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NEW: Contribution of Ceramic Technological Approaches to the Anthropology and Archaeology of Pre- and Protohistoric Societies Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 12 Session IV-3 edited by François Giligny, Ekaterina Dolbunova, Louise Gomart, Alexandre Livingstone Smith and Sophie Méry. Paperback; 205x290mm; 112 pages; 44 figures, 3 tables. 5 papers in French, 2 in English. 729 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697094. £27.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697100. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The reconstruction of the technical systems of ceramic production and of its ‘chaîne opératoire’ is a means of exploring certain social structures in time and space. For many years, methodological procedures based on multidisciplinarity have made it possible to analyse both materials and methods of fabrication for this purpose. Session IV-3 organised at the 18th Congress of the UISPP in 2018 aimed to highlight the contribution of technological approaches to ceramics, both in archaeology and in ethnology, to the analysis of pre- and protohistoric societies. The case studies focus on the Neolithic and the European Bronze Age, but also on the megalithism of our era in Senegal.

Apport des approaches technologiques de la céramique à l’anthropologie et à l’archéologie des sociétés pré et protohistoriques
La reconstitution des systèmes techniques et des chaînes opératoires de production céramique est un moyen qui permet d’explorer certaines structures sociales dans le temps et l’espace. Depuis de nombreuses années, des procédures méthodologiques basées sur la pluridisciplinarité permettent d’analyser tant les matériaux que les méthodes de façonnage à cette fin. La session IV-3 organisée lors du 18e Congrès de l’UISPP en 2018 avait pour but de mettre en évidence l’apport des approches technologiques de la céramique, tant en archéologie qu’en ethnologie des techniques à l’analyse des sociétés pré et protohistoriques. Les études de cas portent essentiellement sur le Néolithique et l’âge du Bronze européen, mais aussi sur le mégalithisme de notre ère au Sénégal.
NEW: Neolithic and Bronze Age Studies in Europe: From Material Culture to Territories Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 13 Session I-4 edited by Marie Besse and François Giligny. Paperback; 205x290mm; 104 pages; 37 figures, 13 tables. 728 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697193. £27.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697209. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Neolithic and Bronze Age Studies in Europe: from material culture to territories presents eight papers from the 2018 UISPP Congress. Topics include the neolithisation process in the Iberian Peninsula; faunal exploitation in early Neolithic Italy; the economic and symbolic role of animals in eastern Germany; Copper Age human remains in central Italy; animal figurines; spatula-idols; territories and schematic art in the Iberian Neolithic; and finally Bronze age hoards at a European scale. The diversity of the papers reflects contemporary approaches and questions in those periods.

About the Editors
Marie Besse is Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Geneva and is Director of the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology at the same university. ;

François Giligny is Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University.
NEW: Between the 3rd and 2nd Millennia BC: Exploring Cultural Diversity and Change in Late Prehistoric Communities by Susana Soares Lopes and Sérgio Alexandre Gomes. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699227. Paperback; 205x290mm; 156 pages; 64 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 727 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699227. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699234. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Between the 3rd and 2nd Millennia BC: Exploring Cultural Diversity and Change in Late Prehistoric Communities is a collection of studies on the cultural reconfigurations that occurred in western Europe between the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC. It brings together seven texts focusing on the evidence from the West of the Iberian Peninsula, and one on the South of England. The texts have their origin in a landmark meeting held at the University of Coimbra in November 2018, where scholars explored the grand narratives explaining the differences between what are traditionally considered Chalcolithic (or Late Neolithic) and Bronze Age communities. The contributions look at key aspects of these grand narratives through regional perspectives, asking the following questions: is there clear data to support the idea of an intensification of social complexity towards the emergence of the Bronze Age chiefdoms? What is the role of monumental architecture within this process? How do we best discuss the different levels of architectural visibility during this period? How can we interpret collective and individual burials in relation to the emergence of individual/territorial powers? In answering these questions, the papers explore regional diversity and argue that regional specificities resist a general interpretation of the historical process at stake. In light of this resistance, the book emphasizes that cultural singularities only become visible through contextual, medium, or low-scale approaches. The recognition of singularities challenges grand narratives, but also carries the potential to expand our understanding of the changes that occurred during this key moment of Late Prehistory. The book thus offers readers the opportunity to think about the diversity of archaeological evidence in combination with an exploration of the available range of approaches and narratives. The critical intertwining of multiple points of view is necessary, because it gets us closer to how elusive the cultural differences of prehistoric communities can be. This elusive dimension is precisely what can force us to constantly rethink what we see and what questions we ask.

About the Editors
Susana Soares Lopes is a researcher at CEAACP – University of Coimbra (Portugal). She is a retired full professor in archaeology at the University of Porto (Portugal), where she taught from 1975 to 2013. Her research, focusing on the Late Prehistory of the Iberian Peninsula, has explored archaeological sites in northern Portugal by integrating a variety of theoretical orientations. She uses this plurality to promote and discuss different perspectives on Prehistory.

Sérgio Alexandre Gomes is a researcher at CEAACP - University of Coimbra (Portugal). His main interests lie in the history of archaeology, archaeological methods and theories, as well as the study of the Late Prehistory of the Iberian Peninsula, with a focus on the archaeology of wall enclosures and pit sites.
NEW: Earthen Construction Technology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 11 Session IV-5 edited by Annick Daneels and Maria Torras Freixa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 168 pages; colour throughout. 719 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697230. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697247. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Earthen Construction Technology presents the papers from Session IV-5 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The archaeological study of earthen construction has until now focused on typology and conservation, rather than on its anthropological importance. Earth is the permanent building material of humankind, and was used by the world’s earliest civilizations for their first urban programmes. The architectural and engineering know-how required to carry out these monumental achievements can only be obtained through archaeological research: extensive excavations with attention to architectural and structural features, and their collapse, coupled with typological, mineralogical, micromorphological, botanical, chemical, and mechanical studies of building materials. This line of research is recent, starting in the 1980s in Europe, but is rapidly growing and illustrated in this volume.

About the Editors
Annick Daneels, archaeologist, PhD (UGent, Belgium, and UNAM, Mexico), senior researcher at the Institute of Anthropological Research of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City. Since 1981 active in archaeological research in Central Veracruz, on the Mexican Gulf coast, with a focus on monumental earthen architecture since 2004. Director of four interdisciplinary projects on Mesoamerican Earthen Architecture since 2009, including excavations, preservation, experimental archaeology, and mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, botanical (pollen, phytoliths, macroremains), mechanical, and micromorphological analysis of archaeological and experimental construction samples. ;

Maria Torras Freixa, archaeologist, PhD (UB, Spain), independent researcher. Since 2013 active in archaeological research on the formation of premodern cities and urban planning, with a focus on Teotihuacan, in the Central Mexican Highlands. Team member of an interdisciplinary project in Teotihuacan since 2018, including fieldwork and geophysical surveys.
NEW: White Castle: The Evaluation of an Upstanding Prehistoric Enclosure in East Lothian by David Connolly, Murray Cook and Hana Kdolska. Paperback; 203x276mm; 108 pages; 42 figures, 8 tables (colour throughout). 134 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699302. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699319. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

White Castle: The evaluation of an upstanding prehistoric enclosure in East Lothian describes the results of a four year research programme of archaeological works between 2010 and 2013, at the later prehistoric enclosure of White Castle, East Lothian, carried out under the auspices of the Rampart Scotland project. The site is a Scheduled Monument, but, despite being subject of mapping and survey for some 200 years, it has never been examined by excavation prior to the Rampart Scotland project’s interventions. White Castle was the first of the series of comparable sites to be excavated in the Lammermuir area. The programme of archaeological evaluation and sequence of radiometric dates furnished evidence for four major phases of activity at White Castle – with the main enclosure period dating to the second half of the first millennium BC. The excavations demonstrated a clear sequence of enclosure development over time, whereby the design and visual impact often appeared to be more important than defence alone. White Castle’s location on the main route through the Lammermuirs with surrounding upland pasture is also highly suggestive to its function and it seems probable that the site’s economy was concerned primarily with controlling access to grazing. The final phase of the prehistoric enclosure appears to combine two key factors: impressing visitors and stock control. While maintenance of White Castle’s enclosure system was abandoned in the closing centuries BC, it is unlikely that the area was deserted and there is also limited evidence for two later phases of activity on site around the Medieval and Early Modern Periods.

About the Authors:
David Connolly MCIfA, FSA Scot has had a long career in archaeology since 1981. Being one of the pioneers of buildings archaeology, land survey and a qualified drone pilot, he is always at the forefront of developing new techniques of archaeological recording. He is also the creator of the successful Archaeology Skills Passport scheme. Since 1999, David devotes his time to running British Archaeological Jobs Resource (BAJR) and its fieldwork arm, CHC Heritage, participating in varied worldwide commercial and research/training projects, including Rampart Scotland. ;

Dr Murray Cook, MA Hons, MCIfA FSA Scot is Stirling Council’s Archaeologist, an Honorary Research Fellow at Stirling University, as well as teaching a course on Stirling at Forth Valley College. As co-director of Rampart Scotland, he also runs regular training digs and is the author of three popular books on Stirling: The Anvil of Scottish History, Digging into Stirling’s Past and Bannockburn and Stirling Bridge: Exploring Scotland’s Two Greatest Battles. ;

Hana Kdolska MA, MSc is a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, gaining practical experience working as a field archaeologist for a number of large commercial units in the UK. As part of Rampart Scotland’s team, she has supervised multiple research excavations across Scotland. Since 2015 she has participated and run archaeological projects in the UK and the Emirate of Ras al-Khaimah (UAE). In 2020, she joined BAJR and CHC Heritage as a co-director.
Sites of Power and Assembly in the Thames Valley in the Middle Ages by Alex Sanmark. DOI: 10.32028/9781789697865-7. Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History 22 pp.114-131.ISBN 9781789697865-7. Download Full PDF  

This article examines three sites of elite and royal power in the early second millennium AD in the Thames valley: Kingston upon Thames in Greater London, Westminster in the City of London, and Runnymede in Surrey. Using a backdrop of comparative material from medieval Scandinavia, these sites are examined in terms of their landscape qualities, particularly their liminal nature. On this basis, it is shown that they demonstrate attributes and features that are frequently connected to assembly sites. It is therefore argued that these sites may well, earlier in time, have been assembly locations that were consciously adopted and developed as royal ritual sites as part of the legitimising process of power.
NEW: Garranes: An Early Medieval Royal Site in South-West Ireland by William O’Brien and Nick Hogan. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699197. Hardback; 205x290mm; 402 pages; 376 figures, colour throughout. 722 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699197. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699203. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Ringforts were an important part of the rural settlement landscape of early medieval Ireland (AD 400–1100). While most of those circular enclosures were farmsteads, a small number had special significance as centres of political power and elite residence, also associated with specialized crafts. One such ‘royal site’ was Garranes in the mid-Cork region of south-west Ireland. In 1937, archaeological excavation of a large trivallate ringfort provided evidence of high-status residence during the fifth and sixth centuries AD. The site had workshops for the production of bronze ornaments, with glass and enamel working as well as indications of farming. Pottery and glass vessels imported from the Mediterranean world and Atlantic France were also discovered. That trade with the Late Roman world is significant to understanding the introduction of Christianity and literacy in southern Ireland at that time.

This monograph presents the results of an interdisciplinary project conducted 2011–18, where archaeological survey and excavation, supported by various specialist studies, examined this historic landscape. Garranes is a special place where archaeology, history and legend combine to uncover a minor royal site of the early medieval period. The central ringfort has been identified as Rath Raithleann, the seat of the petty kingdom of Uí Echach Muman, recalled in bardic poetry of the later medieval period. Those poems attribute its foundation to Corc, a King of Munster in the fifth century AD, and link the site closely to Cian, son-in-law of Brian Bóruma, and one of the heroes of Clontarf (AD 1014). This study provides new evidence to connect the location of Rath Raithleann to high-status occupation at Garranes during the fifth and sixth centuries, and explores its legendary associations in later periods.

Includes contributions from Michelle Comber, Ian Doyle, Lenore Fischer, Kevin Kearney, Susan Lyons, Tim Mighall and Douglas Borthwick, Margaret Mannion, Ignacio Montero-Ruiz and Mercedes Murillo-Barroso, Róisín Nic Cnáimhín, Cian Ó Cionnfhaolaidh, James O’Driscoll, Edward O’Riordain, and Orla-Peach Power.

About the Authors
William O'Brien is Professor of Archaeology in University College Cork, Ireland. His research interests include the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age in Ireland, early mining and metallurgy in Atlantic Europe, upland archaeology, the study of hillforts and monumentality in the later prehistoric period. He has a particular interest in the prehistory of south-west Ireland, where he has conducted numerous research excavations. ;

Nick Hogan is a graduate of National University of Ireland Galway, where he completed a BA degree in Archaeology and a MA in Landscape Archaeology. In 2008, he was appointed Technical Officer for the Department of Archaeology in University College Cork, where he is responsible for teaching and support in the areas of archaeological fieldwork and computing. He is an experienced field archaeologist with a range of skills in excavation, land survey and geophysics.
NEW: From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 10 Session XXXIII-1&2 edited by Françoise Bostyn, François Giligny and Peter Topping. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 71 figures, 7 tables (colour throughout). 718 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697117. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697124. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age presents the papers from Session XXXIII of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). 23 authors contribute nine papers from Parts 1 and 2 of the Session. The first session ‘Siliceous rocks: procurement and distribution systems’ was aimed at analysing one of the central research issues related to mining, i.e. the production systems and the diffusion of mining products. The impact of extraction on the environment, group mobility and the numbers involved in the exploitation phase were considered; mining products were also examined with a view to identifying local and imported/exported products and the underlying social organization relating to the different fields of activity. The second session ‘Flint mines and chipping floors from prehistory to the beginning of the nineteenth century’ focused on knapping activities. The significance of the identification of knapping workshops in the immediate vicinity of mine shafts and of their presence in villages as well as in intermediary places between the two was considered in the analysis of chaîne opératoire sequences. The potential of product quality and artefact distribution to contribute to the understanding of the social organisation of the communities being studied was also examined.
About the Editors
Françoise Bostyn is currently Professor at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne. She specialises in the European Neolithic and works particularly on lithic industries, from the characterisation of resources and procurement systems, especially from flint mines, to the abandonment of tools within domestic settlements. Through technological and typological approaches, the questions of the organization of production at different scales, the structure of supply and exchange networks, and the emergence of craft specialists are explored from an evolutionary perspective, from the arrival of the first farmers in France until the emergence of the first hierarchical societies. ;

François Giligny has been Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University since 2009. Experienced in preventive archaeology, he conducts research and excavations in the Paris basin. He has created and since 2016 has been co-director of two professional master’s degree courses at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne: Master of Archaeology ‘Archaeological Engineering’ and Master in Heritage and Museums ‘Archaeological Heritage Mediation and Valorisation’. François is Scientific Director of the magazine « Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie » and is engaged in two UISPP Commissions for which he organised the 18th Congress in 2018 in Paris. His research topics include the European Neolithic, ceramic technology, archaeological methodology, digital heritage and digital archaeology. ;

Peter Topping is a Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University. His expertise lies in the analysis of multiperiod landscapes, and his main research interest is the European Neolithic period. Formerly employed by RCHME and English Heritage, he has worked on Neolithic flint mines, causewayed enclosures and the Stonehenge landscape, amongst many others types of site. He has also participated in fieldwork led by the US National Park Service in Ohio and Minnesota, and is currently directing a project on prehistoric quarries in the Northumberland Cheviots, alongside researching European Neolithic mines and quarries for a Prehistoric Society research monograph.
NEW: Rougga I: Le forum et ses abords (fouilles 1971–1974) edited by Maurice Euzennat† and Hédi Slim†. Paperback; 205x290mm; 518 pages; 214 figures, 54 tables (13 colour plates). French text. 706 2020 Archaeology of the Maghreb 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698251. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698268. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Located in Byzacena, 12 km south-east of Thysdrus / El Jem, the municipality of Bararus / Henchir, Rougga is known for its large Roman cisterns first reported in the 18th century and for the discovery in 1972 of a hoard of Byzantine gold coins. ROUGGA I gives an account of the overall results of the excavations carried out at the site of the forum, from 1971 to 1974, by the Tunisian-French mission under the direction of Maurice Euzennat † and Hédi Slim †.

Situé en Byzacène, à 12 km au sud-est de Thysdrus/El Jem, le municipe de Bararus/Henchir Rougga est connu pour ses grandes citernes d’époque romaine signalées depuis le XVIIIe s. et pour la découverte en 1972 d’un trésor de monnaies d’or byzantines publié en 1982 dans le volume III de la monographie générale du site. Ce volume I, rédigé pour l’essentiel au début des années 90, rend compte du résultat global des fouilles menées à l’emplacement du forum, de 1971 à 1974, par la mission tuniso-française sous la direction de Maurice Euzennat† et Hédi Slim†. L’ouvrage comprend trois parties : tout d’abord, une présentation générale du site par les deux chefs de mission et Pol Trousset ; ensuite, une description de la stratigraphie du forum et du mobilier qui en provient, par Roger Guéry† avec la collaboration de divers spécialistes ; enfin, une étude architecturale extrêmement précise des différents éléments qui composent le centre monumental de la cité : citernes, platea et portiques, xyste et temples, par Gilbert Hallier†. Ces travaux permettent de mieux appréhender la place du municipe de Bararus au centre d’une riche région agricole qui a laissé les traces de cadastration parmi les mieux conservées d’Afrique. Ils mettent en évidence sa longue durée d’occupation, du IIIe s. av. J.-C. (avec quelques traces antérieures remontant à la Préhistoire) jusqu’au XIe s., et l’originalité des partis architecturaux qui ont présidé à la construction de son centre monumental à l’époque flavienne, ses transformations au IIe s. et son abandon à l’époque byzantine.

Maurice Euzennat (1926-2004), Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, Membre de l’Institut. ;

Hédi Slim (1935-2019), Directeur de Recherche à l’Institut National du Patrimoine de Tunis, Directeur de la division du Recensement général et des Études. ;

Roger Guéry (1926-1997), Ingénieur au CNRS, archéologue-céramologue. ;

Gilbert Hallier (1923-2010), Architecte d.p.l.g., Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, architecte-archéologue. ;

Pol Trousset, Directeur de Recherche honoraire au CNRS, archéologue-géographe.

Préface de Fathi Bejaoui, Directeur de Recherche à INP.

Postface de Pierre Gros, Membre de l'Institut.

Ouvrage publié avec le concours de l'Institut Français de Tunisie et du Programme Investissements d’Avenir, Initiative d’Excellence d’Aix-Marseille Université - A*MIDEX, AMX-MED-012.
NEW: Current Perspectives in Sudanese and Nubian Archaeology A Collection of Papers Presented at the 2018 Sudan Studies Research Conference, Cambridge edited by Rennan Lemos and Samantha Tipper. Paperback; 203x276mm; 126 pages; 39 figures, 14 tables. 133 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698978. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698985. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Current Perspectives in Sudanese and Nubian Archaeology brings together papers presented at the 2nd Sudan Studies Research Conference, held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge. Scholars from various institutions around the world gathered to discuss the most recent trends in the field of Sudanese and Nubian archaeology, ranging from recent fieldwork in Sudan to scientific analysis of material culture and current theoretical approaches. The papers collected here focus on early administrative and mortuary material culture in the Nile valley and adjacent areas; religious beliefs and practices at Kerma; the adoption and local use of imported objects in the New Kingdom colonial period; and the role of Sudan and East Africa in human population history. Together, all papers represent the diversity of current approaches to the archaeology of Sudan and Nubia in various periods.

About the Author
Rennan Lemos is an ERC postdoctoral research fellow at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. He recently completed his PhD in Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology at the University of Cambridge, specialising in mortuary material culture in New Kingdom Nubia. ;

Samantha Tipper is a senior lecturer at the University of Lincoln. She is a bioarchaeologist and paleopathologist with experience working in both the commercial and academic sectors in human osteology, paleopathology and forensic anthropology.
NEW: Current Research in Egyptology 2019 Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Symposium, University of Alcalá, 17–21 June 2019 edited by Marta Arranz Cárcamo, Raúl Sánchez Casado, Albert Planelles Orozco, Sergio Alarcón Robledo, Jónatan Ortiz García, Patricia Mora Riudavets. Paperback; 203x276mm; 248 pages; 89 figures, 11 tables. 133 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699074. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699081. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Current Research in Egyptology 2019 presents the papers and posters from the twentieth meeting of the prestigious international student Egyptology conference, on this occasion held at the University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain. The conference took place 17–21 June 2019 at the Major College of San Ildefonso, the historic centre of the University of Alcalá, with almost 200 participants from various countries and institutions all over the world. The conference addressed a wide range of topics including all periods of ancient Egyptian History and different aspects of its material culture, archaeology, history, society, religion and language. Fifteen wide-ranging papers are published here with wider information on the scientific and cultural programme of the conference.

About the Editors
Marta Arranz holds a master’s degree in archaeology and heritage from the Autónoma University of Madrid, and she is a doctoral candidate in Egyptology at the University of Alcalá. ;

Raúl Sánchez Casado obtained a PhD in Egyptology at the University of Seville; he is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Granada. ;

Albert Planelles Orozco completed a master´s degree in ancient cultures and languages at the University of Barcelona; he is currently working on his PhD in Assyriology at the University of Alcalá. ;

Sergio Alarcón Robledo holds an MPhil in Egyptology at the University of Cambridge and an MA in archaeology from the University of California, Los Angeles; he is a PhD candidate in Egyptology at Harvard University. ;

Jónatan Ortiz García completed his PhD in Cultural Heritage at the University of Valencia; he is a Juan de la Cierva postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alcalá. ;

Patricia Mora Riudavets completed an MA in Egyptology at the University of Liverpool. She is a professional archaeological photographer.
The house that turned around and the street that wasn’t: A cross-disciplinary study of the metamorphosis of the centre of a small town, c. 1680–1760 by Reidun Marie Aasheim, Finn-Einar Eliassen and Marianne Johansson. Pages 1-12 from ‘For My Descendants and Myself, a Nice and Pleasant Abode’ – Agency, Micro-history and Built Environment edited by Göran Tagesson, Per Cornell, Mark Gardiner, Liz Thomas and Katherine Weikert.Download Full PDF  

This article demonstrates what can be achieved through a close, cross-disciplinary cooperation between historians and archaeologists, combining written and archaeological material in an integrated study. The point is illustrated by a pilot investigation of the medieval trading-place and early modern small town of Son, an important timber-exporting port on the eastern side of the Oslo fjord in the 16th and 17th centuries. The cross-disciplinary approach is especially successful in revealing the development of the centre of Son in the decades around 1700, where a house was seemingly ‘turned around’, and a main street opened up through previously private plots. Also, the infilling of a small bay made it possible to create new plots of land, which eventually became the central market square of the small town. This process could not only be precisely dated, but also the developers were identified, as members of the Solgaard family, Son’s leading merchants, who made great investments in the project. Finally, a strong argument is made for post-medieval archaeology in Norway, where only sites and artefacts older than 1537 are automatically protected by law.
NEW: Searching for the 17th Century on Nevis: The Survey and Excavation of Two Early Plantation Sites by Robert A. Philpott, Roger H. Leech and Elaine L. Morris. Paperback; 205x290mm; 238 pages; 118 figures; 14 tables. 711 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698862. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698879. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Searching for the 17th Century on Nevis is the first of a series of monographs dedicated to the archaeological investigation of the landscape, buildings and artefacts of the Eastern Caribbean by the Nevis Heritage Project. This volume presents the results of documentary research and excavation on two sugar plantation sites on the island of Nevis. Upper Rawlins, located high on Nevis mountain, was occupied in the late 17th and early 18th century and abandoned early. Fenton Hill was occupied from the mid-17th to the mid-19th century and originated with an earthfast timber building, probably a dwelling house, later converted to a kitchen and encapsulated in stone about 1700. The adjacent main house was probably destroyed in the French raid of 1706 and rebuilt in timber. The final occupation was by Portuguese Madeiran labourers, who were introduced to fill a labour force shortage in the 1840s.

Detailed reports on the finds assemblage include discussions of the handmade, bonfired Afro-Caribbean pottery made by enslaved African women, imported European ceramics and glass, clay tobacco pipes, metalwork and building materials. The dominance of imported goods from south-western England demonstrates the strong mercantile links between Nevis and Bristol, but local Nevis production of ceramics adds new insights into the estatebased ceramic production on European lines.

Includes contributions by David Barker, Clive Gamble, Jerzy Gawronski, Sheila Hamilton-Dyer, David A. Higgins, Linda Mitchell, Sebastiaan Ostkamp and Jaco Weinstock.

About the Authors
Dr Robert Philpott MCIfA FSA is a researcher at the University of Liverpool, with interests in post-medieval archaeology of colonial settlement in the Caribbean, material culture and the Roman and later archaeology of North West England. ;

Professor Roger Leech MCIfA FSA, formerly Head of Archaeology for the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, now Visiting Professor in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Southampton, has published widely on urban archaeology and architecture, and the historical archaeology of the Caribbean. ;

Dr Elaine L. Morris MCIfA FSA is Visiting Fellow at the University of Southampton (UK) with interests in prehistoric and colonial archaeology in the Caribbean and prehistoric ceramics in Britain.
NEW: Le four de Sévrier et autres fours et fourneaux d’argile aux âges des métaux en Europe occidentale by Jean Coulon. Paperback; 205x290mm; 248 pages; 181 figures, 25 tables. French text. 710 2021 Laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique UNIGE . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698619. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698626 . Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Sevrier kiln, discovered in 1974 on a submerged island in Lake Annecy in the Haute-Savoie region of France, is a headline find of alpine archeology. Almost fifty years later, it continues to provoke debate. This study looks back at the history of an artefact considered in turn as one of the earliest Western pottery kilns, as an enigmatic stove for domestic use, and as a technological link in the Final Bronze Age which would herald the professionalization of pottery, hitherto a purely domestic industry, seasonal and self-sufficient.

It takes the form of a multidisciplinary investigation where archaeological, ethnoarchaeological and experimental approaches are brought together to consider the contradictory hypotheses, broaden the focus and put forward new perspectives.

In particular the study focuses on technological history, and on the changing social structure of Bronze Age communities, which contributed to the advent of proto-artisans specialising in pottery production, a few centuries later.

About the Author
Jean Coulon, archaeologist, teacher, and artist, was born in Annecy in 1952 and is a member of the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology of Geneva. The practical experience acquired during a long practice of ceramics led him naturally to take an interest in this famous discovery from the Alpine lake-dwellings.

French Description
Le four de Sévrier, découvert en 1974 sur un haut fond immergé du lac d’Annecy, est un objet phare de l’archéologie alpine. Près d’une cinquantaine d’années plus tard, il continue de se dérober à l’interprétation des spécialistes. Cette étude revient sur l’histoire d’un artefact considéré tour à tour comme le princeps des fours de potier occidentaux, comme un énigmatique fourneau à usage domestique, comme un maillon technologique de l’âge du bronze fi nal qui annoncerait la professionnalisation de la poterie, activité jusqu’alors familiale, saisonnière et autarcique.

Ce nouveau regard sur cet objet de référence, prend la forme d’une enquête pluridisci-plinaire ou les volets archéométrique, ethnoarchéologique et expérimental accueillent et passent au crible les hypothèses contradictoires, élargissent les problématique s et posent de nouvelles perspectives.

Il interroge par le prisme de l’histoire des techniques, les infl exions dans l’organisation sociale des communautés de l’âge du Bronze. Celles, en particulier, qui favoriseront, quelques siècles plus tard, l’avènement de proto artisans, spécialisés dans les activités de transformation de l’argile.

Jean Coulon, archéologue, enseignant, artiste, né à Annecy en 1952, est titulaire d’un Master en Arts Plastiques de l’Université de St Etienne, d’un doctorat en Langue, Histoire et Civilisation des mondes anciens de l’Université Lyon Lumière 2, membre du Laboratoire d’Archéologie Préhistorique et Anthropologie de Genève. Son parcours est riche d’une grande diversité d’expériences. Celles acquises au cours d’une longue pratique de la céramique l’ont amené tout naturellement à s’intéresser à cet objet célèbre des palafi ttes alpins.
NEW: Göytepe: Neolithic Excavations in the Middle Kura Valley, Azerbaijan edited by Yoshihiro Nishiaki and Farhad Guliyev. Hardback; 210x297mm; 384 pages; 285 figures, 37 tables (colour throughout). 708 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698787. £88.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698794. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Göytepe: Neolithic Excavations in the Middle Kura Valley, Azerbaijan, publishes the first round of fieldwork and research (2008-2013) at this key site for understanding the emergence and development of food-producing communities in the South Caucasus. Situated close to the Fertile Crescent of Southwest Asia, where Neolithisation processes occurred earlier, research in the South Caucasus raises intriguing research questions, including issues of diffusion from the latter and interaction with ‘incoming’ Neolithic communities as well as the possibility of independent local Neolithisation processes. In order to address these issues in the South Caucasus, a joint Azerbaijan–Japan research programme was launched in 2008 to investigate Göytepe, one of the largest known Neolithic mounds in the South Caucasus. The results of the first phase of the project (2008-2013) presented here provide rich archaeological data from multi-disciplinary perspectives: chronology, architecture, technology, social organisation, and plant and animal exploitation, to name a few. This volume is the first to present these details in a single report of the South Caucasian Neolithic site using a high-resolution chronology based on dozens of radiocarbon dates.

About the Editors
Yoshihiro Nishiaki, who received his BA and MA from the University of Tokyo and PhD from University College London, is a professor of prehistoric archaeology at the University of Tokyo and Director of its University Museum. His research involves the prehistory of Southwest Asia and its neighbouring regions through fieldwork and archaeological analyses of material remains. He has directed a number of field campaigns at Palaeolithic and Neolithic sites in Syria, Iran, Azerbaijan, and Uzbekistan. The Neolithisation processes of the South Caucasus have been a major target of his research in the past few decades. ;

Farhad Guliyev, a graduate of the Baku State University of the Republic of Azerbaijan, received his PhD from the Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences (ANAS) and currently serves as Director of the Museum of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, ANAS. His major research interests lie in the socio-economic development of the South Caucasus from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age. His recent international field projects besides Göytepe include the Neolithic sites of Hacı Elamxanlıtepe, Menteshtepe and Kiciktepe, also in western Azerbaijan.
NEW: Discurso, espacio y poder en las religions antiguas edited by Rafael A. Barroso-Romero and José Ángel Castillo Lozano. Paperback; 203x276mm; 212 pages; 12 figures, 1 table; Spanish text. 132 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698848. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698855. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas aims to reflect on how the wielders of power, be they religious, social or political, shape the discourses that justify their power within the framework of a society or a specific group, and how space participates in these discourses. Intellectuals, aristocrats, holy men or even the dead all needed to shape a discourse that would allow them to justify their hierarchies, whether they were internal or common to all of society, to reach a social consensus and to sustain them over time. The forms in which power used religion to express itself were quite diverse, such as ritual violence, martyrdom, sacrifice, or even divine trickery. Sometimes certain spaces became places whose political and religious control brought about conflicts, whose resolution was found through the legitimisation generated by the complex theological discourse, which reinforced the extraordinary qualities of the gods to reaffirm their authority, or through the cohesive value of the rites. This volume analyses these questions through fourteen works by sixteen researchers from different institutions. It includes studies carried out with materials from a wide range of sources: epigraphy, the archaeological record, and literary sources.

About the Editors
Rafael A. Barroso-Romero is a doctoral researcher at the Max-Weber-Kolleg, Universität Erfürt and at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where he lectures as a member of the Department of Ancient History. He is currently developing his doctoral research on materiality, spatiality, and the body in unusual burials in the Roman West. ;

José Ángel Castillo Lozano completed his Doctorate in History at the Universidad de Murcia. He is currently a High School teacher. His area of specialisation lies in the world of Late Antiquity, on which he has published around fifteen papers.

Spanish Description
Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas pretende reflexionar acerca de cómo el poder da forma a los discursos que lo justifican en el marco de una sociedad o de un grupo concreto y cómo el espacio participa de aquellos. Intelectuales, aristócratas, hombres santos o incluso los difuntos, todos ellos necesitaron configurar un discurso que permitiera justificar sus jerarquías −ya fueran internas o comunes a toda la sociedad− consensuarlas socialmente y sustentarlas en el tiempo. Las formas en las que el poder utilizaba a la religión para expresarse fueron muy diversas, como la violencia ritual, el martirio, el sacrificio, o incluso el engaño divino. A veces, determinados espacios se convirtieron en lugares cuyo control político y religioso generaba conflictos, cuya solución se encontró en la legitimación generada por el complejo discurso teológico, que refuerza las cualidades extraordinarias de los dioses para reafirmar su autoridad, o por el valor cohesivo de los ritos. Este volumen analiza tales cuestiones a través de catorce trabajos de dieciséis investigadores procedentes de diversos centros. Recoge investigaciones realizadas con materiales de muy diversa procedencia: la epigrafía, el registro arqueológico o las fuentes literarias.

Rafael A. Barroso-Romero es Graduado en Historia (UCO) y Máster en Ciencias de las Religiones (UCM). Actualmente es investigador predoctoral en el Max-Weber-Kolleg (IGS “Resonant Self- World Relations in Ancient and Modern Socio-Religious Practices”) de la Universität Erfürt y al mismo tiempo en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, donde imparte docencia como miembro del Departamento de Prehistoria, Historia Antigua y Arqueología. ;

José A. Castillo-Lozano (1991) es graduado en Historia en la Universidad de Murcia. En la actualidad es profesor de secundaria (funcionario de carrera) y doctor en historia. Su ámbito de especialización radica en el mundo de la Antigüedad Tardía del cual ha publicado un
NEW: Professor Challenger and his Lost Neolithic World: The Compelling Story of Alexander Thom and British Archaeoastronomy by Euan W. MacKie†. Paperback; 203x276mm; 158 pages; 81 figures (colour throughout). 131 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918330. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918347. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Professor Challenger and his Lost Neolithic World combines the two great passions of the author’s life: reconstructing the Neolithic mind and constructively challenging consensus in his professional domain. The book is semi-autobiographical, charting the author’s investigation of Alexander Thom’s theories, in particular regarding the alignment of prehistoric monuments in the landscape, across a number of key Neolithic sites from Kintraw to Stonehenge and finally Orkney. It maps his own perspective of the changing reception to Thom’s ideas by the archaeological profession from initial curiosity and acceptance to increasing scepticism. The text presents historical summaries of the various strands of evidence from key Neolithic sites across the UK and Ireland with the compelling evidence from the Ness of Brodgar added as an appendix in final justification of his approach to the subject.

About the Author Euan W. MacKie (1936-2020), was a British archaeologist who graduated with a degree in Archaeology and Anthropology from St John’s College, Cambridge in 1959. He excavated at the Mayan site of Xunantunich in 1959-60 and was then employed at the British Museum Department of Ethnography before becoming Curator and Keeper of Archaeology and Anthropology at the Hunterian Museum at the University of Glasgow where he later obtained his PhD. His principal research areas were the brochs and vitrified forts of the Scottish Iron Age, and archaeoastronomy – the investigation of the astronomical knowledge of prehistoric cultures.

Reviews
'History matters, and this comprehensive volume sheds light not just on the particular period covered but on how its legacy lives on in colouring our view of archaeoastronomy today.'—Liz Henty, British Archaeology, May 2021
NEW: “Los animales enseñaron el camino…”: La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas by María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa and José Carlos Castañeda Reyes. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94 pages; colour throughout. 130 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698596. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698602. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

“Los animales enseñaron el camino…”: La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas examines the past fauna of the Sierra Gorda region of Mexico, and its representation in archaeological ceramics. Queretaro's Sierra Gorda was declared a “Biosphere Reserve” on May 19, 1997, by presidential decree. As a natural area thus protected, there are almost 400,000 hectares of great biodiversity, in which there are at least 15 types and subtypes of different vegetation, more than 1800 species of plants, 124 of fungi and 550 species of vertebrates, among other elements that prove the natural wealth of the region. As part of the "Northern Archaeological Project of the State of Querétaro, Mexico" (PANQ), the book presents ceramic representations of the fauna of the region, relating them to the oral traditions that the inhabitants of the region have preserved until now. In so doing it demonstrates the deep interdependence of humans and animals, and analyses wider cultural interconnections across Mesoamerica. The book goes on to analyze some of these Mesoamerican cultural traits, although its main goal is to highlight the archaeological evidence that has been recovered by the project since 1990 in this still little-known region of ancient Mexico.

About the Authors
María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa is Professor of Archaeology at the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Since 1990 she has led the Proyecto Arqueológico Norte del Estado de Querétaro, and has published extensively on the region. ;

José Carlos Castañeda-Reyes, a historian and archaeologist, is Professor at the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana campus Iztapalapa.

Spanish Description: “Los animales enseñaron el camino…” La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas by María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa and José Carlos Castañeda Reyes La Sierra Gorda queretana fue declarada “Reserva de la Biosfera” el 19 de mayo de 1997, por decreto presidencial. Como área natural así protegida, son casi 400 000 hectáreas de gran biodiversidad, en las que habitan al menos 15 tipos y subtipos de vegetación diferente, más de 1800 especies de plantas, 124 de hongos y 550 especies de vertebrados, entre otros elementos que comprueban la riqueza natural de la región. Como parte del desarrollo del “Proyecto Arqueológico del Norte del Estado de Querétaro, México” (PANQ), hemos localizado diversos testimonios que muestran ejemplos de la fauna del pasado, que además forma parte de algunas tradiciones orales que conservan los habitantes de la región hasta nuestros días. En el libro analizamos algunos de estos rasgos culturales mesoamericanos, si bien nos interesa resaltar primordialmente los testimonios arqueológicos que se han recuperado por el proyecto que desde 1990 viene desarrollándose en esta región, todavía poco conocida, del México antiguo.

María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa. Arqueóloga. Egresada de la Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia (Licenciatura en Arqueología) y de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Maestría en Historia del Arte y Doctorado en Estudios Mesoamericanos). Candidata al grado de Doctor en estudios Mesoamericanos por la UNAM. Profesor-Investigador de tiempo completo de la Dirección de Estudios Arqueológicos del INAH. Directora del Proyecto Arqueológico Norte del Estado de Querétaro, México, desde 1990. ;

Jose Carlos Castañeda Reyes. Mexicano. Historiador y arqueólogo. Egresado de la Escuela Normal Superior de México, de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México y de la Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Estudios de Maestría y Doctorado en Estudios de Asia y Africa, especialidad Medio Oriente (Historia antigua) por El Colegio de México. Profesor-investigador en el Departamento de Filosofía. Area de Historia del Estado y de la Sociedad, Universidad Autónoma Metr
NEW: Heritage in the Making: Dealing with the Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany edited by Flaminia Bartolini. Paperback; 210x297mm; 158 pages; colour throughout. 5 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698732. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The fifth volume of Ex Novo has the pleasure to host Flaminia Bartolini as guest editor for the special issue titled Heritage in the Making. Dealing with Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany. This collection of peer-reviewed papers stems in part from the successful workshop held at McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge in December 2018 under the aegis of the DAAD-Cambridge Hub. The event gathered several international heritage experts and professionals from both Germany and Italy to explore the complexities of handling Heritage related to Fascism and National Socialism.

The selection of papers contribute much to the debate on the shifting conditions of the reception of dictatorial regimes, and more specifically the fate of fascist material legacies from the aftermath of WWII to the present day.

The second part of this volume includes an additional contribution by Aydin Abar which keeps in with the broad theme of political reappropriation of the past lying at the core of Bartolini’s collection of papers but strays away from their geographical focus by extending the analysis to the exploitation of Achaemenian material legacies in reinforcing nationalist narratives in nineteenth and twentieth century Iran.
Luxury tableware? Terra sigillata in the coastal region of the northern Netherlands Pages 94-110 from Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience: Barbarian perspectives and Roman strategies to deal with new threats edited by Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß by Annet Nieuwhof. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696813-8.ISBN 9781789696813-8. Download Full PDF  

With thousands of finds, Roman terra sigillata (TS) is a common find category in terp settlements of the Northern Netherlands. It is traditionally interpreted as luxury tableware of the local elites, who acquired it through their contacts with Romans, or who were able to buy it from traders who came to this area with their merchandise. This paper questions that interpretation. The reason is that the far majority of TS is found as sherds, which, despite their good recognisability, only rarely fit other sherds. Moreover, many of these sherds are worked or used in some way. They were made into pendants, spindle whorls and playing counters, or show traces of deliberate breakage and of use for unknown purposes. Such traces are found on 70–80% of the sherds. The meaning of TS hence seems to have been symbolic rather than functional. Rather than as luxury tableware, TS may have been valued for the sake of the material itself, and may have been imported as sherds rather than as complete vessels. A symbolic value also shows from its long-term use. Used or worked TS sherds from the 2nd and 3rd century AD are often found in finds assemblages that may be interpreted as ritual deposits, not only from the Roman Period but also from the early Middle Ages. There are striking parallels for such use in early modern colonial contexts. TS sherds may have been part of the diplomatic gifts by which the Romans attempted to keep peace north of the limes, or may even have been payments for local products. These sherds might thus be comparable to the trade beads of early-modern European colonial traders.

Keywords
Northern Netherlands; terra sigillata; Roman colonialism; indigenous people; secondary use; exchange.
Mobility and Exchange across Borders: Exploring Social Processes in Europe during the First Millennium BCE – Theoretical and Methodological Approaches Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 9, Sessions XXXIV-4 and XXXIV-5 edited by Veronica Cicolani. Paperback; 205x290mm; 144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French. 707 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697292. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697308. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Mobility and Exchange across Borders presents the proceedings of Sessions XXXIVIV and XXXIV-V of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). Over the last few decades, the study of cultural interactions in the Iron Age has been considerably renewed thanks to the application of new methods and tools, opening the way to new research perspectives. The papers provide different examples from various archaeological contexts and regions while applying new methodologies able to highlight the diversity of cultural transfers. Their purpose is to stimulate a debate on human interactions and cultural transfers in order to open up new analytical perspectives on this topic and to critically examine the markers and approaches traditionally used to identify human and object mobility during the first millennium BC. Through the different approaches and perspectives presented herein, this volume aims to contribute to the renewal of the scientific debate on mobility and interactions as important drivers of societal change and to stimulate future research and debate.

About the editor
Veronica Cicolani is a permanent researcher at the CNRS French Institute, AOrOc UMR8546 CNRS-PSL and member of editorial team of Etudes Celtiques. Archaeologist specialist of European protohistory, and of the history of museum collections, her research focuses on technological and cultural interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds and on Italic craft practices. Since 2005, she has been a scientific collaborator of the National Museum of Saint-Germain-en-Laye (MAN), where she also co-curated the Golasecca French exhibition (2009-2010). She has been involved in international research programmes on Celtic-Italic interactions (DFG Die sitzbanck of Hochdorf, ANR Caecina) and led a French-Italian research program on Ligurian bronze craft production (Labex Archimede 2015-2016). During the past few years, she has been exploring new inter-disciplinary approaches to the study of cultural and technological interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds.
Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context: An Exploration into Culture, Society, and the Study of European Prehistory. Part 2 Practice – The Social, Space, and Materiality by Tobias L. Kienlin. Paperback; 210x297mm; 250 pages; 169 figures (colour throughout). 697 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697506. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697513. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Practice – The Social, Space, and Materiality forms the second part of Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context: An exploration into culture, society, and the study of European prehistory. It studies Bronze Age tells and our approaches towards an understanding of this fascinating way of life, drawing on the material remains of long-term architectural stability and references back to ancestral place. While the first volume challenged Neo-Diffusionist models of the influence of Mediterranean palatial centres on the development of tell communities in the Carpathians and an attendant focus on social stratification, the second part sets out an alternative theoretical approach, which foregrounds architecture and the social use of space. Unlike the reductionist macro perspective of mainstream social modelling, inspired by aspects of practice theory outlined in this book, the account given seeks to allow for what is truly remarkable about these sites, and what we can infer from them about the way of life they once framed and enabled. The stability seen on tells, and their apparent lack of change on a macro scale, are specific features of the social field, in a given region and for a specific period of time. Both stability and change are contingent upon specific historical contexts, including traditional practices, their material setting and human intentionality. They are not an inherent, given property of this or that ‘type’ of society or social structure. For our tells, it is argued here, underneath the specific manifestation of sociality maintained, we clearly do see social practices and corresponding material arrangements being negotiated and adjusted. Echoing the argument laid out in the first part of this study, it is suggested that archaeology should take an interest in such processes on the micro scale, rather than succumb to the temptation of neat macro history and great narratives existing aloof from the material remains of past lives.

About the Author
Tobias L. Kienlin is professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Cologne, Germany. His research interests include the European Neolithic, Copper and Bronze Ages, settlement archaeology, archaeological theory, social archaeology, material culture studies and archaeometallurgy. Current projects include BORBAS (Borsod Region Bronze Age Settlement) on Early Bronze Age tell sites in north-eastern Hungary and the Toboliu project in north-western Romania.
L’arte rupestre nella penisola e nelle isole italiane: rapporti tra rocce incise e dipinte, simboli, aree montane e viabilità Rock art in the Italian peninsula and islands: issues about the relation between engraved and painted rocks, symbols, mountain areas and paths edited by Francesco M. P. Carrera, Renata Grifoni Cremonesi and Anna Maria Tosatti. Paperback; 203x276mm; 484 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 129 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698237. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698244. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

L’arte rupestre nella penisola e nelle isole italiane presents the proceedings of IFRAO 2018 – Session 2H: Rock Art in the Italian Peninsula and Islands: Issues about the Relation between Engraved and Painted Rocks, Symbols, Mountain Areas and Paths. The various papers present a remarkable synthesis of current knowledge on inscriptions, engraved and painted, on the rock walls of the Italian peninsular. In recent years an increasing amount of data has been collected, characterized by a regional and peculiar iconography with some common elements: anthropomorphic figures, weapons, daggers, halberds and other several symbols, all stylised. A peculiarity of this research is the site’s locations within small shelters, inappropriate for habitation or in places suitable for supervising mountain and territory roads; this research demonstrates similarities to that carried out in the Western Mediterranean Sea. A new subject of relates to the possible interpretations of some engravings as solar and stellar symbols related to the measuring of time and to economic, daily and seasonal factors.

L’ouvrage «Art rupestre de la Péninsule italienne, de la Sicile, de la Sardaigne et de la Corse» qui publie les actes du 20ème Congrès International « Rock Art Congres IFRAO 2018 », dont les différentes communications ont été réunies par Francesco Carrera, Renata Grifoni Cremonesi et Anna Maria Tosatti, présente une remarquable synthèse des connaissances actuelles sur les inscriptions gravées et peintes sur les parois rocheuses des régions prises en compte. Le plus souvent très schématiques, difficilement datables, elles correspondent soit à des pictogrammes qui évoquent des objets de la vie courante, soit à des idéogrammes qui transmettent des idées liées à la pensée symbolique des peuples protohistoriques qui les ont réalisées. Quelques articles sont consacrés aux cupules creusées sur des roches en plein air pour récupérer l’eau de pluie, d’autres à des rainures très profondes qui correspondent à des “polissoirs”. – Henry de Lumley - Institut de Paléontologie Humaine, Paris
Offa's Dyke Journal: Volume 2 for 2020 edited by Howard Williams and Liam Delaney. Paperback; 176x250mm; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 2 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698527. £35.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

As the first and only open-access peer-reviewed academic journal about the landscapes, monuments and material culture of frontiers and borderlands in deep-time historical perspective, the Offa’s Dyke Journal (ODJ) has a concerted focus on the Anglo-Welsh borderlands given its sponsorship from the University of Chester and the Offa’s Dyke Association in support of the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory. Yet ODJ also provides a venue for original research on frontiers and borderlands in broader and comparative perspective. While Offa’s Dyke and Wat’s Dyke remain key foci, the contents of volumes 1 and 2 together illustrate the wider themes, debates and investigations encapsulated by ODJ concerning boundaries and barriers, edges and peripheries, from prehistory through to recent times, as well as considerations of the public archaeology and heritage of frontiers and borderlands.

Table of Contents
Collaboratory, Coronavirus and the Colonial Countryside – Howard Williams ;
Two Chimeras in the Landscape – Mark Bell ;
The ‘Wall of Severus’: Pseudoarchaeology and the West Mercian Dykes – Keith Fitzpatrick-Matthews ;
Saxon Kent versus Roman London? Presenting Borderland Heritage at the Faesten Dic in Joyden’s Wood, Kent – Ethan Doyle White ;
Living after Offa: Place-Names and Social Memory in the Welsh Marches – Howard Williams ;
Offa’s and Wat’s Dykes – David Hill ;
Grim’s Ditch, Wansdyke, and the Ancient Highways of England: Linear Monuments and Political Control – Tim Malim
Nothing but tombs and towers? Results of the Al-Mudhaybi Regional Survey 2019 by Stephanie Döpper & Conrad Schmidt. Pages 157-169 from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 50 2020 edited by Daniel Eddisford. PSAS. Download Full PDF  

Sites with towers in eastern Arabia have been interpreted as regional centres of the Early Bronze Age. One of those sites is Al-Khashbah in central Oman. Until now, however, nothing was known about its hinterland that would support the idea of a regional centre. The Al-Mudhaybi Regional Survey was therefore initiated in order, for the first time, to provide comprehensive and detailed knowledge of this third-millennium BC landscape. This paper presents the results of the remote sensing and ground truthing of potential features in the 2019 field season. Nearly 4000 archaeological structures ranging from the Neolithic to the modern era have been positively identified. Interestingly, some periods such as the Hafit and Wadi Suq were abundantly present, while the Umm an-Nar and Late Bronze Age were almost totally missing. It is also important to note that, except for the possible Hafit-period tower at Al-Fath, no Bronze Age settlement sites were found. The reasons behind this pattern remain to be discovered.
Bronze Age microliths at Saruq al-Hadid, Dubai by Mark W. Moore, Lloyd Weeks, Charlotte M. Cable, Yaaqoub Youssef Al-Ali, Mansour Boraik & Hassan Zein. Pages 149-166 from Stone Tools of Prehistoric Arabia: Papers from the Special Session of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held on 21 July 2019 edited by K. Bretzke, R. Crassard and Y.H. Hilbert. PSAS. Download Full PDF  

Excavations at Saruq al-Hadid, Dubai, have recovered a large assemblage of stone artefacts, including backed microliths, from a dense midden of animal bone deposited during the mid-second millennium BC. Stoneworkers at Saruq al-Hadid combined simple core reduction methods with sophisticated backing techniques to produce the microliths. Unstandardized flake blanks were backed directly, or were truncated into segments which were subsequently backed. The final stage of backing was carefully controlled and was probably accomplished using a pressure technique; the backed surface on many microliths is distinctively domed in profile. Most microliths are asymmetrical in shape and many display a distinctive scalene triangle morphology. The microliths probably functioned as armatures for arrows, although other functions are possible. Here we contextualize microlith production at Saruq al-Hadid through a review of late prehistoric microlith traditions in south-eastern Arabia and neighbouring regions of Asia and Africa. This raises intriguing but unresolved issues related to preceding technological traditions, cultural connections, and group identity.
Archaeology Today: A Colouring Book by Cornelius Holtorf and Daniel Lindskog. Paperback; 210x297mm; 16 pages; black & white throughout. 704 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698190. £4.99 (No VAT). Download Full PDF   Buy Now

This colouring book offers a short introduction to the world of the contemporary archaeologist, exploring new approaches and theories of investigation. With text by professional archaeologist Cornelius Holtorf and beautiful, highly detailed illustrations by archaeologically trained professional illustrator Daniel Lindskog, each page is full of information to explore, and designs to colour.

About the Contributors
Cornelius Holtorf is Professor of Archaeology at Linnaeus University in Sweden. ;

Daniel Lindskog is a professional illustrator with a degree in archaeology.
Travelling the Korosko Road: Archaeological Exploration in Sudan’s Eastern Desert edited by W. Vivian Davies and Derek A. Welsby. Hardback; 205x290mm; 252 pages; 493 plates, 74 figures (colour throughout). 688 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 24. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698039. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698046. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume publishes accounts of archaeological exploration carried out during the last 30 years or so in the Sudanese Eastern Desert. It is divided into two related parts.

The first and foremost covers results from the work of the Centro Ricerche sul Deserto Orientale (CeRDO), which is based at Varese in northern Italy. Between 1989 and 2006, CeRDO, directed by the brothers Alfredo and Angelo Castiglioni, ran a pioneering programme of expeditions, which traversed the so-called ‘Korosko Road’ (the main desert route connecting Egypt and Sudan) and followed multiple other tracks throughout the Eastern Desert. They encountered in the process a rich archaeological landscape, hundreds of previously undocumented sites, many frequented over millennia, prominent among them gold-production areas and their associated settlements. The CeRDO record, the photographic database, the material retrieved, to which several of the papers published here are devoted, are now all the more valuable, in that many of these sites have since been badly disturbed and some entirely destroyed by recent goldmining activities.

The second part, introduced by a concise account of the historical usage of the Korosko Road, reports in full on a single, short season of documentation, organized in 2013 under the auspices, and with the support, of the Sudan Archaeological Research Society. Its main aim was detailed recording of a group of pharaonic rock-inscriptions discovered by CeRDO expeditions, most located along the Korosko Road and almost all related to the colonial gold-working industry. The project included also a degree of investigation and mapping of the wider context, as well as the recording and study of associated archaeological material, in particular of ceramic remains. The results complement and usefully extend in part those of CeRDO.
Conversations in Human Evolution: Volume 1 edited by Lucy Timbrell. Paperback; 203x276mm; 124 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 128 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695854. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695861. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Conversations in Human Evolution is an ongoing science communication initiative seeking to explore the breadth and interdisciplinarity of human evolution studies. This volume reports twenty interviews (referred to as ‘conversations’ as they are informal in style) with scholars at the forefront of human evolution research, covering the broad scientific themes of quaternary and archaeological science, Palaeolithic archaeology, biological anthropology and palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary anthropology and evolutionary genetics. This project features academics at various different stages in their careers and from all over the world; in this volume alone, researchers are based at institutions in seven different countries (namely the United Kingdom, Australia, the United States of America, Germany, Denmark, India, and China), covering four continents.

Having arisen at the start of the COVID19 pandemic, Conversations in Human Evolution aims to encourage engagement with both human evolutionary studies and the broader socio-political issues that persist within academia, the latter of which is particularly pertinent during this time of global uncertainty. The conversations delve deeply into the study of our species’ evolutionary history through the lens of each sub-discipline, as well as detailing some of the most current advances in research, theory and methods. Overall, Conversations in Human Evolution seeks to bridge the gap between the research and researcher through contextualisation of the science with personal experience and historical reflection.

About the Editor
Lucy Timbrell is an AHRC-funded PhD researcher in the Archaeology of Human Origins Research Group at the University of Liverpool. Broadly, she is interested in the evolution of modern human diversity, with her doctoral research focussing on quantifying the population structure of early Homo sapiens in Late-Middle Pleistocene Africa. Alongside her PhD research, she organises the widely-known University of Liverpool Evolutionary Anthropology seminar series.
New Frontiers in Archaeology: Proceedings of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference 2019 edited by Kyra Kaercher, Monique Arntz, Nancy Bomentre, Xosé L. Hermoso-Buxán, Kevin Kay, Sabrina Ki, Ruairidh Macleod, Helena Muñoz-Mojado, Lucy Timbrell and Izzy Wisher. Paperback; 203x276mm; 308 pages; illustrated throughout (83 pages of colour). Print RRP: £48.00. 127 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697940. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697957. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume is the result of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference (CASA), held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research from September 13–15, 2019. CASA developed out of the Annual Student Archaeology Conference, first held in 2013, which was formed by students at Cambridge, Oxford, Durham and York. In 2017, Cambridge became the home of the conference and the name was changed accordingly. The conference was developed to give students (from undergraduate to PhD candidates) in archaeology and related fields the chance to present their research to a broad audience.

The theme for the 2019 conference was New Frontiers in Archaeology and this volume presents papers from a wide range of topics such as new geographical areas of research, using museum collections and legacy data, new ways to teach archaeology and new scientific or theoretic paradigms. From hunting and gathering in the Neolithic to the return of artefacts to Turkey, the papers contained within show a great variety in both geography and chronology. Discussions revolve around access to data, the role of excavation in today’s archaeology, the role of local communities in archaeological interpretation and how we can ask new questions of old data. This volume presents 18 papers arranged in the six sessions with the two posters in their thematic sessions.