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NEW: Laying the Foundations: Manual of the British Museum Iraq Scheme Archaeological Training Programme edited by John MacGinnis and Sébastien Rey. Paperback; 205x225mm; illustrated in full colour throughout. 808 2022. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271408. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271415. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Laying the Foundations, which developed out of the British Museum’s ‘Iraq Scheme’ archaeological training programme, covers the core components for putting together and running an archaeological field programme. The focus is on practicality. Individual chapters address background research, the use of remote sensing, approaches to surface collection, excavation methodologies, survey with total (and multi) stations, use of a dumpy level, context classification, on-site recording, databases and registration, environmental protocols, conservation, photography, illustration, post-excavation site curation and report writing. While the manual is oriented to the archaeology of Iraq, the approaches are no less applicable to the Middle East more widely, an aim hugely facilitated by the open-source distribution of translations into Arabic and Kurdish.
NEW: Arqueología de la arquitectura en el oppidum oretano de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real): los bastiones de la puerta S by Jorge del Reguero González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94pp; 48 figures (colour throughout). Spanish text. 145 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803271088. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803271095. Institutional Price £9.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Arqueología de la arquitectura en el oppidum oretano de El Cerro de las Cabezas focuses on the two bastions that make up the south gate of the Iberian oppidum of Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real). It comprises two defensive constructions whose internal space fulfilled a socioeconomic function related to the storage of cereal. Primarily archaeoarchitectural, supported by the digitisation and study of the photographic archive of the excavation, the research aims to analyse the construction techniques and materials of both structures, define their successive construction phases within the historical process of the settlement and to evaluate the architectural ensemble within a spatial area of enormous importance within the urban framework. All this allows us to understand the continuous changes and transformations that this space suffered between the 5th and 3rd centuries BC to defend Punic influence and presence in this Iberian oppidum.

About the Author
Jorge del Reguero González holds a degree in history and a masters in Archaeology and Heritage from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM). He has participated in several annual research projects at the Iberian oppidum of El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real), supported by non-invasive archaeological actions (geophysical surveys) and analysis of construction techniques through the archaeology of architecture. He has also participated in excavations at the Tartessian site of Casas del Turuñuelo (Guareña, Badajoz) and the eastern necropolis of the Spanish-Roman site of Baelo Claudia (Bolonia, Cádiz).

en español
Se aborda en el presente trabajo un estudio arquitectónico sobre los dos bastiones que configuran la puerta sur del oppidum ibérico de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real). Se trata de dos construcciones defensivas cuyo espacio interno cumplió con una función socioeconómica relacionada con el almacenamiento de cereal. A través de este trabajo de investigación, de carácter arqueoarquitectónico, apoyado en la digitalización y reestudio del archivo fotográfico del proceso de excavación, se pretende analizar las técnicas y los materiales constructivos de ambas construcciones, definir sus sucesivas fases constructivas dentro el proceso histórico del asentamiento y valorar el conjunto arquitectónico en un área espacial de enorme importancia dentro del entramado urbano. Todo ello nos permitirá conocer los continuos cambios y transformaciones que sufrió este espacio, entre los siglos V y III a.C., para defender, seguidamente, la influencia y presencia púnica en este oppidum ibérico.

Jorge del Reguero González es graduado en Historia por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) y Máster en Arqueología y Patrimonio por la citada universidad. Ha participado en varios proyectos de investigación, de carácter anual, para el estudio urbano y territorial del oppidum ibérico de El Cerro de las Cabezas (Valdepeñas, Ciudad Real), apoyado en actuaciones arqueológicas no invasivas (prospecciones geofísicas) y análisis de las técnicas constructivas mediante una lectura propia de la arqueología de la arquitectura. Ha colaborado en las excavaciones en el yacimiento tartésico de Casas del Turuñuelo (Guareña, Badajoz) o la necrópolis oriental del yacimiento hispanorromano de Baelo Claudia (Bolonia, Cádiz).
Taymāʾ II: Catalogue of the Inscriptions Discovered in the Saudi-German Excavations at Taymāʾ 2004–2015 by Michael C. A. Macdonald. Hardback; 210x297mm; 264 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 717 2020 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698763. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698770. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Taymāʾ II is a Catalogue which contains all the inscriptions discovered during the 24 seasons of the Saudi- German excavations at Taymāʾ from 2004–15 which were funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The 113 objects carry inscriptions in different languages and scripts, illustrating the linguistic diversity of the oasis through time. Although the majority are fragmentary, they provide an important source for the history of the oasis in ancient and mediaeval times.

The Babylonian cuneiform inscriptions in this volume confirm for the first time the ten-year sojourn at Taymāʾ of the last Babylonian king Nabû-na’id (556–539 BC). In addition, Imperial Aramaic inscriptions dated by the reigns of Lihyanite kings, based at Dadan (modern al-ʿUlā), reveal for the first time that they ruled Taymāʾ at a period in the second half of the first millennium BC.

As well as editing the volume, Michael C. A. Macdonald edited the Imperial Aramaic inscriptions found from 2010–15, plus those in the form of the Aramaic script which developed in Taymāʾ, and the Nabataean, Dadanitic, and Taymanitic texts. In addition, Hanspeter Schaudig edited the cuneiform inscriptions; Peter Stein, the Imperial Aramaic texts found from 2004–09; and Frédéric Imbert, the Arabic inscriptions. Arnulf Hausleiter and Francelin Tourtet provided archaeological contributions, while Martina Trognitz curated the virtual edition of many of the texts recorded by RTI. The indexes contain the words and names from all known texts from the oasis, including those in the Taymāʾ Museum and other collections which will be published as Taymāʾ III.

About the Author
Michael C. A. Macdonald is an Honorary Fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford, and Fellow of the British Academy. He works on the languages, scripts and ancient history of Arabia and directs the Online Corpus of the Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia (http://krc.orient.ox.ac.uk/ociana/). He has been working at Taymāʾ since 2010. ;

With contributions by:
Arnulf Hausleiter is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula. He has been co-directing the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 with Ricardo Eichmann. ;

Frédéric Imbert is Professor at the Institut de recherches et d’études sur les mondes arabes et musulmans, Aix-Marseille University. ;

Hanspeter Schaudig is Associate Professor of Assyriology at the Seminar für Sprachen und Kulturen des Alten Orients at the University of Heidelberg. ;

Peter Stein is Associate Professor for Semitic studies at the Faculty of Theology / Ancient Languages Division at the University of Jena. ;

Francelin Tourtet is a PhD candidate at the Freie Universität Berlin working on his dissertation on Bronze and Iron Age pottery from Taymāʾ. ;

Martina Trognitz is member of the Austrian Centre of Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage at the Austrian Academy of Sciences.
El tesoro de Regina Turdulorum (Casas de Reina, Badajoz) by David Martínez Chico. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94 pages; 9 figures, 3 tables, illustrated catalogue (30 plates); colour throughout. Spanish text. 137 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699401. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699418. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Regina Turdulorum Hoard (Casas de Reina, Badajoz) was buried with 818 imitative antoniniani of Divo Claudio type, minted in copper. The vast majority of the coins bear the reverse legend CONSECRATIO. This figure makes the Regina Turdulorum hoard one of the most important in Spain and Portugal. In numismatic terms, the most common reverse type is the funeral pyre, as opposed to the eagle. In addition to this main group, there is a second group, where there are curious imitations that follow various prototypes for the manufacture of the reverse. The study of the posthumous coinage of Claudius II and his imitations represents one of the most complex tasks in ancient numismatics. The work is considerably complicated by the fact that they are highly copied coins, which means that regular issues are very difficult to distinguish from the imitations. In this sense, the hoard provides vital information for the western monetary circulation of the Roman Empire, contributing to the debate on Gallic and African imitations. It also opens the way to the hypothesis that Hispania may have been another centre for issuing Divo Claudio imitations. Although the latter remains to be proven, the tentative and open nature of this book provides the opportunity to open new lines of study in the hope that they will be resolved sooner rather than later.

Spanish Description:
El tesoro de Regina Turdulorum (Casas de Reina, Badajoz) se compone de 818 antoninianos de imitación, fundamentalmente del tipo Divo Claudio, acuñados en cobre. La inmensa mayoría de las monedas tiene en el reverso la característica leyenda CONSECRATIO. Esta cifra convierte al tesoro de Regina Turdulorum como de los más importantes en España y Portugal. A nivel numismático, la tipología de reverso más común es la de pira funeraria, frente a la de águila. Junto a este principal grupo se añade otro segundo, donde hay curiosas imitaciones que siguen varios prototipos para la confección de los reversos. El lector debe ser consciente que el estudio de las acuñaciones póstumas de Claudio II y sus imitaciones representa una de las tareas más complejas en numismática antigua. La labor se complica considerablemente por el hecho de ser monedas muy copiadas, de tal modo que las emisiones regulares son muy difíciles de distinguir de las imitaciones. En este sentido, el tesoro aporta una información vital para la circulación monetaria occidental del Imperio Romano, contribuyendo al debate de las imitaciones galas y africanas. Y abriendo paso a la hipótesis de que Hispania posiblemente fue otro centro emisor de imitaciones divoclaudianas. Aunque esto último estaría por demostrarse, el carácter provisional y abierto de este libro brinda la oportunidad de abrir nuevas líneas de estudio, con la esperanza de que se resuelvan más pronto que tarde.

David Martínez Chico es un historiador, arqueólogo y numismático, así como fundador y director editorial desde 2014 de Revista Numismática Hécate. Anteriormente, en 2008, fundó plataformas numismáticas como Foro Imperio Numismático, consciente de la importancia en la difusión y transferencia de conocimientos en su campo.
Heritage in the Making: Dealing with the Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany edited by Flaminia Bartolini. Paperback; 210x297mm; 158 pages; colour throughout. 5 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698732. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The fifth volume of Ex Novo has the pleasure to host Flaminia Bartolini as guest editor for the special issue titled Heritage in the Making. Dealing with Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany. This collection of peer-reviewed papers stems in part from the successful workshop held at McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge in December 2018 under the aegis of the DAAD-Cambridge Hub. The event gathered several international heritage experts and professionals from both Germany and Italy to explore the complexities of handling Heritage related to Fascism and National Socialism.

The selection of papers contribute much to the debate on the shifting conditions of the reception of dictatorial regimes, and more specifically the fate of fascist material legacies from the aftermath of WWII to the present day.

The second part of this volume includes an additional contribution by Aydin Abar which keeps in with the broad theme of political reappropriation of the past lying at the core of Bartolini’s collection of papers but strays away from their geographical focus by extending the analysis to the exploitation of Achaemenian material legacies in reinforcing nationalist narratives in nineteenth and twentieth century Iran.
New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East Studies in Honour of Tony J. Wilkinson edited by Dan Lawrence, Mark Altaweel and Graham Philip. Paperback; 205x290mm; 346 pages; 181 figures, 22 tables, 10 plates (46 pages of colour). 662 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695731. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695748. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East is a collection of papers produced in honour of Tony James Wilkinson, who was Professor of Archaeology at Durham University from 2006 until his death in 2014. Though commemorative in concept, the volume is an assemblage of new research representing emerging agendas and innovative methods in remote sensing. The intention is to explore the opportunities and challenges faced by researchers in the field today, and the tools, techniques, and theoretical approaches available to resolve them within the framework of landscape archaeology. The papers build on the traditional strengths of landscape archaeology, such as geoarchaeology and settlement pattern analysis, as well as integrating data sources to address major research questions, such as the ancient economy, urbanism, water management and the treatment of the dead. The authors demonstrate the importance of an interdisciplinary approach for understanding the impact of human activity on shaping the landscape and the effect that landscape has on sociocultural development.

About the Editors
Dr Dan Lawrence is an Associate Professor in the department of Archaeology at Durham University and director of the Archaeology Informatics Laboratory, a specialist hub for remote sensing and computational approaches to the archaeological record. He has directed landscape survey projects across the Middle East and Central Asia, and is currently working on the publication of survey work in Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan. ;

Mark Altaweel
is Reader in Near East Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He has taught courses and conducted research on Near Eastern history and archaeology, using GIS, computational modelling, big data analytics, remote sensing methods, and socialecological theory. He has led many projects in the Near East while being also involved in various research projects on complex systems in other disciplines. ;

Graham Philip is Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Department of Archaeology, Durham University. He has served as Editor of the journal Levant since 2008. He excavated the Chalcolithic / Early Bronze Age site of Tell esh-Shuna North in Jordan (1991-94) and currently directs a collaborative project with the American University of Beirut at the Neolithic and EBA site of Tell Koubba in North Lebanon.
Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East edited by Anja Fügert and Helen Gries. Paperback; 205x290mm; 130 pages; 97 figures, 5 tables (61 colour pages). 645 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696059. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696066. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Glazed bricks applied as a new form of colourful and glossy architectural decor first started to appear in the early Iron Age on monumental buildings of the Ancient Near East. It surely impressed the spectators then as it does the museum visitors today. Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East comprises the proceedings of a workshop held at the 11th International Congress of the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (ICAANE) at Munich in April 2018, organised by the editors. Over the last decade excavations have supplied new evidence from glazed bricks that once decorated the facades of the Ancient Near East’s public buildings during the Iron Age (1000–539 BC) and especially significant progress has been achieved from revived work on glazed bricks excavated more than a century ago which today are kept in various museum collections worldwide. Since the latest summarising works on Ancient Near Eastern glazed architectural décors have been published several decades ago and in the meantime considerable insight into the subject has been gained, this volume aims to provide an updated overview of the development of glazed bricks and of the scientific research on the Iron Age glazes. Furthermore, it presents the on-going research on this topic and new insights into glazed bricks from Ashur, Nimrud, Khorsabad, and Babylon.

About the Editors
Anja Fügert received her master’s degree in Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2005 with a dissertation on the Old Babylonian palace at Uruk. From 2005 to 2014 she was a staff member of the research project Tell Sheikh Hamad / Syria and in 2013 she defended her PhD on the Neo-Assyrian glyptics from this site. After working as a freelance illustrator in the Egyptian National Museum in Cairo she did a 2-year traineeship at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. She also taught courses of Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin and at the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. Since December 2017 she is the head of the editorial office of the Orient-Department of the German Archaeological Institute. Together with Helen Gries, she initiated and directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur).

Helen Gries obtained MA in Near Eastern Archaeology at Johannes Gutenberg-Universität of Mainz in 2010. In 2011 she started her PhD as a member of the Graduate School ‘Formen von Prestige in Kulturen des Altertums’ at Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität of Munich. In 2014 she completed her PhD at Munich with a dissertation on the Ashur temple at Ashur. She has undertaken fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Lebanon, and Jordan. In 2014 and 2015 she was postdoc researcher and lecturer at Institute of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Munich. Since 2015 she is researcher and curator for Mesopotamia at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. Together with Anja Fügert, she directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur), which is funded by the German Research Foundation since 2018.
Carving Interactions: Rock Art in the Nomadic Landscape of the Black Desert, North-Eastern Jordan by Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+206 pages; 216 figures, 32 tables (129 colour pages). 577 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693119. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693126. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Safaitic rock art of the North Arabian basalt desert is a unique and understudied material, one of the few surviving traces of the elusive herding societies that inhabited this region in antiquity. Yet little is known about this rock art and its role in the desert societies. Why did these peoples make carvings in the desert and what was the significance of this cultural practice? What can the rock art tell us about the relationship between the nomads and their desert landscape? This book investigates these questions through a comprehensive study of over 4500 petroglyphs from the Jebel Qurma region of the Black Desert in north-eastern Jordan. It explores the content of the rock art, how it was produced and consumed by its makers and audience, and its relationship with the landscape. This is the first-ever systematic study of the Safaitic petroglyphs from the Black Desert and it is unique for the study of Arabian rock art. It demonstrates the value of a material approach to rock art and the unique insights that rock art can provide into the relationship between nomadic herders and the wild and domestic landscape.

About the Author
Nathalie Østerled Brusgaard (PhD, Leiden University) is an archaeologist specialising in rock art studies and social zooarchaeology. Nathalie has worked on excavations in the Netherlands and Germany and on rock art surveys in Jordan and the USA.
Glass and Glass Production in the Near East during the Iron Age Evidence from objects, texts and chemical analysis by Katharina Schmidt. Paperback; viii+316 pages; 85 figures, 28 tables, 68 plates (approx. 92 pages in colour). 520 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691542. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691559. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Glass and Glass Production in the Near East during the Iron Age: Evidence from objects, texts and chemical analysis examines the history of glass in Iron Age Mesopotamia and neighbouring regions (1000–539 BCE). This is the first monograph to cover this region and period comprehensively and in detail and thus fills a significant gap in glass research. It focusses on identification of the different types of glass objects and their respective manufacturing techniques from the the Iron Age period. Both glass as material and individual glass objects are investigated to answer questions such as as how raw glass (primary production) and glass objects (secondary production) were manufactured, how both these industries were organised, and how widespread glass objects were in Mesopotamian society in the Iron Age period. Such a comprehensive picture of glass and its production in the Iron Age can only be achieved by setting archaeological data in relation to cuneiform texts, archaeometric analyses and experimental-archaeological investigations. With regard to the different disciplines incorporated into this study, an attempt was made to view them together and to establish connections between these areas.

About the Author
Katharina Schmidt obtained MA in Near Eastern Archaeology at Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität of Munich in 2012, with a dissertation on glazed Neo-Assyrian vessels from Upper Mesopotamia. In 2013 she started her PhD as a member of the Graduate School ‘Distant Worlds’ at the same university. As a visiting researcher, she studied at University College, London, and acquired additional knowledge in the use of chemical analyses – in particular with regard to glass. In 2016 she completed her PhD at Munich with a dissertation on glass and glassmaking in the Iron Age period. As an archaeologist she worked on excavations in Syria (Tell Halaf) and Turkey (Sirkeli Höyük, Dülük Baba Tepesi). Since 2016 she has been director of the German Protestant Institute of Archaeology in Amman, Jordan, where she carries out various research and excavation projects, above all the excavations at Tall Zirā´a.

Reviews
'Katharina Schmidt has written a much-needed volume on Iron Age glass from the Near East... this is a major contribution to the study of Iron Age glass that will be of great help to students of ancient technologies and glass for years to come.' - Julian Henderson, Department of Classics and Archaeology, University of Nottingham (Antiquity, December 2019)
Hatra: Il territorio e l’urbanistica Prefazione di Roberta Venco Ricciardi by Enrico Foietta. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+560 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (140 plates in colour). Italian text; Introduction and chapter summaries in English. 64 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690057. £88.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690064. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The ancient city of Hatra is located 80 km southwest of the modern city of Mosul. The site reached its apogee during the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD, arriving at the striking dimensions of c. 300 hectares and into a new role as the capital of a significant buffer state between the Parthian and Roman empires.

This volume is devoted to the study of the landscape surrounding Hatra and of the development of this important city, drawing on published information gathered by Iraqi and foreign expeditions, as well as unpublished data garnered from over fifteen years of fieldwork at the site by the Italian Archaeological Expedition.

The study of the landscape comprehends the morphology, hydrology and geology of the region and offers new proposals regarding the exploitation of natural resources and the development of regional and local routes through the territory under Hatra’s political and military control during the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD.

The analysis of Hatra as an urban centre consists of a detailed study of the city’s hydrology, street network and urban areas, with the purpose of detecting the principles behind the planning and development of the city. The main elements of the urban space are treated in this book: the Temenos area and the Small Shrines, the Necropoles, the Fortifications, the Houses, and the Palaces. Due to the cross-referencing of archaeological, historical and epigraphic data, new ideas have been proposed regarding the chronological phases of urbanism at Hatra, from its foundation up to the destruction of the city by the Sasanian army in AD 241.

La città di Hatra si trova nella Jazira irachena a circa 80 km a sud-ovest di Mosul. Il centro raggiunse il suo apogeo durante il II-III sec. d.C., toccando l’impressionante estensione di quasi 300 ettari e divenendo la capitale di un influente stato cuscinetto, collocato tra l’impero partico e l’impero romano.

Questo volume è dedicato allo studio del territorio e dell’urbanistica di questo importante sito antico, impiegando contestualmente informazioni edite, raccolte dalle varie missioni irachene e straniere che si sono avvicendate sul terreno, e inedite, provenienti dal vasto Archivio della Missione Archeologica Italiana a Hatra in più di quindici anni di ricerche sul campo.

Lo studio del territorio definisce un quadro dettagliato della morfologia, idrologia e geologia della regione e dell’area prossima al centro, oltre a proporre alcune nuove ipotesi interpretative sullo sfruttamento delle risorse ambientali, sull’articolazione della rete viaria periurbana e regionale e sull’estensione del territorio sottoposto al controllo politico e militare della città durante il II e III sec. d.C.

L’analisi urbanistica comprende uno studio approfondito dell’idrologia cittadina, della rete stradale e delle aree urbane, allo scopo di individuarne le principali caratteristiche ed eventuali regole nella pianificazione e nello sviluppo della città. Nel libro sono inoltre analizzati i principali elementi che compongono il tessuto urbano: il Temenos e i templi minori, le necropoli, le difese cittadine, le case e i palazzi. Grazie all’utilizzo contestuale del dato archeologico, storico ed epigrafico, è stato inoltre possibile formulare nuove ipotesi sulle fasi urbanistiche e sulla cronologia di Hatra dalla fondazione alla sua distruzione, avvenuta per mano sasanide nel 241 d.C.

ENRICO FOIETTA è dottore di ricerca e borsista presso l’Università degli Studi di Torino. È membro di varie missioni archeologiche nel Vicino Oriente (Siria e Iran). Attualmente collabora attivamente con la Missione Archeologica Congiunta Italo-Iraniana in Khuzistan (ICAR - CRAST), con la Missione Archeologica Italiana a Hatra, con il Centro Ricerche Archeologiche e Scavi di Torino (CRAST) e la Missione Franco-Siriana a Europos-Dura (CNRs Paris).
Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011 Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 edited by Jeanine Abdul Massih and Shinichi Nishiyama in collaboration with Hanan Charaf and Ahmad Deb. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+452 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (124 colour plates). (Print RRP £65.00). 452 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919474. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919481. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Syria has been a major crossroads of civilizations in the ancient Near East since the dawn of human kind. Until the current crisis began in 2011, Syria was one of the foremost pioneers in the investigation of past human knowledge, diversity, and identity. However, due to the ongoing war, archaeological excavations came to an abrupt halt. Since then, there have been countless alarming reports of damage or destruction inflicted on archaeological, historical, and museum sites.

The International Syrian Congress on Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (ISCACH), held December 3-5, 2015 in Beirut, Lebanon, was designed to bring together international scholars who have directed or participated in archaeological expeditions in Syria, and colleagues from Syria. By doing so, not only could the results of years of archaeological investigations and cultural heritage management in Syria be shared and discussed, but also a spirit of friendship and collaboration could be fostered and strengthened during this turbulent period.

The Congress focussed on the scientific aspects of each explored site and region allowing researchers to examine in detail each heritage site, its characteristics and identity. Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011: Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 consists of two parts. The first part presents the results of archaeological investigations conducted between 2000 and 2010. The second part comprises abstracts of papers and posters presented during the Congress. It is hoped that this book will represent an important contribution to the scientific dialogue between international and Syrian scholars, and will appeal to the general public interested in the culture and history of Syria.

About the Editors
JEANINE ABDUL MASSIH is professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Hellenistic and Roman settlements, town planning, and architecture. She co-directed the excavations of Cyrrhus (Aleppo, Syria) on behalf of the Lebanese University and the DGAMS and coordinated many field and research projects in Syria and Lebanon. Since 2014, she has been in charge of the excavations and management of the Quarries of Baalbek (Lebanon) and of a survey project on the Southern Beqaa (Lebanon).

SHINICHI NISHIYAMA is associate professor at Chubu University, Japan. He specializes in the Iron Age culture of the ancient Near East, especially in the northern Levant. He has participated in various archaeological projects in the Near East and Central Asia including Syria, Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. He was also involved in the UNESCO-led cultural heritage projects in Afghanistan and Tajikistan. He currently co-directs archaeological projects in Iraqi Kurdistan (Yasin Tepe) and in Lebanon (Southern Beqaa).

HANAN CHARAF is assistant professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Near Eastern history and archaeology during the Bronze and Iron Ages in the central Levant. Her research interests include Bronze Age ceramic production and distribution, Bronze Age Cypriot pottery imported to Lebanon, supra and intraregional trade (exchange commodities and routes) in the Levant during the Bronze Age, and cultural characteristics of the transitional period Late Bronze Age-Iron Age in the central Levant.

AHMAD DEB holds a PhD in archaeology and is currently Head of the Department of the Historical Buildings and Archaeological Documentation at the Directorate General of Antiquities of Syria. He directed the Syrian excavations of Tell Nahr El-Arab (Tell Al-Shamiyeh) between 2011 and 2018. He specializes in Bronze Age settlements and burials in the Near East. Today, he dedicates his time to saving and documenting Syrian endangered cultural heritage.
About Bakr Awa Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Peter A. Miglus. Pages 229-239.Download Full PDF  

The site of Bakr Awa (35°13’14”N, 45°56’26”E) situated on the outskirts of the city of Halabja is one of the biggest ancient settlements in the western foothills of the Zagros in Iraqi Kurdistan (AAI 1970, 335 no. 54; AASI 1975-76, map 77 no. 14). It consists of a c. 800 x 600 m large lower city (max. +579 m a.s.l.) and a steep citadel mound (max. +595 m a.s.l.) dominating the plain (approx. +565 m a.s.l.). The citadel is crowned by an earthen parapet wall while the mound is surrounded by a moat dug probably in the Islamic period (Fig.1).
Current Investigations into the Early Neolithic of the Zagros Foothills of Iraqi Kurdistan Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Roger Matthews, Wendy Matthews, Kamal Rasheed Raheem and Kamal Rauf Aziz. Pages 219-228.Download Full PDF  

One of the most significant transformations in history took place after the last Ice Age, from c. 12,000 BC (all dates calibrated BC), when human communities changed from being mobile hunter-foragers to more settled farmers and stock-keepers, with domesticated crops and animals. This Neolithic transformation was a fundamental development in the human condition across much of the world and led ultimately, through surplus accumulation and social differentiation, to the emergence of towns, cities, and empires, shaping the modern world. The full volume is available in paperback here.
In the Neo-Assyrian Border March of the Palace Herald: Geophysical Survey and Salvage Excavations at Gird-i Bazar and Qalat-i Dinka (Peshdar Plain Project 2015) Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Karen Radner, Andrei Ašandulesei, Jörg Fassbinder, Tina Greenfield, Jean-Jacques Herr, Janoscha Kreppner and Andrea Squitieri. Pages 353-367.Download Full PDF  

The Peshdar Plain is situated in the province of Sulaymaniyah, district of Raniyah (also known as Raparin district), in the Kurdish Autonomous Region of Iraq, directly at the border with Iran on the upper reaches of the Lower Zab. The regional centre is the town of Qaladze (Qalat Dizeh), in the northwest of the plain, whose impressive settlement mound (36° 11’ 7” N, 45° 6’ 53” E) demonstrates that the site has held this position since antiquity. The Peshdar Plain Project was inaugurated in 2015 with the goal of investigating the region in the Neo-Assyrian period and focuses on two sites: tiny Gird-i Bazar (36° 8’ 18” N, 45° 8’ 28” E; henceforth Bazar), a shallow mound (altitude: 539 m) of only 1.5 ha situated in the plain, and the more impressive Qalat-i Dinka (36° 8’ 12” N, 45° 7’ 57” E; henceforth Dinka), looming high over the Lower Zab on the imposing terminal outcrop of a crescent-shaped mountain range along the northern river bank. This first report will briefly detail the geophysical survey (section 1) and the excavations (section 2) conducted in 2015 before introducing the bioarchaeological sampling strategy (section 3) and presenting a first assessment of the sites and more generally of the significance of our work in the regional setting of the Peshdar Plain and within the Neo-Assyrian Empire and its client states (section 4). The full volume is available in paperback here.
Magnetic investigations in the Shahrizor Plain: Revealing the unseen in survey prospections Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Simone Mühl and Jörg Fassbinder. Pages 241-248.Download Full PDF  

Prospection by magnetometer in urban environments outside the limits of excavation offers the possibility to unveil the layout of entire settlements, including street networks and residential and other architectural features, without the use of a spade. Questions about city planning, the use of built and open space and the organization of religious and other architecture at sites can all be addressed (cf. Fassbinder 2002; Fassbinder et al. 2005; Benech 2007). Magnetic prospections of sites in the Shahrizor Plain, which have been conducted since October 2013, have the potential to provide insights into the diachronic use of rural space in the region. This paper will focus on the results of investigations which were carried out at Gird-i Shatwan (bečuk – ‘the small mound Shatwan’; SSP-51 & 52), a small Parthian site in the rural environment of Wadi Shamlu in the center of the Shahrizor Plain. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Satu Qala: an Assessment of the Stratigraphy of the Site Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Cinzia Pappi. Pages 297-307.Download Full PDF  

The view of historical developments within the area of Idu, identified with Sâtu Qalâ on the Lower Zāb in Iraqi Kurdistan (Van Soldt 2008), and its hinterland have so far been closely connected to available information on the imperial expansion of Assyria in the region. Through the support of the Directorate of Antiquities of the Kurdish Regional Government of Iraq, an international team consisting of the universities of Leiden (2010-12), Leipzig (2010-14), the Salahaddin University of Erbil (2010-12), and the University of Pennsylvania (2013) was able to conduct several seasons of fieldwork at Sâtu Qalâ. Data from this fieldwork can now provide a much wider historical sequence for the settlement. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Monumental Earthen Architecture in Early Societies: Technology and power display Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 2 / Session B3 edited by Annick Daneels. iv+64 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 213 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912833. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912840. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The theme of the symposium is the archaeology of earthen architecture in pre- and protohistoric cultures, with an emphasis on constructive techniques and systems, and diachronic changes in those aspects. The main interest is in monumental architecture (not domestic), where it is better possible to appreciate the building strategies that show raw earth to be as noble a material as stone or wood, but with its very own characteristics which required the development of original solutions and construction techniques. The scope on monumental buildings also allows analyzing the political, social and economical factors that made such architecture a recognized expression of societal values and political power.
Metallurgical Production in Northern Eurasia in the Bronze Age by Stanislav Grigoriev. 831 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 6 2015 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912758. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912369. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Copper is the first metal to play a large part in human history. This work is devoted to the history of metallurgical production in Northern Eurasia during the Bronze Age, based on experiments carried out by the author and analyses of ancient slag, ore and metal. It should be noted that archaeometallurgical studies include a huge range of works reflecting different fields of activity of ancient metallurgists. Often, all that unites these is the term ‘metallurgy’. This work considers the problems of proper metallurgy, i.e. extracting metal from ore. A number of accompanying operations are closely connected with it, such as charcoal-burning, ore dressing, furnace constructing, and preparation of crucibles. In some instances the author touches upon these operations; however the main topic of the work is the smelting process. The closing stage of the metallurgical production is metalworking including various casting and forging operations, and also auxiliary operations: making of crucibles, casting molds, stone tools for metal forging. These problems are, as a rule, out of frameworks of this research.

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