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NEW: Earthen Construction Technology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 11 Session IV-5 edited by Annick Daneels and Maria Torras Freixa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 168 pages; colour throughout. 719 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697230. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697247. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Earthen Construction Technology presents the papers from Session IV-5 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The archaeological study of earthen construction has until now focused on typology and conservation, rather than on its anthropological importance. Earth is the permanent building material of humankind, and was used by the world’s earliest civilizations for their first urban programmes. The architectural and engineering know-how required to carry out these monumental achievements can only be obtained through archaeological research: extensive excavations with attention to architectural and structural features, and their collapse, coupled with typological, mineralogical, micromorphological, botanical, chemical, and mechanical studies of building materials. This line of research is recent, starting in the 1980s in Europe, but is rapidly growing and illustrated in this volume.

About the Editors
Annick Daneels, archaeologist, PhD (UGent, Belgium, and UNAM, Mexico), senior researcher at the Institute of Anthropological Research of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City. Since 1981 active in archaeological research in Central Veracruz, on the Mexican Gulf coast, with a focus on monumental earthen architecture since 2004. Director of four interdisciplinary projects on Mesoamerican Earthen Architecture since 2009, including excavations, preservation, experimental archaeology, and mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, botanical (pollen, phytoliths, macroremains), mechanical, and micromorphological analysis of archaeological and experimental construction samples. ;

Maria Torras Freixa, archaeologist, PhD (UB, Spain), independent researcher. Since 2013 active in archaeological research on the formation of premodern cities and urban planning, with a focus on Teotihuacan, in the Central Mexican Highlands. Team member of an interdisciplinary project in Teotihuacan since 2018, including fieldwork and geophysical surveys.
Indigenous Heritage and Rock Art Worldwide Research in Memory of Daniel Arsenault edited by Carole Charette, Aron Mazel and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; 210 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French. 691 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696899. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696905. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Professor Daniel Arsenault, along with his wife, Nadine Desbiens, and stepson, Jacob Desbiens-Doyle, were sadly taken from this world in 2016 following a tragic car accident. Daniel was the leading exponent in Canadian Shield rock art. Working in the northern part of Quebec, Daniel explored many hundreds of square kilometres of this vast area for rock art. Working with ethnographers and First Nation people, Daniel became a formidable force in promoting this little known assemblage, lecturing all over the world and stimulating audiences wherever he went. Complementing his knowledge of rock art, Daniel also had a deep understanding of the heritage of the people whose ancestors made the images. Shortly before his death, Daniel was made an Erasmus Mundus Professor at Polytechnic Institute of Tomar in Portugal. Here, he was due to share his wealth of knowledge and enthusiasm about rock art and cultural heritage to an attentive audience.

Daniel clearly had much more to offer, and this book is an extension of his ways of thinking. He has left an important legacy that has touched the lives of many, including people who contributed to this volume.

The book has 14 thought-provoking chapters and deals with Daniel’s first love - the archaeology of artistic endeavour. It gathers together both academic colleagues and family who share with the reader elements of Daniel’s life. The book is also a serious academic volume, providing the reader with new ideas about the interpretation and dating of rock art, ethnography, heritage and material culture.

About the Author
Carole Charette holds a PhD in art education and design at Concordia University, Quebec; an MFA in stylistic interpretations in typography and a degree in graphic design at Université Laval, Quebec; a certificate in multimedia at Sheridan College, Ontario; and a diploma in exhibition design at Collège du Vieux-Montréal, Quebec. She was an assistant professor at MacEwan University in Edmonton (2014–2018) and has also been a creative director and editor of several publications about design.

Aron Mazel is a Reader in Heritage Studies in Media, Culture, and Heritage at Newcastle University and a Research Associate in the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand.

George Nash is employed at the Museum of Prehistoric Art (Quaternary and Prehistory Geosciences Centre, Maçao, Portugal [IPT]). George has been an academic and professional archaeologist for the past 35 years and has undertaken extensive fieldwork on prehistoric rock-art in Indonesia, Malaysia, Norway, Sardinia, Spain, Sweden, and more recently, the Negev (Israel).

Table of Contents
Préface / Preface ;
Nécrologie / Necrology - Daniel Arsenault ( 1957–2016 ) ;
Daniel Arsenault : The scholarly legacy gone but not forgotten ;
Dancing in the dark with firelight: the power of shaded paintings in the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg and surrounding areas, southeastern Africa – Aron Mazel ;
Contextualising megalithic rock art on Neolithic chambered tombs: A Welsh perspective – George Nash ;
Understanding landscape composition without rock art: A study of panel/canvas behaviour in the Valcamonica, Lombardy, Northern Italy – George Nash ;
Prehistory of central Portugal: brief panoramic of rock art and archaeometry studies – Sara Garcês, Hugo Gomes, Luiz Oosterbeek, Pierluigi Rosina ;
Pleistocene Art at the Beginnings of the Twentieth-First Century: Rethinking the place of Europe in a Globalised Context – Oscar Moro Abadía and Bryn Tapper ;
A multifaceted approach for contextualising the rock art of the Algonquian First Nations in the Canadian Shield – Daniel Arsenault ;
E=mc0, an equation for studying the timeframes of world rock art – Daniel Arsenault ;
“Los animales enseñaron el camino…”: La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas by María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa and José Carlos Castañeda Reyes. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94 pages; colour throughout. 130 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698596. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698602. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

“Los animales enseñaron el camino…”: La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas examines the past fauna of the Sierra Gorda region of Mexico, and its representation in archaeological ceramics. Queretaro's Sierra Gorda was declared a “Biosphere Reserve” on May 19, 1997, by presidential decree. As a natural area thus protected, there are almost 400,000 hectares of great biodiversity, in which there are at least 15 types and subtypes of different vegetation, more than 1800 species of plants, 124 of fungi and 550 species of vertebrates, among other elements that prove the natural wealth of the region. As part of the "Northern Archaeological Project of the State of Querétaro, Mexico" (PANQ), the book presents ceramic representations of the fauna of the region, relating them to the oral traditions that the inhabitants of the region have preserved until now. In so doing it demonstrates the deep interdependence of humans and animals, and analyses wider cultural interconnections across Mesoamerica. The book goes on to analyze some of these Mesoamerican cultural traits, although its main goal is to highlight the archaeological evidence that has been recovered by the project since 1990 in this still little-known region of ancient Mexico.

About the Authors
María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa is Professor of Archaeology at the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Since 1990 she has led the Proyecto Arqueológico Norte del Estado de Querétaro, and has published extensively on the region. ;

José Carlos Castañeda-Reyes, a historian and archaeologist, is Professor at the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana campus Iztapalapa.

Spanish Description: “Los animales enseñaron el camino…” La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas by María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa and José Carlos Castañeda Reyes La Sierra Gorda queretana fue declarada “Reserva de la Biosfera” el 19 de mayo de 1997, por decreto presidencial. Como área natural así protegida, son casi 400 000 hectáreas de gran biodiversidad, en las que habitan al menos 15 tipos y subtipos de vegetación diferente, más de 1800 especies de plantas, 124 de hongos y 550 especies de vertebrados, entre otros elementos que comprueban la riqueza natural de la región. Como parte del desarrollo del “Proyecto Arqueológico del Norte del Estado de Querétaro, México” (PANQ), hemos localizado diversos testimonios que muestran ejemplos de la fauna del pasado, que además forma parte de algunas tradiciones orales que conservan los habitantes de la región hasta nuestros días. En el libro analizamos algunos de estos rasgos culturales mesoamericanos, si bien nos interesa resaltar primordialmente los testimonios arqueológicos que se han recuperado por el proyecto que desde 1990 viene desarrollándose en esta región, todavía poco conocida, del México antiguo.

María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa. Arqueóloga. Egresada de la Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia (Licenciatura en Arqueología) y de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Maestría en Historia del Arte y Doctorado en Estudios Mesoamericanos). Candidata al grado de Doctor en estudios Mesoamericanos por la UNAM. Profesor-Investigador de tiempo completo de la Dirección de Estudios Arqueológicos del INAH. Directora del Proyecto Arqueológico Norte del Estado de Querétaro, México, desde 1990. ;

Jose Carlos Castañeda Reyes. Mexicano. Historiador y arqueólogo. Egresado de la Escuela Normal Superior de México, de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México y de la Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Estudios de Maestría y Doctorado en Estudios de Asia y Africa, especialidad Medio Oriente (Historia antigua) por El Colegio de México. Profesor-investigador en el Departamento de Filosofía. Area de Historia del Estado y de la Sociedad, Universidad Autónoma Metr
Anthropomorphic Images in Rock Art Paintings and Rock Carvings edited by Terence Meaden and Herman Bender. 606 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693577. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693584. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the realm of rock art, humanlike images appear widely through time and space from the Upper Palaeolithic to the Neolithic and Bronze Ages, and for some continents to later, yet still prehistoric, times. The artworks discussed in Anthropomorphic Images in Rock Art Paintings and Rock Carvings range from paintings, engravings or scratchings on cave walls and rock shelters, images pecked into rocky surfaces or upon standing stones, and major sacred sites (among them Gobekli Tepe, Avebury, Stonehenge, and the Palaeolithic Chauvet Cave) in which the possibility exists of recovery of the meanings intended by the artists and sculptors. Such prospects can relate to known or inferred legends, myths, folklore, rites and ritual, and often allude to matters that recognise the unremitting benefits of human, animal and crop fertility to humankind. Occasionally, relevant art forms are present not in whole but as pars pro toto, in which a part stands for or symbolises the whole. Images or artistic compositions often articulate, in ways more or less manifest, scenes of dramatic action as with hunting and dancing, mating and birthing, ritual and ceremony, some of which may openly or latently express yearnings for the rewards of fruitful fecundity – as with the much-loved worldview known as the hieros gamos or Sacred Marriage.

About the Editors
Terence Meaden has Oxford University degrees in archaeology (MSc) and physics (MA, DPhil). Formerly a physics professor, in retirement he is working full time in fieldwork and landscape archaeology studying aspects of the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods, chiefly in Ireland, Scotland and England. Recent publications include Stonehenge, Avebury and Drombeg Stone Circles Deciphered (2016), contributions to the Edinburgh University Journal of Lithic Studies (2017), and The Origins of the Universe, Earth, Life and Humanity (2018).

Herman Bender is an independent researcher with a background in geology (professional emphasis) and a technical field in industry. An amateur astronomer with decades of experience and approved historical consultant, he has nationally and internationally published in the fields of archeoastronomy, prehistoric trail research, petroform research, applied geophysics, cultural landscape studies and Northern archaic shamanistic traditions.
Redonner vie à une collection: les terres cuites communes du fort La Tour by Julie Toupin. Paperback; xviii+248 pages; 19 tables, 1 graph, 13 figures, fully illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). French text. (Print RRP £54.00). 101 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693836. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693843. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Research on common earthenware from the first half of the 17th century is very elementary, when it exists at all. This study seeks to bring back to life the ceramics, the inhabitants and the site where the objects were used. The collection includes 1602 fragments from 277 common earthenware objects coming from the period of occupation of Fort La Tour (1631-1645) in Portland Point, New Brunswick. These pieces were mostly made in France, but some are probably of English origin.

Mostly through the visual identification of the features included in the ceramic body, a classification system was developed with four main groups, 28 types, and 10 variations. With this classification system, earthenware objects were able to be grouped based on the activities for which they were used and related to their uses and functions. This process enabled links to be established with the daily use of the earthenware objects on a French site in the first half of the 17th century.

French description
Les recherches portant sur les terres cuites communes datant de la première demie du XVIIe siècle sont pratiquement inexistantes ou sont très élémentaires. Cette recherche se veut une étude qui permettra de redonner vie aux objets cérames ainsi qu’aux habitants et au site sur lequel ces objets furent utilisés. Notre collection comprend un ensemble de 1 602 tessons regroupés en 277 objets de terres cuites communes provenant de la phase d'occupation du fort La Tour (1631-1645) à Portland Point au Nouveau-Brunswick (BhDm-7). Ces pièces sont majoritairement de facture françaises, mais quelques objets sont probablement anglais.

Nous avons élaboré, principalement par l’identification visuelle des inclusions comprises dans la pâte, une typologie céramique comprenant quatre grandes familles, 28 types et 10 variantes. À partir de cette classification, les objets en terre cuite commune furent regroupés à l'intérieur d’activités fonctionnelles qui ont été reliées aux usages et aux fonctions de ces céramiques. Cette démarche a permis d’établir des liens avec l’utilisation quotidienne des terres cuites communes sur un site français de la première demie du XVIIe siècle.
Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era edited by Liz Thomas and Jill Campbell. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+150 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (36 colour plates). 426 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918316. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918323. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era presents a series of papers reflecting the latest approaches to the study of buildings from the historic period. This volume does not examine buildings as architecture, but adopts an archaeological perspective to consider them as artefacts, reflecting the needs of those who commissioned them. Studies have often failed to consider the historical contexts in which the buildings were constructed and how they were subsequently used and interpreted. The papers in this volume situate their interpretation in their social context. Buildings can inform us about past cultures as they are responsive and evolve to meet people’s needs over time.

The buildings examined in this volume range from the twelfth to the twenty-first century and cross continents including case-studies from America, Australia and Europe, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Scandinavia and the Mediterranean. Themes include: Approaches to the study of buildings, Buildings of Power, Buildings in Identity, Domestic Space and Urban and Village Spaces. The essays consider building design, role, and how the buildings were altered as their function changed to coincide with the needs and aspirations of those who owned or used the buildings. This collection of papers emphasizes the need for further international multidisciplinary approaches including archaeology, architectural history and art history in order to understand how ideas, styles, approaches and designs spread over time and space. Together, these papers generate valuable new insights into the study of buildings in the historic period.

About the Editors
LIZ THOMAS is a historical-archaeologist and heritage and cultural researcher based at the School of Natural and Built Environment, The Queen’s University of Belfast. She recently completed her British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship, a multidisciplinary study that focused on the docklands of Belfast, Northern Ireland. She specialises in the study of institutions, in particular won policymaking, political environments and human agency. Thomas’ current research is based on Public Heritage.

JILL CAMPBELL is a skilled buildings archaeologist. She has conducted fieldwork in Northern Ireland, England and Scotland and has produced architectural histories for the Northern Ireland Environment Agency. Dr Campbell has several published papers, and has contributed a chapter on medieval manor houses to the Oxford Handbook of Later Medieval Archaeology.
Identified skeletal collections: the testing ground of anthropology? by Charlotte Yvette Henderson and Francisca Alves Cardoso. 428 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918057. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918064. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Human skeletons are widely studied in archaeological, anthropological and forensic settings to learn about the deceased. Methods used to identify individuals in forensic contexts and to determine age and sex in archaeological settings are normally tested on identified skeletal collections: collections of skeletons with known age-at-death, sex, often occupation and cause of death. These collections often represent individuals dying within the last century, but this is variable and often depends on the purpose for creating the collection. Many were developed in attempts to understand local population biology whereas those collected recently are for forensic purposes: to improve identification in legal contexts. Some of these collections were developed from body donation programmes, while others have come from cemeteries: cemeteries which were either no longer viable or needed clearing. All these factors impact on who curates these collections: archaeology or anthropology departments and museums. However, unlike many other skeletons curated in these locations, these are individuals with names. All this raises ethical questions about their creation, curation and their use for research.

This book focusses on identified skeletal collections in the UK, Portugal, South Africa, USA and Canada. The chapters discuss how and why collections were amassed including the local legislation governing them. Alongside this run the ethical issues associated with their collection, curation and access to them. The demographics of the collections: who is included and why, along with such biases and how they can impact on research are also discussed, as are limitations in the documentary data associated with these individuals. The importance of these collections is also focussed on: particularly their role in developing and testing methods for age determination in adults. This shows why these collections are so vital to improve methods and interpretations for archaeological and forensic research. The importance of communicating this to the wider public is also addressed.

About the Editors CHARLOTTE HENDERSON is a researcher in CIAS – Research Centre for Anthropology and Health based in the Department of Life Sciences, Coimbra (Portugal). She completed her PhD at the University of Durham in the Department of Archaeology. Her research focusses on methods for identifying activity in past populations. She has a long-standing interest in ethics which she studied as part of her undergraduate degree in Philosophy.

FRANCISCA ALVES CARDOSO is a research fellow at CRIA – Centre for Research in Anthropology (Portugal). In 2008 she was awarded a PhD in Biological Anthropology/Paleopathology by the University of Durham (UK). Her research focuses on the significance of socio-economic and cultural variables in the interpretation of human skeletons. In 2014 she was awarded a grant to develop the project - Portuguese Human Identified Skeletal Collections (HISC): Shaping their ethical and legal framework, which aims to build a bridge between science and society on the importance of HISC, whilst considering their scientific value, social and cultural, as well as ethical implications.
My dear Miss Ransom: Letters between Caroline Ransom Williams and James Henry Breasted, 1898-1935 edited by Kathleen L. Sheppard. Paperback; 148x210mm; vi+310 pages; 5 black & white plates, 1 colour plate. 399 2018 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917821. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917838. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Caroline Louise Ransom Williams (1872-1952) is remembered as the first American university-trained female Egyptologist, but she is not widely-known in the history of science. Her mentor was James Henry Breasted, well-known as the first American Egyptologist and founder of the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago. As long as they worked together and as much as they depended on each other professionally, Ransom Williams is little more than a footnote in the published history of archaeology. She was a successful scholar, instructor, author, and museum curator. She also had personal struggles with her mother and her husband that affected the choices she could make about her career. This book presents the correspondence between Ransom Williams and Breasted because the letters are crucial in piecing together and allowing an in-depth analysis of her life and career.

The written conversation, comprised of 240 letters between the two, shows that Ransom Williams had a full life and productive career as the first American female Egyptologist. Through these letters, we see part of a life that is unique while at the same time analogous to other professional women in the period. This edition is the first book-length discussion of Ransom Williams’ life and career.

About the Editor DR. KATHLEEN SHEPPARD is Associate Professor in the Department of History and Political Science at Missouri S&T in Rolla, Missouri, USA. She received her PhD in the History of Science from the University of Oklahoma in 2010. Her research focuses on the history of Egyptology in the US and in the UK, and especially women's roles in the discipline. She finds that telling the life stories of women in Egyptology is not only interesting, but it is also crucial to fully understanding the founding and development of the discipline. In her spare time, she is a mom, wife, and Ironman triathlete.
Archaeological Data Recovery in the Piceance and Wyoming Basins of Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming edited by Matthew J. Landt. xx+358 pages; 142 illustrations, 109 tables (103 plates in colour). 396 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917951. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917968. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £58.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the United States of America, Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act requires that projects funded, authorized, or permitted by the federal government consider historic properties that may be affected by the development of those projects. To comply with Section 106, an interstate pipeline corridor in southwestern Wyoming and northwestern Colorado was surveyed to identify cultural resources and to evaluate them in terms of significance and potential listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Once sites were identified, a mitigation strategy was developed in coordination with the Bureau of Land Management. That plan prioritized important cultural resources within a regional archaeological context and included substantial excavations at 14 sites.

The archaeological excavations were successful in recovering the types of data necessary to address regional research issues that were raised in the project’s alternative mitigation plan. The data recovery effort included site-specific geophysical assessments as well as providing an opportunity to analyze the geology, fauna, flora, and tens of thousands of prehistoric and historical artifacts from the sites. While there is nothing about the number of artifacts that inherently adds to our understandings of past lifeways, the analyses substantially added to regional datasets for the Paleoindian, Archaic, Formative, Protohistoric, and Historical components. Specifically, the analyses addressed prehistoric chronometric and settlement patterns (Chapter 5), subsistence strategies (Chapter 6), lithic reduction strategies (Chapter 7), as well as synthesizing information for prehistoric hearths (Chapter 8) and architecture (Chapter 9). Chapter 10 focuses on the results of remote sensing at two sites. That is followed by regional syntheses of the prehistoric (Chapter 11) and historical data (Chapter 12). When combined with existing datasets, this synthetic work substantially improves the quality of regional archaeological interpretations. Given the results presented herein, it is clear that the mitigation approach within the pipeline corridor was successful in providing important archaeological information that advances local and regional understandings of past lifeways.

About the Editor
Matthew Landt has more than 20 years’ archaeological experience across the western and central United States. He has authored publications in regional and national journals and actively pursues the presentation of archaeological data to the public. He has worked at Alpine Archaeological Consultants since 2007. Alpine has provided cultural resource services for a wide variety of projects since their founding in 1988. During the past 30 years, they have completed numerous local, regional, and interstate projects and have a broad region of expertise, covering the Great Plains, Mountain West, Great Basin, and the Greater Southwest.
Innovative Approaches and Explorations in Ceramic Studies edited by Sandra L. López Varela. vi+144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (44 colour plates). 380 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917364. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917371. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Innovative Approaches and Explorations in Ceramic Studies celebrates thirty years of Ceramic Ecology, an international symposium initiated at the 1986 American Anthropological Association meeting at the suggestion of Frederick R. Matson. For almost twenty-five years, Dr. Charles Kolb organized the symposium to discuss multiple theoretical and methodological approaches to ceramic studies around the world. By fostering interdisciplinary interactions, the symposium has pushed the boundaries of what can be understood about the human experience through the creative and systematic study of ceramics. Contributions in this volume explore the application of instrumental techniques and experimental studies to analyze ceramics and follow innovative approaches to evaluate our methods and theories in our quest to learn about the societies we dedicate our studies to.

About the Author
Sandra L. Lopez Varela (PhD, University of London, 1996; RPA, since 2005) is a professor at the Faculty of Philosophy and Literature, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Motivated by her studies of Maya pottery in the Usumacinta region, she extended her analytical approach to the study of Maya formative ceramics in northern Belize. Her current research studies concentrate on the effects of social development policies and institutional economics to combat poverty on nonindustrial technologies, an interest that developed from her ethnoarchaeological studies of griddle making at Cuentepec, in the State of Morelos. The transdisciplinary and international approach to her research has brought together scientists from apparently unrelated fields to archaeology and to contribute to modern social inquiry, a dialogue that awarded her the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in 2012, with the project ‘Sustaining Heritage in the Future Cities of Development: archaeological analysis of institutional solutions to poverty’. Deriving from this innovative project she is developing a mobile application, ‘Alternative Mexico’, financed by UNAM, to empower and promote local communities’ definition of cultural heritage in Mexico’s City metropolitan area. Her international recognition to advance our knowledge of the past was recognized with her election to hold the Archaeology Seat of the American Anthropological Association (2011–2014). She has served as President of the Society for Archaeological Sciences (2009–2011) and as Treasurer of the Sociedad Mexicana de Antropología (2015-2017). In 2009, she joined the Mexican Academy of Sciences, Arts, Technology, and Humanities.
Ancient Engineering: Selective Ceramic Processing in the Middle Balsas Region of Guerrero, Mexico by Jennifer Meanwell. xiv+352 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 36 2017 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 48. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916503. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916510. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume has two main objectives: establishing a chronology of the Middle Balsas and detailing the region’s pottery production methods. The author posits that pottery intended for different functions was often deliberately made and/or decorated in ways that were chosen to make the vessels more appropriate for their intended functions. More specifically, this study determines whether any of the pottery production patterns identified in the region are linked to specific constraints imposed by the materials during the process of pottery manufacture. For example, it examines whether variables such as vessel shape and wall thickness correlate with the clay types and processing techniques determined during thin section analysis of the ancient sherds. Additionally, certain production behaviours are identified that are characteristic of the entire region and that can be used as markers of local tradition.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Tarascan Pottery Production in Michoacán, Mexico An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective by Eduardo Williams. xii+170 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 355 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916732. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916749. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Pottery is one of humankind’s most important inventions. It is thousands of years old, and it is fair to say that without it the development of civilization as we know it would not have been possible. Food preparation and storage, religion and ritual, wine-making, trade, art, and architecture, among many other human achievements, were all aided by pottery, an artificial material that lent itself to the elaboration of all kinds of objects: vessels, figurines, roof tiles, water pipes, fishnet weights, and tablets inscribed with the earliest forms of writing, to name but a few; a veritable litany of human creativity. This book examines a contemporary pottery tradition in Mesoamerica, but also looks back to the earliest examples of cultural development in this area. By means of ethnographic analogy and ceramic ecology, this study seeks to shed light on a modern indigenous community and on the theory, method and practice of ethnoarchaeology; undoubtedly one of the most important aspects of archaeological research in Mexico today.

Reviews
‘The author’s… argument situates the ethnoarchaeological method/theory as the… outcome of a deep anthropological archaeology tradition. Furthermore, the utility of ethnoarchaeology to theory building and bridging arguments in archaeology as well as sociocultural anthropology [is] highlighted amiably. The greater value of the [book]… is the concise reporting of the fieldwork illustrating the patterned physical manifestations of routine potting in and about households valuable to archaeologists reconstructing ancient pathways…' — Kirk D. Straight, Ethnoarchaeology, 2020

‘Williams deftly weaves… a compelling argument for incorporating modern ethnographic observance as suggested bridging methods for understanding… intangible cultural components in the archaeological record to serve as points of departure for reconstructing ancient craft creation processes…' — Lorraine A. Williams-Beck, Latin American Antiquity, 30(4), 2019
Set in Stone? War Memorialisation as a Long-Term and Continuing Process in the UK, France and the USA by Emma Login. xii+182 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 216 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912574. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912581. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book provides a holistic and longitudinal study of war memorialisation in the UK, France and the USA from 1860 to 2014. Moving beyond the social-political circumstances of a memorial’s construction, this study examines memorialisation as a continuing and transformative process. It explores the many ways in which war memorials are repeatedly appropriated, and re-appropriated, undergoing both physical and symbolic transformations. In order to study this full range of transformations, this book presents a unique analytical model that conceptualises objects of memory within three intersecting timescales: the chronological timescale, the conflict timescale and the object timescale. This new methodology facilitates an innovative, holistic approach of understanding engagement with a monument at any given moment in time, allowing meaningful comparisons to be made across both spatial and cultural boundaries. In doing so, it enables an approach to the cultural heritage conflict that moves beyond the socio-political to conceptualise war memorials within a shared cultural experience.
Heritage Management at Fort Hood, Texas: experiments in historic landscape characterisation by Glynn Barrett, Lucie Dingwall, Vince Gaffney, Simon Fitch, Cheryl Huckerby and Tony Maguire. Edited by Lucie Dingwall and Vince Gaffney. paperback; x+126 pages; 83 figures, plates, maps, plans, drawings and photographs (60 in colour); 27 tables; with CD. 24 2007. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739110. £19.99 (No VAT). Institutional Price £19.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

The landscape of Fort Hood, in central Texas, presents archaeologists and cultural resource managers with some of their most exacting but absorbing challenges. That much is clear from the activities of the many archaeologists and heritage managers who have sought to use the extensive cultural database and unique landscape of the base as a test bed for research and management methodologies. This project, carried out as an international collaboration between the Fort Hood Cultural Resource Management Team and the Institute of Archaeology and Antiquity (University of Birmingham, UK), sought to provide a novel application of historic landscape characterisation (HLC) methodologies at the base. For decades, the effective stewardship and management of cultural resources at Fort Hood, Texas, has proven to be a formidable challenge. Balancing this responsibility with the Army mission at Fort Hood, which includes ongoing intensive mechanized training across a 217,000-acre military reservation, has tested the abilities of even the most capable of cultural resource managers. The identification of over 2,000 archaeological sites on the installation, while a great accomplishment, pales in comparison to the demands of determining site significance. Now, with this innovative historic landscape characterization study, the authors have presented us with an extraordinary opportunity to view these resources within the context of a cultural landscape that systematically considers the multiple roles of Fort Hood. It is hoped that this will facilitate the move from significance determinations that are site-specific to ones based upon, as the authors state, the concepts of group value and spatial relationships at a landscape level. The accompanying CD (displaying selected data layers provided as Google Earth layers) assists readers in viewing and interpreting the data and the value of HLC procedures and output for the purposes of heritage management. Contents: 1. The Origins and Aims of the Fort Hood Historic Landscape Characterisation Project; 2) Approaches to historic landscape characterisation; 3) Fort Hood in Context; 4) The Fort Hood archaeological database; 5) The historic landscape characterisation project.
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