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Excavations at Chester. The Northern and Eastern Roman Extramural Settlements Excavations 1990-2019 and other investigations by Leigh Dodd. Paperback; 205x290mm; 142 pages; illustrated throughout. 668 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 71. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696271. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696288. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Excavations at Chester: the northern and eastern Roman extramural settlements presents the results of fifteen archaeological investigations carried out within the canabae to the north and east of the Roman legionary fortress at Chester between 1990 and 2019. The results demonstrate that there was sparse development of the canabae to the north of the fortress during the 1st and 2nd centuries; instead, this area was predominantly used for the extraction of building materials⁠ – sandstone and clay. By the 3rd century, the final phase of usage took the form of a small cemetery, the first to be examined in this area. Subject to more constraints, the sites investigated within the eastern canabae close to the fortress produced limited evidence for urban plot divisions, whilst those further east provided evidence for the division and management of agricultural land forming the prata legionis.

About the Author
Leigh Dodd has worked in the commercial sector of archaeology since the early 1990s. During this time he has excavated a wide range of sites including many of the Roman and post-medieval periods, several of which have been published in regional and international journals. Additionally, he has written many finds reports for a wide-range of clients. He is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.

Reviews
'This is a lucid and business-like report on developer-funded digs in the northern and eastern environs of the legionary fortress at Chester. It brings together work by various archaeological contractors, an initiative of synthesis to be applauded, and complements recent publication of work south and west of the fortress.'—Nick Hodgson, Current Archaeology, Issue 370, January 2021
Scelte tecnologiche, expertise e aspetti sociali della produzione Una metodologia multidisciplinare applicata allo studio della ceramica eneolitica by Vanessa Forte. Paperback; 205x290mm; 148 pages; 101 figures, 17 tables. Italian text. 660 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696691. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696707. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Ceramic technology is a topic widely explored in archaeology, especially for its social inferences. This volume addresses the social aspects of production and the role of potters within prehistoric communities. The book focusses on the Copper Age when social complexity was incipient rather than developed, and ceramic production was not considered a formalised activity. Household and funerary pottery dated from the second half of the 4th to the end of the 3rd millennium BC unearthed from eight archaeological contexts located in the current area of Rome were analysed through a multidisciplinary study. An integrated approach of archaeometric investigation, trace analysis and experimental archaeology provided a framework of empirical data reflecting the transmission of technological choices among diverse ceramic traditions and the coexistence of different levels of expertise within productions related to household or funerary activities.

Petrographic analyses, XRF and XRD, led to an understanding of the ceramic recipes, their use and the firing technology used by Copper Age potters. The reference collection of technological traces relating to forming techniques, surface treatments and comb decorations allowed characterization of the craftspeople’s expertise. A potter’s skill is inferred in terms of the technical investment required at each stage of production or in shaping specific ceramic vessels. In light of these data, the pottery from the Copper Age contexts of central Italy suggests a recurring association between skilled productions and socially valued goods, as the vessels used in funerary contexts demonstrate.

About the Author
Vanessa Forte, following the completion of her PhD (2014) at Sapienza University of Rome, she spent two years as a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, Cambridge University. She currently collaborates to national and international research projects as a member of the Laboratory of Technological and Functional Analyses of Prehistoric Artefacts (LTFAPA), and is an Honorary Fellow at the Sapienza University of Rome.

Italian Description
La tecnologia ceramica è un argomento molto studiato in archeologia, soprattutto in relazione alla società. Questo volume si focalizza sugli aspetti sociali della produzione attraverso lo status dei vasai nelle comunità dell’Età del Rame, un periodo in cui la complessità sociale è incipiente e la produzione ceramica è considerata un’attività non formalizzata. La ceramica proveniente da otto contesti archeologici localizzati nell’area dell’attuale citta di Roma e occupati tra il IV ed il III millennio a.C., è stata analizzata attraverso uno studio multidisciplinare. Un approccio integrato di analisi archeometriche, traceologiche e archeologia sperimentale ha permesso di delineare le principali scelte tecnologiche di all’interno di diverse tradizioni stilistiche e la coesistenza di livelli di expertise artigianale nelle produzioni domestiche e funerarie.

Attraverso l’analisi petrografica, associata ad XRF e XRD è stato possibile definire le ricette ceramiche, il loro modo d’uso e le tecniche di cottura praticate dai vasai eneolitici. La collezione di riferimento, composta da tracce tecnologiche delle sequenze di messa in forma dei vasi, dei trattamenti delle superficie e delle decorazioni a pettine, ha permesso di isolare diversi livelli di expertise, definiti in base all’investimento tecnico richiesto per portare a termine specifiche sequenze di lavorazione nei diversi stadi del processo produttivo. I risultati di questa ricerca mostrano
Αthens and Attica in Prehistory: Proceedings of the International Conference, Athens, 27–31 May 2015 edited by Nikolas Papadimitriou, James C. Wright, Sylvian Fachard, Naya Polychronakou-Sgouritsa and Eleni Andrikou. Hardback; 698 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (273 colour plates). Papers in English (with Greek abstracts) or Greek (with English abstracts). 655 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696714. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696721. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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The numerous rescue excavations conducted in Athens and Attica by the Archaeological Service during and after the major construction projects of the 2004 Olympic Games brought to light significant new prehistoric finds which have transformed our understanding of the region in prehistory. However, despite their importance, the new discoveries had remained mostly unnoticed by the international community, as the results were scattered in various publications, and no synthesis was ever attempted. The goal of the 2015 international conference Athens and Attica in Prehistory, which was organized by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, the University of Athens (Department of Archaeology and History of Art), the Museum of Cycladic Art and the Ephorate of Antiquites of East Attica (Hellenic Ministry of Culture) was to gather scholars working in the region and present for the first time a survey of Attic prehistory which would include the most recent discoveries and integrate over a century of scholarship. The 668- page conference proceedings include over 66 papers in Greek and English with sections dedicated to topography, the palaeo-environment, the Neolithic, the Chalcolithic transition, the Early Bronze Age, the Middle and Late Bronze Age, as well as the contacts between Attica and its neighbouring regions. A series of new detailed maps, derived from an exhaustive GIS-related database, provide the most up to date topographical and archaeological survey of Prehistoric Attica. Athens and Attica in Prehistory provides the most complete overview of the region from the Neolithic to the end of the Late Bronze Age. Its importance goes beyond the field of Aegean prehistory, as it paves the way for a new understanding of Attica in the Early Iron Age and indirectly throws new light on the origins of what will later become the polis of the Athenians.

About the Editors
Nikolas Papadimitriou is a Research Associate and Lecturer at the Institute of Classical Archaeology, University of Heidelberg. Specializing in the prehistory and early history of Attica, death practices in the Bronze Age Aegean, Mediterranean interconnections, and the study of ancient craftsmanship, he currently co-directs research projects on prehistoric Marathon and Thorikos.

James C. Wright holds the William R. Kenan, Jr. Chair and is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania. He is currently director of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project and co-director of the University of Toronto Excavations at Kommos, both in Greece.

Sylvian Fachard, the former A. W. Mellon Professor of Classical Studies at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (2017–2020), is currently Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. He is the co-director of the Mazi Archaeological Project in Attica.

Naya Sgouritsa, Professor Emerita of Archaeology at the University of Athens, specializes in Mycenaean Archaeology. Since 2002, she has been director of the Lazarides excavations on the island of Aegina. Her main research interests focus on Mycenaean Attica, Late Bronze Age cemeteries and burial practices, pottery, and figurines.

Eleni Andrikou is the Head of the Ephorate of Antiquities of East Attica, Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports. She excavated at Arkhanes (Crete), and conducted numerous excavations in Thebes and Khaironeia (Boeotia), as well as in the Mesogeia and Laurion areas (Attica).
Domi militiaeque: Militär- und andere Altertümer Festschrift für Hannsjörg Ubl zum 85. Geburtstag edited by Günther E. Thüry. 150 figures; 4 tables; 4 plates (86 colour pages). Papers in German (3 in English). 644 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 68. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695328. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695335. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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This volume is in honour of the Austrian scholar Prof. Dr Hannsjörg Ubl. It contains a tabula gratulatoria, a bibliography and 24 contributions covering a wide range of topics. The focus being Greek and Roman, the volume includes papers about the Langobards, renaissance replicas of classical sculpture, and the archaeology of World War I. The 'classical' papers deal with Greek and Roman art and art looting; dogs in Greek and Roman warfare; Roman looking-glasses; erotic inscriptions of Gaulish spindle whorls; military equipment and dress accessories; Roman military history and the non-military archaeology of Raetia, Noricum and Pannonia.

Günther E. Thüry is a lecturer at the Department of Classical Studies at Salzburg University, specialising in Roman cultural history, archaeobiology, epigraphy and numismatics. His bibliography includes some 300 publications, including books on ancient coinage, Greek and Roman environmental history, Roman diet and Roman eroticism.

German Description
Dem österreichischen Archäologen Prof. Dr. Hannsjörg Ubl ist diese Festschrift gewidmet. Sie umfasst eine tabula gratulatoria, die Bibliographie des Jubilars und 24 Beiträge, die sich mit einem weiten Spektrum von Themen beschäftigen. Während ihr Schwerpunkt auf der griechischrömischen Antike liegt, widmen sich Aufsätze von Michael P. Speidel auch den Langobarden, von Kurt Gschwantler renaissancezeitlichen Nachbildungen griechisch-römischer Skulpturfunde und von Rupert Gietl und Reinfrid Vergeiner der Archäologie des Ersten Weltkriegs. Die Arbeiten zur klassischen Antike behandeln Themen der griechischen und römischen Kunst (Claudia Lang- Auinger, Erwin Pochmarski); den Kunstraub im Altertum (Ernst Künzl); den Einsatz von Hunden im Krieg (Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry); römische Spiegel (Lawrence Okamura); erotische Inschriften auf gallischen Spinnwirteln (Günther E. Thüry); militärische Ausrüstungs- und Bekleidungsgegenstände (Thomas Fischer, Christian Koepfer, José Remesal Rodríguez, Bernd Steidl, Paula Zsidi); die römische Militärgeschichte (Martin Mosser, Bernhard Palme, Michael A. Speidel, Zsolt Visy, Ekkehard Weber); und die zivile Kultur der Provinzen Rätien, Noricum und Pannonien (Gerald Grabherr, Renate Miglbauer, Beatrix Petznek, Peter Scherrer, Gerhard Waldherr und Magdalena Waser).

Günther E. Thüry ist Lehrbeauftragter am Fachbereich Altertumswissenschaften der Universität Salzburg. Er arbeitet vor allem über Themen der römischen Kulturgeschichte, Archäobiologie, Epigraphik und Numismatik. Zu seinen ca. 300 Veröffentlichungen zählen Bücher über antike Münzkunde, griechische und römische Umweltgeschichte, römische Ernährung und römische Erotik.
Old Oswestry Hillfort and its Landscape: Ancient Past, Uncertain Future edited by Tim Malim and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; 254 pages; 117 figures, 34 plates, 5 tables. Print RRP £45.00. 637 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696110. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696127. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Old Oswestry is considered to be one of England's most precious archaeological jewels, described by Sir Cyril Fox in the 1930s as 'the outstanding work of the Early Iron Age type on the Marches of Wales', and its design is unique amongst hillforts in the UK. Located on the edge of the Shropshire Plain and just a kilometre north of the market town of Oswestry, the hillfort (and its hinterland landscape) can trace activity through artefactual evidence back at least 5000 years, with the last 3000 years evident as earthworks. The reader will notice that little in the way of archaeological investigation has occurred within the hillfort, and indeed, more excavation took place when its internal space became a training ground for trench warfare during World War I than through any academic endeavour.

Old Oswestry Hillfort and its Landscape: Ancient Past, Uncertain Future, organised into 14 well-crafted chapters, charts the archaeology, folklore, heritage and landscape development of one of England's most enigmatic monuments, from the Iron Age, through its inclusion as part of an early medieval boundary between England and Wales, to its role during World War I when, between 1915 and 1918, over 4000 troops (including Oswestry's own great war poet Wilfrid Owen), were being trained at any one time for the Western Front.

This book also discusses in detail the recent threats to the monument's special landscape from insensitive development and its alternative potential to act as a heritage gateway for the recreational and economic benefit of Oswestry and surrounding communities.

About the Editors
Tim Malim is a graduate of the Institute of archaeology, London, and has worked in many parts of the UK and abroad as an archaeologist during a 40-year career. After working for Cambridge University and English Heritage as part of the Fenland Survey in the 1980s, he set up and directed the Archaeological Field Unit of Cambridgeshire County Council in the 1990s and was a course director at Cambridge University’s extra-mural department, Madingley Hall. Currently, he is head of the heritage team at SLR Consulting, a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and Chairman of the Federation of Archaeological Managers and Employers. He has excavated a wide range of sites, and his main research interests include British prehistory and the Anglo-Saxons, with specialist knowledge of the fens, wetland archaeology and its preservation, ancient routeways, and Anglo-Saxon dykes. He has published eight books and over 50 other articles, and is a resident of Oswestry, having moved to Shropshire in 2002.

George Nash is an Associate Professor at Geosciences Centre of Coimbra University ITM (Earth and Memory Institute), Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (IPT), Portugal, as well as working for SLR Consulting, an environmental planning consultancy based in the UK. His academic specialisms include the study of prehistoric and contemporary art, prehistoric architecture, mortuary practices, and buildings. In 2014 he was part of a successful HLF bid to excavate two sections of the practice trenching at Walney Island, Cumbria. For SLR Consulting, George has undertaken a number of projects for BAE Systems and the MoD including building assessments at six former Royal Ordnance Factories, the World War II Tank Factory at Manston Road, Leeds, and more recently, at former RAF Abingdon (now the British Army’s Dalton Barracks, west of Oxford). Since 2012, George has been an active member of the protest group HOOOH and has made an extensive study of the practice trenches in and around the hillfort
Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the Archaeology and History of Interaction in European Protohistory edited by Roxana-Gabriela Curcă, Alexander Rubel, Robin P. Symonds and Hans-Ulrich Voß. Paperback; 175x245mm; 164 pages; 60 figures (29 colour pages). Print RRP: £32.00. 641 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 67. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691030. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691047. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the archaeology and history of interaction in European protohistory asks the following questions: How did the ‘Barbarians’ influence Roman culture? What did ‘Roman-ness’ mean in the context of Empire? What did it mean to be Roman and/or ‘Barbarian’ in different contexts? The papers presented here explore the concepts of Romanisation and of Barbaricum from a multi-disciplinary and comparative standpoint, covering Germania, Dacia, Moesia Inferior, Hispania, and other regions of the Roman Empire. They deal with issues such as conceptual analysis of the term ‘barbarian’, military and administrative organization, inter-cultural and linguistic relations, numismatics, religion, economy, prosopographic investigations, constructing identities; and they present reflections on the theoretical framework for a new model of Romanisation.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel served at the Goethe Institute and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) in Romania before being appointed Senior Research Fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and Associate Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the Director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. His academic writings include cultural history and literary studies but focus mainly on ancient history and religion as well as on Roman archaeology. These are geographically centered on the fringes of the Empire and the ‘barbarian’ people who lived there.

Roxana-Gabriela Curcă is Assistant Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania and Director of the Department for Long Distance Learning at the Faculty of History. Her academic papers focus on ancient bilingualism, the language of Greek and Latin inscriptions and onomastics. She has been a visiting professor at a number of universities: State University of New York at Buffalo, UCLA, University of West Alabama (USA); National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Flinders University, Adelaide (Australia).

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main. He is responsible for the Iron Age, Roman and Migration Periods, and for editorial work. He is project coordinator of the ‘Corpus of Roman Finds in the European Barbaricum (CRFB)’. From 1985 to 1991 he was Scientific Assistant, at the Central Institute of Ancient History and Archaeology of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR, in the department of Pre- and Protohistory, at Berlin. He conducts research into the proto-history of Central Europe, and is a collaborator of the CRFB project.

Robin P. Symonds is a specialist in Roman ceramics and author of Rhenish Wares: Fine Dark Coloured Pottery from Gaul and Germany (1992). He was employed as a Roman pottery specialist for the Colchester Archaeological Trust (1981–1990), then for the Museum of London Archaeology Service (1991–2004) and thereafter in France at the Institut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (INRAP), based at Dijon. He retired from Inrap in 2015 and moved with his family to eastern Romania in 2017. He has reported on the ceramics from many different international sites, and has published numerous papers and reviews on aspects of Roman pottery research.
Working at Home in the Ancient Near East edited by Juliette Mas and Palmiro Notizia. Paperback; 175x245mm; 124 pages; 30 figures, 4 tables. 628 2020 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695915. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695922. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Working at Home in the Ancient Near East brings together the papers and discussions from an international workshop organized within the framework of the 10th International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East held in Vienna in April 2016. The volume examines the organization, scale, and the socio-economic role played by institutional and non-institutional households, as well as the social use of domestic spaces in Bronze Age Mesopotamia. The invited speakers – archaeologists, philologists, and historians specializing in ancient Mesopotamia – who approached these topics from different perspectives and by analyzing different datasets were encouraged to exchange their views and to discuss methodological concerns and common problems.

This volume includes seven archaeological- and philological-oriented essays focusing on specific sites and archives, from northern Mesopotamia to southern Babylonia. The contributions assembled in the present volume seek to bridge the gap between archaeological records and cuneiform sources, in order to provide a more accurate reconstruction of the Mesopotamian economies during the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC.

About the Editors
Juliette Mas is an archaeologist specializing in Near Eastern pre-classic pottery and domestic architecture. She completed her PhD in 2013 at Lyon 2 University (France) and was awarded a Post-doctoral fellowship (2013-2016) at the University of Liege (Belgium), where she was also a scientific collaborator. She is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the Collège de France (UMR 7192 - PROCLAC). Since 2001, she has been involved in various international archaeological missions in the Near East and has overseen the study and publication of Bronze age pottery collections from Syrian and Iraqi archaeological sites.

Palmiro Notizia is a post-doctoral researcher in Assyriology at the Università di Pisa. Previously, he was a JAE-Doctor fellow at the Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales (CSIC, Madrid) and a postdoctoral researcher at the Università degli Studi di Messina. His research interests focus on the social and economic history of Mesopotamia in the third and second millennia BCE. He has edited and studied unpublished cuneiform documents in the British Museum, the Yale Babylonian Collection, the Harvard Semitic Museum and the Cornell University Cuneiform Collections.
Bringing Down the Iron Curtain Paradigmatic Change in Research on the Bronze Age in Central and Eastern Europe? edited by Klára Šabatová, Laura Dietrich, Oliver Dietrich, Anthony Harding and Viktória Kiss. Paperback; 205x290mm; 186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (30 pages in colour). 610 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694543. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694550. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Bringing down the Iron Curtain: Paradigmatic changes in research on the Bronze Age in Central and Eastern Europe? presents the researches of scholars of different generations from twelve countries (Hungary, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Serbia, Croatia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Germany, USA, Canada, Austria) who participated in a session of the same title at the 20th Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists in Istanbul, 2014. The papers addressed the question of change in the approaches to Bronze Age research in the Central and Eastern European countries from different points of view. It has been a quarter of a century since the fall of communism in Central and Eastern Europe and the opening up of these areas to the West. With this process, archaeology saw a large influx of new projects and ideas. Bilateral contacts, Europe-wide circulation of scholars and access to research literature has fuelled the transformation processes. This volume is the first study which relates these issues specifically to Bronze Age Archaeology. The contributions discuss not only theoretical issues, but also current developments in all aspects of archaeological practice.

About the Editors
Klára Šabatová studied archaeology at Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic, and teaches prehistory there. Her research focuses on Bronze Age and landscape archaeology in Central Europe. Her interests include the processing of large quantities of pottery and settlement archaeology. She has led excavations on Neolithic and Bronze Age sites in Moravia. At present she is particularly concerned with Bronze Age chronology and burial rites.

Laura Dietrich studied prehistoric archaeology in Bucharest and Berlin. She has worked on projects from south-eastern Europe to the Levant, and since 2011 has been a Research Assistant at the German Archaeological Institute. Her research focuses on the archaeology of food and conflict.

Oliver Dietrich studied prehistoric archaeology in Berlin and works at the German Archaeological Institute. His research focus is the Neolithic and Bronze Age between south-eastern Europe and the Near East. His interests include archaeology of religion and cult, metallurgy, agents of craft in prehistory and distribution modes of prehistoric innovations.

Anthony Harding is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology at the University of Exeter, UK, and an Affiliate of the Philosophical Faculty of Charles University, Prague. He specialises in European Bronze Age archaeology and has written several books and many articles on various aspects of the Bronze Age. He has led excavations in Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania as well as Britain. In recent years he has worked extensively on the archaeology of salt exploitation.

Viktória Kiss is a senior research fellow of the Institute of Archaeology, Research Centre for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. She specialises in Central European Bronze Age archaeology. She has written a book about Middle Bronze Age Encrusted Pottery in Western Hungary, and edited several other volumes concerning the Bronze Age archaeology of the region. In recent years she has worked on pottery, metal production, bioarchaeology and mobility.
‘Scènes de Gynécées’ Figured Ostraca from New Kingdom Egypt by Joanne Backhouse. Paperback; 205x290mm; 136 pages; 170 figures approx. (Print RRP: £28.00). 600 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 26. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693454. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693461. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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‘Scènes de Gynécées’ Figured Ostraca from New Kingdom Egypt: Iconography and intent examines images of women and children drawn on ostraca from Deir el-Medina, referred to in previous scholarship as ‘Scènes de Gynécées’. The images depict women with children either sitting on beds in a domestic setting or in outdoor kiosks. The former are likely to show celebrations carried out in the home to mark the birth of a child. This may have included the bringing of gifts, mainly consumables and small household items. It is possible this was recorded in hieratic texts, also on ostraca, described in earlier research as gift-giving lists. The kiosk scenes may have depicted the place women gave birth in or more likely the place of confinement after birth. However, given the dense nature of settlement at Deir el-Medina it is possible these scenes were symbolic evoking the protection of Isis who nurtured Horus in the papyrus thicket of the Delta. In order to understand the purpose and intent of these images, repeat motifs are considered and their similarities to wall paintings within the village are examined. The objects are important as they represent rare examples of regional art, found only at Deir el-Medina. Also, women are the main protagonists in the scenes, which is unusual in Egyptian art as women are generally depicted alongside the male patron of the work, as his wife, daughter or sister. This publication represents the first systematic study of this material and it brings together ostraca from museums worldwide to form a corpus united contextually, thematically and stylistically.

About the Author
Joanne Backhouse completed her PhD at the University of Liverpool in 2016. Her research interests focus on depictions of non-royal women in ancient Egypt, both two and three-dimensional. She teaches in the Continuing Education department at the University of Liverpool and a variety of educational venues in the North West of England, focusing on the material culture of ancient Egypt.
Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit II: Coin Finds 2012–2016 / Late Roman and Early Islamic Pottery from Kom al-Ahmer by Michele Asolati, Cristina Crisafulli and Cristina Mondin with contributions by Maria Lucia Patanè and Mohamed Kenawi. Hardback; 205x290mm; xii+340 pages; 41 figures; 22 tables; 127 plates (88 colour pages). 592 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693966. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693973. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit were ideally placed to take advantage of the Mediterranean trade given their close proximity to the Egyptian ports of Thonis-Heracleion, Alexandria, and Rosetta during the Hellenistic, Roman, Late Roman, and early Islamic period. The social and economic vitality of the sites has been revealed during investigations undertaken by the Italian archaeological mission between 2012 and 2016 and published in Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt ca. 700 BC – AD 100.

This volume presents over 1070 coins (ca. 310 BC–AD 641) and 1320 examples of Late Roman and Early Islamic pottery, testimony to the considerable commercial activity in the region during the Late Antique period. Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit emerge as centers of an exchange network involving large-scale trade of raw materials to and from the central and eastern Mediterranean.

About the Authors
Michele Asolati is Associate Professor of Numismatics at the University of Padua. His research focuses on Late Roman and Early Medieval coinage and on the coin finds of the Mediterranean area, having published extensively on the subject.

Cristina Crisafulli is Curator of the Numismatic Collections of the Correr Museum in Venice. Her research focuses on the Roman coins of the third century AD and on coin finds of the Mediterranean area, especially North Africa.

Cristina Mondin is the coordinator of the Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit Archaeological Project and Manager of the Asolo Museum. She authored many articles on Roman and Late Roman pottery from contexts in Italy, Egypt, Turkey, and Croatia. Her research focuses on the economy and the trade in the Mediterranean.
Weaving in Stones: Garments and Their Accessories in the Mosaic Art of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity by Aliza Steinberg. Paperback; 205x290mm; 380pp; 321 figures in colour and black & white. (Print RRP: £55.00). 581 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693218. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693225. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Weaving in Stones: Garments and Their Accessories in the Mosaic Art of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity is the first book to trace and document the garments and their accessories worn by some 245 figures represented on approximately 41 mosaic floors (some only partially preserved) that once decorated both public and private structures within the historical-geographical area of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity. After identifying, describing and cataloguing the various articles of clothing, a typological division differentiating between men’s, women’s and children’s clothing is followed by a discussion of their iconographic formulae and significance, including how the items of clothing and accessories were employed and displayed and their ideological and social significance. The book is copiously illustrated with photographs of mosaics and other artistic media from throughout the Greek, Roman and Byzantine world, with particular emphasis on the examples from Eretz Israel.

About the Author
Dr Aliza Steinberg received her PhD from the Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University. Her academic research is focused on garments and their accessories in the Mosaic Art of Eretz Israel in Late Antiquity.
Ancient West Mexico in the Mesoamerican Ecumene by Eduardo Williams. Paperback; 205x290mm; 400pp; illustrated throughout (approx. 321 figures). 580 2019 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 12. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693539. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693546. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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This book presents a discussion of the culture history of ancient West Mexico from the time of the first human inhabitants until the last cultural developments that took place before the Spanish invasion in the 16th century. The overall narrative is played out within the context of the Mesoamerican ecumene; that is, the universe of cultural and social interactions that coalesced into one of the few pristine civilizations of the ancient world.

The book presents a long-overdue synthesis and update of West Mexican archaeology aimed at scholars, students and the general public. Ancient West Mexico in the Mesoamerican Ecumene is the first book about West Mexican archaeology written by a single author. Another unique feature of this book is that it follows a holistic approach that includes data and perspectives from sociocultural anthropology, ethnohistory, ethnoarchaeology, and general analogy with many ancient cultures within the Mesoamerican ecumene and beyond (including several of the Old World). The focus of interest is the relationship between West Mexico and the rest of the ecumene, and the role played by the ancient West Mexicans in shaping the culture and history of the Mesoamerican universe.

Ancient West Mexico has often been portrayed as a ‘marginal’ or ‘underdeveloped’ area of Mesoamerica. This book shows that the opposite is true. Indeed, Williams convincingly demonstrates that West Mexico actually played a critical role in the cultural and historical development of the Mesoamerican ecumene.

About the Author
Eduardo Williams has been involved in West Mexican archaeology and ethnohistory since receiving his BA degree in 1982. He obtained his PhD degree from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, in 1989. Williams joined the faculty of the Colegio de Michoacán (Zamora, Mexico) in 1990, where he holds the post of Professor in the Center for Archaeological Research. He has been a visiting scholar in the Department of Anthropology, University of California at Los Angeles (1988); the Middle-American Research Institute, Tulane University (New Orleans) (1998); and the Department of Anthropology, Tulane University (2012). The following books stand out among Williams’ contributions to West-Mexican archaeology: La sal de la tierra (Colegio de Michoacán, 2003; awarded the Alfonso Caso Prize the Mexican Institute of Anthropology and History [INAH]); Water Folk: Reconstructing an Ancient Aquatic Lifeway in Michoacán, Western Mexico (Archaeopress, 2014); and Tarascan Pottery Production in Michoacán, Mexico (Archaeopress, 2017).

Reviews
‘For far too long, west Mexican prehistory has been the poor stepchild of Mesoamerican studies. Eduardo Williams’ book demonstrates the connections between this neglected region and the better known areas of the Mesoamerican world. One of the strengths of Eduardo’s book is that he puts the history of archaeological and ethnographic research into perspective… Williams links west Mexican cultures and sites to the wider world of Mesoamerica. Other writers have either ignored the subject or only touched on it lightly. Eduardo documents the important connections. For those learning about the Mesoamerican world, these specific, documented connections are invaluable… I think this will be the “go-to” volume for anyone who wants either a broad overview or to compare different regions and developments (e.g. settlement, trade, social organization) through time…’' —Robert B. Pickering, Professor of Anthropology, The University of Tulsa, Oklahoma, February 2020

'Williams’ brid
Bridge of Civilizations: The Near East and Europe c. 1100–1300 edited by Peter Edbury, Denys Pringle and Balázs Major. Hardback; 176x250mm; xx+318 pages; 170 figures, 10 maps. 576 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693270. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693287. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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This volume brings together 22 of the papers presented at a conference held in Esztergom, Hungary, in May 2018 to coincide with the 800th anniversary of the crusade of King Andrew II of Hungary to the Holy Land in 1217–18. The theme, Bridge of Civilizations, was chosen to highlight aspects of the links and contrasts between Europe and the areas around the eastern Mediterranean that were visited and occupied by western crusaders and settlers in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, giving special attention to the evidence provided by archaeology and material culture, as well as historical sources.

The results of the joint Syrian-Hungarian Archaeological Mission (SHAM) to the Hospitaller castle of Margat (al-Marqab) highlighted in this volume include an up-to-date overview of the structural development of the site from 1187 to 1285, as well as particular studies of the wall paintings, cooking installations and pottery. SHAM’s recent rescue work at Crac des Chevaliers also provides the basis for studies of the water-management system and medieval burials revealed in its courtyard, while other papers examine the masonry marks and surviving evidence of medieval trebuchet damage at both castles. Other papers focus on the medieval castles of Karak (Jordan) and Jubayl (Lebanon), the medieval buildings of Latakia (Syria), the impact of the Crusades on buildings in Cairo, historic bridges in Lebanon, the medieval chapels of Yanouh-Mghayreh and Edde-Jbeil (Lebanon), piscinas in Crusader churches in the East, the images of donors found in medieval Lebanese churches, and the activity of late thirteenth-century Western metal-workers in Cyprus.

Papers focusing more particularly on historical sources include a new edition of a late eleventh- to twelfth-century pilgrimage itinerary from Hungary to the Holy Land, a discussion of two minor military orders in Hungary, and the portrayal of Sultan al-Kāmil in a contemporary western account of the Fifth Crusade.

About the Editors
Peter Edbury is Emeritus Professor of Medieval History in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. He has published widely on the history and institutions of the kingdoms founded by the crusaders in the Near East and has re-edited the legal treatises by John of Ibelin (2003) and Philip of Novara (2009).

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013).

Balázs Major is an archaeologist, Arabist and historian by training and holds a PhD from Cardiff University. He is the director of the Institute of Archaeology at Pázmány Péter Catholic University and a lecturer in the Department of Arabic Studies.
Great Cloister: A Lost Canterbury Tale A History of the Canterbury Cloister, Constructed 1408-14, with Some Account of the Donors and their Coats of Arms by Paul A. Fox. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+694 pages; 759 illustrations, full colour throughout. 595 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693317. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693324. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Great Cloister: A Lost Canterbury Tale presents a new study of the heraldry, genealogy and history of the Canterbury Cathedral cloister. It is the first comprehensive and complete study of this monument ever undertaken, and it provides a detailed chronology as well as many new insights into the families who were donors. The monument is revealed to have been the personal project of Archbishop Thomas Arundel (d.1414), an individual closely connected with the overthrow of King Richard II. The work as a whole provides considerable insights into the revolution of 1399 and the troubled reign of Henry IV as seen through the lens of individual families.

The cloister, as originally conceived, contained 856 heraldic shields, badges and devices of which 576 were unique. Some 365 families, principalities, religious foundations and other individuals both real and imagined were represented, some with more than one shield or device. More precisely, there were 252 families, 51 peerage families, 3 English royal families (Lancaster, York and Beaufort), 20 principalities, 12 religious foundations, 9 bishops, 7 saints, 3 heroes, 4 cities or towns, 2 priests, 1 monk and 1 for God himself (in the form of the Holy Trinity). The origins and evolution of each shield represented are considered in detail.

About the Author
Dr Paul A. Fox, FHS, FSA is a retired consultant physician, medical researcher and university lecturer. He is the honorary editor of Coat of Arms: Journal of the Heraldry Society, a former Chairman of the Heraldry Society, and an Academician of the Académie Internationale d’Héraldique.

Reviews
'...this is a splendid volume allowing the history and genealogy of the Canterbury cloister and its hundreds of associated individuals and families to stand in new and radiant light. It will remain as an indispensable vade mecum for long into the future.'—David Wright, The Antiquaries Journal

'Like the enterprises of the early antiquarians, this book will doubtless stand the test of time; it will be consulted by scholars for generations to come.'—Michael Carter, Journal of the British Archaeological Association, September 2020

'This book will prove a valuable reference for those interested in the Cloister.'—Philip Allfrey, The Coat of Arms, 2020 Volume 3, no.237
Les pratiques funéraires en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle by András Márton. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+528 pages; 322 figures, 382 maps. French text. 588 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 62. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693355. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693362. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £70.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Les pratiques funéraires en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle aims to give an overview of Roman burial practices in Pannonia during the Early Roman period. Among the different approaches proposed by R. Reece for the study of Roman cemeteries, this work focuses on the grave treatment and grave furnishing. The funerary practices are thus apprehended through the study of tomb structure, the selection and treatment of grave goods and human remains.

The book proposes a synthesis of the published finds to serve as a base for future research. The analysis consists of a documentary review (presented in the catalogue and numerous tables) as complete as possible from the published data, accompanied by a detailed analysis of the information available today to highlight the trends regarding the entire province but also the peculiarities that can be distinguished at the regional level. The analysis is supported by many graphics and maps. Many general trends, common to the western provinces of the Roman Empire, were detected but also many particularities linked to the economic and social situation of the communities, the different components of the population of Pannonia and the political and military history of the province.

About the Author
András Márton was born in Budapest. He holds masters degrees in History, and Archaeology (specializing in Roman provincial and Classical archaeology) from the Eötvös Lorand University, Budapest and a PhD from the Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest. He currently lives in France and is involved with research programmes at the Louvre and the Museum of Fine Arts, Lyon. His research interests are pottery studies and ancient funerary practices.

French Description:
Cette étude vise à donner une présentation des pratiques funéraires romaines en Pannonie durant le Haut-Empire. Parmi les différentes approches pour l’étude des cimetières romains, ce travail porte sur le traitement des tombes et leur mobilier. Les pratiques funéraires sont ainsi appréhendées à travers l'étude de la structure des tombeaux, la sélection et le traitement des mobiliers funéraires et des restes humains. L'objectif principal est de proposer une synthèse des découvertes publiées pouvant servir de base aux recherches à venir. L’analyse consiste en une revue documentaire (présentée dans le catalogue et détaillée au sein des tableaux) aussi complète que possible des données publiées, accompagnée d’une analyse détaillée des informations aujourd’hui disponibles, afin de mettre en évidence les tendances concernant toute la province, mais aussi les particularités régionales et locales. L'analyse est accompagnée par de nombreux graphiques et des cartes. Bien sûr, des tendances générales, communes aux provinces occidentales de l'Empire romain, ont pu être détectées, mais également de nombreuses particularités liées à la situation économique et sociale des communautés, aux différents groupes de population en Pannonie et à l'histoire politique et militaire de la province.

András Márton a étudié à l'Université Eötvös Lóránd à Budapest où il a obtenu deux diplômes de Master, l'un en Histoire et l'autre en Archéologie (spécialisé en Archéologie des provinces romaines et en Archéologie classique). Après avoir obtenu son diplôme, il a travaillé au Musée national hongrois puis au Musée des Beaux-Arts de Budapest. Il a soutenu sa thèse intitulée « Le rituel funéraire en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle en comparaison avec les provinces occidentales » summa cum laude à l'Université de Bretagne O
La naissance des cités-royaumes cypriotes by Thierry Petit. Paperback; 175x245mm; 168pp. 587 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693478. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693485. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Three theories vie to explain the causes, characteristics and chronology behind the emergence of Iron Age Cypriot city-kingdoms: Achaean, Phoenician and autochthonous. Privileged by scholars until as recently as the 1980s, the first linked the emergence of the Cypriot city-state to the great Achaean migrations at the end of the second millennium. Epic foundation myths, telling of cities founded by Achaean heroes returning from Troy, were seen as fabled versions of events unfolding ostensibly at the outset of the Iron Age. The writings of D.W. Rupp cast doubt on the Achaean theory, by placing these developments at a much later date (8th c. BCE) and tracing their origins to the growing influence of the Phoenicians. This hypothesis was hotly contested, giving rise to a third theory, according to which the Cypriot Iron Age was essentially a continuation of the island’s Bronze Age civilisation. The latter theory now holds sway and is scarcely ever contested. The Cypriot city-kingdoms that we observe in the historical period (7th-4th c. BCE) are said to have arisen, after a few decades of instability, as early as the 11th century. Their political and administrative structures would have undergone little more than consolidation in the 8th century, before enjoying their floruit during the Archaic and Classical periods and finally disappearing amid the Wars of the Diadochi at the start of the Hellenistic period.

By recasting these developments within the broader context of the re-emergence of state structures in the eastern Mediterranean, La naissance des cités-royaumes cypriotes reassesses the arguments advanced by champions of the received theory. It likewise situates the phenomenon within a firmer theoretical (i.e. anthropological) framework, intended to establish well-defined distinctions. Furthermore, it proposes a shared typology that can accommodate other political entities, traces of which are found throughout the Geometric period (11th-8th c. BCE). Not only does the archaeological evidence compel us to question whether events unfolded as suggested, it reinforces a more nuanced variant of the Phoenician theory. Various state markers, though abundant in the 8th century (Cypro-Geometric III), seem indeed conspicuously absent during Cypro-Geometric I and II. Excavations at one such city-state, the palace of Amathus, have yielded compelling indications as to when a lasting dynasty originally arose. From them, we can surmise that the Kingdom of Amathus was the first of its kind. While the process no doubt took several decades, under no circumstances did it occur before the 9th century BCE. This coincides, moreover, with the wave of resurgent state-building that swept the eastern Mediterranean and engulfed even more westerly regions like the Aegean.

À propos de l'origine des cités-royaumes cypriotes connues aux époques archaïque et classique (VIIe-IVe s. av.), trois théories s'affrontent, que l'on peut respectivement appeler la « théorie achéenne », la « théorie phénicienne » et la « théorie autochtone ». C'est cette dernière qui actuellement fait consensus. Selon ses défenseurs, les poleis de l'île auraient été constituées en royaumes dès le XIe s. en prenant pour base une organisation politique et socio-économique héritée de l'Âge du Bronze. Dans cet ouvrage, l'auteur entend démontrer que cette vision des choses est erronée et ne se fonde sur aucune évidence archéologique ou textuelle. En dépit d'une certaine hiérarchisation sociale visible dans les ensevelissements, les polities cypriotes du début de l'Âge du Fer (I-II) ne constituent pas des États, mais des entités moins centralisées que l
Digging Up Jericho Past, Present and Future edited by Rachael Thyrza Sparks, Bill Finlayson, Bart Wagemakers and Josef Mario Briffa SJ. Paperback; 205x290mm; 320pp. 584 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693515. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693522. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £54.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Digging Up Jericho: Past Present and Future, arising from a conference exploring the heritage, archaeology and history of the Jericho Oasis, includes contributions by 21 internationally significant scholars.

This is the first volume to offer a holistic perspective on the research and public value of the site of Jericho – an iconic site with a long and impressive history stretching from the Epipalaeolithic to the present day. Once dubbed the ‘Oldest City in the World’, it has been the focus of intense archaeological activity and media interest in the 150 years since its discovery. From early investigations in the 19th century, through Kathleen Kenyon’s work at the site in the 1950s, to the recent Italian-Palestinian Expedition and Khirbat al-Mafjar Archaeological Project, Jericho and its surrounding landscape has always played a key role in our understanding of this fascinating region. Current efforts to get the site placed on the World Heritage List only enhance its appeal.

Covering all aspects of work at the site, from past to present and beyond, this volume offers a unique opportunity to re-evaluate and assess the legacy of this important site. In doing so, it helps to increase our understanding of the wider archaeology and history of the Southern Levant.

About the Editors
Rachael Thyrza Sparks is Associate Professor and Keeper of the Institute of Archaeology’s Collections at University College London.

Bill Finlayson is Professor of Prehistoric Environment and Society in the Human Origins and Palaeoenvironments Research Group at Oxford Brookes University and a Visiting Professor in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Reading.

Bart Wagemakers is a lecturer in Ancient and Religious History at the Institute Archimedes at the University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht.

Josef Mario Briffa SJ is a lecturer at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome and a Roman Catholic priest.
The Cultures of Ancient Xinjiang, Western China: Crossroads of the Silk Roads edited by Alison V.G. Betts, Marika Vicziany, Peter Jia and Angelo Andrea Di Castro. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+206 pages; 214 figures (67 colour pages). 594 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694062. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694079. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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The Cultures of Ancient Xinjiang, Western China: Crossroads of the Silk Roads unveils the ancient secrets of Xinjiang, western China, one of the least known but culturally rich and complex regions located at the heart of Asia. Historically, Xinjiang has been the geographic hub of the Silk Roads, serving international links between cultures to the west, east, north and south. Trade, artefacts, foods, technologies, ideas, beliefs, animals and people have traversed the glacier covered mountain and desert boundaries. Perhaps best known for the Taklamakan desert, whose name translates in the Uyghur language as ‘You can go in, you will never come out’, here the region is portrayed as the centre of an ancient Bronze Age culture, revealed in the form of the famous Tarim Mummies and their grave goods. Three authoritative chapters by Chinese archaeologists appear here for the first time in English, giving international audiences direct access to the latest research ranging from the central-eastern Xiaohe region to the western valleys of the Bortala and Yili Rivers. Other contributions by European, Australian and Chinese archaeologists address the many complexities of the cultural exchanges that ranged from Mongolia, through to Kashgar, South Asia, Central Asia and finally Europe in pre-modern times.

About the Editor
Alison Betts, Professor of Silk Road Studies, University of Sydney, has worked on the archaeology of Central Asia for more than two decades and more recently on Xinjiang.

Marika Vicziany, Professor Emerita in Arts, Monash University, has specialised during the last four decades in Indian and Chinese culture and socioeconomic change.

Peter Weiming Jia, Research Fellow, University of Sydney, has for more than a decade studied the Bronze Age sites of Xinjiang.

Angelo Andrea Di Castro, Research Adjunct in Arts, Monash University, has been working on archaeological sites in Italy, Nepal, Australia and China for some three decades.

Reviews
'This is a major achievement in Xinjiang archeology. The editors and authors are to be warmly congratulated for making available to researchers worldwide a rich assemblage of raw data that has been carefully described and informatively analyzed. The forthright presentation of so much primary evidence for civilization during the Bronze and Iron Age constitutes a tremendous breakthrough in Xinjiang archeology.'—Victor Mair, Asian Ethnicity, Volume 22, 2021, Issue 1
Eν Σοφίᾳ μαθητεύσαντες: Essays in Byzantine Material Culture and Society in Honour of Sophia Kalopissi-Verti edited by Charikleia Diamanti and Anastasia Vassiliou. Paperback;205x290mm; 454pp; illustrated throughout (116 pages in colour). 593 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692624. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692631. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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En Sofía mathitéfsantes. Essays in Byzantine Material Culture and Society in Honour of Sophia Kalopissi-Verti contains a collection of thirty studies dedicated to Sophia Kalopissi-Verti by her students which celebrate the multifaceted academic and teaching career of Professor Kalopissi-Verti, Emerita of Byzantine Archaeology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. The contributions cover a large variety of topics presenting unpublished archaeological material, suggesting new approaches to various aspects of Byzantine archaeology, material culture and art history. Geographically topics span a vast area from Constantinople to South Sinai and from Cyprus and Antiocheia to the Aegean Islands, continental Greece and Italy. Covering the period from the Early Byzantine to the Post-Byzantine period, they are organised in seven thematic sections: Urbanism and Architecture; Painting and Iconography; Stone Carving and Sculpture; Ceramics; Bone, Metal and Textiles; Coinage and Sigillography; Inscriptions, Portraits and Patronage. The broad thematic, chronological and geographic scope of the volume’s essays reflects the wide range of Kalopissi-Verti’s pioneering research and her own interests, to which she introduced her students and with which she inspired them.

About the Editor Charikleia Diamanti obtained a PhD from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. She is curator of Byzantine Antiquities at the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Cyclades, Hellenic Ministry of Culture, specialising in pottery, settlements and economy of the Late Roman/Early Byzantine period.

Anastasia Vassiliou obtained a PhD from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. She is curator of Byzantine Antiquities at the Ephorate of Antiquities of Argolis, Hellenic Ministry of Culture, specialising in medieval pottery and aspects of everyday life.
Egypt in Croatia: Croatian Fascination with Ancient Egypt from Antiquity to Modern Times edited by Mladen Tomorad. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 369 illustrations in colour and black & white. 585 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 24. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693393. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693409. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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At first sight, it seems that ancient Egyptian history and culture have no meaningful ties with present-day Croatia. However, when we scratch beneath the surface of the common idea of Egypt, that of a distant and ancient civilisation, we notice that its elements have been present in Croatia ever since antiquity. Egypt in Croatia provides a closer look at many aspects of the presence and fascination of ancient Egyptian culture in Croatia, from antiquity to the present. The topics explored are the artefacts discovered in present-day Croatia (mostly from the early 19th century), Croatian travellers to Egypt from the 16th to the middle of the 20th century, Egyptian collections in Croatia and early collectors from the 1820s until the 1950s, an overview of the development of Egyptology of study within Croatia as well as the various elements of ‘Egyptomania’ found in Croatia, mostly from the beginning of the 19th century.

About the Editor
Mladen Tomorad is a senior researcher and professor of Ancient History at the Department of History, University of Zagreb. He has a masters degree in History and a PhD in Ancient History and Museology, and he has also studied Egyptology at the University of Manchester.
Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt ca. 700 BC – AD 1000 edited by Mohamed Kenawi. Hardback; xxviii+350 pages; 358 figures, 52 tables. (Print RRP £65.00). 575 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692983. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692990. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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With contributions by Cristina Mondin, Michele Asolati Louise Bertini, Audrey Eller, Urška Furlan, Ole Herslund, Israel Hinojosa Baliño, Marie-Caroline Livaditis, Giorgia Marchiori, Marcus Müller, Benjamin T. Pennington and Amy Wilson.

In 2012, fieldwork began at two large sites in the Beheira Province in the western Nile Delta: Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit (ancient Metelis). Being close to the important ports of Thonis-Heracleion, Alexandria, and Rosetta meant that they had been ideally placed to take advantage of the trade between the Mediterranean and Egypt. The sites are being thoroughly investigated to reveal their archaeological significance.

Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt presents the results of the Italian archaeological mission between 2012 and 2016. It provides details of the survey and excavation results from different occupation phases. A complete town beneath the Nile silt was revealed using a combination of modern scientific techniques. Hellenistic houses and a temple enclosure wall were investigated at Kom Wasit; while at Kom al-Ahmer, a Late Roman house, an amphora storage building, a cistern and an early Islamic cemetery were revealed.

Dating from the Late Dynastic to the Early Islamic period, the remains found at Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit demonstrate for the first time the rich archaeological heritage of this region.

About the Editor
Mohamed Kenawi is a Researcher and Training Manager at the School of Archaeology, University of Oxford, for the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa project. He was Head Researcher (2011–16), followed by Acting Director (2016–17), of the Hellenistic Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria. He taught at the American University in Cairo and at Catania University. He has participated in various archaeological missions in Libya, Italy, and Egypt, among them those at Kom al-Ahmer/Kom Wasit, Athribis, Dionysias, and Manqbad. He currently collaborates on projects with Padua University and Tübingen University. He has published various articles about his research, in addition to his monograph, Alexandria’s Hinterland: Archaeology of the Western Nile Delta, Egypt (2014). He published a co-authored book with G. Marchiori entitled Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology: the Italian Contribution (2018). He is Egypt Coordinator for the Manar al-Athar open access photo-archive.
Settlements and Necropoleis of the Black Sea and its Hinterland in Antiquity Select Papers from the Third International Conference ‘The Black Sea in Antiquity and Tekkeköy: An Ancient Settlement on the Southern Black Sea Coast’, 27-29 October 2017, Tekkeköy, Samsun edited by Gocha R. Tsetskhladze and Sümer Atasoy. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+302 pages; 299 figures, 13 tables. 573 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692068. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692075. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Settlements and Necropoleis of the Black Sea and its Hinterland in Antiquity contains a selection of some two dozen of the papers from an international conference held in October 2017 at Tekkeköy in Samsun, ancient Amisos, on the Turkish Black Sea coast. The archaeology sessions included presentations not only on the Tekkeköy/Samsun region but also on other parts of the Black Sea. They were presented by participants from Bulgaria, France, Georgia, Romania, Russia, Turkey and the United Kingdom. The selection offered here includes almost all of the contributions on archaeology and ancient history. The papers cover all shores of the Black Sea, studying (once again), the establishment dates of some Greek colonies, East Greek transport amphorae, the Black Sea on the Tabula Peutingeriana, the history of Tekkeköy, a Sinopean from Tomis, imports at Açic Suat (Caraburun), arrowhead and dolphin-shaped monetary signs from Berezan, the pre-Roman economy of Myrmekion, the necropolis of Porthmion, Artyushchenko-1 settlement on the Taman Peninsula, South Pontic imports at Classical sites in Ajara, recent excavations in Gonio-Apsarus, the Alaca Höyük Chalcolithic culture in coastal settlements, the Baruthan Tumuli at Amisos, iron finds from the Fatsa Cıngırt Kayası excavations, new excavations at Amastris, ancient Sebastopolis, politics and diplomacy in Paphlagonia, the Great Göztepe tumulus in Paphlagonia, Amasya-Oluz Höyük, the Iron Age sites of Zile district, Byzantine finds at Komana, glass bracelets from Samsun Museum, and dating the Kavak Bekdemir Mosque in Samsun.

About the Editors
Prof. Gocha Tsetskhladze (PhD Moscow, DPhil Oxford) is a classical archaeologist who specializes in ancient Greek colonisation and the archaeology of the Mediterranean, the Black Sea, Caucasia, Anatolia, and Central and Eastern Europe in the 1st millennium BC. For more than 20 years he has excavated several Greek colonial sites around the Black Sea (in Georgia, Russia, and the Ukraine). He is currently affiliated with the University of Nottingham, as well as the International Hellenic University in Thessaloniki and the University of Bucharest.

Prof. Emeritus Sümer Atasoy (PhD Istanbul) is a classical archaeologist and a specialist in museum studies and cultural heritage. He has excavated many sites in Anatolia, including Amisos/Samsun, one of the principal Greek colonies on the southern Black Sea coast. For more than ten years he has been director of excavations at Tios, the only Greek colony in the southern Black Sea not to have been overbuilt.
Maritime-Related Cults in the Coastal Cities of Philistia during the Roman Period Legacy and Change by Simona Rodan. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+212 pages; 40 figures (26 pages in colour). 571 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 60. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692563. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692570. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Maritime-Related Cults in the Coastal Cities of Philistia during the Roman Period questions the origins and the traditions of the cultic rites practised during Roman times along the southern shores of the Land of Israel. This area was known since biblical times as ‘Peleshet’ (Philistia), after the name of one of the Sea Peoples that had settled there at the beginning of the Iron Age. Philistia’s important cities Jaffa, Ashkelon, Gaza and Rafiah were culturally and religiously integrated into the Graeco-Roman world. At the same time, each city developed its own original and unique group of myths and cults that had their roots in earlier periods. Their emergence and formation were influenced by environmental conditions as well as by ethno-social structures and political circumstances. Philistia’s port cities served as crossroads for the routes connecting the main centres of culture and commerce in ancient times. Most of their cults were closely associated with the sea, and reflect the existential dependency of the inhabitants on the sea that supplied them with sustenance and livelihood and was regarded as a divine beneficent power. The myths also echo the lives of the sailors, their beliefs and fears derived from encountering the dangers of the sea: storms, floods, reefs and giant fish portrayed as monsters. The population of the cities was of mixed and varied ethnic and cultural origins. This was the result of the waves of conquests and migrations over the ages, yet each city was noted for its unique ethnic components. The book also deals with the political circumstances, which had a decisive impact on the formation of religious life and cultic rites in all four cities. It sheds new light to the understanding of the events and historical processes in the region.

About the Author
Simona Rodan is a historian whose field of research are the beliefs, customs and cultic practices in the ancient Mediterranean world, and their reflection in literature and art from the ancient period to the modern times. She holds a PhD in Maritime Civilizations from the University of Haifa. Rodan is the author of The Goddess of Luck, the City and the Sea: The Cult of Tyche and Fortuna in the Coastal Cities of Eretz Israel (2014) (in Hebrew) and Aegean Mercenaries in Light of the Bible: Clash of Cultures in the Story of David and Goliath (2015).
Experimental Archaeology: Making, Understanding, Story-telling Proceedings of a Workshop in Experimental Archaeology: Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens with UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture, Dublin (Athens, 14th-15th October 2017) edited by Christina Souyoudzoglou-Haywood and Aidan O'Sullivan. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+106 pages; 96 figures, 1 table (59 pages in colour). (Print RRP £28.00). 570 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693195. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693201. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Experimental Archaeology: Making, Understanding, Story-telling is based on the proceedings of a two-day workshop on experimental archaeology at the Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens in 2017, in collaboration with UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture. Scholars, artists and craftspeople explore how people in the past made things, used and discarded them, from prehistory to the Middle Ages. The papers include discussions of the experimental archaeological reconstruction and likely past experience of medieval houses, and also about how people cast medieval bronze brooches, or sharpened Bronze Age swords, made gold ornaments, or produced fresco wall paintings using their knowledge, skills and practices. The production of ceramics is explored through a description of the links between Neolithic pottery and textiles, through the building and testing of a Bronze Age Cretan pottery kiln, and through the replication and experience of Minoan figurines. The papers in this volume show that experimental archaeology can be about making, understanding, and storytelling about the past, in the present.

Aidan O’Sullivan is a Professor of Archaeology at University College Dublin, Ireland. He is Director of the UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture and established the School of Archaeology’s MSc in Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture in 2016. His research interests focus on early medieval Ireland, AD 400-1100, in its northwest European context; Experimental Archaeology and Material Culture studies; and Wetland Archaeology and Environments globally. He is the author and co-author of 13 books, including Early Medieval Ireland, AD 400-1100. The evidence from archaeological excavations (Royal Irish Academy, 2013) and co-edited The Oxford Handbook of Wetland Archaeology (Oxford University Press, 2012).

Christina Souyoudzoglou-Haywood is Director of the Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens (IIHSA) and Adjunct Lecturer in the School of Classics, University College Dublin. Her main research area is the Late Bronze Age of Greece, particularly the western periphery of the Mycenaean world, focusing on the Ionian island of Kephalonia, where she has been conducting a diachronic fieldwalking survey since 2003. For many years Curator of the Classical Museum, UCD, she has published on its history and contents as well as on Greek and Cypriot antiquities in other Irish museum and university collections.

Reviews
'Experimental Archaeology: Making, Understanding, Story-telling' is a short edited volume that should be of interest to students, archaeologists, and craftspeople who want to learn more about the technical details of certain European Bronze Age technologies derived through experimental archaeology.'—David P. Walton, Ethnoarchaeology, February 2021
Listening to the Stones: Essays on Architecture and Function in Ancient Greek Sanctuaries in Honour of Richard Alan Tomlinson edited by Elena C. Partida and Barbara Schmidt-Dounas. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+264 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (45 pages in colour). 565 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690873. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690880. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Listening to the Stones: Essays on Architecture and Function in Ancient Greek Sanctuaries in Honour of Richard Alan Tomlinson deals with a range of topics that relate to the broad scope of Richard Tomlinson’s archaeological quests and echoes his own methodology in research. Innovative masonry modes, matters of style and orders, proportions and design principles, as well as the inter-regional connections which fostered the transmission of architectural traditions and technical know-how have been cardinal points in Tomlinson’s writings and lectures, as much as the Greek foundations on foreign soil, the forethought in planning, achievements in the field of engineering and the interaction between the secular, the sepulchral and the sacred premises in an ancient city. The conservative or progressive attitudes of a society usually leave an imprint on architectural creations. So, architecture is subject to evolution along with the developing societies. Its gradual changing signifies the building programs taken up by ancient communities. Within this frame, we better comprehend the function of public edifices, the remodeling of cult sites in accordance with historic circumstances, the role of politics in architecture. This book is a token of appreciation of a British professor of archaeology, who spread knowledge of the Greek civilization, manifesting the brilliant spirit of the versatile ancient Greek builders.

About the Editors
Elena C. Partida is research archaeologist at the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports, and adjunct professor at the University of Patras. She holds MA and PhD from the University of Birmingham. Trained by the Academic Staff Development Unit in ‘Teaching, assessing students and presentation skills’, she lectured on Classical archaeology at Birmingham University, as assistant to the head of the Department, Prof. R.A. Tomlinson. Elena attended seminars on Roman architecture at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts and the course ‘Interventions to monuments and historic settlements’ organised by the European Centre for the Precaution and Prognosis of Earthquakes. On the Acropolis of Athens E.P. was responsible for the documentation of architectural disiecta membra within the European project ‘Network of archaeological sites in Athens’. Appointed Curator of Antiquities at Delphi, E.P. carried out a study on the Delphi Museum Re-Exhibition (awarded with the Best Practices distinction), in parallel to studies on the restoration and consolidation of ancient monuments at Delphi; she also designed the installation of open-air exhibitions. As a curator of Patras Archaeological Museum, E.P. is in charge of interdisciplinary international collaborative projects involving cultural patrimony, new finds and new technologies.

Barbara Schmidt-Dounas studied classical archaeology, ancient history and prehistory at the Universities Johann Wolfgang von Goethe at Frankfurt/Main and Georg August at Göttingen in Germany. She was a scientific collaborator at the University Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in Frankfurt/Main – Germany within the project ‘Donations offered by Hellenistic Kings to Greek Cities and Sanctuaries’ which was funded by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) (1984-1986). Barbara was a lecturer and later an assistant and Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; in 2006 shewas appointed Professor of Classical Archaeology at the same University. Barbara is a member of the founding board of the Interdisciplinary Centre of Archaeological Studies ‘Manolis Andronikos’ (ΔΙ.ΚΕ.Α
Geophysical Phenomena and the Alexandrian Littoral by N. Evelpidou, C. Repapis, C. Zerefos, H. Tzalas and C. Synolakis. Hardback; 175x245mm; x+132 pages; 51 figures, 2 tables (51 pages in colour). 561 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692341. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692358. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Alexandria is located on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt, bordered by Egypt’s Western Desert and the fertile Nile Delta. For many centuries, Alexandria was the major port city in the Eastern Mediterranean and it has been repeatedly struck by natural disasters, such as earthquakes, tsunamis and land subsidence, in its ~2400-year history. This book focuses on the geomorphological and archaeological evidence on the coastal zone of Alexandria, attempting to provide a comprehensive review of its evolution, taking into consideration long-term and short-term factors.

The book provides an extensive background on the geomorphology and recent geoarchaeological history of Alexandria, discussing historical maps and natural disasters. In the coastal area of Alexandria there is numerous archaeological evidence, such as burial sites, quarry activities and ancient building remnants, as well as geomorphological features, all revealing a complex evolution of the coastal zone. New evidence, such as fish tanks and ship wrecks in order to discuss the Late Holocene evolution of the coastal zone. Detailed illustrations and maps accompany the book chapters providing the reader the opportunity to gain an extensive view of Alexandria’s features.

About the Authors
Niki Evelpidou is a Professor of Geomorphology and Geoinformatics at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Faculty of Geology and Geoenvironment, and Faculty Affiliate of the Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences of the College of Charleston, USA. Prof. Evelpidou is actively involved in the research fields of geomorphology, coastal geomorphology, sea level changes, palaeogeography, geology, spatial technologies, study and modelling of natural hazards, while emphasizing on the use of new technologies and innovation.

Christos Repapis was Director of the Research Centre of Atmospheric Physics and Climatology of the Academy of Athens (1985-2005) and has remained as Research Associate of the Centre since his retirement.

Christos Zerefos heads the Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens and is president-elect of the General Assembly of the Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation. Other roles academic posts include Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Physics (Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki), Visiting Professor (Universities of Minnesota and Boston) and Samarbeidspartnere (University of Oslo).

Harry Tzalas has conducted a range of innovative experimental archaeological studies relating to ancient sea vessels. In 1997 he formed the Hellenic Institute of Ancient and Mediaeval Alexandrian Studies and obtained a concession from the Egyptian Authorities for an underwater survey of 14 kilometers of the eastern littoral of Alexandria; 28 campaigns were successfully conducted.

Costas Synolakis is Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Southern California and a a member of the Academy of Athens holding the Chair of Earth Sciences. His research studies the impact of natural hazards, and particularly tsunamis and extreme flooding events on beaches. He has participated or led 30 scientific expeditions in 21 countries, practically in all of the world’s oceans and seas.
The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual by Glennise West. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 362 figures (colour and black & white), 1 table. 539 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 23. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691825. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691832. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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What is the Tekenu? What was its function? What are its origins? These are questions upon which Egyptologists have long pondered. However, Egyptologists, until now, have avoided any major work on the topic. Previous treatments of the Tekenu largely adopt a selective approach focusing on a specific form. Rarely has the Tekenu been examined profoundly in all of its forms or contexts with its possible origins commented upon merely in passing. The aim of The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual is to provide a provocative examination and interpretation of the Tekenu in an endeavour to proffer plausible answers hitherto eluding scholars. Attested from the Fifth Dynasty until, and including the Saite Period, the Tekenu is a puzzling icon which is depicted within the funerary scenes in the tombs of some ancient Egyptian nobles. In this work four distinct types of Tekenu are identified and classified and then a Corpus Catalogue is formed. The Tekenu is appraised within the context of the wall scene. Two tombs are dealt with in greater detail.

About the Author
Glennise West graduated from the University of Sydney and taught English and History at secondary school level. Later she followed her lifelong interest in ancient Egypt obtaining MA and PhD from Macquarie University, Sydney. The topic of this book was the subject of her PhD dissertation. She lives in Sydney.

Reviews
'The great worth of this volume is that it gathers all the sources for the tekenu in one place and presents them with copious illustrations, many of them in colour. The catalogue is certainly the longest and most-detailed part of the book and will be of considerable use to anyone who is interested in Egyptian funerals and their representation on tomb walls.'—Christian Knoblauch, Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt, Volume 56, 2020
Tracing Pottery-Making Recipes in the Prehistoric Balkans 6th–4th Millennia BC edited by Silvia Amicone, Patrick Sean Quinn, Miroslav Marić, Neda Mirković-Marić and Miljana Radivojević. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+182 pages; 109 figures; 19 tables. 562 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692082. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692099. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Tracing Pottery-Making Recipes in the Prehistoric Balkans 6th–4th Millennia BC is a collection of twelve chapters that capture the variety of current archaeological, ethnographic, experimental and scientific studies on Balkan prehistoric ceramic production, distribution and use. The Balkans is a culturally rich area at the present day as it was in the past. Pottery and other ceramics represent an ideal tool with which to examine this diversity and interpret its human and environmental origins. Consequently, Balkan ceramic studies is an emerging field within archaeology that serves as a testing ground for theories on topics such as technological know-how, innovation, craft tradition, cultural transmission, interaction, trade and exchange. This book brings together diverse studies by leading researchers and upcoming scholars on material from numerous Balkan countries and chronological periods that tackle these and other topics for the first time. It is a valuable resource for anyone working on Balkan archaeology and also of interest to those working on archaeological pottery from other parts of the world.

Silvia Amicone, lead editor, is a scientific researcher at the University of Tübingen within the Competence Centre Archaeometry Baden-Württemberg (CCA-BW), and an Honorary Research Fellow at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London (UCL). She completed an AHRC-funded doctoral research at the Institute of Archaeology, UCL, as member of the cutting-edge international project ‘The Rise of Metallurgy in Eurasia’. Her research focuses on archaeomaterials, particularly on the analysis of pottery technology in contexts of intense socio-cultural innovation.
Stamps on Terra Sigillata Found in Excavations of the Theatre of Aptera by Martha W. Baldwin Bowsky. Paperback; 175x245mm; ii+208 pages; 98 colour figures. 560 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 54. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692389. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692396. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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Stamps on Terra Sigillata Found in Excavations of the Theatre of Aptera presents a group of stamped fragments of Italian and eastern sigillata found in excavations of the Theatre of Aptera (Crete). A total of 258 stamped sherds have been discovered and identified: 28 already published by the author and another 230 included here. Aptera now yields more stamped fragments of terra sigillata than any other Cretan city to date, including Knossos.

The sigillata stamps from the Theatre of Aptera can be analysed so as to address a series of fundamental questions. Three of these constitute traditional uses of the evidence available from an analysis of terra sigillata: which potters supplied the Theatre of Aptera and its environs; where these potters were active; when these potters were active and therefore what production centres supplied the Theatre of Aptera and its area over time. Two more questions go further, in an effort to take advantage of this kind of material’s ability to testify to patterns of contact and exchange, as well as to details of life within the Roman imperial system: what distribution patterns might have brought terra sigillata to the Theatre of Aptera and its vicinity; and whether we can suggest how terra sigillata was consumed in Aptera’s Theatre and its environs.

Aptera’s Theatre was a venue not only for performances but for drinking, eating, and serving, on the part of theatregoers, spectators, actors and other performers. These activities took place during a period of prosperity for Roman Aptera in the first and second centuries, a period that coincides nicely with the production and distribution of terra sigillata. The people of Aptera and the surrounding area took full advantage of Crete’s strategic position amid crossroads of transit and exchange as well as integration into the Roman economy, to display their prosperity and status in public and in private.

About the Author
Martha W. Baldwin Bowsky is a Professor Emerita of Classical Studies, retired from the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California; she now lives and pursues research from a base in High Point, North Carolina. She graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. She began her career as an epigraphist when she was involved in field research on Crete in 1979 and 1980, while preparing a doctoral dissertation on the Julio-Claudian governors of the province of Creta-Cyrenae. After a year at the University of California at Davis, she enjoyed a full career of teaching and research at University of the Pacific; she remains an active scholar and participant in international conferences. Throughout her career she has been active in epigraphical research on the archaeological sites and in the storerooms and museums of Crete, with a particular interest in the Roman period on the island. Her focus has turned from top-down studies of provincial administration to bottom-up studies of the material culture of the island as an active participant in the Roman empire. She has authored a significant number of articles both publishing new inscriptions – on stone and on pottery – and also setting these and other Cretan inscriptions into their historical and archaeological contexts.

Reviews
'Issues with this work are few…  a testament to the thorough and precise research of Baldwin Bowsky. […] The publication of the stamped sigillata from Aptera expands this knowledge, especially for the role played by the city in trade networks both on and off the island.'—Jane Francis, American Journal of Arc
The Lost Abbey of Eynsham by Steve Parrinder. Paperback; 175x245mm; 300pp; 298 illustrations. 554 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692501. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692518. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

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The Lost Abbey of Eynsham will be of interest not just to local historians but to those with an interest in the development of monasticism and medieval art and architecture, particularly the Romanesque. Eynsham was one of the few religious foundations in England in continuous use from the late Saxon period to the Dissolution. Its first Benedictine Abbot was the internationally renowned scholar and teacher, Aelfric, and it was frequently visited by medieval kings given its close proximity to the royal hunting lodge of Woodstock. Hugh of Avalon, later canonised, was appointed Bishop of Lincoln at a royal council at Eynsham in 1186. Shortly afterwards the abbey achieved fame with the Vision of the Monk of Eynsham which is said to have influenced Dante. Its reputation was further enhanced when Eynsham acquired an important relic, the arm of St Andrew in 1240. In the later Middle Ages, the abbey went into decline and was beset by scandal. It surrendered to the Crown in 1538 and the huge structure was gradually demolished and pillaged for its building materials. Now, nothing remains in situ above ground. This book aims to rescue this important abbey from obscurity by summarising its history and examining the material remains of Eynsham Abbey, most of which have never been published before.

About the Author
Steve Parrinder read History at Kings College London before securing a PGCE and becoming a teacher in 1970. For 30 years he was at Richmond-upon-Thames College where he taught History and Archaeology and ended his professional career in 2007 as Programme Manager for Humanities. His MA in Medieval Studies was taken at Birkbeck College, London, in 1982 and his dissertation (unpublished) was on Romanesque Sculpture from Reading Abbey. He moved to Eynsham, Oxfordshire, at the end of 2012 where he is now an active member of the Eynsham History Group and has written a number of articles for the Eynsham Record. He is married with two daughters and three grandchildren.

Reviews
'This is a rather special book, and no mistake. Without ever losing sight of the core thread of the physical evidence, [the author has] managed to bring the whole story of the abbey to life, and make it so readable into the bargain. I particularly like the new material on the Post-Dissolution period.'—Alan Hardy, archaeologist, December 2019