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Earthen Construction Technology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 11 Session IV-5 edited by Annick Daneels and Maria Torras Freixa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 168 pages; colour throughout. 719 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697230. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697247. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Earthen Construction Technology presents the papers from Session IV-5 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The archaeological study of earthen construction has until now focused on typology and conservation, rather than on its anthropological importance. Earth is the permanent building material of humankind, and was used by the world’s earliest civilizations for their first urban programmes. The architectural and engineering know-how required to carry out these monumental achievements can only be obtained through archaeological research: extensive excavations with attention to architectural and structural features, and their collapse, coupled with typological, mineralogical, micromorphological, botanical, chemical, and mechanical studies of building materials. This line of research is recent, starting in the 1980s in Europe, but is rapidly growing and illustrated in this volume.

About the Editors
Annick Daneels, archaeologist, PhD (UGent, Belgium, and UNAM, Mexico), senior researcher at the Institute of Anthropological Research of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City. Since 1981 active in archaeological research in Central Veracruz, on the Mexican Gulf coast, with a focus on monumental earthen architecture since 2004. Director of four interdisciplinary projects on Mesoamerican Earthen Architecture since 2009, including excavations, preservation, experimental archaeology, and mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, botanical (pollen, phytoliths, macroremains), mechanical, and micromorphological analysis of archaeological and experimental construction samples. ;

Maria Torras Freixa, archaeologist, PhD (UB, Spain), independent researcher. Since 2013 active in archaeological research on the formation of premodern cities and urban planning, with a focus on Teotihuacan, in the Central Mexican Highlands. Team member of an interdisciplinary project in Teotihuacan since 2018, including fieldwork and geophysical surveys.
“Los animales enseñaron el camino…”: La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas by María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa and José Carlos Castañeda Reyes. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94 pages; colour throughout. 130 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698596. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698602. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

“Los animales enseñaron el camino…”: La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas examines the past fauna of the Sierra Gorda region of Mexico, and its representation in archaeological ceramics. Queretaro's Sierra Gorda was declared a “Biosphere Reserve” on May 19, 1997, by presidential decree. As a natural area thus protected, there are almost 400,000 hectares of great biodiversity, in which there are at least 15 types and subtypes of different vegetation, more than 1800 species of plants, 124 of fungi and 550 species of vertebrates, among other elements that prove the natural wealth of the region. As part of the "Northern Archaeological Project of the State of Querétaro, Mexico" (PANQ), the book presents ceramic representations of the fauna of the region, relating them to the oral traditions that the inhabitants of the region have preserved until now. In so doing it demonstrates the deep interdependence of humans and animals, and analyses wider cultural interconnections across Mesoamerica. The book goes on to analyze some of these Mesoamerican cultural traits, although its main goal is to highlight the archaeological evidence that has been recovered by the project since 1990 in this still little-known region of ancient Mexico.

About the Authors
María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa is Professor of Archaeology at the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Since 1990 she has led the Proyecto Arqueológico Norte del Estado de Querétaro, and has published extensively on the region. ;

José Carlos Castañeda-Reyes, a historian and archaeologist, is Professor at the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana campus Iztapalapa.

Spanish Description: “Los animales enseñaron el camino…” La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas by María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa and José Carlos Castañeda Reyes La Sierra Gorda queretana fue declarada “Reserva de la Biosfera” el 19 de mayo de 1997, por decreto presidencial. Como área natural así protegida, son casi 400 000 hectáreas de gran biodiversidad, en las que habitan al menos 15 tipos y subtipos de vegetación diferente, más de 1800 especies de plantas, 124 de hongos y 550 especies de vertebrados, entre otros elementos que comprueban la riqueza natural de la región. Como parte del desarrollo del “Proyecto Arqueológico del Norte del Estado de Querétaro, México” (PANQ), hemos localizado diversos testimonios que muestran ejemplos de la fauna del pasado, que además forma parte de algunas tradiciones orales que conservan los habitantes de la región hasta nuestros días. En el libro analizamos algunos de estos rasgos culturales mesoamericanos, si bien nos interesa resaltar primordialmente los testimonios arqueológicos que se han recuperado por el proyecto que desde 1990 viene desarrollándose en esta región, todavía poco conocida, del México antiguo.

María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa. Arqueóloga. Egresada de la Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia (Licenciatura en Arqueología) y de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Maestría en Historia del Arte y Doctorado en Estudios Mesoamericanos). Candidata al grado de Doctor en estudios Mesoamericanos por la UNAM. Profesor-Investigador de tiempo completo de la Dirección de Estudios Arqueológicos del INAH. Directora del Proyecto Arqueológico Norte del Estado de Querétaro, México, desde 1990. ;

Jose Carlos Castañeda Reyes. Mexicano. Historiador y arqueólogo. Egresado de la Escuela Normal Superior de México, de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México y de la Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Estudios de Maestría y Doctorado en Estudios de Asia y Africa, especialidad Medio Oriente (Historia antigua) por El Colegio de México. Profesor-investigador en el Departamento de Filosofía. Area de Historia del Estado y de la Sociedad, Universidad Autónoma Metr
Redonner vie à une collection: les terres cuites communes du fort La Tour by Julie Toupin. Paperback; xviii+248 pages; 19 tables, 1 graph, 13 figures, fully illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). French text. (Print RRP £54.00). 101 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693836. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693843. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Research on common earthenware from the first half of the 17th century is very elementary, when it exists at all. This study seeks to bring back to life the ceramics, the inhabitants and the site where the objects were used. The collection includes 1602 fragments from 277 common earthenware objects coming from the period of occupation of Fort La Tour (1631-1645) in Portland Point, New Brunswick. These pieces were mostly made in France, but some are probably of English origin.

Mostly through the visual identification of the features included in the ceramic body, a classification system was developed with four main groups, 28 types, and 10 variations. With this classification system, earthenware objects were able to be grouped based on the activities for which they were used and related to their uses and functions. This process enabled links to be established with the daily use of the earthenware objects on a French site in the first half of the 17th century.

French description
Les recherches portant sur les terres cuites communes datant de la première demie du XVIIe siècle sont pratiquement inexistantes ou sont très élémentaires. Cette recherche se veut une étude qui permettra de redonner vie aux objets cérames ainsi qu’aux habitants et au site sur lequel ces objets furent utilisés. Notre collection comprend un ensemble de 1 602 tessons regroupés en 277 objets de terres cuites communes provenant de la phase d'occupation du fort La Tour (1631-1645) à Portland Point au Nouveau-Brunswick (BhDm-7). Ces pièces sont majoritairement de facture françaises, mais quelques objets sont probablement anglais.

Nous avons élaboré, principalement par l’identification visuelle des inclusions comprises dans la pâte, une typologie céramique comprenant quatre grandes familles, 28 types et 10 variantes. À partir de cette classification, les objets en terre cuite commune furent regroupés à l'intérieur d’activités fonctionnelles qui ont été reliées aux usages et aux fonctions de ces céramiques. Cette démarche a permis d’établir des liens avec l’utilisation quotidienne des terres cuites communes sur un site français de la première demie du XVIIe siècle.
Ancient Engineering: Selective Ceramic Processing in the Middle Balsas Region of Guerrero, Mexico by Jennifer Meanwell. xiv+352 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 36 2017 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 48. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916503. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916510. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume has two main objectives: establishing a chronology of the Middle Balsas and detailing the region’s pottery production methods. The author posits that pottery intended for different functions was often deliberately made and/or decorated in ways that were chosen to make the vessels more appropriate for their intended functions. More specifically, this study determines whether any of the pottery production patterns identified in the region are linked to specific constraints imposed by the materials during the process of pottery manufacture. For example, it examines whether variables such as vessel shape and wall thickness correlate with the clay types and processing techniques determined during thin section analysis of the ancient sherds. Additionally, certain production behaviours are identified that are characteristic of the entire region and that can be used as markers of local tradition.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

North American Rock Art Research 2010-2014 by Reinaldo Morales Jr. Taken from Rock Art Studies: News of the World V edited by Paul Bahn, Natalie Franklin, Matthias Strecker and Ekaterina Devlet. Pages 225-243.Download Full PDF  

North American rock art research since 2010 includes many familiar approaches, some modified to meet contemporary needs, and a few innovations that are maturing into standard research tools. The living voices of descendant communities are more important than ever to many researchers, who acknowledge that our enterprise is essentially one of outsiders looking in. Still others choose to begin on the inside, with the shared structures of human cognition, and approach the visible results (the rock art) as the gestural evidence of lost communicative acts. We even see some studies trying to reinforce one approach with the other—hybrid solutions in an increasingly pluralist endeavour. The information we gather is coming more and more from once invisible views of rock art: GIS-enabled distribution models of select data over more detailed landscapes; portable spectroscopy, microscopy, two- and three-dimensional extreme-resolution imaging; and drone-assisted photography and video (shared with more curious eyes through the explosion of rock art on social media). The last five years of rock art research in North America reflect the contributions of established academics and their students (off the lapel pin and into the lecture notes, to modify an old phrase), and the contributions of volunteers and avocationalists whose tireless dedication and unbridled enthusiasm remain infectious.
North America Chapter 20 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Dan Hicks and Michael D. Petraglia. 409-454.Download Full PDF  

This chapter presents a characterization of the North American collections. It begins with a discussion of the c. 271 ‘archaeological’ objects from North America that were part of the PRM founding collection (20.2). It then discusses the collections from the Northeastern United States (20.3), the Southern United States (20.4), the Midwestern United States (20.5), and the Western United States (20.6), before considering the material from Canada (20.7) and Greenland (20.8). Brief conclusions are drawn in section 20.9. The archaeological collections from Hawai’i are not discussed here, but form part of the discussion of Polynesian material in Chapter 27. Similarly, the archaeological collections from Puerto Rico are discussed with the Caribbean material in Chapter 19. The PRM holds no ‘archaeological’ collections from the United States Virgin Islands. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
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