moesia, general nomenclature and encoding of professions, associations and family life); onomastics and origins, and finally, the military (iconography of funerary monuments and centurions’ social life). The publication is intended, on one hand, to enhance knowledge of the diversity of Roman social standings, of the exhibited social markers and – perhaps most important – stress the variety of forms which express status and place within the community, and on the other, to reiterate a series of fresh, modern views on these matters, resulting from a gathering of mostly junior researchers.

About the Author
GEORGE CUPCEA is a researcher at the National History Museum of Transylvania and Babeș-Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca, Romania. His interests lie in the field of Latin epigraphy, Roman military history, especially the hierarchy of the Roman army. He also specialises in Roman provincial archaeology, especially non-invasive techniques and he is working on the enlistment process of the Dacian frontier in the UNESCO World Heritage List, as part of the trans-national FRE site.

RADA VARGA is a researcher at Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, and specialises on digital epigraphy, ancient population studies, Roman occupations and professions. She is the coordinator of the project that hosted the conference (http://romans1by1.com), and also directs the archaeological excavations in the civil settlement of the auxiliary fort of Războieni (Ad Batavos), Dacia.