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NEW: Laying the Foundations: Manual of the British Museum Iraq Scheme Archaeological Training Programme edited by John MacGinnis and Sébastien Rey. Paperback; 205x225mm; illustrated in full colour throughout. 808 2022. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271408. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271415. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Laying the Foundations, which developed out of the British Museum’s ‘Iraq Scheme’ archaeological training programme, covers the core components for putting together and running an archaeological field programme. The focus is on practicality. Individual chapters address background research, the use of remote sensing, approaches to surface collection, excavation methodologies, survey with total (and multi) stations, use of a dumpy level, context classification, on-site recording, databases and registration, environmental protocols, conservation, photography, illustration, post-excavation site curation and report writing. While the manual is oriented to the archaeology of Iraq, the approaches are no less applicable to the Middle East more widely, an aim hugely facilitated by the open-source distribution of translations into Arabic and Kurdish.
NEW: Qatar: Evidence of the Palaeolithic Earliest People Revealed by Julie Scott-Jackson. Paperback; 240x270mm; 258 pages; 94 figures (colour throughout). Full text in English and Arabic. 766 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270500. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270517. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Qatar: Evidence of the Palaeolithic Earliest People Revealed, with full text in both English and Arabic, tells the story of the long and difficult search to discover the identity of the first people to inhabit the sovereign State of Qatar, which is situated on a peninsula, that extends into the Arabian Gulf. The book synthesises the results of extensive fieldwork by the PADMAC Unit with the many diverse historical records and reports of investigations, beginning with Holgar Kapel’s, in the early 1950s.

The archaeology of the State of Qatar is an important part of the cultural heritage of the world. The loss of archaeological sites to urban and industrial development since the 1950s has been inevitable but the loss of over 30 years of Palaeolithic research in Qatar, an area of prehistoric significance, as a result of academic dissension, is certainly regrettable. The work of the PADMAC Unit in Qatar now marks the end of this Palaeolithic research hiatus.

About the Author
Julie Scott-Jackson is the Director of the PADMAC Unit, based at Kellogg College, University of Oxford, where she also completed her doctorate In Palaeolithic Geoarchaeology. She has been studying Palaeolithic sites on high levels In the Middle East and Southern England since the 1990s.
NEW: Die Entstehung komplexer Siedlungen im Zentraloman: Archäologische Untersuchungen zur Siedlungsgeschichte von Al-Khashbah by Conrad Schmidt, Stephanie Döpper, Jonas Kluge, Samantha Petrella, Ullrich Ochs, Nick Kirchhoff, Susanne Maier und Mona Walter. Hardback; 210x297; 590 pages; 358 figures, 68 plates (colour throughout). German text.. 803 2021 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 5. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271002. £96.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271019. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Die Entstehung komplexer Siedlungen im Zentraloman: Archäologische Untersuchungen zur Siedlungsgeschichte von Al-Khashbah presents the results of a survey conducted in 2015 and beyond by the Institut für die Kulturen des Alten Orients of the Universität Tübingen in Al-Khashbah, one of the largest Early Bronze Age sites on the Omani Peninsula. Ten monumental buildings, 273 tombs and other structures from the Hafit (3100-2700 BC) and Umm an-Nar periods (2700-2000 BC) were documented here. This makes Al-Khashbah ideally suited for the investigation of the beginnings of complex settlements and social structures in northern Inner Oman at the transition from the 4th to the 3rd millennium BC, because many of the achievements previously attributed to the Umm an-Nar period, such as monumental architecture and the smelting of copper, can already be proven here in the preceding Hafit period. In the Umm an-Nar period, the development of Al-Khashbah continues steadily, giving the site additional importance. According to the results of the survey, however, copper production at the site no longer seems to play a role in this period.

Aus den auf die frühe Bronzezeit folgenden Epochen des 2. und 1. Jahrtausends v. Chr. sowie des 1. und 2. Jahrtausends n. Chr. gibt es in Al-Khashbah nur äußerst wenige Befunde. Erst im 18.–20. Jahrhundert n. Chr. erfährt der Ort eine intensive Wiederbelebung, wovon insbesondere die alte Lehmziegelsiedlung im Norden der Palmenoase, eine kleine Siedlung im Osten des Untersuchungsgebiets, eine Reihe von Bewässerungsanlagen, mehrere Friedhöfe, Petroglyphen sowie zahlreiche an der Oberfläche gefundene spätislamische Keramikscherben zeugen.
NEW: Tinqueux « la Haubette » (Marne, France): Un site exceptionnel du Néolithique ancien edited by Lamys Hachem. Paperback; 210x297mm; 220 pages; 92 figures, 30 tables (colour throughout). French text with English Summary. 771 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699760. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699777. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Neolithic site of Tinqueux ‘la Haubette’ (Marne) dated to the ‘Blicquy/Villeneuve-Saint-Germain’ (5000-4700 cal. BC) is composed of five houses, further series of pits and the remains of an oven. An abundance of finds has allowed us to explore a number of themes in greater detail. The first concerns the potential singularity of the site due to its very easterly location within the BVSG area of expansion and its place within the broader chronological sequence. The second is the nature of the settlement within the network of ‘producer’ and ‘receiver’ sites which characterises the BVSG. The third theme that we focus on is the provenance of raw materials, and the fourth one is the internal settlement chronology.

The analyses carried out on the settlement structure and on the archaeological finds reveal hitherto unknown facets of the BVSG culture, like refining the chronological sequence for this period in its regional facies; and establishing a particularly valuable periodisation for the site itself. Comparison with nearby and distant sites has helped us to understand the relationship of this settlement to other contemporary sites. It reveals that the site looked to the east and that there was a strong cultural dynamic which was expressed by varied networks of influence and circulation, particularly for the acquisition of raw materials and finished products.

About the Author
Lamys Hachem is a researcher in zooarchaeology and pre-history at the Institut National de Recherches Archéologiques Préventives (INRAP). As part of the team Trajectoires « De la sédentarisation à l’Etat » (UMR 8215 of CNRS and Paris I-Sorbonne University), her research and publications focus on the societies of the Early, Middle and Final Neolithic period, particularly in the northern half of France, where she has led teams performing preventive archaeological excavations for more than two decades.

En français
Le site néolithique de Tinqueux « la Haubette » (Marne) daté du « Blicquy/Villeneuve-Saint-Germain » (5000-4700 cal. BC) a livré cinq maisons, ainsi que des fosses et une structure de combustion. Les éléments de la culture matérielle abondants ont permis d’approfondir différentes problématiques. La première traite de la singularité du site en raison de sa position très orientale dans l’aire d’extension du BVSG et sa place dans la séquence chronologique. Le second sujet porte sur la nature de l’habitat dans le réseau des sites « producteurs » ou « receveurs » qui caractérise le BVSG. Le troisième thème abordé est celui de la provenance des matières premières et le quatrième est celui des caractéristiques chronologiques internes au village.

Les analyses menées sur la structuration du village et sur le mobilier archéologique ont permis de révéler un pan encore inconnu de la culture BVSG. Ainsi, la séquence chronologique fine de cette période dans son faciès régional a pu être établie ; comme que la périodisation interne du village. La comparaison avec des sites proches ou éloignés a été déterminante pour comprendre le rapport de cet habitat avec les sites contemporains. Elle révèle une ouverture vers l’est et une forte dynamique culturelle qui se traduit par des réseaux d’influences et de circulations variées, notamment pour l’approvisionnement en matières premières et en produits finis.
NEW: Survey tra Fiumi, Pianure e Colline L’evoluzione del paesaggio archeologico nel territorio di Santa Croce di Magliano by Pasquale Marino. Paperback; 203x276mm; 154 pages; 111 figures, 15 tables, 21 plates, 3 maps (colour throughout). Italian text. 141 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270807. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270814. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Survey tra Fiumi, Pianure e Colline analyses the territory of Santa Croce di Magliano in the province of Campobasso, Molise, Italy and studies all its archaeological aspects in order to understand patterns of occupation of the human groups that have inhabited it and how they, through the evolution of social interactions, have received extraterritorial influences. It maintains a focus on this small area of the lower Molise in the wider regional context of the Frentano state. This study has been able to contribute further evidence to support attempts to explain the interactions between the Samnite cultures located north of the Fortore river and those located south of the same river, characterised by a Daunian culture (at least until the sixth century BC). It also highlights the evolution of settlement types over the centuries. Furthermore it has been also possible to highlight how the types of settlement have evolved over the centuries, up to the current urban form of the village considered in this study.

About the Author
Pasquale Marino is an independent researcher specialising in the archaeology of prehistoric and historical landscapes, in particular the analysis of artefacts related to their territorial contexts. After obtaining a Master’s degree at the University of Molise, he completed a PhD at the University of Campania ‘L.Vanvitelli’ (2018). He has published in various national and international journals and contributed in several national and international conferences. He is currently collaborating with the chairs of Prehistoric Material Culture and the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology at the Department of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education of the University of Molise.

In Italiano
L’archeologia del paesaggio abbina lo studio dei materiali archeologici con lo studio del paesaggio per comprendere le fasi di sviluppo, mutazione e, nel caso, abbandono di un determinato territorio. Essa può essere considerata un grande contenitore in cui far confluire ogni aspetto dell’archeologia per ricostruire tutte le fasi umane relative ad un determinato territorio. La ricostruzione dei commerci, delle vie di comunicazione, del comportamento di gruppi localizzati in un determinato territorio e come essi possano essere stati influenzati dal territorio stesso.

In questo volume è stato preso in analisi il territorio di Santa Croce di Magliano, in provincia di Campobasso, Molise, Italia ed è stato analizzato in tutti i suoi aspetti archeologici per tentare di capire le modalità di spostamento dei gruppi umani che lo hanno abitato e come essi, con l’evolversi delle interazioni sociali, abbiano avuto influenze extraterritoriali, cercando di inquadrare questo fazzoletto di terra del basso Molise in quello che è un contesto di macro area come lo stato Frentano.

Con questo è stato possibile inserire un altro tassello che tenta di spiegare le interazioni tra culture poste a nord del fiume Fortore, di derivazione sannitica, con quelle culture poste a sud dello stesso fiume, di cultura daunia, almeno fino al VI sec. a.C. . Inoltre è stato possibile mettere in evidenza come si siano evolute le tipologie di insediamento nel corso dei secoli, fino ad arrivare all’attuale forma cittadina del paese di riferimento in questo studio.

Il dott. Pasquale Marino è un ricercatore indipendente specializzato il archeologia del paesaggio preistorico e storico. In particolare nell’analisi dei manufatti in riferimento ai contesti territoriali.

Dopo il conseguimento della laurea magistrale presso l’Università degli Studi del Molise, ha conseguito il Dottorato di ricerca presso l’Università degli Studi della Campania “L.Vanvitelli” (2018). Ha pubblicato in diverse riviste nazionali e internazionali e partecipato a diversi convegni nazionali e internazionali. Attualmente è collaboratore delle cattedre di cultura materiale preistorica e laboratorio d
Taymāʾ II: Catalogue of the Inscriptions Discovered in the Saudi-German Excavations at Taymāʾ 2004–2015 by Michael C. A. Macdonald. Hardback; 210x297mm; 264 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 717 2020 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698763. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698770. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Taymāʾ II is a Catalogue which contains all the inscriptions discovered during the 24 seasons of the Saudi- German excavations at Taymāʾ from 2004–15 which were funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The 113 objects carry inscriptions in different languages and scripts, illustrating the linguistic diversity of the oasis through time. Although the majority are fragmentary, they provide an important source for the history of the oasis in ancient and mediaeval times.

The Babylonian cuneiform inscriptions in this volume confirm for the first time the ten-year sojourn at Taymāʾ of the last Babylonian king Nabû-na’id (556–539 BC). In addition, Imperial Aramaic inscriptions dated by the reigns of Lihyanite kings, based at Dadan (modern al-ʿUlā), reveal for the first time that they ruled Taymāʾ at a period in the second half of the first millennium BC.

As well as editing the volume, Michael C. A. Macdonald edited the Imperial Aramaic inscriptions found from 2010–15, plus those in the form of the Aramaic script which developed in Taymāʾ, and the Nabataean, Dadanitic, and Taymanitic texts. In addition, Hanspeter Schaudig edited the cuneiform inscriptions; Peter Stein, the Imperial Aramaic texts found from 2004–09; and Frédéric Imbert, the Arabic inscriptions. Arnulf Hausleiter and Francelin Tourtet provided archaeological contributions, while Martina Trognitz curated the virtual edition of many of the texts recorded by RTI. The indexes contain the words and names from all known texts from the oasis, including those in the Taymāʾ Museum and other collections which will be published as Taymāʾ III.

About the Author
Michael C. A. Macdonald is an Honorary Fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford, and Fellow of the British Academy. He works on the languages, scripts and ancient history of Arabia and directs the Online Corpus of the Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia (http://krc.orient.ox.ac.uk/ociana/). He has been working at Taymāʾ since 2010. ;

With contributions by:
Arnulf Hausleiter is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula. He has been co-directing the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 with Ricardo Eichmann. ;

Frédéric Imbert is Professor at the Institut de recherches et d’études sur les mondes arabes et musulmans, Aix-Marseille University. ;

Hanspeter Schaudig is Associate Professor of Assyriology at the Seminar für Sprachen und Kulturen des Alten Orients at the University of Heidelberg. ;

Peter Stein is Associate Professor for Semitic studies at the Faculty of Theology / Ancient Languages Division at the University of Jena. ;

Francelin Tourtet is a PhD candidate at the Freie Universität Berlin working on his dissertation on Bronze and Iron Age pottery from Taymāʾ. ;

Martina Trognitz is member of the Austrian Centre of Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage at the Austrian Academy of Sciences.
La necropoli romana di Melano (Canton Ticino – Svizzera) by Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess. Paperback; 203x276mm; 118 pages; 20 colour figures, 6 black & white figures, 12 black & white plates. Italian text. 140 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699784. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699791. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Roman necropolis of Melano (Canton Ticino, Switzerland), excavated in 1957 and 1979, is one of the few from this period discovered in the Sottoceneri region, where the findings are mostly isolated burials or those in small groups. It consists of 26 cremation and inhumation tombs and stands out for its variety of types and the materials used in their construction. Cremation burials, the most numerous, range from the simplest, single-chamber burials, up to double-chamber and multiple cinerary niches. Inhumation tombs, generally belonging to children or adolescents, have yielded clues as to the use of wooden boxes as coffins or the placement of the body on a cot or stretcher. The grave goods include all the main material classes of the Roman period typical of the region, together with finds that bear the imprint of a centre that developed along the shores of Lake Ceresio and activities related to it, such as fishing. The stratigraphy of the necropolis and the grave goods indicate continuous use from the 1st to the 3rd century AD.

About the Author
Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess graduated in 1990 from the University of Zurich, majoring in Classical Archaeology, Egyptology and Ancient History. In 2001, she completed her PhD thesis, ‘Aspects of Roman Pottery in Canton Ticino (Switzerland)’, at the University of Nottingham (UK). She has pursued various studies in Classical and medieval archaeology, focusing in particular on Roman pottery and since 2000 has taken part in the excavation of the multi-period site of Tremona-Castello.

in italiano
La necropoli romana di Melano (Canton Ticino – Svizzera), scavata nel 1957 e nel 1979, costituisce a tutt’oggi una delle poche di quest’epoca scoperte nel Sottoceneri dove i rinvenimenti sono invece perlopiù sepolture isolate o riunite in piccoli gruppi. È costituita da 26 tombe fra cremazioni e inumazioni e si distingue per la loro varietà a livello tipologico e per i materiali impiegati nella loro costruzione. Fra le sepolture a cremazione, le più numerose, vi sono quelle più semplici, a vano singolo, fino a quelle a doppia camera e a loculo cinerario multiplo. Le tombe a inumazione, generalmente pertinenti a bambini o adolescenti, hanno restituito indizi riguardo all’uso di deporre il corpo in cassa lignea o su un lettino o barella. Nei corredi funerari sono presenti tutte le principali classi materiali d’epoca romana tipiche della regione unitamente a reperti che recano l’impronta di un centro sviluppatosi lungo le rive del lago Ceresio e dedito a particolari attività ad esso collegate, come la pesca. La stratigrafia verticale della necropoli e gli oggetti di corredo ne indicano un uso continuato dal I al III sec. d.C.

Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess si è laureata nel 1990 all’Università di Zurigo, specializzandosi in Archeologia classica, Egittologia e Storia antica. Nel 2001 ha completato la sua tesi di dottorato Aspetti della ceramica romana nel Canton Ticino (Svizzera) presso l’Università di Nottingham (GB). Ha svolto diversi studi di archeologia classica, in particolare sulla ceramica romana, e medievale. Dal 2000 partecipa agli scavi archeologici del sito multiperiodico di Tremona-Castello.
A Monumental Hellenistic Funerary Ensemble at Callatis on the Western Black Sea The Documaci Tumulus: Volume I edited by Valeriu Sîrbu, Maria-Magdalena Ștefan and Dan Ștefan. Paperback; 205x290mm; 342 pages; 191 figures, 20 tables. 757 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694369. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694376. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

A Monumental Hellenistic Funerary Ensemble at Callatis on the Western Black Sea presents one of the most spectacular early Hellenistic funerary monuments, recently excavated on the western Black Sea coast by a Romanian-Bulgarian-Polish interdisciplinary research team. Documaci Tumulus, covering a painted tomb, and marked by a monumental statue, was built at the threshold of the 4th to 3rd centuries BC in the cemetery of the Greek City of Callatis. The sophisticated construction techniques and the remains of commemorative rituals attest to the dynamic political arena of the Diadochi wars in the Black Sea area and offer a glimpse into a complex and interconnected world of Hellenistic architects and artists. The monument will fuel discussions about the mechanisms of ritualised identity expression in mixed cultural environments, functioning under the pressure of political change, or about community membership, symbolic discourse and ancestors— all reflected in ‘le jeu des miroirs’ of the funerary practices.



About the editors
Valeriu Sîrbu is a senior archaeologist of the second Iron Age with more than forty years of experience. His main contributions are in the archaeology of ritual, magic, human and animal sacrifices, and sacred places and fortifications in Pre-Roman Dacia. ;

Maria-Magdalena Ștefan is an archaeologist dealing with tumuli graves in the Lower Danube area, Hellenistic tomb architecture and decoration, multi-cultural interactions in border zones and ancient identities. ;

Dan Ștefan is an archaeologist and geophysicist and an experienced analyst of archaeological landscapes with non-invasive methods, including LiDAR and aerial prospection. He has worked at more than one hundred archaeological sites in Romania, the Republic of Moldavia, Bulgaria and Greece.
The Archaeology of ‘Underdog Sites’ in the Douro Valley From Prehistory to the Modern Age edited by Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez, Sonia Díaz-Navarro, Javier Fernández-Lozano and Javier Jiménez Gadea. Paperback; 203x276mm; 390 pages; colour illustrations throughout. Papers in English and Spanish. 139 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699890. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699906. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Archaeology of ‘Underdog Sites’ in the Douro Valley brings together the best presentations from the eighth and ninth meetings of Archaeology of the Douro Valley, held in Ávila and Astorga (Spain), respectively in 2018 and 2019. However, instead of a simple collection of articles, the aim of this publication is to show the importance of projects that have been left in the background despite obtaining interesting archaeological data about the occupation of this valley and its evolution. Moreover, we must take into account that many of these projects support new activity in a rural territory that is increasingly neglected politically and economically. Hence the use of the term ‘underdog’, defined as a person or group of people with less power or money than the rest of society. Overall, the volume provides a general and interdisciplinary view of the different types of occupation in the territory of the Douro Valley. The chapters are divided into four sections, three of them chronological: Prehistory and Protohistory; Antiquity and Late Antiquity; and the medieval and modern ages. The last section is thematic and includes diachronic studies, museology, and the archaeology of mining. Therefore, the present volume is a medium to showcase the latest research carried out in this important territory and to contribute to knowledge of its history, updating the archaeological state of the art in the valley and presenting results that may be used in the most diverse types of comparative studies.

About the Editors
Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez is a pre-doctoral researcher at the University of Salamanca (Junta de Castilla y León and European Social Fund). His main research focuses on Latin epigraphy in Hispania. ;

Sonia Díaz-Navarro is a pre-doctoral researcher at the University of Valladolid (Junta de Castilla y León and European Social Fund). Her research is based on the osteoarchaeological study of the peninsular populations of recent prehistory (Neolithic-Bronze Age). ;

Javier Fernández-Lozano is assistant professor at the University of León. His main lines of research are the archaeology of mining and the study of the geological processes responsible for the formation of mountains in the Iberian Peninsula, using techniques based on 3D laser, spectral analysis and gravimetry. ;

Javier Jiménez Gadea is director of the Museum of Avila. He specialises in the Middle Ages, Islam and heritage management.

En español
Esta monografía reúne las mejores contribuciones presentadas en las VIII y IX Jornadas de Arqueología del Valle del Duero, celebradas en Ávila y Astorga en 2018 y 2019, respectivamente. Más allá de constituir una recopilación de artículos, el objetivo de esta obra es poner de manifiesto la importancia de proyectos arqueológicos que han sido relegados a un segundo plano, a pesar de arrojar interesantes resultados sobre la ocupación del Valle del Duero y su evolución y constituir un recurso de dinamización de un territorio, eminentemente rural, cada vez más abandonado. A ello se debe que el título de este monográfico empleé el término ‘underdog’, definido como una persona o un grupo de personas con menos poder o dinero que el resto de la sociedad.

A lo largo de la obra el lector encontrará una visión general e interdisciplinar de los diferentes modos de ocupación y explotación del territorio en torno al valle del Duero. Los capítulos están estructurados en cuatro secciones: tres de corte cronológico –Prehistoria y Protohistoria, Antigüedad y Antigüedad Tardía y Épocas medieval y moderna– y una temática –Varia– que recoge trabajos de corte diacrónico, museológico o sobre la Arqueología de la minería.

Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez trabaja actualmente como investigador predoctoral en la Universidad de Salamanca (Junta de Castilla y León y Fondo Social Europeo). Su investigac
Pits and Boots: Excavation of Medieval and Post-medieval Backlands under the Bon Accord Centre, Aberdeen by Michael Roy. Paperback; 205x290mm; 368 pages; 170 figures, 43 tables. 735 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694871. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694888. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Pits and Boots derives from excavations carried out in 2007-8, in advance of an extension to the Bon Accord Centre in Aberdeen, that uncovered the backlands of an area that would have formed part of the industrial quarter of the medieval town. The site is well-dated by dendrochronology, augmented by artefactual evidence, and indicates activity from the late 12th century AD into the early modern period, with a particularly intensive period in the 13th century. Structural evidence consists primarily of the backland boundaries, hearth/ovens, several wood-lined wells and many large pits. It is the contents of these pits and wells which forms the core of this monograph. The waterlogged conditions within the pits and wells has meant that a remarkable assemblage of organic remains including leather, wooden artefacts, textiles, animal pelts, fibres, and cordage has survived. The leather assemblage is the largest ever to be found in Scotland and has revealed a range of activities associated with the use of animal hides, from hide processing to tanning and shoemaking. The wood assemblage is also extensive and includes bowls, platters, coopered vessels and tools. Metalwork, crucibles, clay mould fragments and ceramics all testify to the industrial nature of the area, while the large quantities of animal and fishbone demonstrate that butchery on an industrial scale took place in the area. The excavation charts the changing nature of this once-peripheral area of Aberdeen, from an industrial zone in the medieval period, to horticultural and domestic spaces in post-medieval times, and has thus greatly enhanced our knowledge of Scottish urban development.

About the Author
Michael Roy currently works as a Project manager in the Post-Excavation sector at AOC Archaeology Group. After graduating from the University of Cambridge in 1993 and the University of Leicester in 1994, Michael has worked in archaeology across the UK, working for several years for the Scottish Urban Archaeological Trust and Essex County Council’s Field Archaeology Unit. Joining AOC Archaeology in 2004, he has directed substantial urban excavations in Edinburgh (Parliament House), Aberdeen (Bon Accord) and Dunbar, in addition to working in their Consultancy sector.
Barāqish/Yathill (Yemen) 1986-2007 Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration / Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies edited by Sabina Antonini and Francesco G. Fedele. DOI: 10.32028/9781789694703. Paperback; 205x290mm; 2 volumes: 398pp & 546pp; 700 figures, tables and plates. Contributions in English, Italian, and French. Chapter abstracts in English and Arabic. 732 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694703. £98.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694710. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The walled town of Barāqish in interior Yemen – ancient Yathill of the Sabaeans and Minaeans – was for Alessandro de Maigret (1943-2011) ‘one of the archaeological marvels not just of Yemen, but of the entire Near East’. Established as an oasis settlement in the semi-desert depression of the Jawf, it became in the 1st millennium BCE a thriving caravan station on the ‘incense’ route and a famed place of worship, controlled by rich rulers and merchants. Topography and trade made it a crucible of South Arabian and foreign traditions, and on several occasions, it was a border town disputed between rival powers. A sustained archaeological effort to investigate the site and area began in 1986 by the Italian Archaeological Mission, led by de Maigret, and developed in two phases. In 1989-1992 the temple of the patron god was excavated, while between 2003-2007 a range of new excavations were undertaken, including a second temple, a sounding, a dissection of the tell's edge outside the Minaean wall, and a cemetery.

Presented across two volumes, Volume 1: Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration is particularly devoted to the temple of god ʿAthtar dhu-Qabḍ (Temple B), dated to the second half of the 1st millennium BCE. Six chapters fully illustrate its excavation, architecture, restoration, findings, inscriptions, and dating. The contribution of this work and monument to regional history transcends its local significance. The report is framed by ten chapters detailing the historiography of research on Barāqish, the initial surveys carried out in 1986-1987, the architecture and restoration of Temple A together with the extramural excavation at the adjacent curtain wall, the cultic equipment, and radiocarbon datings. The nine contributors are leading scholars in the above fields and include recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

The core of Volume 2: Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies is a final report on Area C, an exploratory dissection through the western edge of the Barāqish mound outside the curtain wall, and a unique operation for Yemen until now. Eight chapters detail the excavation, stratigraphy, and geoarchaeology (from about 800 BCE to the present), in addition to radiocarbon chronology, cultural finds, animal and plant remains, economy, major historical events, and unique evidence for trade. Four further chapters offer a glimpse of settlement archaeology for Sabaean Yathill and the survey of a religious centre to the west, together with a first typology of Minaean pottery and an epigraphic and political-historical overview for Barāqish and the Jawf. The contributors are recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

About the Editors
Sabina Antonini heads the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen c/o Monumenta Orientalia (Rome). Since 1984 she has taken part in archaeological surveys and excavations of prehistoric sites in Khawlān al-Ṭiyāl and Ramlat al-Sabʿatayn and of South Arabian sites, including Yalā, Tamnaʿ, Ḥayd ibn ʿAqīl, and Barāqish. She is a specialist in South Arabian archaeology and history of art. Her contribution, ‘The Italian Archaeological Mission at Šibām al-Ġirās, Yemen’, has appeared in Festschrift in honour of Professor Mikhail Piotrovsky (2019). ;

Francesco G. Fedele has been Professor of Anthropology and Prehistoric ecology at the Università di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Naples, until retirement in 2011. As a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen since 1984 he has conducted excavations in Khawlān al- Ṭiyāl and at Barāqish, with a particular focus on site geoarchaeology and archaeofaunas. His recent publications include ‘New data on domestic and wild camels in Sabaean and Minaean Yemen’ in Archaeozoology of the Near East 9 (2017).
White Castle: The Evaluation of an Upstanding Prehistoric Enclosure in East Lothian by David Connolly, Murray Cook and Hana Kdolska. Paperback; 203x276mm; 108 pages; 42 figures, 8 tables (colour throughout). 134 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699302. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699319. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

White Castle: The evaluation of an upstanding prehistoric enclosure in East Lothian describes the results of a four year research programme of archaeological works between 2010 and 2013, at the later prehistoric enclosure of White Castle, East Lothian, carried out under the auspices of the Rampart Scotland project. The site is a Scheduled Monument, but, despite being subject of mapping and survey for some 200 years, it has never been examined by excavation prior to the Rampart Scotland project’s interventions. White Castle was the first of the series of comparable sites to be excavated in the Lammermuir area. The programme of archaeological evaluation and sequence of radiometric dates furnished evidence for four major phases of activity at White Castle – with the main enclosure period dating to the second half of the first millennium BC. The excavations demonstrated a clear sequence of enclosure development over time, whereby the design and visual impact often appeared to be more important than defence alone. White Castle’s location on the main route through the Lammermuirs with surrounding upland pasture is also highly suggestive to its function and it seems probable that the site’s economy was concerned primarily with controlling access to grazing. The final phase of the prehistoric enclosure appears to combine two key factors: impressing visitors and stock control. While maintenance of White Castle’s enclosure system was abandoned in the closing centuries BC, it is unlikely that the area was deserted and there is also limited evidence for two later phases of activity on site around the Medieval and Early Modern Periods.

About the Authors:
David Connolly MCIfA, FSA Scot has had a long career in archaeology since 1981. Being one of the pioneers of buildings archaeology, land survey and a qualified drone pilot, he is always at the forefront of developing new techniques of archaeological recording. He is also the creator of the successful Archaeology Skills Passport scheme. Since 1999, David devotes his time to running British Archaeological Jobs Resource (BAJR) and its fieldwork arm, CHC Heritage, participating in varied worldwide commercial and research/training projects, including Rampart Scotland. ;

Dr Murray Cook, MA Hons, MCIfA FSA Scot is Stirling Council’s Archaeologist, an Honorary Research Fellow at Stirling University, as well as teaching a course on Stirling at Forth Valley College. As co-director of Rampart Scotland, he also runs regular training digs and is the author of three popular books on Stirling: The Anvil of Scottish History, Digging into Stirling’s Past and Bannockburn and Stirling Bridge: Exploring Scotland’s Two Greatest Battles. ;

Hana Kdolska MA, MSc is a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, gaining practical experience working as a field archaeologist for a number of large commercial units in the UK. As part of Rampart Scotland’s team, she has supervised multiple research excavations across Scotland. Since 2015 she has participated and run archaeological projects in the UK and the Emirate of Ras al-Khaimah (UAE). In 2020, she joined BAJR and CHC Heritage as a co-director.
Garranes: An Early Medieval Royal Site in South-West Ireland by William O’Brien and Nick Hogan. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699197. Hardback; 205x290mm; 402 pages; 376 figures, colour throughout. 722 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699197. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699203. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Ringforts were an important part of the rural settlement landscape of early medieval Ireland (AD 400–1100). While most of those circular enclosures were farmsteads, a small number had special significance as centres of political power and elite residence, also associated with specialized crafts. One such ‘royal site’ was Garranes in the mid-Cork region of south-west Ireland. In 1937, archaeological excavation of a large trivallate ringfort provided evidence of high-status residence during the fifth and sixth centuries AD. The site had workshops for the production of bronze ornaments, with glass and enamel working as well as indications of farming. Pottery and glass vessels imported from the Mediterranean world and Atlantic France were also discovered. That trade with the Late Roman world is significant to understanding the introduction of Christianity and literacy in southern Ireland at that time.

This monograph presents the results of an interdisciplinary project conducted 2011–18, where archaeological survey and excavation, supported by various specialist studies, examined this historic landscape. Garranes is a special place where archaeology, history and legend combine to uncover a minor royal site of the early medieval period. The central ringfort has been identified as Rath Raithleann, the seat of the petty kingdom of Uí Echach Muman, recalled in bardic poetry of the later medieval period. Those poems attribute its foundation to Corc, a King of Munster in the fifth century AD, and link the site closely to Cian, son-in-law of Brian Bóruma, and one of the heroes of Clontarf (AD 1014). This study provides new evidence to connect the location of Rath Raithleann to high-status occupation at Garranes during the fifth and sixth centuries, and explores its legendary associations in later periods.

Includes contributions from Michelle Comber, Ian Doyle, Lenore Fischer, Kevin Kearney, Susan Lyons, Tim Mighall and Douglas Borthwick, Margaret Mannion, Ignacio Montero-Ruiz and Mercedes Murillo-Barroso, Róisín Nic Cnáimhín, Cian Ó Cionnfhaolaidh, James O’Driscoll, Edward O’Riordain, and Orla-Peach Power.

About the Authors
William O'Brien is Professor of Archaeology in University College Cork, Ireland. His research interests include the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age in Ireland, early mining and metallurgy in Atlantic Europe, upland archaeology, the study of hillforts and monumentality in the later prehistoric period. He has a particular interest in the prehistory of south-west Ireland, where he has conducted numerous research excavations. ;

Nick Hogan is a graduate of National University of Ireland Galway, where he completed a BA degree in Archaeology and a MA in Landscape Archaeology. In 2008, he was appointed Technical Officer for the Department of Archaeology in University College Cork, where he is responsible for teaching and support in the areas of archaeological fieldwork and computing. He is an experienced field archaeologist with a range of skills in excavation, land survey and geophysics.

Reviews
'This is an important publication that makes a signficant contribution to our understanding not only of this early medieval landscape but also of early medieval studies as a whole.'—Archaeology Ireland, Volume 35, Number 2, June 2021

'All told, this volume is handsomely published by Archaeopress with excellent figures, and also benefits from being freely accessible as an Open Access publication. Securing a hard copy while it is available, however, is advisable, as this is destined to be an indispensable landmark for the wider field. This truly seminal publication demonstrates the enduring value of long-term, landscape-scale field projects, which one may hope will become a regular feature of the research landscape for early medieval Ireland.'—Patrick Gleeson, Journal of Irish Archaeology, Volume XXX (2021)
Rougga I: Le forum et ses abords (fouilles 1971–1974) edited by Maurice Euzennat† and Hédi Slim†. Paperback; 205x290mm; 518 pages; 214 figures, 54 tables (13 colour plates). French text. 706 2020 Archaeology of the Maghreb 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698251. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698268. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Located in Byzacena, 12 km south-east of Thysdrus / El Jem, the municipality of Bararus / Henchir, Rougga is known for its large Roman cisterns first reported in the 18th century and for the discovery in 1972 of a hoard of Byzantine gold coins. ROUGGA I gives an account of the overall results of the excavations carried out at the site of the forum, from 1971 to 1974, by the Tunisian-French mission under the direction of Maurice Euzennat † and Hédi Slim †.

Situé en Byzacène, à 12 km au sud-est de Thysdrus/El Jem, le municipe de Bararus/Henchir Rougga est connu pour ses grandes citernes d’époque romaine signalées depuis le XVIIIe s. et pour la découverte en 1972 d’un trésor de monnaies d’or byzantines publié en 1982 dans le volume III de la monographie générale du site. Ce volume I, rédigé pour l’essentiel au début des années 90, rend compte du résultat global des fouilles menées à l’emplacement du forum, de 1971 à 1974, par la mission tuniso-française sous la direction de Maurice Euzennat† et Hédi Slim†. L’ouvrage comprend trois parties : tout d’abord, une présentation générale du site par les deux chefs de mission et Pol Trousset ; ensuite, une description de la stratigraphie du forum et du mobilier qui en provient, par Roger Guéry† avec la collaboration de divers spécialistes ; enfin, une étude architecturale extrêmement précise des différents éléments qui composent le centre monumental de la cité : citernes, platea et portiques, xyste et temples, par Gilbert Hallier†. Ces travaux permettent de mieux appréhender la place du municipe de Bararus au centre d’une riche région agricole qui a laissé les traces de cadastration parmi les mieux conservées d’Afrique. Ils mettent en évidence sa longue durée d’occupation, du IIIe s. av. J.-C. (avec quelques traces antérieures remontant à la Préhistoire) jusqu’au XIe s., et l’originalité des partis architecturaux qui ont présidé à la construction de son centre monumental à l’époque flavienne, ses transformations au IIe s. et son abandon à l’époque byzantine.

Maurice Euzennat (1926-2004), Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, Membre de l’Institut. ;

Hédi Slim (1935-2019), Directeur de Recherche à l’Institut National du Patrimoine de Tunis, Directeur de la division du Recensement général et des Études. ;

Roger Guéry (1926-1997), Ingénieur au CNRS, archéologue-céramologue. ;

Gilbert Hallier (1923-2010), Architecte d.p.l.g., Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, architecte-archéologue. ;

Pol Trousset, Directeur de Recherche honoraire au CNRS, archéologue-géographe.

Préface de Fathi Bejaoui, Directeur de Recherche à INP.

Postface de Pierre Gros, Membre de l'Institut.

Ouvrage publié avec le concours de l'Institut Français de Tunisie et du Programme Investissements d’Avenir, Initiative d’Excellence d’Aix-Marseille Université - A*MIDEX, AMX-MED-012.
Searching for the 17th Century on Nevis: The Survey and Excavation of Two Early Plantation Sites by Robert A. Philpott, Roger H. Leech and Elaine L. Morris. Paperback; 205x290mm; 238 pages; 118 figures; 14 tables. 711 2021 The Early Colonial Settlement and Landscape of Nevis and St Kitts: Studies in the Historical Archaeology of the Eastern Caribbean . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698862. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698879. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Searching for the 17th Century on Nevis is the first of a series of monographs dedicated to the archaeological investigation of the landscape, buildings and artefacts of the Eastern Caribbean by the Nevis Heritage Project. This volume presents the results of documentary research and excavation on two sugar plantation sites on the island of Nevis. Upper Rawlins, located high on Nevis mountain, was occupied in the late 17th and early 18th century and abandoned early. Fenton Hill was occupied from the mid-17th to the mid-19th century and originated with an earthfast timber building, probably a dwelling house, later converted to a kitchen and encapsulated in stone about 1700. The adjacent main house was probably destroyed in the French raid of 1706 and rebuilt in timber. The final occupation was by Portuguese Madeiran labourers, who were introduced to fill a labour force shortage in the 1840s.

Detailed reports on the finds assemblage include discussions of the handmade, bonfired Afro-Caribbean pottery made by enslaved African women, imported European ceramics and glass, clay tobacco pipes, metalwork and building materials. The dominance of imported goods from south-western England demonstrates the strong mercantile links between Nevis and Bristol, but local Nevis production of ceramics adds new insights into the estatebased ceramic production on European lines.

Includes contributions by David Barker, Clive Gamble, Jerzy Gawronski, Sheila Hamilton-Dyer, David A. Higgins, Linda Mitchell, Sebastiaan Ostkamp and Jaco Weinstock.

About the Authors
Dr Robert Philpott MCIfA FSA is a researcher at the University of Liverpool, with interests in post-medieval archaeology of colonial settlement in the Caribbean, material culture and the Roman and later archaeology of North West England. ;

Professor Roger Leech MCIfA FSA, formerly Head of Archaeology for the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, now Visiting Professor in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Southampton, has published widely on urban archaeology and architecture, and the historical archaeology of the Caribbean. ;

Dr Elaine L. Morris MCIfA FSA is Visiting Fellow at the University of Southampton (UK) with interests in prehistoric and colonial archaeology in the Caribbean and prehistoric ceramics in Britain.
Travelling the Korosko Road: Archaeological Exploration in Sudan’s Eastern Desert edited by W. Vivian Davies and Derek A. Welsby. Hardback; 205x290mm; 252 pages; 493 plates, 74 figures (colour throughout). 688 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 24. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698039. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698046. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume publishes accounts of archaeological exploration carried out during the last 30 years or so in the Sudanese Eastern Desert. It is divided into two related parts.

The first and foremost covers results from the work of the Centro Ricerche sul Deserto Orientale (CeRDO), which is based at Varese in northern Italy. Between 1989 and 2006, CeRDO, directed by the brothers Alfredo and Angelo Castiglioni, ran a pioneering programme of expeditions, which traversed the so-called ‘Korosko Road’ (the main desert route connecting Egypt and Sudan) and followed multiple other tracks throughout the Eastern Desert. They encountered in the process a rich archaeological landscape, hundreds of previously undocumented sites, many frequented over millennia, prominent among them gold-production areas and their associated settlements. The CeRDO record, the photographic database, the material retrieved, to which several of the papers published here are devoted, are now all the more valuable, in that many of these sites have since been badly disturbed and some entirely destroyed by recent goldmining activities.

The second part, introduced by a concise account of the historical usage of the Korosko Road, reports in full on a single, short season of documentation, organized in 2013 under the auspices, and with the support, of the Sudan Archaeological Research Society. Its main aim was detailed recording of a group of pharaonic rock-inscriptions discovered by CeRDO expeditions, most located along the Korosko Road and almost all related to the colonial gold-working industry. The project included also a degree of investigation and mapping of the wider context, as well as the recording and study of associated archaeological material, in particular of ceramic remains. The results complement and usefully extend in part those of CeRDO.

Reviews:
'The Korosko Road serves as the main route through the desert between Egypt and the Sudan. The present volume covers the archeological exploration carried out in the region over the past 30 years in a series of essays by several scholars. The first part explores and documents the region between 1989 and 2006. There are chapters on the archeological remains, pottery finds and on the gold mines—the main reason for colonial penetration into this region otherwise inhospitable to Europeans. The second part of the book, the fruit of a brief season in 2013 by the Sudan Archeologist Research Society, opens with a useful summary of travelers to the region going back to antiquity. The aim is to consolidate the previous survey and document the more than 40 hieroglyphic inscriptions found in the region. The book is beautifully produced with full and detailed academic records of all finds. The hundreds of excellent photographs are of importance, since the recent informal reopening of many mines has led to much looting of archeological sites.'—Caroline Stone, AramcoWorld, May 2021
Die Bestattungsgruben in Bat by Conrad Schmidt, with contributions by Stefan Giese und Christian Hübner and Steve Zäuner. Hardback; 210x297mm; 374pp; 250 figures; 187 tables (97 pages of colour). German text. 680 2020 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697391. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697858. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Volume 1 of the series Arabia Orientalis presents the first comprehensive study of two Umm an-Nar (2700—2000 BC) burial pits from the UNESCO World Heritage site Bat in the Sultanate of Oman. They were excavated between 2010 and 2012 by the University of Tübingen. Each burial pit represents one of the largest closed finds of the Early Bronze Age in the region. Finds largely include beads and other items of personal adornment, as well as pottery and human bones. Detailed typologies of all objects are the basis for in-depth statistical analyses of the different categories of finds and the reconstruction of burial customs at Bat. Furthermore, imports and imitations from other regions including the Indus Valley, Iran, and Mesopotamia illuminate Bat’s foreign relations and integration into the interregional exchange and communication system. The interpretation of the unearthed human remains conducted by Steve Zauner offer, not only the number of individuals, sex, and age of the deceased, but also insights into lifestyle, diseases, and stress of the people in the past.

German description
Die Umm an-Nar-Zeit (2700–2000 v. Chr.) auf der östlichen Arabischen Halbinsel gilt als Periode tiefgreifender Veränderungen in der ökonomischen und sozialen Organisation der Gesellschaft sowie der Ausbeutung von Ressourcen. Einer der größten und bedeutendsten Fundplätze dieser Zeit im Sultanat Oman ist der seit 1988 auf der Welterbeliste der UNESCO stehende Fundort Bat in der Provinz Al-Dhahirah. Von 2010 bis 2015 führte die Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen ein Projekt zur Erforschung der Entwicklung der beiden Nekropolen von Bat und Al-Ayn sowie der Siedlung von Al-Zebah durch. Im Mittelpunkt der Untersuchungen stand die Frage nach den Gründen und Ursachen des sozioökonomischen Umbruchs im 3. Jahrtausend v. Chr. und wie sich dieser in den Lebensverhältnissen der damaligen Bevölkerung widerspiegelt.

Die vorliegende Publikation stellt den ersten Band der Endberichte des Forschungsprojekts des Instituts für die Kulturen des Alten Orients der Universität Tübingen in Bat, Al-Zebah und Al- Ayn dar. Das Werk beinhaltet die vollständige Auswertung der beiden Umm an-Nar-zeitlichen Bestattungsgruben A-Inst. 0006 und A-Inst. 0025 in Bat einschließlich anthropologischer Analysen und einer geophysikalischen Prospektion in der Nekropole von Bat. Beide Gruben zählen zu den größten jemals im Oman untersuchten geschlossenen Fundkontexten der frühen Bronzezeit. Zur Publikation gehört ein online unter https://tinyurl. com/9781789697391-der-fundekatalog publizierter Katalog, der sämtliche Einzelnachweise zu den Funden aus den beiden Bestattungsgruben enthält.
El Palacio: Historiography and new perspectives on a pre-Tarascan city of northern Michoacán, Mexico edited by Marion Forest. Paperback; 203x276mm; 314 pages; 143 figures, 52 tables; papers in English and Spanish. 125 2020 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 53. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697964. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697971. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

In the centuries that preceded the European conquest in 1521, the central-northern region of the state of Michoacán, West Mexico, was a place of significant socio-political changes materialized by important transformations of settlement pattern and material culture. The archaeological site of El Palacio (also known as La Crucita or Mich. 23), located in the Zacapu Basin, constituted a major center throughout these regional events. The site has been mentioned in the archaeological literature as early as the end of the nineteenth century, and dispersed subsequent research has documented changes in site morphology, function, and degree of integration into interregional networks of cultural interaction. The present volume offers the first monographic publication about El Palacio. It is composed of a series of eleven contributions looking at both legacy and archive data (1896–1995) and results derived from recent archaeological investigations (2012–2017). The systematic review and analysis of the chrono-stratigraphy, material culture, urbanism, and economic and ritual practices at the site yields critical information that allows discussion of the role of El Palacio and the context of its development at both local and extra-local scales, between A.D. 850 and 1521. Beyond this central concern, this volume provides extended material for cultural comparisons with West, Northwest and Central Mexico during this time period, as well as for broader discussions about the complex social mechanisms involved in the rise, transformation, and fall of premodern urban centers.

About the Editor
Marion Forest received her PhD in archaeology from the University Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Anthropology of Brigham Young University. She specializes in urbanization processes in western and central Mexico. Her current research includes a survey and excavation field project at Teotihuacan and further developments in the integration of LiDAR data in archaeology.

Spanish Description
En los siglos que precedieron a la conquista española de 1521, la región centro-norte del estado de Michoacán, occidente de México, fue el escenario de cambios sociopolíticos importantes, materializados a través de transformaciones significativas en el patrón de asentamiento y la cultura material a escala regional. El sitio arqueológico de El Palacio (también conocido como La Crucita o Mich. 23), localizado en la cuenca de Zacapu, constituye un centro mayor que fue ocupado entre 850 y 1521 d. C y transformado de manera continua a lo largo de su historia ocupacional. El Palacio atrajo la atención de diversos investigadores desde finales del siglo diecinueve y fue sujeto a investigaciones subsecuentes. Si bien las intervenciones en el sitio fueron dispersas, éstas permitieron documentar ciertos cambios en la morfología del asentamiento, su función, y su grado de integración en las redes de interacción culturales a larga distancia. El presente volumen constituye la primera publicación monográfica sobre El Palacio. Se compone de once contribuciones enfocadas tanto en la reevaluación de la información existente del sitio (obtenida entre los años 1896 y 1995) como en el estudio de los datos adquiridos durante las investigaciones recientes (de 2012 a 2017). La revisión y análisis sistemático de la cronoestratigrafía, la cultura material, el urbanismo, y las prácticas rituales y económicas que caracterizan la ocupación prehispánica del sitio, produjeron una documentación que permite discutir el papel de El Palacio y su contexto de desarrollo en una escala local y regional. El presente volumen ofrece, asimismo, un contenido con material extensivo útil para ser retomado en estudios comparativos, sobre todo con respecto a las regiones Oeste, Noroeste y Central de México durante los periodos Epiclásico y Postclásico. Finalmente esta obra contribuye a generar una reflexión en tor
Nel regno del fango: speleoarcheologia della Grotta di Polla (Salerno, Italia) Risultati delle prime campagne di scavo edited by Antonella Minelli and Sandra Guglielmi. Paperback; 203x276mm; 114 pages; 61 figures, colour throughout. Italian text. 123 . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691221. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691238. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Nel regno del fango presents the preliminary results of the archaeological excavations recently carried out in the Grotta di Polla, in the province of Salerno, in the Vallo di Diano area. Speleoarchaeological researches in recent years have revealed the considerable difficulty of operating methodologically in an environment, such as that of a cave which, in addition to being often characterized by the limitations caused by the darkness and tightness of the environments, has in this case led to the presence of a considerable amount of mud which made researches even more complex. The methodologies adopted for the preservation and conservation of archaeological materials and the results obtained are therefore illustrated. From an interpretative point of view, the cave is configured as an area that has been exploited with a certain continuity from the Neolithic to the whole Bronze Age with the specific function of a burial area.

About the Editors
Antonella Minelli is an academic researcher in the scientific field of Evolutionary Anthropology (BIO/08), at the Department of Humanities, Social and Formation Sciences of the University of Molise. ;

Sandra Guglielmi is a researcher in Physical Anthropology (BIO/08), at the Department of Humanities, Social and Formation Sciences of the University of Molise.

Italian Description
Il volume presenta i risultati preliminari degli scavi archeologici effettuati nella Grotta di Polla, ubicata in provincia di Salerno, nel territorio del Vallo di Diano, in Italia meridionale.

La grotta si configura come un’area sfruttata con una certa continuità, dal Neolitico finale a tutta l’Età del Bronzo, con la specifica funzione di area sepolcrale. Le informazioni acquisite nel corso delle ricerche e degli studi di natura archeostratigrafica, paleobiologica, archeobotanica, hanno permesso di tracciare un quadro significativo ed esaustivo delle modalità di sfruttamento del contesto ipogeico, inserendosi a pieno nei modelli comportamentali noti, per il periodo considerato, in Italia centro-meridionale.

Nel volume sono illustrate le metodologie adottate per la preservazione e la conservazione dei materiali archeologici. I risultati ottenuti sono - dunque - di un certo rilevo nonostante la notevole difficoltà di operare metodologicamente in un ambiente, come quello di grotta che, oltre a dover fare i conti con i limiti dovuti all’oscurità e all’ampiezza degli ambienti, è caratterizzato in questo caso da una considerevole quantità di fango, che ha reso le ricerche ancora più complesse.

Antonella Minelli è ricercatore confermato nel settore scientifico disciplinare di Antropologia, presso il Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Sociali e della Formazione dell’Università degli Studi del Molise. Ha lavorato come responsabile scientifico in contesti pre-protostorici in grotta e in open-air site in Italia e in Europa ed è stata direttore e collaboratore scientifico delle missioni archeologiche finanziate dal Ministero degli Affari Esteri italiano in Colombia e Paraguay. È autrice di diverse pubblicazioni. ;

Sandra Guglielmi è ricercatore a tempo determinato in Antropologia Fisica, presso il Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Sociali e della Formazione dell’Università degli Studi del Molise. L’area disciplinare della sua attività di ricerca è l’Antropologia Fisica e Biomolecolare applicata ai campioni archeologici. Ha svolto attività scientifica in diversi ambiti archeologici, da contesti protostorici a contesti storici, in Italia e in Sud America. È autrice di diverse pubblicazioni.
El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico 20 años de excavaciones arqueológicas en el Sector III by Mª del Rosario García Huerta, Francisco Javier Morales Hervás and David Rodríguez González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 160 pages; 64 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 671 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696912. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696929. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico presents the results of archaeological work which has been carried out since 1997 in so-called Sector III of the Alarcos site, located on a hill next to the Guadiana river, a few kilometres from Ciudad Real. These archaeological campaigns have made it possible to obtain essential information to understand the communities that, from the end of the Bronze Age to the end of the Iron Age, inhabited this large town and its surrounding area.

An interesting set of structures and other evidence of material culture have been recovered, which allow us to characterize the daily activities of people between the 10th-11th century BC and, in addition, they enable us to understand the paleoenvironment of this territory and the nature of the economy and the food transformation activities of these protohistoric populations.

The use of this territory has been determined over the centuries, being originally a residential area which later, in Iberian times, assumed economic functionality, as it was intended for grain storage, grinding and cooking food.

The documentation of a wide and varied repertoire of ceramic materials and an interesting set of foreign ceramics corroborates the dynamism this settlement achieved, during both the Pre-Iberian period and the full Iberian period.

About the Authors
Mª del Rosario García Huerta holds a PhD in Prehistory and is Senior Lecturer on this subject at the University of Castilla-La Mancha. ;

Francisco Javier Morales Hervás was awarded an extraordinary prize during his bachelor's degree and holds a PhD in History from the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he is Associate Lecturer in Prehistory. ;

. David Rodríguez González is Lecturer in Prehistory at the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he also coordinates the Degree in History and is a member of the Governing Council. ;

Spanish Description
El objeto de este libro es dar a conocer los trabajos de investigación arqueológica que desde 1997 se han realizado en el denominado Sector III del yacimiento de Alarcos, ubicado en un cerro situado junto al río Guadiana, a pocos kilómetros de Ciudad Real. Estas campañas arqueológicas han permitido obtener una información esencial para poder conocer a las comunidades que, desde finales de la Edad del Bronce hasta finales de la Edad del Hierro, habitaron este gran poblado y su área circundante.

Se ha logrado recuperar un interesante conjunto de estructuras y otras evidencias de la cultura material, que permiten caracterizar las actividades cotidianas que desempeñaban estas personas entre el siglo X a.C. y el II a.C. y, además, nos posibilitan realizar una aproximación al paleoambiente de este territorio y a las características de la economía y de las actividades de transformación de alimentos de estas poblaciones protohistóricas.

Se ha determinado su uso a lo largo de los siglos, siendo en origen un área residencial que posteriormente, en época ibérica, asumió una funcionalidad económica al estar destinada al almacenamiento de grano, a molienda y cocción de alimentos.

La documentación de un amplio y variado repertorio de materiales cerámicos y de un interesante conjunto de cerámicas foráneas corrobora el dinamismo que alcanzará este asentamiento, tanto en época Preibérica como durante el Ibérico pleno.

Mª del Rosario García Huerta es doctora en Prehistoria y profesora titular de esta materia en la Universidad de Castilla- La Mancha. Sus líneas de investigación se han centrado en las culturas protohistóricas de la península ibérica, celtibérica e ibérica y, más recientemente, ha iniciado el estudio del simbolismo animal en la Prehistoria. Es investigadora principal de numerosos proyectos de investigación arqueológicos y autora de un gran número de libros
The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland The British School at Rome’s Tiber Valley Project by Helen Patterson, Robert Witcher and Helga Di Giuseppe. Paperback; 205x290mm; 372 pages; 131 figures, 21 tables (colour throughout). 665 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 70. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696158. £38.50 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696165. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now


The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland presents a new regional history of the middle Tiber valley as a lens through which to view the emergence and transformation of the city of Rome from 1000 BC to AD 1000. Setting the ancient city within the context of its immediate territory, the authors reveal the diverse and enduring links between the metropolis and its hinterland. At the heart of the volume is a detailed consideration of the results of a complete restudy of the pioneering South Etruria Survey (c. 1955–1970), one of the earliest and most influential Mediterranean landscape projects. Between 1998 and 2002, an international team based at the British School at Rome conducted a comprehensive restudy of the material and documentary archive generated by the South Etruria Survey. The results were supplemented with a number of other published and unpublished sources of archaeological evidence to create a database of around 5000 sites across southern Etruria and the Sabina Tiberina, extending in date from the Bronze Age, through the Etruscan/Sabine, Republican and imperial periods, to the middle ages. Analysis and discussion of these data have appeared in a series of interim articles published over the past two decades; the present volume offers a final synthesis of the project results.

The chapters include the first detailed assessment of the field methods of the South Etruria Survey, an extended discussion of the use of archaeological legacy data, and new insights into the social and economic connectivities between Rome and the communities of its northern hinterland across two millennia. The volume as a whole demonstrates how the archaeological evidence generated by landscape surveys can be used to rewrite narrative histories, even those based on cities as familiar as ancient Rome.

Includes contributions by Martin Millett, Simon Keay and Christopher Smith, and a preface by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill.

About the Authors
Helen Patterson is the former Assistant Director (Archaeology) of the British School at Rome and director of the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project (1998–2002). She is a specialist in the archaeology of the late antique and early medieval periods, with particular interests in ceramic production and distribution. She has published a series of edited volumes including Bridging the Tiber (2004), Mercator Placidissimus (with F. Coarelli, 2008) and Veii: the historical topography of the ancient city (with R. Cascino & H. Di Giuseppe, 2012).

Robert Witcher is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University, UK. From 1999 to 2002, he was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. His research interests include landscape archaeology with a particular focus on the pre-Roman and Roman periods in Italy and the wider Mediterranean. He has published on aspects of ancient rural settlement, agriculture, demography and globalization. He is the editor of the world archaeology journal, Antiquity.

Helga Di Giuseppe specialises in Italian archaeology with particular interests in the classical and late antique periods. She has published widely on ancient landscape, Roman villas, and ceramic and textile production, and has edited several major excavation and conference volumes. From 1998 to 2002, she was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. She is currently project manager for Fasti Online with the International Association of Classical Archaeology and editorial manager with the publisher Scienze e Lettere.

Reviews
'To conclude, this monograph, like its predecessor, must be welcomed. Any detailed analysis of old data is certain to enrich our historical perspective.'—Richard Hodges, Bryn Mawr Classical Review, March 2021

'Tracking throug
The Maltese Archipelago at the Dawn of History Reassessment of the 1909 and 1959 Excavations at Qlejgħa tal-Baħrija and Other Essays edited by Davide Tanasi and David Cardona. Paperback; 205x290mm; 188 pages; 192 figures, 27 tables (77 pages of colour). 667 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694932. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694949. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Maltese Archipelago at the Dawn of History. Reassessment of the 1909 and 1959 excavations at Qlejgħa tal-Baħrija and other essays is a collection of essays focusing on the reassessment of the multifaceted evidence which emerged by excavations carried out in 1909 and 1959 in the settlement of Bahrija, a key site for the understanding of the later stages of Maltese prehistory before the beginning of the Phoenician colonial period. The two excavations, largely unpublished, produced a large quantity of ceramic, stone and metal artefacts together with skeletal remains. The reappraisal of the material will shed light on critical moments of central Mediterranean prehistory. Main topics such as the Aegean-Sicily-Malta trade network, mass migration movements from the Balkans towards the Central Mediterranean and the colonial dynamics of the Phoenicians operating in the West are addressed in the light of new data and with the support of an array of archaeometric analyses.

About the Editors
Davide Tanasi is an expert of Mediterranean prehistory and archaeology of ancient Sicily and Malta, in which fields is has published several papers and monographic volumes such as: D. Tanasi, N. Vella (eds), Site, artefacts, landscape: prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta, Monza: Polimetrica 2011; D. Tanasi, N. Vella (eds) The late prehistory of Malta: essays on Borġ in-Nadur and other sites, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2015. ;

David Cardona is Senior Curator of Phoenician, Roman and Medieval sites with the governmental agency Heritage Malta. He is a specialist of Roman and Late Roman archaeology and in this field he is about to publish a comprehensive work on Malta entitled Roman buildings and their architecture in Malta. His research interests include landscape archaeology, archaeology of technology and architecture.

Reviews
'Like every good piece of research, this volume answers questions and raises new ones. It also offers a space to revisit conclusions and voice dissent where needed. The collaborative nature of the work is particularly welcome and it is hoped that this standard will be adopted across all archaeological research on the islands. This is the beginning of a new era for Bronze Age studies on the Maltese Islands.'—Isabelle Vella Gregory, Malta Archaeological Review, 2021, Issue 12
A Biography of Power: Research and Excavations at the Iron Age 'oppidum' of Bagendon, Gloucestershire (1979-2017) by Tom Moore. Paperback; 205x290mm; 626 pages, illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 621 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695342. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695359. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume explores the changing nature of power and identity from the Iron Age to Roman period in Britain. Presenting detailed excavation results and integrating a range of comprehensive specialist studies, A Biography of Power provides fresh insights into the origins and nature of one of the lesser-known, but perhaps most significant, Late Iron Age oppida in Britain: Bagendon in Gloucestershire.

Combining the results of a large-scale geophysical survey, with analysis of both historic and new excavations, this volume reassesses Iron Age occupation at Bagendon, revealing evidence for diverse artisanal activities and complex regional exchange networks that saw livestock, and people, travelling to Bagendon from west of the Severn. The results of excavation of two morphologically unusual, banjo-like enclosures, and of one of the previously unexamined dykes, has revealed that the Bagendon oppidum had earlier origins and more complex roles than previously envisaged. The volume also provides new insights into the nature of the Iron Age and Roman landscape in which Bagendon was situated. Detailing the discovery of two, previously unknown, Roman villas at Bagendon, this research also demonstrates the continued significance of this landscape in the early Roman province.

This volume redefines Bagendon as a landscape of power, which offers important insights into the changing nature of societies from the Middle Iron Age to Roman period. It calls for a radical reassessment of how we define oppida complexes and their socio-political importance at the turn of the 1st millennium BC.

Contains contributions from Sophia Adams, Michael J. Allen, Sam Bithell, Loïc Boscher, Cameron Clegg, G.B. Dannell, Lorne Elliott, Elizabeth Foulds, Freddie Foulds, Christopher Green, Derek Hamilton, Colin Haselgrove, Yvonne Inall, Tina Jakob, Mandy Jay, Sally Kellett, Robert Kenyon, Mark Landon, Marcos Martinón-Torres, Edward McSloy, Janet Montgomery, J.A. Morley-Stone, Geoff Nowell, Charlotte O’Brien, Chris Ottley, Cynthia Poole, Richard Reece, Harry Robson, Ruth Shaffrey, John Shepherd, Jane Timby, Dirk Visser, D.F. Williams, Steven Willis.

About the Editor
Tom Moore is an Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University. His research focuses on the western European Iron Age and approaches to cultural landscape management. He has published widely on Iron Age social organisation and conducted major field projects at Late Iron Age oppida in Britain and France, including at Bibracte, Burgundy. He is co-author of the textbook: Archaeology: an introduction.

Reviews
'...the excavation results and then the wider discussions are synergetic and demonstrate that the Bagendon project's methodology of a landscape approach is a powerful tool in developing an understanding of the change and continuity that underlies the mechanisms of power and place in the dynamic socio-political landscape of the Late Iron Age and Early Roman interlude. This is a major personal and academic achievement for Tom Moore and for the many organisations who enabled the individual stages of the work through the 'mosaic' funding.'—Tim Copeland, Bristol & Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, March 2021
The Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963-69: The Pharaonic Sites edited by David N. Edwards. Hardback; 205x290mm; 468 pages; 812 figures, 2 tables (16 plates in colour). 652 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 23. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696493. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696509. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Of the Nubian Archaeological Campaigns responding to the construction of the Aswan High Dam, the survey and excavations carried out within Sudanese Nubia represent the most substantial achievement of the larger enterprise. Many components of the larger project of the UNESCO – Sudan Antiquities Service Survey have been published, in addition to the reports of a number of other major projects assigned separate concessions within the region. However, the results of one major element, the Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia (ASSN) between the Second Cataract and the Dal Cataract remain largely unpublished. This volume, focusing on the pharaonic sites, is the first of a series which aims to bring to publication the records of the ASSN. These records represent a major body of data relating to a region largely now lost to flooding. This is also a region of very considerable importance for understanding the archaeology and history of Nubia more generally, not least in relation to the still often poorly understood relationships between Lower Nubia to the north and the surviving areas of Middle and Upper Nubia, to the south.

The ASSN project fieldwork was undertaken over six years between 1963 and 1969, investigating c.130km of the river valley between Gemai, at the south end of the Second Cataract, and Dal.

Reviews
'The Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963–69: The Pharaonic Sites is a remarkable resource for the archaeology of Sudan, and Africa more broadly. It fills a geographical gap in our knowledge of Nubia during the “Pharaonic” period, which will certainly contribute to current research revisiting datasets produced by previous surveys and excavations.'—Rennan Lemos, African Archaeological Review, Volume 38, 2021
The Hafit period at Al-Khashbah, Sultanate of Oman: results of four years of excavations and material studies by Conrad Schmidt & Stephanie Döpper. Pages 265-274 from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 49 2019 edited by Daniel Eddisford. PSAS49 2019. Download Full PDF  

Al-Khashbah, located approximately 17 km north of the modern city of Sināw, is one of the largest Early Bronze Age sites in the Sultanate of Oman. The University of Tübingen has carried out excavations at the site during the last four years (2015–2018), revealing a significant amount of Hafit-period architecture and finds, including a mud-brick complex (Building I) and a stone tower (Building V). Building I dates to around 2800 cal. BC and has provided evidence of bead and chipped stone workshops. Its layout is comparable to the contemporaneous tower at Hili 8, Phase I. Building V yielded the oldest substantial evidence of copper processing in Oman, dating to the end of the fourth millennium, around 3200 cal. BC. Thus, the archaeological record in Oman can now corroborate archaic texts from Uruk in southern Mesopotamia that mention copper objects from the Gulf. This paper presents the preliminary results of the study of the architecture, metallurgy, lithics, ground-stone tools, and anthracological material from Al-Khashbah. These diverse strands of evidence offer valuable insights into the Hafit-period economy, environment, and lifestyle at Al-Khashbah.
London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 by John Schofield, Lyn Blackmore and Jacqui Pearce, with Tony Dyson. Paperback; 210x297mm; xxiv+514 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (132 colour plates). English text with summaries in French and German.. 422 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695595. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918385. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Please note: 2018 hardback edition is now out of print. New paperback edition published in March 2020.

London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 presents and celebrates the mile-long Thames Street in the City of London and the land south of it to the River Thames as an archaeological asset. The argument is based on the reporting of four excavations of 1974–84 by the Museum of London near the north end of London Bridge: Swan Lane, Seal House, New Fresh Wharf and Billingsgate Lorry Park. Here the findings of the period 1100–1666 are presented.

Buildings and property development on sixteen properties south of Thames Street, on land reclaimed in many stages since the opening of the 12th century, include part of the parish church of St Botolph Billingsgate. The many units of land reclamation are dated by dendrochronology, coins and documents. They have produced thousands of artefacts and several hundred kilos of native and foreign pottery. Much of this artefactual material has been published, but in catalogue form (shoes, knives, horse fittings, dress accessories, textiles, household equipment). Now the context of these finds, their deposition in groups, is laid out for the first time. Highlights of the publication include the first academic analysis and assessment of a 13th- or 14th-century trumpet from Billingsgate, the earliest surviving straight trumpet in Europe; many pilgrim souvenirs; analysis of two drains of the 17th century from which suggestions can be made about use of rooms and spaces within documented buildings; and the proposal that one of the skeletons excavated from St Botolph’s church is John Reynewell, mayor of London in 1426–7 and a notable figure in London’s medieval history.

The whole publication encourages students and other researchers of all kinds to conduct further research on any aspect of the sites and their very rich artefactual material, which is held at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive. This is a significantly large and varied dataset for the archaeology and history of London in the period 1100 to 1666 which can be continuously interrogated for generations to come.

About the Authors
John Schofield was an archaeologist at the Museum of London from 1974 to 2008. He has written several well-received books on the archaeology of London and of British medieval towns; and as Cathedral Archaeologist for St Paul’s Cathedral, archaeological accounts of the medieval and Wren buildings. ;
Lyn Blackmore is a Senior Ceramics and Finds Specialist who has worked for MOLA and its predecessors since 1986. In 2009–14 she was Assistant Treasurer of the Medieval Pottery Research Group and in 2017 was elected co-editor of its journal Medieval Ceramics, a role she first held in 1989–94. ;
Jacqui Pearce is a Senior Ceramics Specialist with MOLA, focusing especially on medieval and later pottery, on which she has published widely. In 2017 she was elected President of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology. ;
Tony Dyson was the principal documentary historian and general editor at the Department of Urban Archaeology of the Museum of London from 1974 to 1998.

Eastern Roman Mounted Archers and Extraordinary Medico-Surgical Interventions at Paliokastro in Thasos Island during the ProtoByzantine Period The Historical and Medical History Records and the Archaeo-Anthropological Evidence by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+50 pages; 28 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 111 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696011. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696028. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Procopius’ History of the Wars, and the Strategikon offer important aspects of Eastern Roman military tactical changes adopted against their enemies that brought the mounted archer-lancer to domineer in the synthesis of the army, along with concise descriptions of their training, panoply, and effectiveness in the battlefield during the later ProtoByzantine period. Yet, evidence in the archaeo-anthropological records of these highly specialized military members has remained elusive.

A recent archaeological discovery at the strategically positioned, upland, site of Paliokastro in Thasos island, Greece, and the subsequent study of the human skeletal remains interred in four monumental funerary contexts, in a dedicated naiskos building, provide for the first time through the archaeological record of the region a unique insight of the mounted archers and their female kin during the turbulent ProtoByzantine period. The interdisciplinary study of the anthropological materials focusing on skeletal developmental, acquired skeleto-muscular manifestations and skeleto-anatomical changes recovered valuable evidentiary data on aspects of their in vivo long-term training and preparation, traumatisms and pathologies along with extraordinary traces of cranial and infra-cranial surgical interventions and medical regimens by the hands of a most experienced surgeon.

In conjunction with the archaeological and anthropological evidence, historical and medical history records are integrated aiming toward a nexus with the human dynamics that transpired at Paliokastro within the context of the catastrophic consequences of the ‘barbarian’ invasions in the Aegean Thraco-Macedonia, and the ravages afforded by the Justinian plague during the later component of the ProtoByzantine period.

About the Author
Anagnostis P. Agelarakis is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of History at Adelphi University in New York. He studied Classical Archaeology and European Ethnology as an undergraduate, and as graduate Environmental Studies at Lund University and Lund Polytechnic Institute in Sweden. He holds a M. Phil. and Ph.D. (1989) in Anthropology from Columbia University, New York.
Farmsteads and Funerary Sites: The M1 Junction 12 Improvements and the A5–M1 Link Road, Central Bedfordshire Archaeological investigations prior to construction, 2011 & 2015–16 by Jim Brown. Hardback; 205x290mm; xxiv+596 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £120.00). 556 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692600. £120.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692617. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

With major contributions by Paul Blinkhorn, Dana Challinor, Andy Chapman, Chris Chinnock, Joanne Clawley, Olly Dindol, Claire Finn, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Sarah Inskip, James Ladocha, Phil Mills, Stephen Morris and Jane Timby.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook extensive excavations during the construction of two separate, but adjacent road schemes, some 4.5km apart near Houghton Regis and Toddington, in south Central Bedfordshire. Taken as a whole, the excavations provide a detailed multi-period dataset for regional and national comparison.

The first evidence for occupation occurred in the middle/late Bronze Age comprising pits and clusters of postholes, including four-post and six-post structures. Two pit alignments, more than 2km apart, also indicate that land divisions were being established, and in the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a significant new settlement emerged in the valley bottom. Parts of a further contemporary earlier-middle Iron Age settlement lay at the top of the valley but neither settlement extended into the Roman period. In the late Iron Age or early Roman period three or four new settlements emerged with occupation continuing into the late Roman period in at least one of these. Of particular interest was the recovery of two significant Aylesford-Swarling type cemeteries as well as a third cemetery which largely comprised unurned burials, including some busta, but with few accompanying grave goods.

In the late 7th-century a small probable Christian conversion open-ground inhumation cemetery was established with burials accompanied by a range of objects, including a rare work box, knives, brooches, chatelaine keys and a spearhead. Parts of three medieval settlements were uncovered including one with a potters' working area.
Piazza Armerina L'area nord dell'insediamento medievale presso la Villa del Casale edited by Carmela Bonanno. Paperback; 203x276mm; 172 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 107 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694604. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694611. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Archaeological explorations in the area north of the Roman Villa of Casale in Piazza Armerina (Sicily) were carried out in 2013-2014. Investigations on the slopes of Monte Mangone overlooking the villa, and a survey carried out in the immediate surroundings of the hill in the Colla district, provided valuable new evidence regarding the extension of the medieval town. This exansion also impacted the areas east of the villa, and on the still existing road network that connected it to the river Gela-Nociara, in whose immediate vicinity it is now supposed there was a craft district.

The exhaustive archaeological investigations in the area demonstrate that to the north there are no structures relevant to the late antique villa, dating instead to the mid-tenth century; it is therefore an inhabited area of ​​the late Islamic era which is then abandoned and leveled. After a phase of abandonment, during which the area is sporadically used as a burial place, a Norman settlement is built, datable to the mid 11th and mid 12th century.

Sui resti della Villa tardoantica del Casale di Piazza Armerina, tra il X secolo d.C. e gli inizi dell’XI si era impiantato un vasto insediamento islamico che occupava una vasta area anche a sud e a nord della Villa, di cui è stato esplorato un ampio settore con una strada glareata su cui si aprivano le unità residenziali, alcune delle quali presentavano un cortile interno basolato in cui si trovavano anche un focolare e un forno, intorno a cui si dislocavano i vari ambienti e spesso anche una scala per l’accesso al piano superiore o al tetto. Improvvisamente l’abitato venne abbandonato e i suoi resti furono livellati ; mentre a partire dalla metà dell’XI secolo viene costruito un nuovo abitato normanno, in cui si trova un ambiente rettangolare con portico laterale, una torre difensiva sul lato corto e un silos all’esterno per la conservazione delle derrate. Era un quartiere artigianale ceramico sorto sulla riva del vicino torrente Nocciara.

Nei primi decenni del XII secolo forse per un violento terremoto che colpì la Sicilia centro orientale o in seguito alla repressione della rivolta della popolazione islamica da parte di Guglielmo I, l’abitato venne abbandonato, ma la vita in esso continuò fino all’età federiciana.

L’abitato bizantino e medievale si estendeva anche alle colline retrostanti la Villa (Monte Mangone e Colla); in particolare sulla collina di C.da Colla, durante un survay effettuato su una vasta estensione di terreno, sono state raccolte terra sigillata africana e lastrine di rivestimento in marmo pregiato, che hanno fatto ipotizzare la presenza di un esteso insediamento tardo antico sulla collina retrostante a sud della Villa del Casale.
Offa’s Dyke Journal: Volume 1 for 2019 edited by Howard Williams and Liam Delaney. Paperback; 176x250mm; 162 pages; full colour throughout. 1 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695380. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This open-access and peer-reviewed academic publication stems from the activities of the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory, a research network founded in April 2017 to foster and support new research on the monuments and landscapes of the Anglo-Welsh borderlands and comparative studies of borderlands and frontiers from prehistory to the present. The proceedings of a series of academic and public-facing events have informed the character and direction of the Journal. Moreover, its establishment coincides with the Cadw/Historic England/Offa’s Dyke Association funded Offa’s Dyke Conservation Management Plan as well as other new community and research projects on linear earthworks. Published in print by Archaeopress in association with JAS Arqueología, and supported by the University of Chester and the Offa’s Dyke Association, the journal aims to provide a resource for scholars, students and the wider public regarding the archaeology, heritage and history of the Welsh Marches and its linear monuments. It also delivers a much-needed venue for interdisciplinary studies from other times and places.

Reviews
'Volume 1 has delivered an exceptional series of articles which illustrates the breadth of interest and variety in how people engage with dykes.'—Tim Malim, Archaeologia Cambrensis 170 (2021)