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NEW: Banquets, Rations et Offrandes Alimentaires au Proche-Orient ancien 10,000 ans d’histoire alimentaire révélée by Daniel Bonneterre. Paperback; 175x245mm; 410 pages; 40 figures, 5 maps (34 pages in colour). 751 2021. ISBN 9781789699746. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Banquets, Rations et Offrandes alimentaires au Proche-Orient ancien investigates the essential question of food consumption in the ancient Near East, in particular between the 4th and 1st millennium BC. Thanks to archaeological discoveries and to abundant textual documentation, historians are well equipped to reconstruct the food supply of the cities of Mesopotamia and have a better idea of the variety of products available, a far greater range than might be imagined. The analysis of the treatment of ingredients also reveals techniques unsuspected in pre-industrial times. The codification of culinary recipes developed for the use of temples also reflects a high stage of development. Religious rituals were based on a structured code of food consumption, of which prohibitions and taboos are only one facet. The book presents some aspects of everyday life in a new light. First and foremost, the banquet is seen as a critical institution in shaping urban behaviour. The representation of feasts and banquets in temples and palaces are classic themes of ancient art and literature. Understanding the importance of the meal as a rite of social cohesion, furthermore, allows us to better envision events that would unfold centuries later.

About the Author
Daniel Bonneterre is a specialist in ancient history and an Associate Professor at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières. He gained his doctorate in languages and civilizations of the Ancient Near East from Johns Hopkins University. He has taught in the United States and Canada and has conducted archaeological research in France, Italy, Syria, and Israel. His publications focus on the relationships (or discrepancies) between textual sources and anthropological realities.

En français
L’ouvrage se propose de présenter la question essentielle de la consommation alimentaire dans le Proche-Orient ancien, notamment entre le IVe et le Ier millénaire av. J.-C. Grâce aux découvertes archéologiques et surtout grâce à une abondante documentation textuelle, les historiens disposent aujourd’hui de sources fiables décrivant les approvisionnements des cités de Mésopotamie. Ainsi voit-on mieux la variété des produits disponibles, celle-ci était largement plus grande que ce que l’on pouvait imaginer il y a peu. La transformation des ingrédients fait aussi apparaître des techniques insoupçonnées à une époque préindustrielle. La codification en recettes culinaires élaborées pour l’usage des temples reflète également un haut développement. Les rituels religieux s’appuyaient sur un code alimentaire structuré, dont les interdits et les tabous ne forment que l’une des facettes. Certains aspects de la vie quotidienne sont présentés sous un jour nouveau. Au premier chef le banquet qui est envisagé comme une véritable institution modelant des comportements urbains. De fait, la représentation des festins et des banquets dans les temples et les palais constituent des thèmes classiques de l’art et de la littérature antique. Comprendre l’importance du repas comme rite de cohésion sociale permet incidemment de mieux envisager des événements qui se dérouleront des siècles plus tard.

Daniel Bonneterre est spécialiste de l’histoire antique et docteur en langues et civilisations du Proche-Orient ancien (Ph D). Il a enseigné aux États-Unis ainsi qu’au Canada, et a mené des recherches archéologiques (France, Italie, Syrie, Israël). Ses publications portent sur les rapports entre sources textuelles et réalités anthropologiques.
NEW: Bioarchaeology and Dietary Reconstruction across Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages in Tuscany, Central Italy by Giulia Riccomi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 192 pages; 95 figures, 26 maps. 726 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698657. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698664. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Bioarchaeology and Dietary Reconstruction across Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages in Tuscany, Central Italy presents the results of the first multidisciplinary bioarchaeological analysis to reconstruct living conditions in Tuscany between Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. This was done through the examination of stress markers, including adult stature, periosteal reaction, cranial porosities, and linear enamel hypoplasia, and through palaeodietary reconstruction in order to explore the effects of socio-cultural and environmental factors in a diachronic perspective.

The shift from Classical to Medieval times has long left its mark on the European historical consciousness. Nevertheless, the impact of this transition on living conditions and dietary practices remains a subject of debate, with a prevailing perception of these ‘Dark Ages’ as an impoverished phase following the collapse of the Roman agrarian villa system, particularly in the Mediterranean area. This volume analyses bioarchaeological data from three sites in Tuscany, in the former core of the western Roman Empire and potentially most vulnerable to the major socio-political constraints of the first millennium AD, to provide a corrective view, which begins to show how communities perceived and reacted to changes during the passage to post-Classical times.

About the Author
Giulia Riccomi received an MSc in Archaeology at the University of Pisa and a PhD in Classical Studies and Archaeology at the same institution. As a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Division of Palaeopathology (University of Pisa), she is committed to conducting multidisciplinary research programmes focussing on human bioarchaeology and palaeodiets of Italian Etruscan and Medieval osteological collections. Giulia has several international, peer-reviewed publications concentrating mainly on osteoarchaeology and palaeopathology.
El instrumental de pesca en el Fretum Gaditanum Catalogación, análisis tipo-cronológico y comparativa regional edited by José Manuel Vargas Girón. Paperback; 205x290mm; 188 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Online catalogue. Papers in Spanish and English. 598 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693850. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693867. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

El instrumental de pesca en el Fretum Gaditanum : Catalogación, análisis tipo-cronológico y comparativa region analyses fishing tackle in the region known as Fretum Gaditanum (Straits of Gibraltar), where over a thousand pieces of fishing tackle have been identified. The book offers a typo-chronological classification of the material, which follows a diachronic discourse spanning from the Phoenician-Punic period to Late Antiquity. Special emphasis is given to the morphological-typological changes undergone by these artefacts and technological changes over time. In this way, a comprehensive picture of the fishing arts practised in the environment of Gades during Antiquity is drawn. The corpus is compared to assemblages found in other Atlantic and Mediterranean regions.

About the Editor
José Manuel Vargas Girón holds a BA degree in History (2008)—including an Extraordinary Graduation Prize—an MA in Archaeological-Historical Heritage (2010) and a PhD in Maritime History and Archaeology (2017), all awarded by the University of Cádiz. His research has focused on recording and studying fishing tackle in antiquity and has resulted in the elaboration of a corpus of reference, which includes over a thousand items of fishing tackle. He has participated in numerous research projects, both nationally and internationally (Italy and Morocco), and he has published his results in book chapters, articles, conference proceedings and catalogue entries.

Spanish Description
El estudio de los instrumentos de pesca constituye una reciente línea de investigación que está deparando interesantes resultados para el conocimiento de una de las actividades económicas de mayor arraigo en las sociedades marítimas del pasado: la pesca. Este libro constituye una primera aproximación a la problemática de este tipo de material arqueológico en la región conocida como Fretum Gaditanum, habiéndose elaborado un corpus documental donde se han inventariado casi mil evidencias de instrumental pesquero. En estas páginas el lector encontrará un análisis tipo-cronológico de los materiales catalogados, para lo cual seguiremos un discurso diacrónico, desde época fenicio-púnica hasta la Antigüedad Tardía, incidiendo en la evolución morfo-tipológica que han sufrido estos artefactos y valorándose los cambios tecnológicos que han ido produciéndose a lo largo de la historia. De esta manera, se ha conseguido obtener una visión de conjunto de las artes de pesca practicadas en el entorno gaditano durante la Antigüedad, habiéndose podido comparar el instrumental pesquero del Fretum Gaditanum con el de otras regiones atlánticas y mediterráneas.

José Manuel Vargas Girón es licenciado en Historia por la Universidad de Cádiz (2003-2008), obteniendo el Premio Extraordinario de Fin de Carrera. Realizó un máster en Patrimonio Histórico-Arqueológico en la Universidad de Cádiz (2009-2010). Obtuvo el grado de Doctor en Historia y Arqueológía Marítimas en la Universidad de Cádiz (2017). Su línea de investigación ha girado en torno a la documentación y estudio de los instrumentos de pesca en la Antigüedad, elaborando un corpus de referencia donde se han recopilado casi mil evidencias de instrumental pesquero. Su labor científica puede resumirse en los siguientes puntos: participación en numerosos proyectos de investigación tanto nacionales como internacionales (Italia y Marruecos); publicaciones científicas (libros, capítulos de libros, artículos científicos, actas de congresos, fichas de catálogo de exposiciones y recensiones); participación en reuniones científicas nacionales e internacionales; organización de actividades científicas; estancias internacionales de investigación en centros de excelencia.
Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean A Comparative Archaeological Study at Antiochia ad Cragum (Turkey) and Delos (Greece) by Emlyn K. Dodd. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+208 pages; 30 figures, 42 plates. 597 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 63. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694024. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694031. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £36.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Wine was an ever-present commodity that permeated the Mediterranean throughout antiquity; in particular, settlements in the eastern Mediterranean produced substantial quantities of wine for a variety of uses in the Roman and Late Antique eras.

Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean devotes itself to the viticulture of two such settlements, Antiochia ad Cragum and Delos, using results stemming from surface survey and excavation to assess their potential integration within the now well-known agricultural boom of the 5th-7th centuries AD. Interdisciplinary and ethnographic data supplements the main archaeological catalogue and provides a rounded understanding of production and use. The publication of an excavated vinicultural vat in Rough Cilicia for the first time, along with the first complete discussion of the viticultural industry on Delos in Late Antiquity, underscores the significance of this study.

The combined catalogue, analysis and discussion reinforce the noteworthy position viticulture held in Late Antiquity as an agricultural endeavour, socio-cultural and economic factor engrained within eastern Mediterranean settlements.

About the Author
Emlyn K. Dodd is an Honorary Postdoctoral Associate at Macquarie University and Greece Fellow at the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens. He was recently the Macquarie-Gale British School at Rome Scholar.

Reviews
'The volume is beautifully illustrated, with numerous high-quality photographs and other images... [It] also provides a comprehensive survey of ancient evidence and modern scholarship through exhaustive research and meticulous referencing in more than 1000 footnotes. The monograph makes an invaluable contribution to an important topic for late antiquity.' - Tamara Lewit, European Journal of Post-Classical Archaeologies, May 2020

'In the end, with some 150 pages of detailed description, analysis and interpretation, accompanied by 30 figures and 42 plates — most of them in colour — this study is a rich source of information for anyone interested in wine production and press technology in the Late Roman, Late Antique and Byzantine Mediterranean, and a fine achievement by a promising young scholar in the field.' - Dimitri Van Limbergen, Bryn Mawr Classical Review, March 2021
Household Food Storage in Ancient Israel and Judah by Tim Frank. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+182 pages; 99 figures, 29 tables (40 plates in colour). 463 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919801. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919818. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This study serves as a source book on domestic food storage in Ancient Israel and Judah by outlining important ethnographic and ancient textual and pictorial sources relevant to the discussion. These allow us to understand the motivated actions in relation to food storage, and the significance of food storage in daily life. On the basis of twenty-two well-excavated buildings from thirteen Iron Age sites, representative archaeological data is examined. For each house the total preserved food storage capacity is calculated, activity areas are identified, and specific patterns are noted. Food storage equipment, the location and role of food storage in the household, and the integration with other activities are analysed.

Storage rooms were often located at the margins of houses, but a considerable part of the stored food was kept in other activity areas toward the centre. The data indicates that in Iron Age I food was stored mainly domestically or in shared community facilities, while redistributive food storage became more common in Iron Age II, with significant domestic storage continuing. The ideal of self-sufficiency remained.

About the Author
TIM FRANK is a staff member of the Lahav Research Project, Phase IV archaeological excavations at Tell Halif (Israel). He studied Theology (Biblical Studies) at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and Applied Anthropology (Near Eastern Archaeology) at Mississippi State University, completing his doctorate at the University of Bern, Switzerland. He specializes in household archaeology, particularly that of Ancient Judah. More broadly, he investigates aspects of daily life in Ancient Israel and Judah.
Latrinae: Roman Toilets in the Northwestern Provinces of the Roman Empire by Stefanie Hoss. ii+152 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). 378 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 31. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917258. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917265. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents a selection of papers and case studies first presented at a conference designed to focus on the toilets of the Northwestern provinces of the Roman Empire, taking place at Radboud University on the 1st and 2nd of May 2009. Papers demonstrate the value of scientific analysis of waste to understand the food habits and diseases of the Roman users of the toilet, while elsewhere questions on how to find the necessary expertise and financing for such investigations were raised.

It is impossible at this time to write a definitive history of toilets and toilet-use in Roman times. Much more research is needed to get a clear view of all aspects surrounding human waste removal during the Roman period. While the basics of the architectural aspects of Roman toilets are better known by now, other aspects have been only touched upon briefly. It is hoped that this conference and its proceedings volume will not be the last on this subject in the Northwestern provinces, but just a start for this interesting research topic.

Reviews
'Concluding, the current book is a valuable contribution, adding to a less researched aspect of life in the Roman Northwestern provinces. Also worth mentioning is the fact that all articles have images, plans, maps, reconstructions, pictures and drawings of the complexes and artefacts, which makes them very easy to use and reference. Focusing on a niched matter, all information available in the volume, as well as the general picture it offers, are welcomed contributions, with the potential of being relevant in future researches.'—Rada Varga, Studia Antiqua et Aarchaeologica 25/1, 2019
Not just Porridge: English Literati at Table edited by Francesca Orestano and Michael Vickers. xii+180 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 8 colour pages. 328 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915780. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915797. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The essays presented in Not just Porridge address both the scholar and the bold, adventurous cook. They offer the crumbs of what might be found in great and famous works of literature.

Concocted in Italy by scholars of English and sifted through the judgement of the English editor, this volume traces a curious history of English literature, from the tasty and spicy recipes of the Middle Ages down to very recent times, threatened as they are by junk food and microwaved dinners.

The authors of the essays have lingered on the threshold of the kitchen rather than in the library. Each chapter provides the recipes that best describe the writers involved, and their culinary times.
Sweet Waste: Medieval sugar production in the Mediterranean viewed from the 2002 excavations at Tawahin es-Sukkar, Safi, Jordan by Richard E. Jones and contributors. 245pp; Illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Published by Potingair Press.ISBN 9780956824035. £45.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The history of cane sugar from its origins in the east to its status as a luxury foodstuff and even medicine in the medieval period to a commodity produced and consumed globally in today’s world is well known. Yet archaeologically, sugar is an invisible commodity, its presence usually being inferred from the humble sugar pots used in the last stages of its sophisticated production process. This book attempts to redress the imbalance between history and archaeology by reporting on the excavation of a medieval sugar refinery, Tawahin es-Sukkar near Safi, situated south of the Dead Sea in Jordan. There it was possible to explore many of the steps in the sugar-making process. The book’s title refers to the industrial waste whose study has shed light on those steps. To place this refinery in chronological and economic context, excavation was extended to the adjacent ‘support town’ of Khirbet Shaykh ‘Isa; the book presents its results.

The available archaeological evidence for sugar production across the Mediterranean is reviewed. There is particular emphasis on the sugar vessels and the light they can shed on the poorly understood relationship between primary production centres, refining, storage and consumption centres. The book, which is fully illustrated, can be profitably read by archaeologists, archaeological scientists, historians and visitors to Jordan alike.

About the Author: Richard Jones has wide-ranging experience in archaeological science in the Mediterranean and especially in Greece and Italy The production and distribution of pottery is one of his main interests. Until recently he was Senior Lecturer in archaeological science at the University of Glasgow.
Amphorae from the Kops Plateau (Nijmegen) Trade and supply to the Lower-Rhineland from the Augustan period to AD 69/70 edited by C. Carreras and J. van den Berg. x+404 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 314 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915421. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915438. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the year 19 BC, Roman legions arrived in Nijmegen with the aim of conquering the Rhenish territories from the local populations. In addition to the legionaries themselves, the Roman army required a regular provision of staple supplies in order to keep such a war machine in top condition. The archaeological evidence for this provision is a myriad of organic remains (i.e. seeds, bones, pollen) as well as ceramic containers such as amphorae.

One of the first military camps at Nijmegen, together with that on the Hunerberg, was Kops Plateau. This timber fortress – the most northerly military site of the Julio-Claudian period – dating from 12 BC to AD 69, has provided an extraordinary amphora assemblage. At a time when most Roman roads were still only projects, this distant military outpost received amphora products from all over the Mediterranean basin – from Palestine to Greece in the east to Baetica and northern Africa in the west as well as from the Italian core. In addition to amphorae, Kops Plateau also provided a wide repertory of regional vessels whose contents are unknown.

The amphorae from Kops Plateau represent a singular example of Roman military supply in northern Europe at a very early date. Their analysis sheds light on trading routes in the Atlantic regions, and from Gaul to Germany; indeed also on the Claudian invasion of Britain.
Holocene Prehistory in the Télidjène Basin, Eastern Algeria Capsian occupations at Kef Zoura D and Aïn Misteheyia edited by David Lubell. vi+226 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 4 colour plates. Papers in English and French. 239 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913731. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913748. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From 1972 to 1979, field work was conducted in the Télidjène Basin, Eastern Algeria, as part of a project called The Prehistoric Cultural Ecology of Capsian Escargotières. The primary objective was the controlled excavation of two stratified Capsian sites, the open-air escargotière Aïn Misteheyia (1973 and 1976) and the rock shelter Kef Zoura D (1976 and 1978), both of which have remained incompletely published until now. Aïn Misteheyia and Kef Zoura D have proven to be key sites in a discussion that has been ongoing since at least the 1930s when Vaufrey published his interpretation of Capsian stratigraphy, trying to understand if there was a temporal succession between the Capsien typique and the Capsien supérieur. These are the only Capsian escargotières excavated with modern methods and extensive radiocarbon dating that have a clear stratigraphic sequence in which both variants of the Capsian are represented. We show that Capsien typique precedes Capsien supérieur, that the latter saw the introduction of a new technique for the production of blanks (pressure flaking), that the change is more-or-less contemporary with the 8200 cal BP cold event, and that it was accompanied by a subtle change in a subsistence regime of continued foraging despite the introduction of some herding of apparently introduced domestic stock in neighbouring regions that suggests the changes observed at these two sites may have eventually led in some areas to the introduction of Neolithic subsistence patterns, although there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the central Capsian area of eastern Algeria and southern Tunisia. Aïn Misteheyia was described in two previous reports in Libyca, but the artifact illustrations were never published and appear here as an addendum. Four chapters describe the chronology, stratigraphy, lithic, faunal and charcoal assemblages from Kef Zoura D. In addition, there are chapters analyzing the well preserved assemblages of worked bone from the Capsien supérieur deposits at both sites as well as the small assemblages of marine shell. One chapter is a reprinted paper that originally appeared in Sahara on an engraved stone plaque from Kef Zoura D, and a final chapter is the first report on an ongoing study of use-wear in the lithic assemblage from Kef Zoura D.

About the Editor:
David Lubell (Professor Emeritus, University of Alberta and Adjunct Professor, University of Waterloo) received his PhD in 1971 from Columbia University. He has directed archaeological field work in Algeria, Portugal and Italy, always with an emphasis on the inter-relationship of human groups with their environments as reflected in their subsistence patterns and the analysis of the artifacts they made and used. In collaboration with Mary Jackes, he has expanded his horizons to take into account the bioarchaeology and palaeodemography of the human populations involved. He has also made a decades-long study of the occurrence of edible land snails in Holocene archaeological sites throughout the Mediterranean region and is convinced (but unable yet to prove) that their presence in abundance represents a part of the transition from foraging to food production.

Reviews:

'This volume is a detailed and convincing interdisciplinary presentation of important archaeological material, illustrated with numerous very informative, high-quality figures.' -Jörg Linstädter (Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa, 2017)

'The major achievement of this book is the systematic description of well stratified Capsian sites, offering a high-resolution representation of the transformation of this horizon from the beginning, during the Early Holocene, until its evolved phase... The book is undoubtedly an important entry point for the research in Kef Zoura and at the same time a significant contribution to the knowledge of the Holocene of Algeria.' -Giuseppina Mut
Fish-salting in the northwest Maghreb in antiquity A Gazetteer of Sites and Resources by Athena Trakadas. xi+159 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 200 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912413. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912420. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is a detailed gazetteer of fish-salting production in the northwest Maghreb in antiquity. It consists of a catalogue of fish-salting sites in addition to catalogues of other related resources that are necessary for the production and trans-shipment of the industry’s products: salt and amphorae kilns. The gazetteer is intended to serve as a comprehensive source book, and as such, it builds upon previous studies and current research on the region’s fish-salting industry.
Cannibalism in the Linear Pottery Culture: The Human Remains from Herxheim by Bruno Boulestin and Anne-Sophie Coupey. viii+143 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 183 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912130. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912147. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Herxheim enclosure, located in the German region of Palatinate, is one of the major discoveries of the last two decades regarding the Linear Pottery Culture, and probably one of the most significant in advancing understanding of how this culture ended. The spectacular deposits, mostly composed of human remains, recovered on the occasion of the two excavation campaigns carried out on the site, grabbed people’s attention and at the same time raised several questions regarding their interpretation, which had so far mostly hesitated between peculiar funerary practices, war and cannibalism.

The authors provide here the first extensive study of the human remains found at Herxheim, focusing mainly on those recovered during the 2005–2010 excavation campaign. They first examine the field data in order to reconstruct at best the modalities of deposition of these remains. Next, from the quantitative analyses and those of the bone modifications, they describe the treatments of the dead, showing that they actually were the victims of cannibalistic practices. The nature of this cannibalism is then discussed on the basis of biological, palaeodemographic and isotopic studies, and concludes that an exocannibalism existed linked to armed violence. Finally, the human remains are placed in both their local and chronocultural contexts, and a general interpretation is proposed of the events that unfolded in Herxheim and of the reasons for the social crisis at the end of the Linear Pottery culture in which they took place.

About the Authors:
Bruno Boulestin is an anthropologist at the University of Bordeaux, France, member of the “Anthropologie des populations passées et presents” (A3P) team of the unit “De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel, Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie” (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). He is working on the diachronic study of practices around death in ancient societies from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data and is specialized in the study of bone modifications and corpse treatments.

Anne-Sophie Coupey is an archaeologist at the University of Rennes 1, France, Centre de Recherche en Archéologie, Archéosciences et Histoire (CReAAH, UMR 6566 of the CNRS). She is specialized in the archaeology of death and has worked mainly on funerary practices in Southeastern Asia.

Sabores de Roma Actas del I Simposio Internacional Sobre Gastronomía Antigua Romana edited by Pedro Carretero. 148 pages; Spanish text. 10 2015. ISBN 9788494211065. £13.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

Since ERA Cultura Extremadura started experimenting with Apicius’s recipes, a meeting on Roman cooking and food production became crucial. This is how the first international conference “Sabores de Roma” (flavours of Rome) took place in Zafra on July 2013. This book collects some of the works presented on that conference, in a range of topics from food production and manipulation to experimental recipes and new products commercialized in the last couple of years (garum, oil, wine…). Some of the main Spanish experts in Roman cooking participate in this volume, that is a great approach to the topic.

Table of Contents
Introducción: Sabores de Roma; 1. las prácticas económicas y comerciales en la cultura castreña durante los siglos II-I a. C.; 2. El almacén comercial tardorrepublicano del Cerro de la Atalaya de La Higuera en Jaén; 3. La estela de Apicio: formas de representación de la comida romana en la historiografía y la historia de la cocina europea; 4. Aproximación a la producción de aceite y vino en Caesarobriga (Talavera de la Reina Toledo); 5. El simple zumo de uva, el vina, el vina dulcia, vina cocta, fieles testigos de vida; 6. Experimentación en el tratado de belloas para su uso alimentario. Recreación de una pequeña factoría celtíbero-romana; 7. Gastroarqueología del gijón romano: hipótesis sobre la dieta alimenticia de sus habitantes a través de las fuentes arqueológicas y doumentales; 8. El consumo de aves en la Roma de Augusto
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