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Contribution of Ceramic Technological Approaches to the Anthropology and Archaeology of Pre- and Protohistoric Societies Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 12 Session IV-3 edited by François Giligny, Ekaterina Dolbunova, Louise Gomart, Alexandre Livingstone Smith and Sophie Méry. Paperback; 205x290mm; 112 pages; 44 figures, 3 tables. 5 papers in French, 2 in English. 729 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697094. £27.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697100. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The reconstruction of the technical systems of ceramic production and of its ‘chaîne opératoire’ is a means of exploring certain social structures in time and space. For many years, methodological procedures based on multidisciplinarity have made it possible to analyse both materials and methods of fabrication for this purpose. Session IV-3 organised at the 18th Congress of the UISPP in 2018 aimed to highlight the contribution of technological approaches to ceramics, both in archaeology and in ethnology, to the analysis of pre- and protohistoric societies. The case studies focus on the Neolithic and the European Bronze Age, but also on the megalithism of our era in Senegal.

Apport des approaches technologiques de la céramique à l’anthropologie et à l’archéologie des sociétés pré et protohistoriques
La reconstitution des systèmes techniques et des chaînes opératoires de production céramique est un moyen qui permet d’explorer certaines structures sociales dans le temps et l’espace. Depuis de nombreuses années, des procédures méthodologiques basées sur la pluridisciplinarité permettent d’analyser tant les matériaux que les méthodes de façonnage à cette fin. La session IV-3 organisée lors du 18e Congrès de l’UISPP en 2018 avait pour but de mettre en évidence l’apport des approches technologiques de la céramique, tant en archéologie qu’en ethnologie des techniques à l’analyse des sociétés pré et protohistoriques. Les études de cas portent essentiellement sur le Néolithique et l’âge du Bronze européen, mais aussi sur le mégalithisme de notre ère au Sénégal.
Neolithic and Bronze Age Studies in Europe: From Material Culture to Territories Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 13 Session I-4 edited by Marie Besse and François Giligny. Paperback; 205x290mm; 104 pages; 37 figures, 13 tables. 728 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697193. £27.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697209. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Neolithic and Bronze Age Studies in Europe: from material culture to territories presents eight papers from the 2018 UISPP Congress. Topics include the neolithisation process in the Iberian Peninsula; faunal exploitation in early Neolithic Italy; the economic and symbolic role of animals in eastern Germany; Copper Age human remains in central Italy; animal figurines; spatula-idols; territories and schematic art in the Iberian Neolithic; and finally Bronze age hoards at a European scale. The diversity of the papers reflects contemporary approaches and questions in those periods.

About the Editors
Marie Besse is Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Geneva and is Director of the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology at the same university. ;

François Giligny is Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University.
Earthen Construction Technology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 11 Session IV-5 edited by Annick Daneels and Maria Torras Freixa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 168 pages; colour throughout. 719 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697230. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697247. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Earthen Construction Technology presents the papers from Session IV-5 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The archaeological study of earthen construction has until now focused on typology and conservation, rather than on its anthropological importance. Earth is the permanent building material of humankind, and was used by the world’s earliest civilizations for their first urban programmes. The architectural and engineering know-how required to carry out these monumental achievements can only be obtained through archaeological research: extensive excavations with attention to architectural and structural features, and their collapse, coupled with typological, mineralogical, micromorphological, botanical, chemical, and mechanical studies of building materials. This line of research is recent, starting in the 1980s in Europe, but is rapidly growing and illustrated in this volume.

About the Editors
Annick Daneels, archaeologist, PhD (UGent, Belgium, and UNAM, Mexico), senior researcher at the Institute of Anthropological Research of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City. Since 1981 active in archaeological research in Central Veracruz, on the Mexican Gulf coast, with a focus on monumental earthen architecture since 2004. Director of four interdisciplinary projects on Mesoamerican Earthen Architecture since 2009, including excavations, preservation, experimental archaeology, and mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, botanical (pollen, phytoliths, macroremains), mechanical, and micromorphological analysis of archaeological and experimental construction samples. ;

Maria Torras Freixa, archaeologist, PhD (UB, Spain), independent researcher. Since 2013 active in archaeological research on the formation of premodern cities and urban planning, with a focus on Teotihuacan, in the Central Mexican Highlands. Team member of an interdisciplinary project in Teotihuacan since 2018, including fieldwork and geophysical surveys.
From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 10 Session XXXIII-1&2 edited by Françoise Bostyn, François Giligny and Peter Topping. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 71 figures, 7 tables (colour throughout). 718 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697117. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697124. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age presents the papers from Session XXXIII of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). 23 authors contribute nine papers from Parts 1 and 2 of the Session. The first session ‘Siliceous rocks: procurement and distribution systems’ was aimed at analysing one of the central research issues related to mining, i.e. the production systems and the diffusion of mining products. The impact of extraction on the environment, group mobility and the numbers involved in the exploitation phase were considered; mining products were also examined with a view to identifying local and imported/exported products and the underlying social organization relating to the different fields of activity. The second session ‘Flint mines and chipping floors from prehistory to the beginning of the nineteenth century’ focused on knapping activities. The significance of the identification of knapping workshops in the immediate vicinity of mine shafts and of their presence in villages as well as in intermediary places between the two was considered in the analysis of chaîne opératoire sequences. The potential of product quality and artefact distribution to contribute to the understanding of the social organisation of the communities being studied was also examined.
About the Editors
Françoise Bostyn is currently Professor at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne. She specialises in the European Neolithic and works particularly on lithic industries, from the characterisation of resources and procurement systems, especially from flint mines, to the abandonment of tools within domestic settlements. Through technological and typological approaches, the questions of the organization of production at different scales, the structure of supply and exchange networks, and the emergence of craft specialists are explored from an evolutionary perspective, from the arrival of the first farmers in France until the emergence of the first hierarchical societies. ;

François Giligny has been Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University since 2009. Experienced in preventive archaeology, he conducts research and excavations in the Paris basin. He has created and since 2016 has been co-director of two professional master’s degree courses at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne: Master of Archaeology ‘Archaeological Engineering’ and Master in Heritage and Museums ‘Archaeological Heritage Mediation and Valorisation’. François is Scientific Director of the magazine « Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie » and is engaged in two UISPP Commissions for which he organised the 18th Congress in 2018 in Paris. His research topics include the European Neolithic, ceramic technology, archaeological methodology, digital heritage and digital archaeology. ;

Peter Topping is a Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University. His expertise lies in the analysis of multiperiod landscapes, and his main research interest is the European Neolithic period. Formerly employed by RCHME and English Heritage, he has worked on Neolithic flint mines, causewayed enclosures and the Stonehenge landscape, amongst many others types of site. He has also participated in fieldwork led by the US National Park Service in Ohio and Minnesota, and is currently directing a project on prehistoric quarries in the Northumberland Cheviots, alongside researching European Neolithic mines and quarries for a Prehistoric Society research monograph.
Mobility and Exchange across Borders: Exploring Social Processes in Europe during the First Millennium BCE – Theoretical and Methodological Approaches Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 9, Sessions XXXIV-4 and XXXIV-5 edited by Veronica Cicolani. Paperback; 205x290mm; 144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French. 707 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697292. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697308. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Mobility and Exchange across Borders presents the proceedings of Sessions XXXIVIV and XXXIV-V of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). Over the last few decades, the study of cultural interactions in the Iron Age has been considerably renewed thanks to the application of new methods and tools, opening the way to new research perspectives. The papers provide different examples from various archaeological contexts and regions while applying new methodologies able to highlight the diversity of cultural transfers. Their purpose is to stimulate a debate on human interactions and cultural transfers in order to open up new analytical perspectives on this topic and to critically examine the markers and approaches traditionally used to identify human and object mobility during the first millennium BC. Through the different approaches and perspectives presented herein, this volume aims to contribute to the renewal of the scientific debate on mobility and interactions as important drivers of societal change and to stimulate future research and debate.

About the editor
Veronica Cicolani is a permanent researcher at the CNRS French Institute, AOrOc UMR8546 CNRS-PSL and member of editorial team of Etudes Celtiques. Archaeologist specialist of European protohistory, and of the history of museum collections, her research focuses on technological and cultural interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds and on Italic craft practices. Since 2005, she has been a scientific collaborator of the National Museum of Saint-Germain-en-Laye (MAN), where she also co-curated the Golasecca French exhibition (2009-2010). She has been involved in international research programmes on Celtic-Italic interactions (DFG Die sitzbanck of Hochdorf, ANR Caecina) and led a French-Italian research program on Ligurian bronze craft production (Labex Archimede 2015-2016). During the past few years, she has been exploring new inter-disciplinary approaches to the study of cultural and technological interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds.
Networks and Monumentality in the Pacific Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 7 Session XXXVIII edited by Aymeric Hermann, Frédérique Valentin, Christophe Sand, Emilie Nolet. Paperback; 205x290mm; 104 pages; illutsrated throughout. 678 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697155. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697162. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Sessions XXXVIII-1,2 of UISPP 2018 in Paris were dedicated to monumental constructions and to complex exchange networks in the Pacific. Both topics have been extensively commented on and described by indigenous experts, explorers, missionaries, and scholars over the last two centuries, however these have been made famous only for the most impressive examples such as the moai statues of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) or the kula exchange system of the Trobriand Islands. Some of the latest research on these key aspects of Pacific islands societies are made available in this volume to researchers focusing on the region, but also to a more global scientific community and to the general public. The volume reflects the tremendous progress made in Pacific island archaeology in the last 60 years which has considerably advanced our knowledge of early Pacific island societies, the rise of traditional cultural systems, and their later historical developments from European contact onwards. Interdisciplinarity is particularly stimulating in the Pacific region, where the study of the archaeological record and of chronological sequences are often combined with other kinds of information such as ethnohistorical accounts, oral traditions, and linguistic reconstructions, in the French tradition of ethnoarchéologie and the American tradition of historical anthropology.

About the Editors
Aymeric Hermann is a post-doctoral researcher at the Max-Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Since 2010, he has directed archaeological projects in several archipelagos of French Polynesia as well as in central Vanuatu. ;

Frédérique Valentin is a researcher in Oceanic archaeology at CNRS (UMR 7041, MSH Mondes, Nanterre, France). She specialises in funerary archaeology and biological anthropology. ;

Christophe Sand is Head Archaeologist for the New Caledonia Government at the IRD Research Centre in Nouméa, working on Southern Melanesia, Western Polynesia and Western Micronesia. ;

Emilie Nolet is an Assistant Professor in Archaeology at the University Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne.
Mapping the Past: From Sampling Sites and Landscapes to Exploring the ‘Archaeological Continuum’ Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 8 Session VIII-1 edited by Michel Dabas, Stefano Campana and Apostolos Sarris. Paperback; 205x290mm; 94 pages; 35 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 676 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697131. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697148. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Session VIII-1 of UISPP 2018 in Paris ‘Mapping the Past’ brought together several contributions reflecting on the need to develop sustainable and reliable approaches to mapping our landscape heritage. The session was guided by the crucial concept termed the ‘archaeological continuum’. This concept can be defined as a proactive approach to landscape survey based on the summative evidence detected (or detectable) within the area under examination, reducing spatial and chronological gaps as far as possible through the intensive and extensive application of a wide variety of exploratory methods and analytical techniques. Research work across Europe as well as contributions presented in this session have demonstrated that it is now possible to explore the whole landscape of carefully chosen areas and study them as an archaeological continuum. Archaeological interpretations derived from this kind of approach can be expected to reveal different layers of information belonging to a variety of chronological horizons, each displaying mutual physical (stratigraphic) and conceptual relationships within that horizon. The raising of new archaeological questions and also the development of alternative conservation strategies directly stimulated by the radical ideas inherent in the concept of the ‘archaeological continuum’ are among the major outcomes of the session.

About the Editors
Michel Dabas is Senior Researcher and Co-Director of the Laboratory of Archaeology at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris (AOROC) where he develops approaches for the provision of interactive maps on the web (chronocarto.eu portal) and focuses on the application of geophysical methods for archaeological sites. ;

Stefano R.L. Campana is Professor of Landscape Archaeology at the University of Siena. His research is focused on the understanding of past Mediterranean landscapes from late prehistory to contemporary times. ;

Apostolos Sarris is ‘Sylvia Ioannou’ Professor of Digital Humanities at the Archaeological Research Unit, University of Cyprus and Research Director at F.O.R.T.H.: Head of the GeoSat ReSeArch Lab. He is an Adjunct/Affiliate Professor at Cyprus University of Technology and a Research Associate of the Department of Anthropology, the Field Museum of Natural History of Chicago, Illinois, USA. His research focuses on geophysical prospection, GIS spatial modelling and satellite remote sensing in archaeology.
Stone in Metal Ages Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 6, Session XXXIV-6 edited by Francesca Manclossi, Florine Marchand, Linda Boutoille and Sylvie Cousseran-Néré. Paperback; 205x290mm; 134 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (24 pages in colour). Papers in English and French. 659 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696677. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696684. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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Session XXXIV-6 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): ‘Stone in Metal Ages’ was divided in two parts. The first, ‘Late stone talks: Lithic industries in Metal Ages’, was concerned with knapping. The papers dealt with lithic technology, use-wear analyses and the relation between the decline of stone and the development of metallurgy. The second, ‘Let there be rock and metal: l’outillage en pierre des métallurgistes préhistoriques de la mine à l’atelier’, was designed for papers focussing on stone tools used for metallurgy. This publication combines these two parts. Despite the fact that metal took the place of stone in many spheres, the analysis of lithic products created during the Metal Ages has seen progressive development. Objects and tools made of flint, chert and other stone materials remain important components of the archaeological record, and their study has offered new perspectives on ancient societies. Not only have many aspects of the everyday life of ancient people been better understood, but the socioeconomic and cultural systems associated with the production, circulation and use of stone tools have offered new information not available from other realms of material culture.

About the Editors
Francesca Manclossi is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and she is affiliated at the Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem. ;

Florine Marchand is part of an experimental archaeology team investigating the pressure techniques with the collaboration of Archéorient of Jalès (Casteljau-et-Berrias, France). ;

Linda Boutoille held a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship and subsequently a Royal Irish Academy Research Grant, based at Queen’s University Belfast. ;

Sylvie Cousseran-Néré is an archaeologist of the French National Archaeological Research Institute (Inrap).
Demography and Migration Population trajectories from the Neolithic to the Iron Age Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 5: Sessions XXXII-2 and XXXIV-8 edited by Thibault Lachenal, Réjane Roure and Olivier Lemercier. Paperback; 205x290mm; 180 pages; 89 figures, 2 tables. Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £35.00. 653 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696653. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696660. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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This volume presents the combined proceedings of two complementary sessions of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): Sessions XXXII-2 and XXXIV-8. These sessions aimed to identify demographic variations during the Neolithic and Bronze Age and to question their causes while avoiding the potential taphonomic and chronological biases affecting the documentation. It appears that certain periods feature a large number of domestic and/or funeral sites in a given region and much fewer in the following periods. These phenomena have most often been interpreted in terms of demographics, habitat organization or land use. They are sometimes linked to climatic and environmental crises or historical events, such as population displacements. In the past few years, the increase in large-scale palaeogenetic analyses concerning late prehistory and protohistory has led to the interpretation of genomic modifications as the result of population movements leading to demographic transformations. Nevertheless, historiography demonstrates how ideas come and go and come again. Migration is one of these ideas: developed in the first part of the XX century, then abandoned for more social and economic analysis, it recently again assumed importance for the field of ancient people with the increase of isotopic and ancient DNA analysis. But these new analyses have to be discussed, as the old theories have been; their results offer new data, but not definitive answers. During the sessions, the full range of archaeological data and isotopic and genetic analysis were covered, however for this publication, mainly archaeological perspectives are presented.

About the Editors
Réjane Roure is Senior Lecturer in Protohistoric Archaeology at Paul Valéry Montpellier 3 University; she works in the Joint Research Unit ‘Archaeology of Mediterranean Societies’ (JRU5140-ASM). Specialist in Iron Age societies in Mediterranean Celtic, she works on relations between the Mediterranean and continental Europe, on contacts between Greeks and Gauls and on the ritual practices of ancient societies. Since 2002, she has directed excavations at the archaeological site of Cailar (South of France), where had been found human remains linked to the Gallic practice of severed heads.

Thibault Lachenal is a CNRS Research Fellow and manager of the ‘Society of Prehistory and Protohistory’ team of the ‘Archaeology of Mediterranean Societies’ laboratory (UMR5140-ASM) in Montpellier. Specialist in the Bronze Age in the North-Western Mediterranean, his work focuses on the study of material culture, settlement and selective deposition of metalwork. He has supervised and collaborated in several archaeological excavations in southern France, Corsica and northern Italy and is currently in charge of underwater research at the La Motte site in Agde, a submerged Late Bronze Age settlement.

Olivier Lemercier is Professor of Prehistory at the University Paul Valéry - Montpellier 3 (France), and director of studies for the Master of Archaeology and Doctor of Archaeology degrees sp. Prehistory, Protohistory, Paleoenvironments, Mediterranean and African. Specialist in Bell Beakers and more generally the Neolithic and the transition to the Bronze Age in Europe and the Mediterranean, he is member of the editorial board of the Bulletin de la Société Préhistorique Française, member appointed to the CNRA and the Scientific Council of the Inrap. Author or coordinator of five books and a hundred scientific articles. He is currently President of
Different Times? Archaeological and Environmental Data from Intra-Site and Off-Site Sequences Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 4, Session II-8 edited by Zoï Tsirtsoni, Catherine Kuzucuoğlu, Philippe Nondédéo, Olivier Weller. Paperback; 205x290mm; 136 pages; 39 figures, 10 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £32.00. 642 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696516. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696523. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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Different Times? Archaeological and environmental data from intra-site and off-site sequences brings together seven papers from Session II-8 of the XVIII UISPP Congress (Paris, 4-9 June 2018). The session questioned temporal correlations between intra-site and off-site data in archaeology-related contexts. The word ‘site’ describes here archaeological sites or groups of sites – usually settlements – that have undergone research in recent years and produced information on the duration and timing of human presence. Comparison with evidence from geomorphological and paleoenvironmental research conducted at various distances from settlements gives some interesting results, such as ‘missing’ occupation periods, distortions in human presence intensity through space as well as time, variability in explanations concerning the abandonment of settlements, etc. Examples presented here highlight: first, discrepancies between time records within built areas used for living and the surrounding lands used for other activities (cultivation, herding, travelling, etc); second, discrepancies produced by the use of different ‘time markers’ (ie. chronostratigraphy of archaeological layers or pottery evolution on the one hand, sedimentary or pollen sequences on the other hand). Although improving the resolution of individual data is essential, the authors argue that the joint and detailed examination of evidence produced together by human and natural scientists is more important for reaching a reliable reconstruction of past people’s activities. Both the session and the volume stem from the Working Group ‘Environmental and Social Changes in the Past’ (Changements environnementaux et sociétés dans le passé) in the research framework of the Cluster of Excellence ‘Dynamite’ (Territorial and Spatial Dynamics) of the University Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne (ANR-11-LABX-0046, Investissements d’Avenir).

About the Editors
Zoï Tsirtsoni is an archaeologist and researcher at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), currently in position at the laboratory Archéologies et Sciences de l’Antiquité at Nanterre. She is a specialist in Aegean and Balkan prehistory and co-director, since 2008, of the Greek-French research project at the tell settlement of Dikili Tash in Greek Eastern Macedonia. Concerned with relative and absolute chronology, crafts (especially pottery), settlement, and problems of archaeological visibility, she has coordinated or participated in several collaborative interdisciplinary research projects (e.g. ANR ‘Balkans 4000’, ERC ‘PlantCult’), already published or in progress.

Catherine Kuzucuoğlu is a geomorphologist at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique). Working in the fields of physical geography, geoarchaeology, volcanism and reconstruction of past climates and environments, she develops collaboration research programs with Turkish and international teams in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Anatolia, investigating (1) Pleistocene and Holocene evolution of valleys and lakes, (2) geomorphological records of recent volcanic activity and landscape evolution, (3) reconstructions of climate and environment from lake and marsh records, and their impacts on past civilizations. She has been Deputy Director in charge of Archaeology at French Institute for Anatolian Studies in Istanbul (2000- 2003), and Director of Laboratory of Physical Geography (2009-2013).

Philippe Nondédéo is currently an investigator at the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Sc
Caractérisation, continuités et discontinuités des manifestations graphiques des sociétés préhistoriques Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 3, Session XXVIII-4 edited by Elena Paillet, Marcela Sepulveda, Eric Robert, Patrick Paillet and Nicolas Mélard. Paperback; 205x290mm; 118 pages; 108 figures, 7 tables, 1 plate. French text. Print RRP: £32.00. 640 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696356. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696363. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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This volume presents the proceedings of Session XXVIII-4 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France), Caractérisation, continuités et discontinuités des manifestations graphiques des sociétés préhistoriques. Papers address the question of exchange and mobility in prehistoric societies in relation to the evolution of their environments through the prism of their graphic productions, on objects or on walls. This volume offers the opportunity to question their symbolic behaviours within very diverse temporal, chrono-cultural or geographic contexts. It also provides the framework for a discussion on cultural identity and how this was asserted in the face of environmental or social changes or constraints.

French Description
La session du XVIIIème congrès de l’UIPP intitulée « caractérisation, continuités et discontinuités des manifestations graphiques des sociétés préhistoriques » aborde la question des échanges et de la mobilité des sociétés préhistoriques, en prise avec l’évolution de leurs milieux, à travers le prisme de leurs productions graphiques, sur objets ou sur parois. Ce volume offre l’occasion de questionner leurs comportements symboliques, au sein de contextes temporels, chrono-culturels ou géographiques très divers. Il offre aussi le cadre d’une discussion sur l’identité culturelle et de la façon dont ils l’ont affirmée, face aux changements ou aux contraintes environnementales ou sociales. Propulseurs décorés au Magdalénien, ou objets en ivoire du Gravettien, témoignent tour à tour de permanences techniques ou symboliques, et en même temps de singularités locales à l’échelle de l’Europe. La notion d’identité culturelle est abordée à travers la production singulière de l’art mobilier du Taillis des Côteaux, ou de la thématique, rare mais pas secondaire, du félin dans l’art pariétal et mobilier, illustrant des frontières souvent ténues entre sphères fonctionnelle et symbolique. Enfin, la relation entre l’art et son environnement se décline sur des territoires rupestres plus récents mais tout aussi remarquables, le Bassin parisien au Mésolithique, et l’Egypte prédynastique. Les articles de cette session montrent ainsi comment les systèmes de pensées exprimés par des images peuvent ainsi perdurer sur le temps long, et témoigner de pratiques sociales élaborées, dont les rythmes ne sont pas toujours en adéquation avec les productions matérielles du quotidien.

Elena Paillet est conservatrice du Patrimoine au Service régional de l’Archéologie, DRAC Bretagne et UMR 6566 CReAAH Université de Rennes 1.

Marcela Sepulveda est Professeur Associée Escuela de Antropología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Chercheur associée UMR 8096 ArchAm (CNRS-Paris 1) & UMR8220 LAMS (CNRS- Sorbonne Université).

Eric Robert est préhistorien, Maitre de conférences au Museum national d’Histoire naturelle, UMR Hitoire naturelle de l’Homme Préhistorique 7194 (CNRS, MNHN, UPVD).

Patrick Paillet est préhistorien, Maître de conférences HDR (habilité à diriger des recherches) du Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle (Département Homme et Environnement, UMR 7194 « Histoire naturelle de l’Homme préhistorique »).

Nicolas Mélard est conservateur du patrimoine, archéologue, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des musées de France, UMR 7055 Préhistoire et Technologie (CNRS / Université Paris Nanterre).
Peintures et gravures rupestres des Amériques: Empreintes culturelles et territoriales Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 2, Session XXV-3 edited by Brigitte Faugère and Philippe Costa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 108 pages; 66 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). French text. Print RRP: £28.00.. 639 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696332. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696349. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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The rock art of the Americas was produced at very different times and by different cultures, both by hunter-gatherers, fishermen and by farmers from village or state societies. Each group can be characterised by diverse styles and techniques. The function of rock art depended on religious, political or social concerns that referred to a particular context and time. Peintures et gravures rupestres des Amériques: Empreintes culturelles et territoriales presents the proceedings from Session XXV-3 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France). Papers address the following questions: How does the study of rock art make it possible to culturally characterize its authors? What does it tell us about the function of sites? How and under what circumstances does it make it possible to delimit a cultural territory? The six articles in this volume provide case studies from Mexico, El Salvador, Costa Rica, French Guiana and Chile.

Brigitte Faugère is a professor of archaeology at the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Since the 1990s, she has led research projects on the cultures of north-central and western Mexico, in particular in the field of rock art.

Philippe Costa is an archaeologist specializing in Central America and an associate researcher at the Center for Mexican and Central American Studies. Since 2018, he has directed a Franco-German-Costa Rican archaeological project in the Guanacaste mountain range of Costa Rica.

French Description:
L’art rupestre des Amériques a été produit à des époques et par des cultures très différentes, tant par les chasseurs cueilleurs pêcheurs que par les agriculteurs inscrits dans des sociétés villageoises ou étatiques. Chaque groupe ou société a développé des styles d’une grande diversité et utilisé des techniques différentes, qui les caractérisent. La fonction de l’art rupestre dépendait de préoccupations religieuses, politiques ou sociales qui se réfèrent à un contexte et à une époque particulière. Les questions qu’abordent ce symposium organisé lors du XVIIIe colloque annuel de l’IUSPP sont ainsi : En quoi l’étude de l’art rupestre permet-il de caractériser culturellement ses auteurs ? Que nous apprend-il sur la fonction des sites ? En quoi et dans quelles circonstances permet-il de délimiter un territoire culturel ? Les six articles que comptent ce volume permettent d’aborder des études de cas portant sur le Mexique, le Salvador, le Costa Rica, la Guyane française et le Chili. Même si des peintures rupestres sont connues dans tous ces pays, les études proposées dans ce volume concernent en majorité des gravures. Deux grandes options ont été choisies par les auteurs : s’intéresser à une tradition particulière et à sa fonction dans une région donnée (Philippe Costa pour le Salvador, Joseph Mountjoy pour l’Occident du Mexique, Felipe Sol pour le Costa Rica, Françoise Fauconnier pour le Chili) ou bien recenser les différentes traditions présentes sur un territoire et essayer d’interpréter leur diversité (B. Faugère pour le centre-nord du Mexique, Gérald Migeon pour la Guyane française).

Brigitte Faugère est archéologue spécialiste du Mexique et Professeur à l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon- Sorbonne. Elle dirige depuis les années 1990 des projets de recherche sur les cultures du centre-nord et de l’Occident du Mexique, en particulier dans le domaine de l’Art rupestre. Elle est membre sénior de l’Institut Universitaire de France.

Philippe Costa est archéologue spécialiste de l’Amérique Centrale et chercheur as
Pre and Protohistoric Stone Architectures: Comparisons of the Social and Technical Contexts Associated to Their Building Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 1, Session XXXII-3 edited by Florian Cousseau and Luc Laporte. Paperback; 205x290mm; 206 pages; 98 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). Full parallel text in English and French. Print RRP: £38.00. 638 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695458. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695465. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

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Pre and Protohistoric Stone Architectures: Comparisons of the Social and Technical Contexts Associated to Their Building presents the papers from Session XXXII-3 of the XVIII UISPP Congress (Paris, 4-9 June 2018). This session took place within the commission concerned with the European Neolithic. While most of the presentations fell within that chronological period and were concerned with the Atlantic coast and the Mediterranean basin, wider geographical and chronological comparisons were also included. This volume aims to break the usual limits on the fields of study and to deconstruct some preconceived ideas. New methods developed over the past ten years bring out new possibilities regarding the study of such monuments, and the conference proceedings open up unexpected and promising perspectives. This volume is a parallel text edition in English and French.

About the Editors
Florian Cousseau is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the University of Geneva (Switzerland). His work focuses on megalithic architecture in Western Europe for which he has developed a new methodology. He has adapted building archaeology methodology to study pre-protohistoric elevations. As a result he has updated the data of famous sites in northwestern France such as Barnenez, Guennoc and Carn.

Luc Laporte is Research Director at CNRS (France). He is a specialist in the Neolithic period in Europe, and on the subject of megaliths in general. He has published widely on the megaliths of western France, Western Europe, and Africa, for the Neolithic and Protohistoric periods.
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