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NEW: Laying the Foundations: Manual of the British Museum Iraq Scheme Archaeological Training Programme edited by John MacGinnis and Sébastien Rey. Paperback; 205x225mm; illustrated in full colour throughout. 808 2022. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271408. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271415. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Laying the Foundations, which developed out of the British Museum’s ‘Iraq Scheme’ archaeological training programme, covers the core components for putting together and running an archaeological field programme. The focus is on practicality. Individual chapters address background research, the use of remote sensing, approaches to surface collection, excavation methodologies, survey with total (and multi) stations, use of a dumpy level, context classification, on-site recording, databases and registration, environmental protocols, conservation, photography, illustration, post-excavation site curation and report writing. While the manual is oriented to the archaeology of Iraq, the approaches are no less applicable to the Middle East more widely, an aim hugely facilitated by the open-source distribution of translations into Arabic and Kurdish.
NEW: A Quaint & Curious Volume: Essays in Honor of John J. Dobbins edited by Dylan K. Rogers and Claire J. Weiss. Hardback; 174x245mm; 204 pages; 87 figures, 10 tables (colour throughout). 801 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692181. £49.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692198. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

John J. Dobbins, Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology, taught at the University of Virginia in the Department of Art from 1978 until his retirement in 2019. His legacy of research and pedagogy is explored in A Quaint & Curious Volume: Essays in Honor of John J. Dobbins. Professor Dobbins’ research in the field of Roman art and archaeology spans the geographical and chronological limits of the Roman Empire, from Pompeii to Syria, and Etruria to Spain. This volume demonstrates some of his wide-reaching interests, expressed through the research of his former graduate students. Several essays examine the city of Pompeii and cover the topics of masonry analysis, re-examinations of streets and drains, and analyses of the heating capacity of baths in Pompeii. Beyond Pompeii, the archaeological remains of bakeries are employed to elucidate labor specialization in the Late Roman period across the Mediterranean basin. Collaborations between Professor Dobbins and his former students are also explored, including a pioneering online numismatic database and close examination of sculpture and mosaics, including expressions of identity and patronage through case studies of the Ara Pacis and mosaics at Antioch-on-the-Orontes. A Quaint & Curious Volume not only demonstrates John Dobbins’ scholarly legacy, but also presents new readings of archaeological data and art, illustrating the impact that one professor can have on the wider field of Roman art and archaeology through the continuing work of his students.

About the Editors
Dylan K. Rogers, PhD (2015), University of Virginia, is Lecturer of Roman Art and Archaeology at UVa and previously served as the Assistant Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens from 2015-2019. He is the author of Water Culture in Roman Society (2018), and is the co-editor of the volumes, What’s New in Roman Greece? (2019) and The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Athens (2021). His research specialty is Roman fountains throughout the Roman Empire, investigating their impact on surrounding landscapes through the lens of sensory archaeology. He has also published on the topics of wall-painting in Pompeii, Roman mosaics, the siege of Athens by L. Cornelius Sulla in 86 BC, and archaeological archives. Rogers has worked on archaeological excavations in Pompeii, Sicily, Greece, and Turkey. ;

Claire J. Weiss, PhD (2018), University of Virginia, is a classical archaeologist whose research focuses on Roman urbanism, especially the sidewalks of ancient Roman cities and the relationship of these structures to urban social and economic organization. She has conducted archaeological field work and excavations in Pompeii since 2001, serving as the Assistant Director and Project Coordinator of the Via Consolare Project in Pompeii from 2006 to 2018, and now co-directing the Roman Colonial Urbanism Project.
NEW: Plant Food Processing Tools at Early Neolithic Göbekli Tepe by Laura Dietrich. Paperback; 205x290mm; 245pp; 103 figures, 62 tables, 33 plates (colour throughout). 798 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270920. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270937. Download Full PDF   Buy Now

Plant Food Processing Tools at Early Neolithic Göbekli Tepe reconstructs plant food processing at this key Pre-Pottery Neolithic (9600-8000 BC) site, with an emphasis on cereals, legumes and herbs as food sources, on grinding and pounding tools for their processing, and on the vessels implied in the consumption of meals and beverages. Functional investigations on grinding and pounding tools and on stone containers through use-wear and residue analyses are at the core of the book. Their corpus amounts to more than 7000 objects, constituting thus the largest collection published so far from the Neolithic of Upper Mesopotamia. The spectrum of tools and of processed plants is very broad, but porridges made of cereals, legumes and herbs, and beers predominate over bread-like food. The find contexts show that cooking took place around the well-known monumental buildings, while the large quantity of tools suggests feasting in addition to daily meals.

About the Author
NEW: Qatar: Evidence of the Palaeolithic Earliest People Revealed by Julie Scott-Jackson. Paperback; 240x270mm; 258 pages; 94 figures (colour throughout). Full text in English and Arabic. 766 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270500. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270517. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Qatar: Evidence of the Palaeolithic Earliest People Revealed, with full text in both English and Arabic, tells the story of the long and difficult search to discover the identity of the first people to inhabit the sovereign State of Qatar, which is situated on a peninsula, that extends into the Arabian Gulf. The book synthesises the results of extensive fieldwork by the PADMAC Unit with the many diverse historical records and reports of investigations, beginning with Holgar Kapel’s, in the early 1950s.

The archaeology of the State of Qatar is an important part of the cultural heritage of the world. The loss of archaeological sites to urban and industrial development since the 1950s has been inevitable but the loss of over 30 years of Palaeolithic research in Qatar, an area of prehistoric significance, as a result of academic dissension, is certainly regrettable. The work of the PADMAC Unit in Qatar now marks the end of this Palaeolithic research hiatus.

About the Author
Julie Scott-Jackson is the Director of the PADMAC Unit, based at Kellogg College, University of Oxford, where she also completed her doctorate In Palaeolithic Geoarchaeology. She has been studying Palaeolithic sites on high levels In the Middle East and Southern England since the 1990s.
NEW: The Rise of Metallurgy in Eurasia Evolution, Organisation and Consumption of Early Metal in the Balkans by Miljana Radivojević, Benjamin Roberts, Miroslav Marić, Julka Kuzmanović-Cvetković, Thilo Rehren. Paperback; 205x290mm; 698pp; 340 figures; 70 tables (colour throughout). 806 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270425. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270432. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Please note, print copies can be ordered now and will despatch once stock arrives in approx. 3-4 weeks.

The Rise of Metallurgy in Eurasia is a landmark study in the origins of metallurgy. The project aimed to trace the invention and innovation of metallurgy in the Balkans. It combined targeted excavations and surveys with extensive scientific analyses at two Neolithic-Chalcolithic copper production and consumption sites, Belovode and Pločnik, in Serbia. At Belovode, the project revealed chronologically and contextually secure evidence for copper smelting in the 49th century BC. This confirms the earlier interpretation of c. 7000-year-old metallurgy at the site, making it the earliest record of fully developed metallurgical activity in the world. However, far from being a rare and elite practice, metallurgy at both Belovode and Pločnik is demonstrated to have been a common and communal craft activity.

This monograph reviews the pre-existing scholarship on early metallurgy in the Balkans. It subsequently presents detailed results from the excavations, surveys and scientific analyses conducted at Belovode and Pločnik. These are followed by new and up-to-date regional syntheses by leading specialists on the Neolithic-Chalcolithic material culture, technologies, settlement and subsistence practices in the Central Balkans. Finally, the monograph places the project results in the context of major debates surrounding early metallurgy in Eurasia before proposing a new agenda for global early metallurgy studies.

About the Authors
Miljana Radivojević holds the Archaeomaterials Lectureship at the UCL Institute of Archaeology (UK), where she graduated in Archaeometallurgy. She has spent more than 20 years publishing on early metallurgy in the Balkans and southwest Asia and the role of aesthetics in the invention of novel technologies. ;

Benjamin Roberts has spent over 20 years researching and publishing on European Copper and Bronze Age archaeology and frequently metallurgy and metal objects across Europe. He co-edited with Chris Thornton Archaeometallurgy in Global perspective: Methods and Syntheses (2014) and is currently leading Project Ancient Tin. ;

Miroslav Marić is a specialist in the Neolithic-Bronze Age of the central Balkans at the Institute for Balkan Studies, Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Serbia. He is the field director of the Gradište Iđoš project. ;

Julka Kuzmanović-Cvetković was the Senior Custodian (now retired) at the Homeland Museum of Toplica in Prokuplje, Serbia. She spent more than four decades excavating the site of Pločnik, and developed a unique open air archaeo-park on the site that attracts tourists from the region, and across the globe. ;

Prof Thilo Rehren is the A.G. Leventis Professor for Archaeological Sciences and Director of the Science and Technology, Nicosia, Cyprus.
NEW: Die Entstehung komplexer Siedlungen im Zentraloman: Archäologische Untersuchungen zur Siedlungsgeschichte von Al-Khashbah by Conrad Schmidt, Stephanie Döpper, Jonas Kluge, Samantha Petrella, Ullrich Ochs, Nick Kirchhoff, Susanne Maier und Mona Walter. Hardback; 210x297; 590 pages; 358 figures, 68 plates (colour throughout). German text.. 803 2021 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 5. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271002. £96.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271019. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Die Entstehung komplexer Siedlungen im Zentraloman: Archäologische Untersuchungen zur Siedlungsgeschichte von Al-Khashbah presents the results of a survey conducted in 2015 and beyond by the Institut für die Kulturen des Alten Orients of the Universität Tübingen in Al-Khashbah, one of the largest Early Bronze Age sites on the Omani Peninsula. Ten monumental buildings, 273 tombs and other structures from the Hafit (3100-2700 BC) and Umm an-Nar periods (2700-2000 BC) were documented here. This makes Al-Khashbah ideally suited for the investigation of the beginnings of complex settlements and social structures in northern Inner Oman at the transition from the 4th to the 3rd millennium BC, because many of the achievements previously attributed to the Umm an-Nar period, such as monumental architecture and the smelting of copper, can already be proven here in the preceding Hafit period. In the Umm an-Nar period, the development of Al-Khashbah continues steadily, giving the site additional importance. According to the results of the survey, however, copper production at the site no longer seems to play a role in this period.

Aus den auf die frühe Bronzezeit folgenden Epochen des 2. und 1. Jahrtausends v. Chr. sowie des 1. und 2. Jahrtausends n. Chr. gibt es in Al-Khashbah nur äußerst wenige Befunde. Erst im 18.–20. Jahrhundert n. Chr. erfährt der Ort eine intensive Wiederbelebung, wovon insbesondere die alte Lehmziegelsiedlung im Norden der Palmenoase, eine kleine Siedlung im Osten des Untersuchungsgebiets, eine Reihe von Bewässerungsanlagen, mehrere Friedhöfe, Petroglyphen sowie zahlreiche an der Oberfläche gefundene spätislamische Keramikscherben zeugen.
NEW: ArcheoFOSS XIV 2020: Open Software, Hardware, Processes, Data and Formats in Archaeological Research edited by Julian Bogdani, Riccardo Montalbano and Paolo Rosati. Paperback; 174x245mm; 204pp; Illustrated in colour throughout. Papers in Italian and English. 796 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271248. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271255. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

ArcheoFOSS XIV 2020: Open software, hardware, processes, data and formats in archaeological research collects the proceedings of the fourteenth ArcheoFOSS international conference, held online due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The book gathers seventeen papers on three principal topics, the main sessions of the conference: use and application of free/libre and open-source (FLOS) tools in archaeology; creation, use and promotion of open data and open formats in archaeology; and development and customization of FLOS software and hardware solutions for cultural heritage. Forty-one scholars of very diverse age, academic affiliation and geographic location, but all actively involved in the promotion of FLOS culture, open data and open science in digital archaeology and humanities, contribute. The volume is completed by a critical analysis of the contribution of these important annual meetings to the scientific and cultural activity of the ArcheoFOSS community. The opportunity offered by the pandemic-related difficulties to widen the geographical scope of the conference has been further boosted by the decision to adopt the English language for most of the papers, with the hope that this will extend the work of the ArcheoFOSS community far beyond the Italian national borders.

About the Editors
Julian Bogdani is an assistant professor at Sapienza University of Rome, where he teaches Digital Archaeology and Digital Humanities. The main focus of his research is the theoretical and practical issues related to the application of Computer Science to the archaeological and historical domain. He is the developer of Bradypus, a cloud-based database for archaeology. He directs the archaeological mission of Sapienza at Çuka e Ajtoit, a Hellenistic, Roman and Late Antique site in Albania. ;

Riccardo Montalbano is an archaeologist, specialist in ancient topography. He is currently GIS expert and Data Manager at Parco Archeologico di Ercolano (Naples) and Adjunct Professor at the University Uninettuno. As GIS expert, he is involved in several fi eld projects in Italy and abroad, and he is a member of the core team of the SITAR Project (Superintendency of Rome) and a research fellow of MAGOH Project (University of Pisa). ;

Paolo Rosati received his PhD in 2016 from L’Aquila University for research on the economic sustainability of software in archaeology and the development of FLOSS methods in Humanities (philology, archaeology, history, topography). Today he is a researcher at the Sapienza University of Rome as part of the ERC project PAThs (http:// paths.uniroma1.it).
NEW: Historiographie de préhistoriens et de protohistoriens français du XX° siècle Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 19, Session VII-5 edited by François Djindjian. Paperback; 205x290mm; 140 pages; 73 figures. French text. 794 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271385. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271392. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

In France, the post-World War II period corresponds to a second golden age of prehistory and protohistory, thanks to the development of the CNRS and the creation of the first university chairs. This volume presents the biographies of a wide selection of French archaeologists whose scientific work has particularly marked this period.

Le XVIII° congrès mondial de l’UISPP, qui s’est déroulé à Paris, en juin 2018, a étél’occasion de rendre hommage à plusieurs préhistoriens et protohistoriens, qui ont fontl’objet de communications orales dans une session spéciale du congrès, la session VII-5,et qui sont publiées dans ce volume. En France, la période de l’après deuxième guerremondiale correspond à un deuxième âge d’or de la préhistoire et de la protohistoire,grâce au développement du CNRS et de la création des premières chaires universitaires.Historiographie de préhistoriens et de protohistoriens français du XX° siècle présente lesbiographies d’une sélection étendue d’archéologues français dont l’oeuvre scientifique aparticulièrement marqué cette période.

François Djindjian, professeur honoraire à l’Université de Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne, estun spécialiste de la théorie et des méthodes de l’archéologie et du paléolithique supérieureuropéen. Il est l’actuel président de l’Union Internationale des Sciences préhistoriques etprotohistoriques.
NEW: Use of Space and Domestic Areas: Functional Organisation and Social Strategies Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 18, Session XXXII-1 edited by Luc Jallot and Alessandro Peinetti. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 73 figures, 4 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English, abstracts in French and English. 793 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271361. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271378. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Use of Space and Domestic Areas: Functional Organisation and Social Strategies presents the papers from Session XXXII-1 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The organization of inhabited space is the direct expression of the deep integration of societies with their cultural and natural environment. According to the distribution and the patterning of activities, the organization of human communities and the role of their actors can be brought to light. The various contributions in this volume show the progress of research in terms of understanding the use of space on different scales, from the household to the village, focusing on Neolithic and Bronze Age contexts. Each of the contributions shows the diversity of issues concerning the interpretation of the living spaces, and the diversity of approaches carried out to answer them.

About the Editors
Luc Jallot, archaeologist, is Maître de conférences at the University Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3 (UMR 5140 « Archéologie des Sociétés méditerranéennes »). His researches focus on settlement organisation and dynamics, on material culture, on anthropomorphic art and on the relationship between societies and environment at the end of the Neolithic in Southern France. Since the end of the 1990s he has been involved in several research projects on Neolithic earthen architecture. He has also worked in Eastern Africa and, more recently, on Neolithic and Copper Age contexts in Morocco. ;

Alessandro Peinetti, geoarchaeologist, PhD (University Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3, UMR 5140 « Archéologie des Sociétés méditerranéennes », Università di Bologna) is an independent researcher. His researches focus on the formation processes of the archaeological record, on the built environment, on earthen architecture and on the organisation of settlements and activity areas documented by the analysis of soils and archeological sediments through micromorphology. He is especially involved in research into Neolithic and Bronze Age villages in Italy and Southern France.
NEW (REPRINT AND OPEN ACCESS): The Roman Cemetery at Lankhills Pre-Roman and Roman Winchester. Part II by Giles Clarke. DOI: 10.32028/9781803270081. Hardback; 215x276 pages; 614pp. 777 2021 Winchester Studies 3. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270081. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270098. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Print copies now in stock

Winchester Studies 3.ii: Outside the north gate of Venta Belgarum, Roman Winchester, a great cemetery stretched for 500 yards along the road to Cirencester. Excavations at Lankhills from 1967 to 1972 uncovered 451 graves, many elaborately furnished, at the northern limits of this cemetery, and dating from the fourth century A.D. This book, the second in a two-part study of Venta Belgarum, which forms the third volume of Winchester Studies, describes the excavations of these burials and analyses in detail both the graves and their contents. There are detailed studies and important re-assessments of many categories of object, but it is the information about late Roman burial, religion, and society which is of special interest.

This is a reprint of the volume originally published in 1979 (Oxford, ISBN 9780198131779). The reprint is based on scans of the original publication, with minor changes to present folding or pull-out sections on standard folio pages. A brief introduction to the reprint is provided by the author, Giles Clarke.

Reviews of the 1979 edition:
This meticulous and detailed work is of major importance for the study of Roman burial practices and their relevance for our knowledge of Roman religion. No such comprehensive study has appeared elsewhere … a model of what such a work should be.Prof. J.C. Mann, British Book News (1980) ;

The excavation and report on the Lankhills cemetery is something of a landmark. It is a lesson to Roman archaeologists about what they have been missing through neglect of their cemetery sites, and also a lesson to every-one engaged in cemetery site studies, whatever their period, in how to analyse and present their evidence to maximum advantage. This model publication will be an indispensable work of reference for many years to come.Dr Sonia Hawkes, Times Literary Supplement (1980) ;

… auch ein Musterbeispiel für die gesamte spätantike provinzialrömische Archäologie.’ [‘… also a model example for the whole of provincial Roman archaeology in the late Roman period.Prof. Jochen Garbsch, Bayerische Vorgeschichtsblätter (1981)

NEW: Lyde Green Roman Villa, Emersons Green, South Gloucestershire edited by Matthew S. Hobson and Richard Newman. Paperback; 205x290mm; 212 pages; 58 figures, 44 tables, 27 plates (colour throughout). 787 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 85. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270463. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270470. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Lyde Green Roman Villa, Emersons Green, South Gloucestershire was excavated between mid-2012 and mid-2013 along with its surroundings and antecedent settlement. The excavations took place as part of the Emersons Green East Development Area, funded through the mechanism of commercial archaeology by Gardiner & Theobald LLP. The results of the stratigraphic analysis are given here along with specialist reports on the human remains, pottery (including thin sections), ceramic building material, small finds, coinage and iron-working waste. Six open-area excavations allowed the archaeologists the rare opportunity to trace a substantial part of the site’s layout. Three ancillary buildings within the villa compound, including a bathhouse, were excavated. Evidence of advanced water management was uncovered in the form of lead piping, ceramic drain tiles and an enigmatic stone structure built into a canalised spring line. The villa’s economy included stock raising, crop processing and iron and textile production. The settlement appears to have originated in the mid-1st century AD, or slightly earlier.

About the Editors
Matthew Hobson is a specialist in Roman Archaeology, with a focus on Britain and the Maghreb and has authored numerous academic publications. He has taught undergraduate and post-graduate courses at universities in the UK and in the Netherlands and directed excavations in the UK, France, Italy and North Africa. In 2017-2020 Matthew arranged and delivered educational courses in the use of satellite imagery and GIS for Heritage Managers across the Middle East and North Africa. ;

Richard Newman is a specialist in Landscape Archaeology, with a focus on Northern England and Gloucestershire. He has authored or co-authored numerous publications. Major archaeological projects include, in the 1990s, the Second Severn Crossing English Approach Roads, and more recently, the East Anglia One cable trench. He has been a visiting fellow at Newcastle University and worked at Lancaster and Bournemouth universities. His PhD was in the post-medieval landscape history of west Gloucestershire.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editors’ foreword ;

Chapter 1 Introduction – Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson, and Damion Churchill ;

Chapter 2: Research objectives, methodologies and summary of results – Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson, and Damion Churchill ;

Chapter 3: The development of the landscape before the 1st millennium AD – Richard Newman and Robert Young with contributions by Adrian Bailey, Kimberley Colman, Lynne Gardiner, David Jackson, Mike McElligott and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 4: Dating the origins of the rural settlement at Lyde Green: a Late Iron Age enclosure system? – Richard Newman and Matthew S. Hobson with contributions by Lynne Gardiner, Mike McElligott, Ed McSloy and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 5: The Romano-British period and the villa estate – Mike McElligott, Richard Newman, Matthew S. Hobson and Megan Stoakley with contributions by Don O’Meara and Lynne Gardiner ;

Chapter 6: The Romano-British artefacts (mid-1st century AD to 5th century AD) ;

Chapter 7: The development of the landscape from the Roman period to the present day – Richard Newman with contributions from Ed McSloy and Megan Stoakley ;

Chapter 8: Lyde Green and the Romano-British villas of South Gloucestershire – Richard Newman ;

Chapter 9: Appendices ;
Appendix 1: Catalogue of Bronze Age pottery ;
Appendix 2: Table of radiocarbon dates ;
Appendix 3: Catalogue of decorated Samian and Samian stamps ;
Appendix 4: Petrographic report of thin-section analyses ;
Appendix 5: Fabric descriptions of ceramic building material ;
Appendix 6: XRF methodology and tables ;
Appendix 7: Met
NEW: Tinqueux « la Haubette » (Marne, France): Un site exceptionnel du Néolithique ancien edited by Lamys Hachem. Paperback; 210x297mm; 220 pages; 92 figures, 30 tables (colour throughout). French text with English Summary. 771 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699760. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699777. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Neolithic site of Tinqueux ‘la Haubette’ (Marne) dated to the ‘Blicquy/Villeneuve-Saint-Germain’ (5000-4700 cal. BC) is composed of five houses, further series of pits and the remains of an oven. An abundance of finds has allowed us to explore a number of themes in greater detail. The first concerns the potential singularity of the site due to its very easterly location within the BVSG area of expansion and its place within the broader chronological sequence. The second is the nature of the settlement within the network of ‘producer’ and ‘receiver’ sites which characterises the BVSG. The third theme that we focus on is the provenance of raw materials, and the fourth one is the internal settlement chronology.

The analyses carried out on the settlement structure and on the archaeological finds reveal hitherto unknown facets of the BVSG culture, like refining the chronological sequence for this period in its regional facies; and establishing a particularly valuable periodisation for the site itself. Comparison with nearby and distant sites has helped us to understand the relationship of this settlement to other contemporary sites. It reveals that the site looked to the east and that there was a strong cultural dynamic which was expressed by varied networks of influence and circulation, particularly for the acquisition of raw materials and finished products.

About the Author
Lamys Hachem is a researcher in zooarchaeology and pre-history at the Institut National de Recherches Archéologiques Préventives (INRAP). As part of the team Trajectoires « De la sédentarisation à l’Etat » (UMR 8215 of CNRS and Paris I-Sorbonne University), her research and publications focus on the societies of the Early, Middle and Final Neolithic period, particularly in the northern half of France, where she has led teams performing preventive archaeological excavations for more than two decades.

En français
Le site néolithique de Tinqueux « la Haubette » (Marne) daté du « Blicquy/Villeneuve-Saint-Germain » (5000-4700 cal. BC) a livré cinq maisons, ainsi que des fosses et une structure de combustion. Les éléments de la culture matérielle abondants ont permis d’approfondir différentes problématiques. La première traite de la singularité du site en raison de sa position très orientale dans l’aire d’extension du BVSG et sa place dans la séquence chronologique. Le second sujet porte sur la nature de l’habitat dans le réseau des sites « producteurs » ou « receveurs » qui caractérise le BVSG. Le troisième thème abordé est celui de la provenance des matières premières et le quatrième est celui des caractéristiques chronologiques internes au village.

Les analyses menées sur la structuration du village et sur le mobilier archéologique ont permis de révéler un pan encore inconnu de la culture BVSG. Ainsi, la séquence chronologique fine de cette période dans son faciès régional a pu être établie ; comme que la périodisation interne du village. La comparaison avec des sites proches ou éloignés a été déterminante pour comprendre le rapport de cet habitat avec les sites contemporains. Elle révèle une ouverture vers l’est et une forte dynamique culturelle qui se traduit par des réseaux d’influences et de circulations variées, notamment pour l’approvisionnement en matières premières et en produits finis.
NEW: The Shaping of the English Landscape: An Atlas of Archaeology from the Bronze Age to Domesday Book by Chris Green and Miranda Creswell. Paperback; 219x297mm; 134 pages; illustrated in colour throughout. 767 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270609. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270616. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Shaping of the English Landscape is an atlas of English archaeology covering the period from the middle Bronze Age (c. 1500 BC) to Domesday Book (AD 1086), encompassing the Bronze and Iron Ages, the Roman period, and the early medieval (Anglo-Saxon) age. It was produced as part of the English Landscape and Identities (EngLaId) project at the University of Oxford, which took place from 2011 to 2016, funded by the European Research Council.

In this book, you will find maps (produced by Chris Green) and discussion of themes including landscape agency, settlement, foodways and field systems, belief and the treatment of the dead, mobility and defence, making things, and material culture. Alongside are artworks (produced by Miranda Creswell) dealing with similar themes and depicting archaeological sites from across England. The authors hope to inspire and encourage debate into the past history of the English landscape.

Includes contributions from Anwen Cooper, Victoria Donnelly, Tyler Franconi, Roger Glyde, Chris Gosden, Zena Kamash, Janice Kinory, Sarah Mallet, Dan Stansbie, John Talbot, and Letty Ten Harkel.

About the Contributors
Chris Green is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the School of Archaeology within the University of Oxford. He worked on English Landscape and Identities throughout the lifespan of the project. Chris specialises in applications of Geographic Information Systems and data science in archaeology. He particularly enjoys making maps. ;

Miranda Creswell is a visual artist based in Oxford. She is currently Artist in Residence at the School of Archaeology and previously worked within the team on English Landscape and Identities, documenting working methods and also creating the Recording England artworks presented in this book.
Understanding and Accessibility of Pre-and Proto-Historical Research Issues: Sites, Museums and Communication Strategies Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 17, Session XXXV-1 edited by Davide Delfino and Valentino Nizzo. Paperback; 205x290mm; 94 pages; 40 figures, 3 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English, one in French. 770 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270784. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270791. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Understanding and Accessibility of Pre-and Protohistorical Research Issues: Sites, Museums and Communication Strategies presents the papers from Session XXXV-1 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). Museums are increasingly seen as the place where scientific research and heritage education meet, rather than being simply a location for exhibitions. The eight contributions from Italy, the United Kingdom, Senegal, Spain and the Netherlands address the following related issues: the mediation of language from research usage to public usage, making the museum visit an educational experience, universal accessibility, involvement of the local community in the management of the sites and museums, use of media and new technology to bring scientific content to the public.

About the Editors
Davide Delfino is an archaeologist in the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities – Regional Direction of Museums of Molise, visiting professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (UNESCO Chair in Humanity and Cultural Integrated Landscape Management), internal researcher of the Geosciences Centre (University of Coimbra), and member of the Land and Memory Institute of Mação (Portugal). He has been Secretary of the UISPP/IUPPS Scientific Commission ‘Metal Ages in Europe’ from 2015. His scientific interests focus on warfare and landscape occupation in the Metal Ages, excavation of hill-top settlements, archaeological forgeries, and museology. He is the author of about 90 national and international scientific publications and has organised several international conferences and conference sessions in Portugal, Brazil, France and Spain.

Valentino Nizzo completed his studies at the ‘Sapienza’ University of Rome with a PhD in Etruscology. He carried out post-doctoral work on ‘Global Archaeology’ at the Italian Institute of Human Sciences in Florence, and then was appointed in 2010 to the Ministry of Cultural Heritage, first at the National Archaeological Museum of Ferrara and then at the General Directorate for Museums. In 2014 he became associate professor of archaeology, and in 2017 director of the National Etruscan Museum of Villa Giulia. His interests focus on the historical and material culture issues of Etruscan- Italic civilisations, on the earliest Greek colonisation, on the comparison between archaeology and anthropology, on funerary ideology and the mechanisms of archaeological communication.
New Advances in the History of Archaeology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 16 (Sessions Organised by the History of Archaeology Scientific Commission at the XVIII World UISPP) edited by Sophie A. de Beaune, Alessandro Guidi, Oscar Moro Abadía, Massimo Tarantini. Paperback; 205x290mm; 244 pages; 106 figures, 4 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. 768 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270722. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270739. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

New Advances in the History of Archaeology presents the papers from three sessions organised by the History of Archaeology Scientific Commission at the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The first session, From stratigraphy to stratigraphic excavation in pre- and protohistoric archaeology organised by Massimo Tarantini and Alessandro Guidi, reviews the development of stratigraphical methods in archaeology in many European countries. The second session, Epistemology, History and Philosophy of Science: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the History of Archaeology, organised by Sophie A. de Beaune and Oscar Moro Abadia, is characterised by different examples of intersections between archaeology and other disciplines like history and the philosophy of science. Finally, four papers discuss the development of different types of interdisciplinarity in Europe and South America. These were presented in the third session, Archaeology and interdisciplinarity, from the 19th century to present-day research, organized by Laura Coltofean, Géraldine. Delley, Margarita Díaz-Andreu and Marc-Antoine Kaeser.

About the Editors
Sophie Archambault de Beaune is Professor at the University of Lyon and researcher at the ‘Archaeology and Ancient Sciences’ laboratory in Nanterre. She works on the technical behaviour and cognitive skills of prehistoric man and is also interested in the history of prehistory. In particular, she has published Pour une archéologie du geste and L’homme et l’outil (CNRS Éditions, 2000 and 2015), Qu’est-ce que la Préhistoire ? (Gallimard, 2016), and, with Antoine Balzeau, Notre Préhistoire: La grande aventure de la famille humaine (Belin, 2016) and co-directed Cognitive Archaeology and Human Evolution (Cambridge, CUP, 2009). She directs the collection ‘Le passé recomposé’ which she created at CNRS Éditions. ;

Alessandro Guidi has been Full Professor of Palethnology at the University of Roma Tre since 2004. He has been concerned mainly with the proto-history of the Italian peninsula, paying particular attention to the problem of the birth of the city and the state, to the history of prehistoric studies, and to theoretical archaeology and methodology. Among his books are Storia della paletnologia (1988), I metodi della ricerca archeologica (1994, 2005), Preistoria della complessità sociale (2000). ;

Oscar Moro Abadía works as Associate Professor at Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada). He specializes in the study of the history and the epistemology of Pleistocene art. His research on rock art has been published in Cambridge Archaeological Journal, Journal of Archaeological Research, Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, World Art, History of Human Sciences, Journal of Anthropological Research, and Journal of Social Archaeology. ;

Massimo Tarantini works as functionary archaeologist at the Italian Ministry of Culture. His research experience concentrates in the fields of prehistoric mining archaeology and in the history of archaeology. He is the author / editor of Evoluzione, preistoria dell’uomo e società contemporanea (with L. Sarti, 2007), Le miniere preistoriche del Gargano (with A. Galiberti, 2011), La nascita della paletnologia in Italia (2012), and Archivi dell’archeologia italiana (with Andrea Pessina, 2021).
Taymāʾ II: Catalogue of the Inscriptions Discovered in the Saudi-German Excavations at Taymāʾ 2004–2015 by Michael C. A. Macdonald. Hardback; 210x297mm; 264 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 717 2020 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698763. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698770. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Taymāʾ II is a Catalogue which contains all the inscriptions discovered during the 24 seasons of the Saudi- German excavations at Taymāʾ from 2004–15 which were funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The 113 objects carry inscriptions in different languages and scripts, illustrating the linguistic diversity of the oasis through time. Although the majority are fragmentary, they provide an important source for the history of the oasis in ancient and mediaeval times.

The Babylonian cuneiform inscriptions in this volume confirm for the first time the ten-year sojourn at Taymāʾ of the last Babylonian king Nabû-na’id (556–539 BC). In addition, Imperial Aramaic inscriptions dated by the reigns of Lihyanite kings, based at Dadan (modern al-ʿUlā), reveal for the first time that they ruled Taymāʾ at a period in the second half of the first millennium BC.

As well as editing the volume, Michael C. A. Macdonald edited the Imperial Aramaic inscriptions found from 2010–15, plus those in the form of the Aramaic script which developed in Taymāʾ, and the Nabataean, Dadanitic, and Taymanitic texts. In addition, Hanspeter Schaudig edited the cuneiform inscriptions; Peter Stein, the Imperial Aramaic texts found from 2004–09; and Frédéric Imbert, the Arabic inscriptions. Arnulf Hausleiter and Francelin Tourtet provided archaeological contributions, while Martina Trognitz curated the virtual edition of many of the texts recorded by RTI. The indexes contain the words and names from all known texts from the oasis, including those in the Taymāʾ Museum and other collections which will be published as Taymāʾ III.

About the Author
Michael C. A. Macdonald is an Honorary Fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford, and Fellow of the British Academy. He works on the languages, scripts and ancient history of Arabia and directs the Online Corpus of the Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia (http://krc.orient.ox.ac.uk/ociana/). He has been working at Taymāʾ since 2010. ;

With contributions by:
Arnulf Hausleiter is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula. He has been co-directing the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 with Ricardo Eichmann. ;

Frédéric Imbert is Professor at the Institut de recherches et d’études sur les mondes arabes et musulmans, Aix-Marseille University. ;

Hanspeter Schaudig is Associate Professor of Assyriology at the Seminar für Sprachen und Kulturen des Alten Orients at the University of Heidelberg. ;

Peter Stein is Associate Professor for Semitic studies at the Faculty of Theology / Ancient Languages Division at the University of Jena. ;

Francelin Tourtet is a PhD candidate at the Freie Universität Berlin working on his dissertation on Bronze and Iron Age pottery from Taymāʾ. ;

Martina Trognitz is member of the Austrian Centre of Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage at the Austrian Academy of Sciences.
Big Data and Archaeology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 15, Session III-1 edited by François Djindjian and Paola Moscati. Paperback; 205x290mm; 106 pages; 33 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. 761 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697216. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697223. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Big Data and Archaeology presents the papers from two sessions of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018): Session III-1 (CA): ‘Big data, databases and archaeology’, and Session III-1 (T): ‘New advances in theoretical archaeology’. The advent of Big Data is a recent and debated issue in Digital Archaeology. Historiographic context and current developments are illustrated in this volume, as well as comprehensive examples of a multidisciplinary and integrative approach to the recording, management and exploitation of excavation data and documents produced over a long period of archaeological research. In addition, specific attention is paid to neoprocessual archaeology, as a new platform aimed at renewing the theoretical framework of archaeology after thirty years of post-modernism, and to the refinement of the concept of archaeological cultures, combining processual, contextual and empirical approaches.

About the Editors
François Djindjian is ancien professeur at the University of Paris I Pantheon Sorbonne (chair of archaeological methods and theory) and associate member of the CNRS UMR 7041. He is President of the International Union for Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP), member of the executive committee of the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH) of Unesco, and delegate member of the International Academic Union (UAI).

Paola Moscati is research director at the Institute of Heritage Science of the National Research Council of Italy. As an archaeologist, specialised in computer applications in archaeology, she is Vice President of the UISPP Commission IV, editor in chief of the international journal ‘Archeologia e Calcolatori’ and scientific coordinator of the international project ‘The Virtual Museum of Archaeological Computing’, jointly promoted with the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei.
Studies on the Palaeolithic of Western Eurasia Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 14, Session XVII-4 & Session XVII-6 edited by György Lengyel, Jarosław Wilczyński, Marta Sánchez de la Torre, Xavier Mangado, Josep Maria Fullola. Paperback; 205x290mm; 262 pages; 109 figures, 34 tables (54 pages in colour). Papers in English (one in French). 760 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697179. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697186. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Studies on the Palaeolithic of Western Eurasia presents the papers from Sessions XVII-4 and XVII-6 of the 18th UISPP World congress (Paris, June 2018). The geographic areas discussed in the Session 4, Central and Eastern Europe, are prehistorically strongly articulated, their cultural successions are highly similar, and they share several common archaeological issues for investigation. The papers disseminate a wealth of archaeological data from Bavaria to the Russian Plain, and discuss Aurignacian, Gravettian, Epigravettian, and Magdalenian perspectives on lithic tool kits and animal remains. The papers of Session 6 are concerned with lithic raw material procurement in the Caucasus and in three areas of the Iberian peninsula.

About the Editors György Lengyel an associate professor at the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology of the University of Miskolc, Hungary, and research associate at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He graduated at the University of Miskolc, and received a PhD degree from the University of Haifa, Israel. His main field of research is the Upper Palaeolithic of Central Europe. The focus of his research is hunter-gatherer subsistence strategy and the formation of the corresponding archaeological record. He conducts research projects on the Upper Palaeolithic of the Levant and Central Europe. ORCID: 0000-0002-7803-3043 ;

Jarosław Wilczyński is head of the Department of Vertebrate Zoology of the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He graduated in archaeology at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, and received his PhD in archaeozoology at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences. His interests are two-pronged, including studying Upper Palaeolithic and Neolithic lithic inventories, as well as Pleistocene and Holocene faunal assemblages. He conducts research projects on the Gravettian and the Epigravettian of Central Europe. ORCID: 0000-0002-9786-0693 ;

Marta Sánchez de la Torre is currently a Beatriu de Pinós postdoctoral researcher at the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona. Her research has mainly focused on the analysis of lithic raw materials by Palaeolithic groups settled in the Pyrenean region by the use of traditional approaches as well as geochemical methods. She is currently directing archaeological seasons at several sites in NE Iberia and participates in different projects in France and Spain. ;

Xavier Mangado is a professor in prehistory at the University of Barcelona and researcher at the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona. He specialise in the analysis of lithic raw materials, mostly by using petrographic and micropalaeontological tools. His research is mainly focused on the study of Palaeolithic groups settled in NE Iberia and he has also participated in several international projects at Portugal, France and Jordan. ;

Josep Maria Fullola has been a professor in prehistory at the University of Barcelona since 1985. In 1986 he created the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona, a research group that promotes advanced research in prehistoric archaeology, being since its creation the main director. He has directed archaeological seasons in several Palaeolithic sites in NE Iberia, but he has also been involved in international projects in Baja California, France and Portugal.
Die Gräber von Bat und Al-Ayn und das Gebäude II in Bat by Stephanie Döpper. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699494. Hardback; 210x297mm; 394pp; 357 figures, 256 tables, 21 plates (colour throughout). Print RRP: £80.00. 741 2021 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699494. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699500. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Early Bronze Age in third-millennium-BC Eastern Arabia was a period of fundamental change, which is apparent in the development of social complexity, the exploitation of new resources and the emergence of new modes of life. Hallmarks of this period include monumental structures, so-called towers, and stone-built circular tombs.

The second volume of the series Arabia Orientalis is dedicated to the archaeological investigation of the Early Bronze Age necropolises of the UNESCO world heritage sites Bat and Al-Ayn in the Sultanate of Oman, as well as the monumental tower structure Building II at Bat. It encompasses detailed reports on the architecture and stratigraphy, as well as the find assemblages from the excavated buildings, including pottery and small finds, along with anthropological as well as anthracological studies. The publication presents insights into changing burial customs, as well as the function of the monumental tower structures. Three out of the four excavated Hafit- and Umm an-Nar-period tombs in the necropolises featured evidence for reuse at later times, especially during the Samad period, where new inhumations were placed into the Bronze Age tombs. The early Umm an-Nar tower Building II is surrounded by a large ditch system that might have served as protection against flooding from the nearby wadi.

About the Author
Stephanie Döpper is a postdoctoral researcher at Goethe University Frankfurt with an interest in mobile and sedentary communities of the Bronze Age in Eastern Arabia, as well as the reuse of prehistoric tombs and early modern mud-brick villages in the region. To facilitate public engagement with archaeological sites, she co-developed the ArchaeoTrail app for self-guided smartphone tours at archaeological sites.

German Description
Die frühe Bronzezeit im dritten Jahrtausend v. Chr. in Südostarabien ist eine Zeit grundlegender Veränderungen, die sich in der Entwicklung sozialer Komplexität, der Ausbeutung neuer Ressourcen und dem Aufkommen neuer Lebensformen zeigt. Kennzeichen dieser Epoche sind monumentale Bauwerke, sogenannte Türme, und aus Stein gebaute runde Gräber.

Der zweite Band der Reihe Arabia Orientalis widmet sich der archäologischen Untersuchung der frühbronzezeitlichen Nekropolen der UNESCO-Welterbestätten Bat und Al-Ayn im Sultanat Oman sowie dem monumentalen Turm Gebäude II in Bat. Er umfasst ausführliche Abhandlungen zur Architektur und Stratigraphie sowie zu den Fundeassemblagen aus den ausgegrabenen Bauwerken, darunter Keramik-, Kleinfunde-, anthropologische sowie anthrakologische Untersuchungen. Die Publikation präsentiert Einblicke in sich verändernde Bestattungssitten und die Funktion des monumentalen Turms. Drei der vier ausgegrabenen Hafit- und Umm an-Nar-zeitlichen Gräber in den Nekropolen belegen spätere Nachnutzungen, vor allem in der Samad-Zeit, in der neue Bestattungen in die bronzezeitlichen Gräber eingebracht wurden. Das Gebäude II aus der frühen Umm an-Nar-Zeit ist von einer großen Grabenanlage umgeben, die möglicherweise als Schutz vor Überschwemmungen des nahen Wadis diente.

Stephanie Döpper ist wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt und beschäftigt sich mit mobilen und sesshaften Gesellschaften der Bronzezeit in Südostarabien sowie der Nachnutzung prähistorischer Gräber und frühneuzeitlicher Lehmziegeldörfer in dieser Region. Um der Öffentlichkeit den Zugang zu archäologischen Stätten zu erleichtern, hat sie die ArchaeoTrail-App für selbstgeführte Smartphone-Touren an archäologischen Stätten mitentwickelt.
A Monumental Hellenistic Funerary Ensemble at Callatis on the Western Black Sea The Documaci Tumulus: Volume I edited by Valeriu Sîrbu, Maria-Magdalena Ștefan and Dan Ștefan. Paperback; 205x290mm; 342 pages; 191 figures, 20 tables. 757 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694369. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694376. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

A Monumental Hellenistic Funerary Ensemble at Callatis on the Western Black Sea presents one of the most spectacular early Hellenistic funerary monuments, recently excavated on the western Black Sea coast by a Romanian-Bulgarian-Polish interdisciplinary research team. Documaci Tumulus, covering a painted tomb, and marked by a monumental statue, was built at the threshold of the 4th to 3rd centuries BC in the cemetery of the Greek City of Callatis. The sophisticated construction techniques and the remains of commemorative rituals attest to the dynamic political arena of the Diadochi wars in the Black Sea area and offer a glimpse into a complex and interconnected world of Hellenistic architects and artists. The monument will fuel discussions about the mechanisms of ritualised identity expression in mixed cultural environments, functioning under the pressure of political change, or about community membership, symbolic discourse and ancestors— all reflected in ‘le jeu des miroirs’ of the funerary practices.



About the editors
Valeriu Sîrbu is a senior archaeologist of the second Iron Age with more than forty years of experience. His main contributions are in the archaeology of ritual, magic, human and animal sacrifices, and sacred places and fortifications in Pre-Roman Dacia. ;

Maria-Magdalena Ștefan is an archaeologist dealing with tumuli graves in the Lower Danube area, Hellenistic tomb architecture and decoration, multi-cultural interactions in border zones and ancient identities. ;

Dan Ștefan is an archaeologist and geophysicist and an experienced analyst of archaeological landscapes with non-invasive methods, including LiDAR and aerial prospection. He has worked at more than one hundred archaeological sites in Romania, the Republic of Moldavia, Bulgaria and Greece.
Mammoths and Neanderthals in the Thames Valley by Katharine Scott and Christine M. Buckingham. Paperback; 174x245mm; 272 pages; 133 figures, 55 tables (colour throughout). 752 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699647. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699654. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Today the Upper Thames Valley is a region of green pastures and well-managed farmland, interspersed with pretty villages and intersected by a meandering river.

The discovery in 1989 of a mammoth tusk in river gravels at Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire, revealed the very different ancient past of this landscape. Here, some 200,000 years ago, mammoths, straight-tusked elephants, lions, and other animals roamed across grasslands with scattered trees, occasionally disturbed by small bands of Neanderthals.

The pit where the tusk was discovered, destined to become a waste disposal site, provided a rare opportunity to conduct intensive excavations that extended over a period of 10 years. This work resulted in the recording and recovery of more than 1500 vertebrate fossils and an abundance of other biological material, including insects, molluscs, and plant remains, together with 36 stone artefacts attributable to Neanderthals. The well-preserved plant remains include leaves, nuts, twigs and large oak logs. Vertebrate remains notably include the most comprehensive known assemblage of a distinctive small form of the steppe mammoth, Mammuthus trogontherii, that is characteristic of an interglacial period equated with marine isotope stage 7 (MIS 7).

Richly illustrated throughout, Mammoths and Neanderthals in the Thames Valley offers a detailed account of all these finds and will be of interest to Quaternary specialists and students alike.

About the Authors
Katharine Scott is internationally recognised for her work on Middle and Upper Pleistocene vertebrate fossils. Her fieldwork at various Upper Thames Quaternary sites concentrated especially on the 10-year excavation of 200,000-year-old fossiliferous deposits at Stanton Harcourt near Oxford. This now comprises the largest collection of excavated mammoths in Britain. She is an Emeritus Fellow of St Cross College Oxford and an Honorary Associate of the Oxford University Museum. ;

Christine Buckingham was born and educated in Oxford. Between 1989 and 1999, Christine was co-director of the excavations at Stanton Harcourt with overall responsibility for recording the geology and stratigraphy and also carried out fieldwork at several other Upper Thames sites. Christine graduated with a DPhil from Oxford Brookes University (in collaboration with the Donald Baden-Powell Quaternary Research Centre, Oxford University) in 2004. She is an Honorary Associate of the Oxford University Museum.
Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The Roman Frontier in Egypt Frontières de l’empire romain : la frontière romaine en Égypte by David J. Breeze and Michel Reddé. Paperback; 185x248mm; 96pp; 150 figures (colour throughout). Full text in English and French. Print RRP: £14.99. 745 2021 Frontiers of the Roman Empire (FRE) . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699456. £14.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699463. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The frontiers of the Roman empire together form the largest monument of one of the world’s greatest states. They stretch for some 7,500km through 20 countries which encircle the Mediterranean Sea. The remains of these frontiers have been studied by visitors and later by archaeologists for several centuries. Many of the inscriptions and sculpture, weapons, pottery and artefacts created and used by the soldiers and civilians who lived on the frontier can be seen in museums. Equally evocative of the lost might of Rome are the physical remains of the frontiers themselves. The aim of this series of books is not only to inform the interested visitor about the history of the frontiers but to act as a guidebook as well.

The Roman military remains of Egypt are remarkable in their variety and in their state of preservation. They deserve to be better known. They include forts, quarries under the authority of the army and whose materials were used in the monumental buildings of Rome, as well as the roads which crossed the desert landscape and brought the Mediterranean into con¬tact with the Indian Ocean. It is hoped that each reader of this book will enjoy learning more about the remarkable Roman inheritance of Egypt.

The full text is presented side-by-side dual-language in English and French.

About the Authors
Professor David J. Breeze has published several books on Roman frontiers and the Roman army. He is a former chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier Studies and led the team which successfully nominated the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site. ;

Michel Reddé is a professor emeritus at the School for Advanced Studies at the Paris Sciences et Lettres University. He has directed or collaborated on several archaeological sites in Egypt and in France (Alésia). He has been director of the European project on studying north-east Roman Gaul.

French Description
Prises ensemble, les frontières de l’Empire romain constituent le monument le plus important de ce qui fut l’un des plus grands États du monde. Elles s’étendent sur environ 7.500 km à travers une ving-taine de pays autour de la Méditerranée. Depuis plusieurs siècles, les vestiges de ces frontières ont fait l’objet d’études par des curieux puis plus tardivement par des archéologues. Bon nombre des inscriptions, sculptures, armes, poteries et autres objets créés et utilisés par les militaires et les civils qui peuplaient ces frontières sont visibles dans les musées. Mais les vestiges physiques de ses frontières sont tout aussi évocateurs de la puissance que fut Rome. La présente séries de livres est conçue non seulement pour informer le visiteur curieux de l’histoire des frontières mais également pour servir de guide sur le terrain.

Les vestiges militaires romains en Égypte sont remarquables tant par leur diversité que par leur état de conservation : ils méritent d’être mieux connus. On y dénombre des forts, des carrières exploitées sous l’autorité des militaires et dont les matériaux ont servi aux constructions monumentales de Rome, ainsi que des pistes qui traversent des paysages désertiques et mettaient la Méditerranée en relation avec l’Océan Indien. Nous espérons que le lecteur prendra plaisir à en apprendre davantage sur l’étonnant héritage romain en Égypte.

Le Professeur David J. Breeze a publié plusieurs livres sur les frontières et l’armée romaines. Il est ancien président du Congrès International d’Études sur les Frontières Romaines et il a dirigé l’équipe qui a réussi à faire inscrire le mur d’Antonin au patrimoine Mondial. ;

Michel Reddé est professeur (ém.) à l’École pratique des Hautes Études/Université de Paris Sciences et Lettres. Il a dirigé ou collaboré à de nombreux chantiers archéologiques en Égypte et en France (Alésia). Il a été directeur du projet ERC Rurland.
Pits and Boots: Excavation of Medieval and Post-medieval Backlands under the Bon Accord Centre, Aberdeen by Michael Roy. Paperback; 205x290mm; 368 pages; 170 figures, 43 tables. 735 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694871. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694888. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Pits and Boots derives from excavations carried out in 2007-8, in advance of an extension to the Bon Accord Centre in Aberdeen, that uncovered the backlands of an area that would have formed part of the industrial quarter of the medieval town. The site is well-dated by dendrochronology, augmented by artefactual evidence, and indicates activity from the late 12th century AD into the early modern period, with a particularly intensive period in the 13th century. Structural evidence consists primarily of the backland boundaries, hearth/ovens, several wood-lined wells and many large pits. It is the contents of these pits and wells which forms the core of this monograph. The waterlogged conditions within the pits and wells has meant that a remarkable assemblage of organic remains including leather, wooden artefacts, textiles, animal pelts, fibres, and cordage has survived. The leather assemblage is the largest ever to be found in Scotland and has revealed a range of activities associated with the use of animal hides, from hide processing to tanning and shoemaking. The wood assemblage is also extensive and includes bowls, platters, coopered vessels and tools. Metalwork, crucibles, clay mould fragments and ceramics all testify to the industrial nature of the area, while the large quantities of animal and fishbone demonstrate that butchery on an industrial scale took place in the area. The excavation charts the changing nature of this once-peripheral area of Aberdeen, from an industrial zone in the medieval period, to horticultural and domestic spaces in post-medieval times, and has thus greatly enhanced our knowledge of Scottish urban development.

About the Author
Michael Roy currently works as a Project manager in the Post-Excavation sector at AOC Archaeology Group. After graduating from the University of Cambridge in 1993 and the University of Leicester in 1994, Michael has worked in archaeology across the UK, working for several years for the Scottish Urban Archaeological Trust and Essex County Council’s Field Archaeology Unit. Joining AOC Archaeology in 2004, he has directed substantial urban excavations in Edinburgh (Parliament House), Aberdeen (Bon Accord) and Dunbar, in addition to working in their Consultancy sector.
Barāqish/Yathill (Yemen) 1986-2007 Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration / Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies edited by Sabina Antonini and Francesco G. Fedele. DOI: 10.32028/9781789694703. Paperback; 205x290mm; 2 volumes: 398pp & 546pp; 700 figures, tables and plates. Contributions in English, Italian, and French. Chapter abstracts in English and Arabic. 732 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694703. £98.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694710. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The walled town of Barāqish in interior Yemen – ancient Yathill of the Sabaeans and Minaeans – was for Alessandro de Maigret (1943-2011) ‘one of the archaeological marvels not just of Yemen, but of the entire Near East’. Established as an oasis settlement in the semi-desert depression of the Jawf, it became in the 1st millennium BCE a thriving caravan station on the ‘incense’ route and a famed place of worship, controlled by rich rulers and merchants. Topography and trade made it a crucible of South Arabian and foreign traditions, and on several occasions, it was a border town disputed between rival powers. A sustained archaeological effort to investigate the site and area began in 1986 by the Italian Archaeological Mission, led by de Maigret, and developed in two phases. In 1989-1992 the temple of the patron god was excavated, while between 2003-2007 a range of new excavations were undertaken, including a second temple, a sounding, a dissection of the tell's edge outside the Minaean wall, and a cemetery.

Presented across two volumes, Volume 1: Excavations of Temple B and related research and restoration is particularly devoted to the temple of god ʿAthtar dhu-Qabḍ (Temple B), dated to the second half of the 1st millennium BCE. Six chapters fully illustrate its excavation, architecture, restoration, findings, inscriptions, and dating. The contribution of this work and monument to regional history transcends its local significance. The report is framed by ten chapters detailing the historiography of research on Barāqish, the initial surveys carried out in 1986-1987, the architecture and restoration of Temple A together with the extramural excavation at the adjacent curtain wall, the cultic equipment, and radiocarbon datings. The nine contributors are leading scholars in the above fields and include recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

The core of Volume 2: Extramural excavations in Area C and overview studies is a final report on Area C, an exploratory dissection through the western edge of the Barāqish mound outside the curtain wall, and a unique operation for Yemen until now. Eight chapters detail the excavation, stratigraphy, and geoarchaeology (from about 800 BCE to the present), in addition to radiocarbon chronology, cultural finds, animal and plant remains, economy, major historical events, and unique evidence for trade. Four further chapters offer a glimpse of settlement archaeology for Sabaean Yathill and the survey of a religious centre to the west, together with a first typology of Minaean pottery and an epigraphic and political-historical overview for Barāqish and the Jawf. The contributors are recognized experts in South Arabian archaeology.

About the Editors
Sabina Antonini heads the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen c/o Monumenta Orientalia (Rome). Since 1984 she has taken part in archaeological surveys and excavations of prehistoric sites in Khawlān al-Ṭiyāl and Ramlat al-Sabʿatayn and of South Arabian sites, including Yalā, Tamnaʿ, Ḥayd ibn ʿAqīl, and Barāqish. She is a specialist in South Arabian archaeology and history of art. Her contribution, ‘The Italian Archaeological Mission at Šibām al-Ġirās, Yemen’, has appeared in Festschrift in honour of Professor Mikhail Piotrovsky (2019). ;

Francesco G. Fedele has been Professor of Anthropology and Prehistoric ecology at the Università di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Naples, until retirement in 2011. As a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission to Yemen since 1984 he has conducted excavations in Khawlān al- Ṭiyāl and at Barāqish, with a particular focus on site geoarchaeology and archaeofaunas. His recent publications include ‘New data on domestic and wild camels in Sabaean and Minaean Yemen’ in Archaeozoology of the Near East 9 (2017).
Classification of Lithic Artefacts from the British Late Glacial and Holocene Periods by Torben Bjarke Ballin. Paperback; 205x290mm; 100 pages; 128 figures. 730 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698695. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698701. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

A system for the hierarchical Classification of Lithic Artefacts from the British Late Glacial and Holocene Periods is offered in this book. It is hoped that it may find use as a guide book for archaeology students, museum staff, non-specialist archaeologists, local archaeology groups and lay enthusiasts. To allow the individual categories of lithic objects to be classified and characterised in detail, it was necessary to first define a number of descriptive terms, which forms the first part of this guide. The main part of the book is the lithic classification section, which offers definitions of the individual formal debitage, core and tool types. The basic questions asked are: what defines Object X as a tool and not a piece of debitage or a core; what defines a microlith as a microlith and not a knife or a piercer; and what defines a specific implement as a scalene triangle and not an isosceles one? As shown in the book, there are disagreements within the lithics community as to the specific definition of some types, demonstrating the need for all lithics reports to define which typological framework they are based on.

The eBook edition of this publication is available in Open Access, supported by Historic Environment Scotland.

About the Author
After having worked as an archaeological specialist and Project Manager in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Norway, Torben Ballin relocated to Scotland in 1998. Since then, he has worked as an independent lithics specialist in Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland, representing the consultancy Lithic Research. Torben’s special interests have been lithic terminology and typology, lithic technology, chronological frameworks, raw material studies, intra-site spatial analyses, prehistoric territories and exchange networks, and Scotland’s Late Upper Palaeolithic and Early Mesolithic industries. His interest in lithic terminology and typology led to the production and publication of a number of works on general lithic typology within and outwith Britain.
Contribution of Ceramic Technological Approaches to the Anthropology and Archaeology of Pre- and Protohistoric Societies Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 12 Session IV-3 edited by François Giligny, Ekaterina Dolbunova, Louise Gomart, Alexandre Livingstone Smith and Sophie Méry. Paperback; 205x290mm; 112 pages; 44 figures, 3 tables. 5 papers in French, 2 in English. 729 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697094. £27.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697100. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The reconstruction of the technical systems of ceramic production and of its ‘chaîne opératoire’ is a means of exploring certain social structures in time and space. For many years, methodological procedures based on multidisciplinarity have made it possible to analyse both materials and methods of fabrication for this purpose. Session IV-3 organised at the 18th Congress of the UISPP in 2018 aimed to highlight the contribution of technological approaches to ceramics, both in archaeology and in ethnology, to the analysis of pre- and protohistoric societies. The case studies focus on the Neolithic and the European Bronze Age, but also on the megalithism of our era in Senegal.

Apport des approaches technologiques de la céramique à l’anthropologie et à l’archéologie des sociétés pré et protohistoriques
La reconstitution des systèmes techniques et des chaînes opératoires de production céramique est un moyen qui permet d’explorer certaines structures sociales dans le temps et l’espace. Depuis de nombreuses années, des procédures méthodologiques basées sur la pluridisciplinarité permettent d’analyser tant les matériaux que les méthodes de façonnage à cette fin. La session IV-3 organisée lors du 18e Congrès de l’UISPP en 2018 avait pour but de mettre en évidence l’apport des approches technologiques de la céramique, tant en archéologie qu’en ethnologie des techniques à l’analyse des sociétés pré et protohistoriques. Les études de cas portent essentiellement sur le Néolithique et l’âge du Bronze européen, mais aussi sur le mégalithisme de notre ère au Sénégal.
Neolithic and Bronze Age Studies in Europe: From Material Culture to Territories Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 13 Session I-4 edited by Marie Besse and François Giligny. Paperback; 205x290mm; 104 pages; 37 figures, 13 tables. 728 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697193. £27.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697209. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Neolithic and Bronze Age Studies in Europe: from material culture to territories presents eight papers from the 2018 UISPP Congress. Topics include the neolithisation process in the Iberian Peninsula; faunal exploitation in early Neolithic Italy; the economic and symbolic role of animals in eastern Germany; Copper Age human remains in central Italy; animal figurines; spatula-idols; territories and schematic art in the Iberian Neolithic; and finally Bronze age hoards at a European scale. The diversity of the papers reflects contemporary approaches and questions in those periods.

About the Editors
Marie Besse is Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Geneva and is Director of the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology at the same university. ;

François Giligny is Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University.
Between the 3rd and 2nd Millennia BC: Exploring Cultural Diversity and Change in Late Prehistoric Communities by Susana Soares Lopes and Sérgio Alexandre Gomes. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699227. Paperback; 205x290mm; 156 pages; 64 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 727 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699227. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699234. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Between the 3rd and 2nd Millennia BC: Exploring Cultural Diversity and Change in Late Prehistoric Communities is a collection of studies on the cultural reconfigurations that occurred in western Europe between the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC. It brings together seven texts focusing on the evidence from the West of the Iberian Peninsula, and one on the South of England. The texts have their origin in a landmark meeting held at the University of Coimbra in November 2018, where scholars explored the grand narratives explaining the differences between what are traditionally considered Chalcolithic (or Late Neolithic) and Bronze Age communities. The contributions look at key aspects of these grand narratives through regional perspectives, asking the following questions: is there clear data to support the idea of an intensification of social complexity towards the emergence of the Bronze Age chiefdoms? What is the role of monumental architecture within this process? How do we best discuss the different levels of architectural visibility during this period? How can we interpret collective and individual burials in relation to the emergence of individual/territorial powers? In answering these questions, the papers explore regional diversity and argue that regional specificities resist a general interpretation of the historical process at stake. In light of this resistance, the book emphasizes that cultural singularities only become visible through contextual, medium, or low-scale approaches. The recognition of singularities challenges grand narratives, but also carries the potential to expand our understanding of the changes that occurred during this key moment of Late Prehistory. The book thus offers readers the opportunity to think about the diversity of archaeological evidence in combination with an exploration of the available range of approaches and narratives. The critical intertwining of multiple points of view is necessary, because it gets us closer to how elusive the cultural differences of prehistoric communities can be. This elusive dimension is precisely what can force us to constantly rethink what we see and what questions we ask.

About the Editors
Susana Soares Lopes is a researcher at CEAACP – University of Coimbra (Portugal). She is a retired full professor in archaeology at the University of Porto (Portugal), where she taught from 1975 to 2013. Her research, focusing on the Late Prehistory of the Iberian Peninsula, has explored archaeological sites in northern Portugal by integrating a variety of theoretical orientations. She uses this plurality to promote and discuss different perspectives on Prehistory.

Sérgio Alexandre Gomes is a researcher at CEAACP - University of Coimbra (Portugal). His main interests lie in the history of archaeology, archaeological methods and theories, as well as the study of the Late Prehistory of the Iberian Peninsula, with a focus on the archaeology of wall enclosures and pit sites.
Earthen Construction Technology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 11 Session IV-5 edited by Annick Daneels and Maria Torras Freixa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 168 pages; colour throughout. 719 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697230. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697247. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Earthen Construction Technology presents the papers from Session IV-5 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The archaeological study of earthen construction has until now focused on typology and conservation, rather than on its anthropological importance. Earth is the permanent building material of humankind, and was used by the world’s earliest civilizations for their first urban programmes. The architectural and engineering know-how required to carry out these monumental achievements can only be obtained through archaeological research: extensive excavations with attention to architectural and structural features, and their collapse, coupled with typological, mineralogical, micromorphological, botanical, chemical, and mechanical studies of building materials. This line of research is recent, starting in the 1980s in Europe, but is rapidly growing and illustrated in this volume.

About the Editors
Annick Daneels, archaeologist, PhD (UGent, Belgium, and UNAM, Mexico), senior researcher at the Institute of Anthropological Research of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City. Since 1981 active in archaeological research in Central Veracruz, on the Mexican Gulf coast, with a focus on monumental earthen architecture since 2004. Director of four interdisciplinary projects on Mesoamerican Earthen Architecture since 2009, including excavations, preservation, experimental archaeology, and mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, botanical (pollen, phytoliths, macroremains), mechanical, and micromorphological analysis of archaeological and experimental construction samples. ;

Maria Torras Freixa, archaeologist, PhD (UB, Spain), independent researcher. Since 2013 active in archaeological research on the formation of premodern cities and urban planning, with a focus on Teotihuacan, in the Central Mexican Highlands. Team member of an interdisciplinary project in Teotihuacan since 2018, including fieldwork and geophysical surveys.
Garranes: An Early Medieval Royal Site in South-West Ireland by William O’Brien and Nick Hogan. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699197. Hardback; 205x290mm; 402 pages; 376 figures, colour throughout. 722 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699197. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699203. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Ringforts were an important part of the rural settlement landscape of early medieval Ireland (AD 400–1100). While most of those circular enclosures were farmsteads, a small number had special significance as centres of political power and elite residence, also associated with specialized crafts. One such ‘royal site’ was Garranes in the mid-Cork region of south-west Ireland. In 1937, archaeological excavation of a large trivallate ringfort provided evidence of high-status residence during the fifth and sixth centuries AD. The site had workshops for the production of bronze ornaments, with glass and enamel working as well as indications of farming. Pottery and glass vessels imported from the Mediterranean world and Atlantic France were also discovered. That trade with the Late Roman world is significant to understanding the introduction of Christianity and literacy in southern Ireland at that time.

This monograph presents the results of an interdisciplinary project conducted 2011–18, where archaeological survey and excavation, supported by various specialist studies, examined this historic landscape. Garranes is a special place where archaeology, history and legend combine to uncover a minor royal site of the early medieval period. The central ringfort has been identified as Rath Raithleann, the seat of the petty kingdom of Uí Echach Muman, recalled in bardic poetry of the later medieval period. Those poems attribute its foundation to Corc, a King of Munster in the fifth century AD, and link the site closely to Cian, son-in-law of Brian Bóruma, and one of the heroes of Clontarf (AD 1014). This study provides new evidence to connect the location of Rath Raithleann to high-status occupation at Garranes during the fifth and sixth centuries, and explores its legendary associations in later periods.

Includes contributions from Michelle Comber, Ian Doyle, Lenore Fischer, Kevin Kearney, Susan Lyons, Tim Mighall and Douglas Borthwick, Margaret Mannion, Ignacio Montero-Ruiz and Mercedes Murillo-Barroso, Róisín Nic Cnáimhín, Cian Ó Cionnfhaolaidh, James O’Driscoll, Edward O’Riordain, and Orla-Peach Power.

About the Authors
William O'Brien is Professor of Archaeology in University College Cork, Ireland. His research interests include the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age in Ireland, early mining and metallurgy in Atlantic Europe, upland archaeology, the study of hillforts and monumentality in the later prehistoric period. He has a particular interest in the prehistory of south-west Ireland, where he has conducted numerous research excavations. ;

Nick Hogan is a graduate of National University of Ireland Galway, where he completed a BA degree in Archaeology and a MA in Landscape Archaeology. In 2008, he was appointed Technical Officer for the Department of Archaeology in University College Cork, where he is responsible for teaching and support in the areas of archaeological fieldwork and computing. He is an experienced field archaeologist with a range of skills in excavation, land survey and geophysics.

Reviews
'This is an important publication that makes a signficant contribution to our understanding not only of this early medieval landscape but also of early medieval studies as a whole.'—Archaeology Ireland, Volume 35, Number 2, June 2021

'All told, this volume is handsomely published by Archaeopress with excellent figures, and also benefits from being freely accessible as an Open Access publication. Securing a hard copy while it is available, however, is advisable, as this is destined to be an indispensable landmark for the wider field. This truly seminal publication demonstrates the enduring value of long-term, landscape-scale field projects, which one may hope will become a regular feature of the research landscape for early medieval Ireland.'—Patrick Gleeson, Journal of Irish Archaeology, Volume XXX (2021)