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NEW: Liburnians and Illyrian Lembs: Iron Age Ships of the Eastern Adriatic by Luka Boršić, Danijel Džino and Irena Radić Rossi. Paperback; 175x245mm; 226 pages; 35 figures, 2 tables, 4 maps (colour throughout). 720 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699159. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699166. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Liburnians and Illyrian Lembs: Iron Age Ships of the Eastern Adriatic explores the origins of two types of ancient ship which appear in the written sources connected with the protohistoric eastern Adriatic area: the ‘Liburnian’ (liburna or liburnica) and the southern Adriatic (Illyrian) ‘lemb’. The relative abundance of written sources suggests that both ships played significant roles in ancient times, especially the Liburnian, which became the main type of light warship in early Roman imperial fleets and ultimately evolved into a generic name for warships in the Roman Imperial period and Late Antiquity. The book provides an extensive overview of written, iconographic and archaeological evidence on eastern Adriatic shipbuilding traditions before the Roman conquest in the late first century BC / early first century AD, questioning the existing scholarly assumption that the liburna and lemb were closely related, or even that they represent two sub-types of the same ship. The analysis shows that identification of the Liburnian liburna and Illyrian lemb as more or less the same ship originates from the stereotypical and essentially wrong assumption in older scholarship that the prehistoric indigenous population of the eastern Adriatic shared the same culture and, roughly, the same identities. The main point made in the book is that two different terms, liburna and lemb, were used in the sources depicting these as two different kinds of ship, rather than being interchangeable terms depicting the same ship type.

About the Authors Luka Boršić obtained his first PhD degree in philosophy with emphasis on classical languages and his second PhD degree in the history of philosophy. His main areas of research are ancient philosophy, Renaissance philosophy and the birth of modern science, as well as gender philosophy. He is currently Director, and Senior Research Fellow of the Institute of Philosophy in Zagreb. In 2019 he was a Fulbright Scholar at Columbia University in New York, during which period he completed his contribution to this book. His main approach to the history of ideas and history of philosophy is hermeneutics, the endeavour to understand multifaceted layers of historical texts. ;

Danijel Džino is Senior Lecturer in the Department of History and Archaeology at Macquarie University, Sydney. His books include: Illyricum in the Roman Politics 229 BC – AD 68 (CUP, 2010), Becoming Slav, Becoming Croat: Identity Transformation in Post-Roman and Early Medieval Dalmatia (Brill, 2010), From Justinian to Branimir: The Making of the Middle Ages in Dalmatia (Routledge, 2021); he is co-author of Rimski ratovi u Iliriku: Povijesni antinarativ (Zagreb, 2013). Džino is also co-editor of the volumes: Byzantium, its Neighbors and its Cultures (Australian Association for Byzantine Studies, 2014) and Migration, Integration and Connectivity on the Southeastern Frontier of the Carolingian Empire (Brill, 2018). ;

Irena Radić Rossi graduated from the Department of Archaeology of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences of the University of Zagreb. In 2004 she became Senior Conservator, the highest rank in the Cultural Heritage Conservation Service. In 2009 she moved to the University of Zadar, where she is currently employed as Associate Professor. She is an associated researcher of the Centre Camille Jullian (Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS), an adjunct professor at the Nautical Archaeology Program of the Texas A&M University, and an affiliated scholar of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology. Her main research interests focus on the technological development of Adriatic shipbuilding and seafaring.
NEW: From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 10 Session XXXIII-1&2 edited by Françoise Bostyn, François Giligny and Peter Topping. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 71 figures, 7 tables (colour throughout). 718 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697117. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697124. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age presents the papers from Session XXXIII of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). 23 authors contribute nine papers from Parts 1 and 2 of the Session. The first session ‘Siliceous rocks: procurement and distribution systems’ was aimed at analysing one of the central research issues related to mining, i.e. the production systems and the diffusion of mining products. The impact of extraction on the environment, group mobility and the numbers involved in the exploitation phase were considered; mining products were also examined with a view to identifying local and imported/exported products and the underlying social organization relating to the different fields of activity. The second session ‘Flint mines and chipping floors from prehistory to the beginning of the nineteenth century’ focused on knapping activities. The significance of the identification of knapping workshops in the immediate vicinity of mine shafts and of their presence in villages as well as in intermediary places between the two was considered in the analysis of chaîne opératoire sequences. The potential of product quality and artefact distribution to contribute to the understanding of the social organisation of the communities being studied was also examined.
About the Editors
Françoise Bostyn is currently Professor at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne. She specialises in the European Neolithic and works particularly on lithic industries, from the characterisation of resources and procurement systems, especially from flint mines, to the abandonment of tools within domestic settlements. Through technological and typological approaches, the questions of the organization of production at different scales, the structure of supply and exchange networks, and the emergence of craft specialists are explored from an evolutionary perspective, from the arrival of the first farmers in France until the emergence of the first hierarchical societies. ;

François Giligny has been Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University since 2009. Experienced in preventive archaeology, he conducts research and excavations in the Paris basin. He has created and since 2016 has been co-director of two professional master’s degree courses at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne: Master of Archaeology ‘Archaeological Engineering’ and Master in Heritage and Museums ‘Archaeological Heritage Mediation and Valorisation’. François is Scientific Director of the magazine « Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie » and is engaged in two UISPP Commissions for which he organised the 18th Congress in 2018 in Paris. His research topics include the European Neolithic, ceramic technology, archaeological methodology, digital heritage and digital archaeology. ;

Peter Topping is a Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University. His expertise lies in the analysis of multiperiod landscapes, and his main research interest is the European Neolithic period. Formerly employed by RCHME and English Heritage, he has worked on Neolithic flint mines, causewayed enclosures and the Stonehenge landscape, amongst many others types of site. He has also participated in fieldwork led by the US National Park Service in Ohio and Minnesota, and is currently directing a project on prehistoric quarries in the Northumberland Cheviots, alongside researching European Neolithic mines and quarries for a Prehistoric Society research monograph.
NEW: La transformación del mundo rural en la isla de Mallorca durante la Antigüedad tardía (c. 300-902/903 d. C.) by Catalina Mas Florit. Paperback; 205x290mm; 138pp; 38 figures, 8 tables (black & white throughout); Spanish text. 709 2021 Limina/Limites: Archaeologies, histories, islands and borders in the Mediterranean (365-1556) 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698503. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698510. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

La transformación del mundo rural en la isla de Mallorca durante la Antigüedad tardía presents the study of the rural landscape of the eastern part of the island of Mallorca (Balearic Islands) during Late Antiquity, providing new data that improves our understanding of one of the least well-known periods of the island. The author describes the results of the study of old archaeological surveys carried out on the island – which had not been published yet – and the results of new archaeological surveys. The conclusions from these studies detected a series of trends that help to better understand the settlement patterns of the island during the transition from the Roman period to medieval times. Furthermore, they help to obtain an overview of different transformations that occurred in the rural world in a territory that was strongly marked by its insularity. Equally discernable in this territory was the role played by the old indigenous substrate, which was reflected in the survival or re-use of pre and proto-historic settlements.

About the Author
Catalina Mas Florit is currently an Associate Professor of Archaeology in the Department of History and Archaeology at the University of Barcelona. Her research examines the transformation of landscapes with a particular interest in island systems and rural areas in the western Mediterranean. She co-directed or directed excavations in the building at the Ripoll street of Barcelona, the early Christian set of l'Illa del Rei (Mahon, Menorca) and the Roman villa at Sa Mesquida (Calvià, Mallorca). She is currently co-director of the excavations of the Roman and Late Antique city of Pollentia (Alcúdia, Mallorca).

Spanish Description
En La transformación del mundo rural en la isla de Mallorca durante la Antigüedad tardía la autora presenta el estudio del paisaje rural de la zona este de la isla de Mallorca (islas Baleares) durante la Antigüedad Tardía, proporcionando nuevos datos que permiten mejorar el conocimiento de uno de los periodos peor conocidos de la historia insular. Se presentan los resultados del estudio de antiguas prospecciones arqueológicas realizadas en la isla que no habían sido publicadas y los resultados de nuevas prospecciones arqueológicas. Las conclusiones permiten detectar una serie de tendencias, que ayudan a comprender mejor el patrón de asentamiento de la población en el tránsito entre época romana y época medieval, así como obtener una visión global de las transformaciones acaecidas en el mundo rural de forma diacrónica en un territorio intensamente marcado por su insularidad. Destaca la presencia antiguos yacimientos indígenas (cuevas y poblados en general de la Edad del Hierro) que fueron reocupados o que perduraron.

Catalina Mas Florit es actualmente profesora agregada interina de Arqueología en el departamento de Historia y Arqueología de la Universidad de Barcelona. Ha centrado su investigación en el estudio de la trasformación del paisaje con un interés particular en sistemas insulares y áreas rurales del Mediterráneo occidental. Ha codirigido o dirigido excavaciones arqueológicas en el edificio de la calle Ripoll de la ciudad de Barcelona, en el complejo cristiano de la Illa del Rei (Mahón, Menorca) y en la villa romana de Sa Mesquida (Calvià, Mallorca). Actualmente es codirectora de las excavaciones de la ciudad romana y tardoantigua de Pollentia (Alcúdia, Mallorca).
NEW: Rei Cretariae Romanae Fautorum: Acta 46 Congressus tricesimus primus Rei Cretariae Romanae Fautorum Napocae habitus MMXVIII edited by Catarina Viegas. DOI: 10.32028/9781789697483. Hardback; 210x297; 620 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English, Italian and Spanish. 706 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697483. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697490. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Acta 46 comprises 64 articles. Out of the 120 scheduled lectures and posters presented at the 31st Congress of the Rei Cretariæ Romanæ Favtores, 61 are included in the present volume, to which three further were added. Given the location of the conference in Romania it seems natural that the number of articles related to the Balkans and Danube region is the largest (with 20 articles), followed by contributions concerning Italy (15), and the Iberian Peninsula (13). The 'rest of the world' is split between the Roman provinces in the East (eight papers), in North-Africa (six), and in central respectively western Europe (two).
NEW: La séquence paléolithique de Karain E (Antalya, Turquie) Analyses techniques et typologiques (1989-2009) by Marcel Otte and Janusz Kozlowski. Paperback; 210x297mm; 90 pages; 99 plates (6 in colour). French text. 703 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696790. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696806. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The long Palaeolithic sequence of Karain (Antalya, Turkey) began around 500,000 years ago and continued until the final Palaeolithic around 10,000 BC. This volume presents all the cultural and technical variations during this immense period, situated in a context which joins Africa, Asia, and Europe. In brief, the assemblage of tools appears to belong to Asian traditions; no Acheulian bifaces were observed. The earlier half of the sequence (stages 9 and 10) corresponds to centripetal industries with thick flakes and with denticulates and racloirs, classified as 'Proto-Charentian'. 'Modern archaic' human remains were sporadically discovered there. The upper phase is by far the most important: stages 8 to 5. These are superb Levallois industries with good quality exogenous materials. The tools are made from elongated flakes and transformed into racloirs with very elegant points. They have been termed 'Karain Mousterian'. Human remains are also associated with this phase (mandible and phalanges). The final phase (stage 4) is classically Mousterian with Neanderthal human remains.

About the Authors
Marcel Otte, Professor Emeritus at the University of Liège (Belgium), specializes in Palaeolithic civilizations in Eurasia and contacts between Europe and other continents during prehistory. ;

Janusz Kozlowski, Professor Emeritus at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków (Poland), specializes in the origin of the Upper Paleolithic in Europe and the migration routes of modern humans across the Balkans, as well as on the origin and spread of the Neolithic throughout the European continent.

French Description
La longue séquence paléolithique de Karain (Antalya, Turquie), débute vers 500.000 ans et se poursuit jusqu’au paléolithique final, vers 10.000 ans. Ce volume présente toutes les variations culturelles et techniques durant cette immense période et située au milieu des grands continents qu’elle joint : Afrique, Asie, Europe. À la base, des ensembles à éclats semblent appartenir aux traditions asiatiques, nous n’avons pas observé de bifaces acheuléens dans toute la séquence. La moitié inférieure (stades 9 et 10) correspond à des industries centripètes à éclats épais et à denticulés et racloirs, classées comme « Proto-Charentien ». Des restes humains « modernes archaïques » y furent découverts sporadiquement. La phase supérieure est de loin le plus importante : stades 8 à 5. Il s’agit de superbes industries Levallois avec matériaux exogènes de bonne qualité. Les outils sont faits sur éclats allongés, et transformés en racloirs et pointes très élégants. Nous l’avons dénommée « Moustérien de Karain ». Des restes humains y sont également associés (mandibule et phalanges). La partie supérieure (stade 4) contient un Moustérien classique avec des restes humains néanderthaliens.

Marcel Otte, professeur émérite à l’université de Liège (Belgique), spécialisé dans les civilisations paléolithiques d’Eurasie, et des contacts entre l’Europe et les autres continents au cours de la plus longue préhistoire. Il travaille surtout sur les aspects spirituels et religieux durant l’évolution humaine. ;

Janusz Kozlowski, professeur émérite à l’université Jagellon de Cracovie (Pologne), est spécialiste de l’origine du paléolithique supérieur en Europe et des voies de migrations de l’homme moderne à travers les Balkans, ainsi que sur ‘origine et la diffusion du Néolithique à travers tout le contient européen.
NEW: Discurso, espacio y poder en las religions antiguas edited by Rafael A. Barroso-Romero and José Ángel Castillo Lozano. Paperback; 203x276mm; 212 pages; 12 figures, 1 table; Spanish text. 132 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698848. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698855. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas aims to reflect on how the wielders of power, be they religious, social or political, shape the discourses that justify their power within the framework of a society or a specific group, and how space participates in these discourses. Intellectuals, aristocrats, holy men or even the dead all needed to shape a discourse that would allow them to justify their hierarchies, whether they were internal or common to all of society, to reach a social consensus and to sustain them over time. The forms in which power used religion to express itself were quite diverse, such as ritual violence, martyrdom, sacrifice, or even divine trickery. Sometimes certain spaces became places whose political and religious control brought about conflicts, whose resolution was found through the legitimisation generated by the complex theological discourse, which reinforced the extraordinary qualities of the gods to reaffirm their authority, or through the cohesive value of the rites. This volume analyses these questions through fourteen works by sixteen researchers from different institutions. It includes studies carried out with materials from a wide range of sources: epigraphy, the archaeological record, and literary sources.

About the Editors
Rafael A. Barroso-Romero is a doctoral researcher at the Max-Weber-Kolleg, Universität Erfürt and at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where he lectures as a member of the Department of Ancient History. He is currently developing his doctoral research on materiality, spatiality, and the body in unusual burials in the Roman West. ;

José Ángel Castillo Lozano completed his Doctorate in History at the Universidad de Murcia. He is currently a High School teacher. His area of specialisation lies in the world of Late Antiquity, on which he has published around fifteen papers.

Spanish Description
Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas pretende reflexionar acerca de cómo el poder da forma a los discursos que lo justifican en el marco de una sociedad o de un grupo concreto y cómo el espacio participa de aquellos. Intelectuales, aristócratas, hombres santos o incluso los difuntos, todos ellos necesitaron configurar un discurso que permitiera justificar sus jerarquías −ya fueran internas o comunes a toda la sociedad− consensuarlas socialmente y sustentarlas en el tiempo. Las formas en las que el poder utilizaba a la religión para expresarse fueron muy diversas, como la violencia ritual, el martirio, el sacrificio, o incluso el engaño divino. A veces, determinados espacios se convirtieron en lugares cuyo control político y religioso generaba conflictos, cuya solución se encontró en la legitimación generada por el complejo discurso teológico, que refuerza las cualidades extraordinarias de los dioses para reafirmar su autoridad, o por el valor cohesivo de los ritos. Este volumen analiza tales cuestiones a través de catorce trabajos de dieciséis investigadores procedentes de diversos centros. Recoge investigaciones realizadas con materiales de muy diversa procedencia: la epigrafía, el registro arqueológico o las fuentes literarias.

Rafael A. Barroso-Romero es Graduado en Historia (UCO) y Máster en Ciencias de las Religiones (UCM). Actualmente es investigador predoctoral en el Max-Weber-Kolleg (IGS “Resonant Self- World Relations in Ancient and Modern Socio-Religious Practices”) de la Universität Erfürt y al mismo tiempo en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, donde imparte docencia como miembro del Departamento de Prehistoria, Historia Antigua y Arqueología. ;

José A. Castillo-Lozano (1991) es graduado en Historia en la Universidad de Murcia. En la actualidad es profesor de secundaria (funcionario de carrera) y doctor en historia. Su ámbito de especialización radica en el mundo de la Antigüedad Tardía del cual ha publicado un
NEW: Heritage in the Making: Dealing with the Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany edited by Flaminia Bartolini. Paperback; 210x297mm; 158 pages; colour throughout. 5 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698732. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The fifth volume of Ex Novo has the pleasure to host Flaminia Bartolini as guest editor for the special issue titled Heritage in the Making. Dealing with Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany. This collection of peer-reviewed papers stems in part from the successful workshop held at McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge in December 2018 under the aegis of the DAAD-Cambridge Hub. The event gathered several international heritage experts and professionals from both Germany and Italy to explore the complexities of handling Heritage related to Fascism and National Socialism.

The selection of papers contribute much to the debate on the shifting conditions of the reception of dictatorial regimes, and more specifically the fate of fascist material legacies from the aftermath of WWII to the present day.

The second part of this volume includes an additional contribution by Aydin Abar which keeps in with the broad theme of political reappropriation of the past lying at the core of Bartolini’s collection of papers but strays away from their geographical focus by extending the analysis to the exploitation of Achaemenian material legacies in reinforcing nationalist narratives in nineteenth and twentieth century Iran.
NEW: Archaeological Mission of Chieti University in Libya: Reports 2006-2008 by Oliva Menozzi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 350 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 702 2020 RES: Reports, Excavations and Studies of the Archaeological Unit of the University G. d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694468. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694475. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The RES Series (Reports, Excavations and Studies of the Archaeological Unit of the University G. d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara) is dedicated to the projects and the researches of the different teams of the university of Chieti-Pescara working on archaeological projects in Italy and abroad. This first volume is dedicated to the Archaeological Mission in Cyrenaica, starting with the reports and researches of the seasons from 2006 to 2008. Chieti University has been working in Libya with a large international team since 1997. The emphasis of the publication is to present archaeological data to form part of an archive of finds, sites and monuments: a resource and reference point for archaeologists from Libya and elsewhere. At this moment the chora (territory) of Cyrene is facing multiple threats, even the potential loss of important monuments. It is hoped that this publication will contribute to the preservation of the local archaeological heritage.

About the Author
Oliva Menozzi began her studies at Chieti University and completed her doctorate at Oxford in 2001. She has been Researcher and Lecturer in Classical Archaeology and Archaeology of Greek Colonization at the University G.d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara (Italy) since 2002 and is now Associate Professor. She has been Director of the CAAM-Centre of the Athenaeum for Archaeometry and Microanalysis since 2015 and of the Master STARch (Sciences and Technologies for Archaeology at risk) since 2019.
NEW: The World of Disney: From Antiquarianism to Archaeology by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 156x234mm; 154 pages; 44 figures. 700 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698275. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698282. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dr John Disney (1779-1857) was the benefactor of the first chair in archaeology at a British university. He also donated his major collection to the University of Cambridge. The sculptures continue to be displayed in the Fitzwilliam Museum.

The Disney family traced its origins back to the Norman invasion of England, and the family home was at Norton Disney in Lincolnshire. Disney’s father, the Reverend John Disney DD (1746-1816) left the Church of England to become a minister at the Unitarian Essex Street Chapel in London. A major sponsor of the chapel was Thomas Brand-Hollis of The Hyde, Essex, who bequeathed the house and his Grand Tour collection (formed with Thomas Hollis) on his death in 1804 to the Reverend John Disney. Disney inherited part of the classical collection of his uncle and father-in-law Lewis Disney-Ffytche, owner of the 18th century pleasure gardens, Le Désert de Retz, outside Paris. Disney’s brother-in-law was Sir William Hillary, founder of the RNLI. Disney was instrumental in the creation of the Chelmsford Museum through the Chelmsford Philosophical Society, and the formation of the Essex Archaeological Society.

About the Author
Professor David Gill is Honorary Professor in the Centre for Heritage at the University of Kent, and Academic Associate in the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage in the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures at the University of East Anglia (UEA). He is a Fellow of the RSA and the Society of Antiquaries. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.
NEW: Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience: Barbarian perspectives and Roman strategies to deal with new threats edited by Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696813. Paperback; 205x290mm; 244 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 699 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 76. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696813. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696820. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience deals with the Roman Empire’s responses to the threats which were caused by the new geostrategic situation brought on by the crisis of the 3rd century AD, induced by the ‘barbarians’ who – often already part of Roman military structures as mercenaries and auxiliaries – became a veritable menace for the Empire. Rome adopted different strategies: they oscillated between inclusion, warfare and other means of exerting influence. The contributions to this volume explore the archaeological evidence for Roman practice and especially the varying strategies of power and influence in the central regions on the one hand, and the south-eastern parts of the European ‘Barbaricum’ on the other. They show how ‘Divide et impera’ functioned as practical policy based on alliances, as well as consequent warfare, and diplomatic initiatives, which are traceable by prestige-goods and subsidia treasures found in the Barbaricum. The comparison of Roman imports in different parts of Iron-Age Europe can help understand better a complex process of shifting power and influence in an emerging new Europe, which transformed the Empire towards medieval ‘Herrschaft’ and social structure.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel holds a PhD in Ancient history and a second one in German literature. He was appointed a senior research fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and associated professor at Cuza University in Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. ;

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is a Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main.

Table of Contents
Preface ;
Beyond the Fringes of Empire: New Approaches concerning Roman Influence and Power in the Barbaricum. An introduction – Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß ;
Roman limes in military campaigns of the Barbarians – Krzysztof Narloch ;
Archaeological footprints of a superpower in hostile territory. Recent research on the traces of Roman military activities in the barbarian region north of the Middle Danube – Claus-Michael Hüssen, Balázs Komoróczy, Ján Rajtár, Marek Vlach ;
Friend or Foe? The political relations between inhabitants of the Upper Tisza region and the Roman Empire at the end of the 2nd and the 3rd century AD, in the light of archaeological and historical sources – Jan Bulas ;
The Limes Germanicus Trade and the Roman Army – Dan-Alexandru Suharoschi, Iulia Dumitrache, Roxana-Gabriela Curca ;
Barbarian brooches in Roman context. Analysis of the finds from the frontier marketplace at Porolissum (Romania) – Coriolan Horațiu Opreanu, Sorin Cociș, Vlad-Andrei Lăzărescu ;
Luxury tableware? Terra sigillata in the coastal region of the northern Netherlands – Annet Nieuwhof (Open Access) ;
Septentrional Encounters – Another Revisit to Roman Vessels in Scandinavian sites – Tove Hjørungdal ;
Westerholt ‘An der Mühle’- A Roman Iron Age Site on the North Sea Coast. A preliminary report – Jan F. Kegler ;
Beyond Hadrian’s Wall: Considerations on the Massive Terrets – Luisa Di Pastena ;
Pierced Roman coins from the ‘Free Dacians’ settlement of Roșiori (Municipality of Dulcești, Neamț County, Romania) – Lucian Munteanu, George Dan-Hânceanu ;
Mars on the River Uecker in Western Pomerania – a further indication of a Roman policy of ‘divide et impera’ in Germania? – Jens-Peter Schmidt and Hans-Ulrich Voß ;
South-eastern Transylvania during the Late Roman Period (3rd-4th centuries AD) – József Puskás ;
Roman type forts in th
NEW: Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context: An Exploration into Culture, Society, and the Study of European Prehistory. Part 2 Practice – The Social, Space, and Materiality by Tobias L. Kienlin. Paperback; 210x297mm; 250 pages; 169 figures (colour throughout). 697 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697506. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697513. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Practice – The Social, Space, and Materiality forms the second part of Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context: An exploration into culture, society, and the study of European prehistory. It studies Bronze Age tells and our approaches towards an understanding of this fascinating way of life, drawing on the material remains of long-term architectural stability and references back to ancestral place. While the first volume challenged Neo-Diffusionist models of the influence of Mediterranean palatial centres on the development of tell communities in the Carpathians and an attendant focus on social stratification, the second part sets out an alternative theoretical approach, which foregrounds architecture and the social use of space. Unlike the reductionist macro perspective of mainstream social modelling, inspired by aspects of practice theory outlined in this book, the account given seeks to allow for what is truly remarkable about these sites, and what we can infer from them about the way of life they once framed and enabled. The stability seen on tells, and their apparent lack of change on a macro scale, are specific features of the social field, in a given region and for a specific period of time. Both stability and change are contingent upon specific historical contexts, including traditional practices, their material setting and human intentionality. They are not an inherent, given property of this or that ‘type’ of society or social structure. For our tells, it is argued here, underneath the specific manifestation of sociality maintained, we clearly do see social practices and corresponding material arrangements being negotiated and adjusted. Echoing the argument laid out in the first part of this study, it is suggested that archaeology should take an interest in such processes on the micro scale, rather than succumb to the temptation of neat macro history and great narratives existing aloof from the material remains of past lives.

About the Author
Tobias L. Kienlin is professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Cologne, Germany. His research interests include the European Neolithic, Copper and Bronze Ages, settlement archaeology, archaeological theory, social archaeology, material culture studies and archaeometallurgy. Current projects include BORBAS (Borsod Region Bronze Age Settlement) on Early Bronze Age tell sites in north-eastern Hungary and the Toboliu project in north-western Romania.
NEW: The Mysterious Spheres on Greek and Roman Ancient Coins by Raymond V. Sidrys. Paperback; 175x245mm; 290pp; 90 figures, colour throughout. 690 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697902. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697919. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

This book is not a standard coin catalogue, but it focuses on quantities and percentages of the mysterious 5950 sphere images on Roman (76BC-AD 476) coin reverses, and a few Greek coins. This research identifies which Emperors, Deities and Personifications are most frequently shown with a sphere, during reigns and eras, and determines the political, cultural, religious and propaganda trends associated with the coin sphere images, and provides a variety of new findings. The book has 257 illustrations of spheres shown on Roman and a few Greek coins, as well as 109 images of statues, reliefs, mosaics, and other ancient art. Consider that the ancient Greeks (620 BC-30 BC) had the first astronomers in Europe (influenced by Egyptian and Babylonian astronomy) who created the celestial and terrestrial sphere theories, including the popular geocentric theory (Earth is the centre of the Universe). But at that time the Greeks very rarely showed sphere images on their coins – far less than 1%! In comparison, the later Romans during 76 BCAD 476 issued coin reverse sphere types as 15% of their total coin types, and therefore millions of these important coin sphere types were minted. The author explores Constantine’s BEATA TRANQVILLITAS Sphere Reverses (AD 321 – 324) and offers a new interpretation of Christian Trinity symbolism that opposes Arianism. Starting in the late 4th century, the Roman religion began to transfer to Christianity, and coins promoted Emperors holding a Christian cross on a globe or a winged Victory/Angel also holding a globus cruciger. At the end of the book, the Epilogue shows the continuous worldwide use (from 5th to 21st century) of sphere images on coins, reliefs, sculptures, astronomical models, drawings, paintings and large monuments, and some of them suggest that Imperial Roman sphere coins created a long legacy.

About the Author
Raymond Sidrys was born in Manhattan, New York; received his B.A. (1971) in Anthropology at Northwestern University (also 1969 summer school at Harvard University), and M.A. (1973) and Ph.D. (1976) in Anthropology/Archaeology at UCLA. He lectured at several Universities in southern California and in Lithuania.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction ;
Chapter 2: Sun Disk Images in Ancient Cultures ;
Chapter 3: Greek Concepts of Celestial and Terrestrial Spheres ;
Chapter 4: Early Greek Coins With Few Sphere Symbols (520 BC – 76 BC) ;
Chapter 5: Prior Research on Roman Coin Sphere Symbols ;
Chapter 6: Astrological/Astronomical Sphere Symbols Move to Rome ;
Chapter 7: Winged Victory vs. Sphere Symbols on Roman Coins ;
Chapter 8: First Spheres on Late Republican Coinage (76 BC - 31 BC) ;
Chapter 9: Spheres Frequent on Roman Imperial Coinage ;
Chapter 10: Chronological Trends for Top Coin Sphere Images ;
Chapter 11: General Conclusions ;
Chapter 12: Appendices ;
Bibliography ;
Index ;
List of Figures and Credits ;
Acknowledgements ;
About the Author
NEW: L’arte rupestre nella penisola e nelle isole italiane: rapporti tra rocce incise e dipinte, simboli, aree montane e viabilità Rock art in the Italian peninsula and islands: issues about the relation between engraved and painted rocks, symbols, mountain areas and paths edited by Francesco M. P. Carrera, Renata Grifoni Cremonesi and Anna Maria Tosatti. Paperback; 203x276mm; 484 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 129 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698237. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698244. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

L’arte rupestre nella penisola e nelle isole italiane presents the proceedings of IFRAO 2018 – Session 2H: Rock Art in the Italian Peninsula and Islands: Issues about the Relation between Engraved and Painted Rocks, Symbols, Mountain Areas and Paths. The various papers present a remarkable synthesis of current knowledge on inscriptions, engraved and painted, on the rock walls of the Italian peninsular. In recent years an increasing amount of data has been collected, characterized by a regional and peculiar iconography with some common elements: anthropomorphic figures, weapons, daggers, halberds and other several symbols, all stylised. A peculiarity of this research is the site’s locations within small shelters, inappropriate for habitation or in places suitable for supervising mountain and territory roads; this research demonstrates similarities to that carried out in the Western Mediterranean Sea. A new subject of relates to the possible interpretations of some engravings as solar and stellar symbols related to the measuring of time and to economic, daily and seasonal factors.

L’ouvrage «Art rupestre de la Péninsule italienne, de la Sicile, de la Sardaigne et de la Corse» qui publie les actes du 20ème Congrès International « Rock Art Congres IFRAO 2018 », dont les différentes communications ont été réunies par Francesco Carrera, Renata Grifoni Cremonesi et Anna Maria Tosatti, présente une remarquable synthèse des connaissances actuelles sur les inscriptions gravées et peintes sur les parois rocheuses des régions prises en compte. Le plus souvent très schématiques, difficilement datables, elles correspondent soit à des pictogrammes qui évoquent des objets de la vie courante, soit à des idéogrammes qui transmettent des idées liées à la pensée symbolique des peuples protohistoriques qui les ont réalisées. Quelques articles sont consacrés aux cupules creusées sur des roches en plein air pour récupérer l’eau de pluie, d’autres à des rainures très profondes qui correspondent à des “polissoirs”. – Henry de Lumley - Institut de Paléontologie Humaine, Paris
FORTHCOMING: Earthen Construction Technology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 11 Session IV-5 edited by Annick Daneels and Maria Torras Freixa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 168 pages; colour throughout. Print RRP: £32.00. 719 2021. ISBN 9781789697230. Book contents pageBuy Now

Earthen Construction Technology presents the papers from Session IV-5 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The archaeological study of earthen construction has until now focused on typology and conservation, rather than on its anthropological importance. Earth is the permanent building material of humankind, and was used by the world’s earliest civilizations for their first urban programmes. The architectural and engineering know-how required to carry out these monumental achievements can only be obtained through archaeological research: extensive excavations with attention to architectural and structural features, and their collapse, coupled with typological, mineralogical, micromorphological, botanical, chemical, and mechanical studies of building materials. This line of research is recent, starting in the 1980s in Europe, but is rapidly growing and illustrated in this volume.

About the Editors
Annick Daneels, archaeologist, PhD (UGent, Belgium, and UNAM, Mexico), senior researcher at the Institute of Anthropological Research of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City. Since 1981 active in archaeological research in Central Veracruz, on the Mexican Gulf coast, with a focus on monumental earthen architecture since 2004. Director of four interdisciplinary projects on Mesoamerican Earthen Architecture since 2009, including excavations, preservation, experimental archaeology, and mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, botanical (pollen, phytoliths, macroremains), mechanical, and micromorphological analysis of archaeological and experimental construction samples. ;

Maria Torras Freixa, archaeologist, PhD (UB, Spain), independent researcher. Since 2013 active in archaeological research on the formation of premodern cities and urban planning, with a focus on Teotihuacan, in the Central Mexican Highlands. Team member of an interdisciplinary project in Teotihuacan since 2018, including fieldwork and geophysical surveys.
FORTHCOMING: Rougga I: Le forum et ses abords (fouilles 1971–1974) edited by Maurice Euzennat† and Hédi Slim†. Paperback; 205x290mm; 518 pages; 214 figures, 54 tables (13 colour plates). French text. Print RRP: £85.00. 706 2020 Archaeology of the Maghreb 2. ISBN 9781789698251. Book contents pageBuy Now

Located in Byzacena, 12 km south-east of Thysdrus / El Jem, the municipality of Bararus / Henchir, Rougga is known for its large Roman cisterns first reported in the 18th century and for the discovery in 1972 of a hoard of Byzantine gold coins. ROUGGA I gives an account of the overall results of the excavations carried out at the site of the forum, from 1971 to 1974, by the Tunisian-French mission under the direction of Maurice Euzennat † and Hédi Slim †.

Situé en Byzacène, à 12 km au sud-est de Thysdrus/El Jem, le municipe de Bararus/Henchir Rougga est connu pour ses grandes citernes d’époque romaine signalées depuis le XVIIIe s. et pour la découverte en 1972 d’un trésor de monnaies d’or byzantines publié en 1982 dans le volume III de la monographie générale du site. Ce volume I, rédigé pour l’essentiel au début des années 90, rend compte du résultat global des fouilles menées à l’emplacement du forum, de 1971 à 1974, par la mission tuniso-française sous la direction de Maurice Euzennat† et Hédi Slim†. L’ouvrage comprend trois parties : tout d’abord, une présentation générale du site par les deux chefs de mission et Pol Trousset ; ensuite, une description de la stratigraphie du forum et du mobilier qui en provient, par Roger Guéry† avec la collaboration de divers spécialistes ; enfin, une étude architecturale extrêmement précise des différents éléments qui composent le centre monumental de la cité : citernes, platea et portiques, xyste et temples, par Gilbert Hallier†. Ces travaux permettent de mieux appréhender la place du municipe de Bararus au centre d’une riche région agricole qui a laissé les traces de cadastration parmi les mieux conservées d’Afrique. Ils mettent en évidence sa longue durée d’occupation, du IIIe s. av. J.-C. (avec quelques traces antérieures remontant à la Préhistoire) jusqu’au XIe s., et l’originalité des partis architecturaux qui ont présidé à la construction de son centre monumental à l’époque flavienne, ses transformations au IIe s. et son abandon à l’époque byzantine.

Maurice Euzennat (1926-2004), Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, Membre de l’Institut. ;

Hédi Slim (1935-2019), Directeur de Recherche à l’Institut National du Patrimoine de Tunis, Directeur de la division du Recensement général et des Études. ;

Roger Guéry (1926-1997), Ingénieur au CNRS, archéologue-céramologue. ;

Gilbert Hallier (1923-2010), Architecte d.p.l.g., Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, architecte-archéologue. ;

Pol Trousset, Directeur de Recherche honoraire au CNRS, archéologue-géographe.

Ouvrage publié avec le concours de l'Institut Français de Tunisie.

Préface de Fathi Bejaoui, Directeur de Recherche à INP.

Postface de Pierre Gros, Membre de l'Institut.
Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 5 2020 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). DOI: 10.32028/9781789697926. Paperback; 205x290mm; 652 pages; colour throughout. 5 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697926. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697933. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Volume 5 is perhaps the richest and most diverse volume of the Journal of Greek Archaeology so far offered to readers. The editors have kept to the journal's core brief to cover all the major periods of Greek Archaeology in a literal sense, with articles from the Neolithic through Greco-Roman times and the Middle Ages and up to the 19th century AD. Geographically, papers range from Sicily through the Aegean to Turkey.

A major novelty is the inclusion of two Colloquia, one on the economics of Greek Protohistoric to Archaic ‘colonisation’ edited by Lieve Donnellan, the second on Byzantine landscape archaeology edited by Effie Athanassopoulos.

Alongside a wealth of period-based papers on settlements, ceramics, lithics and urban infrastructure, the volume also presents a major report on the nature and future of surface survey in Mediterranean lands, a group article – the fruit of some twenty years of twice-yearly conferences by the International Mediterranean Survey Workshop community.

The review section also ranges through prehistory to the recent past, including the historiography of research which includes and extensive and enlightening (but disturbing) review article by Margriet Haagsma on discrimination against female scholars in early 20th century Classical Archaeology.

KOINON: The International Journal of Classical Numismatic Studies Volume III, 2020 edited by Nicholas J. Molinari (General Editor). Paperback; 215x280mm; 144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 3 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698114. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698121. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £56.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

As the name indicates, KOINON is a journal that encourages contributions to the study of classical numismatics from a wide variety of perspectives. The journal includes papers concerning iconography, die studies, provenance research, forgery analysis, translations of excerpts from antiquarian works, specialized bibliographies, corpora of rare varieties and types, ethical questions on laws and collecting, book reviews, and more. The editorial advisory board is made up of members from all over the world, with a broad range of expertise covering virtually all the major categories of classical numismatics from archaic Greek coinage to late Medieval coinage.

Table of Contents
The Unconquerable Sun: An introduction to Koinon III and brief note concerning the solace of numismatics – Nicholas J. Molinari ;
Overstruck sigloi of Azbaal and Baalmelek II of Kition – David Macdonald ;
Cast copies of a Neapolitan silver didrachm from the Berlin coin cabinet – John Voukelatos ;
Susa mint: 311-301 BC – Lloyd W. H. Taylor ;
Sidon to Tyre: the Macedonian administration and relative chronology – Lloyd W. H. Taylor ;
The Kerykeion mint control linked coinage of Andragoras and Sophytes – Lloyd W. H. Taylor ;
Αχελομορφωθ: magistrates of Akarnania. A Reconsideration of the iconographic fluctuations on Akarnanian federal coinage – Nicholas J. Molinari ;
Constantine’s decennalia and his fourth consulship on a follis from Lugdunum – Andrei Bontas ;
The emergence of fur money in medieval Russia – Dzmitry Huletski ;
Hungarian coins – Hebrew letters – Csaba Tóth and József Géza Kiss ;
The ant-nose coinage of ancient China – Thomas Walker ;
Catalogue of new varieties
Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing Patterns of Travel to the Middle East from Medieval to Modern Times edited by Paul and Janet Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; 422 pages; Illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (91 pages in colour). 686 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697520. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697537. Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing patterns of travel to the Middle East from medieval to modern times comprises a varied collection of seventeen papers presented at the biennial conference of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) held in York in July 2019, which together will provide the reader with a fascinating introduction to travel in and to the Middle East over more than a thousand years.

As in previous ASTENE volumes, the material presented ranges widely, from Ancient Egyptian sites through medieval pilgrims to tourists and other travellers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The papers embody a number of different traditions, including not only actual but also fictional travel experiences, as well as pilgrimage or missionary narratives reflecting quests for spiritual wisdom as well as geographical knowledge. They also reflect the shifting political and cultural relations between Europe and the Near and Middle East, and between the different religions of the area, as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region over the centuries. The men and women travellers discussed travelled for a wide variety of reasons — religious, commercial, military, diplomatic, or sometimes even just for a holiday! — but whatever their primary motivations, they were almost always also inspired by a sense of curiosity about peoples and places less familiar than their own. By recording their experiences, whether in words or in art, they have greatly contributed to our understanding of what has shaped the world we live in. As Ibn Battuta, one of the greatest of medieval Arab travellers, wrote: ‘Travelling — it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller!’

Table of Contents (provisional)
Introduction – Paul and Janet Starkey ;
1. Pilgrimage as Travel – Jacke Phillips ;
2. Ibn Jubayr’s Riḥla Reconsidered – Paul Starkey ;
3. ‘Gardens of Paradise’ – Janet Starkey ;
4. ‘Wady Ghrásheca’: an unknown Christian site in Sir Gardner Wilkinson’s unpublished manuscripts from the Eastern Desert – Jan Ciglenečki & Blaž Zabel ;
5. Exploring the Ottoman Empire: the travels of Peter Mundy (1597–c.1667) in Turkey 1617–1620 – Jennifer Scarce ;
6. With a radius most accurately divided into 10,000 parts: John Greaves and his scientific survey of Egypt in 1638–1639 – Ronald E. Zitterkopf ;
7. Dimitrie Cantemir, the ‘Orpheus of the Turkish Empire’ (1673– 1723) – Cristina Erck ;
8. The Artist William Page (1794–1872) and his travels in Greece and western Turkey in the first half of the nineteenth century – Brian J. Taylor ;
9. Jacob Röser: a Bavarian physician travelling the Ottoman Empire in 1834–1835 – Joachim Gierlichs ;
10. Publishing with ‘Modern Taste and Spirit’ – Paulina Banas ;
11. ‘Mr and Mrs Smith of England’: a tour to Petra and east of Jordan in 1865 – David Kennedy ;
12. Anton Prokesch-Osten Jr (1837–1919) – Angela Blaschek ;
13. William Wing Loring, George Brinton McClellan and Ulysses S. Grant: American Civil War Generals in Egypt during the 1870s – Mladen Tomorad ;
14. Consular Agents and Foreign Travellers in Upper Egypt in the Nineteenth Century – Terence Walz ;
15. A Luxor Room with a View at Pagnon’s Hotels – Sylvie Weens ;
16. Richard A. Bermann, the Desert and the Mahdi: an Austrian writer’s fascination with Egypt and the Sudan – Ernst Czerny ;
17. Unlawful Acts and Supernatural Curses: the fictional traveller in Bram Stoker’s The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903) – Rebecca Bruce ;
Notes on Contributors ;
Index
Carving a Professional Identity: The Occupational Epigraphy of the Roman Latin West by Rada Varga. Paperback; 156x234mm; 126 pages; 13 graphs. 684 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 73. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694642. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694659. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Carving a Professional Identity: The occupational epigraphy of the Roman Latin West presents the results of long-term research into the occupational epigraphy from the Latin-language provinces of the Roman Empire. It catalogues stone epigraphs of independent professionals (thus excluding state workers, imperial slaves, freedmen and military personnel), comprising some 690 people, providing quantitative as well as qualitative analyses of the raw data. A glossary translating the occupational titles is also included. The book reveals a very lively work market, where specialisation responded to demand and brought social and economic status to the worker. The coherence of epigraphic habits and manifestations within a professional group, along with all the other existing clues for a rather unitary use of symbols, endorse once more the existence of a Roman provincial, commercial, middle class.

About the Author
Rada Varga is a researcher at Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania) specialising in Latin epigraphy, digital classics, prosopography and provincial archaeology (co-directing the excavations at the fortress of ala I milliaria Batavorum from Dacia). Her main project is Romans1by1, a prosopographical database for people attested in ancient epigraphy. Currently, Dr Varga is a member of the executive committee of EADH (The European Association for Digital Humanities).
Definición y caracterización de las cerámicas a mano con decoración pintada del sur de la península ibérica en época tartésica by Pedro Miguel Naranjo. Paperback; 203x276mm; 476 page; 136 figures; illustrated catalogue consisting of 99 colour plates. Spanish text. 682 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697728. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697735. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Handmade ceramics with painted decoration constitute one of the most outstanding archaeological materials from the Late Bronze Age and the First Iron Age in the Guadalquivir and Guadiana valleys, the context in which the Tartessian culture developed. In this work, an exhaustive study of these ceramic styles has been attempted, defining their technical characteristics, dispersion, forms, decoration, symbolism, chronology, use and meaning. To this overall study are added several unpublished pieces by Alarcos, some with archeometric and content analysis, the results of which allow questioning their traditional consideration as 'post-firing ceramics'.

This characterization allows an orientation in the classification of some styles traditionally considered as a monolithic set when really, there is a much more complex panorama due to different chronological and cultural circumstances. Among the latter, the relationships and contacts established between local communities and Mediterranean populations stand out, giving rise to cultural phenomena of miscegenation or hybridization in which local tradition was combined with all exogenous contributions, a fossilized reality in these productions. This book presents the most complete and up-to-date work on these ceramics, studied from the perspective of new theoretical-methodological approaches and recent interpretations.

About the Author
Pedro Miguel Naranjo has a degree in History (Extraordinary Award) and a doctorate in Prehistory from the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM). He completed a master's degree in History and Ancient Sciences (UCM-UAM), specializing in oriental cultures. His research focuses on the Protohistory of the Iberian Peninsula, specifically the Phoenicians, Tartessians and Greeks.

Spanish Description
Las cerámicas a mano con decoración pintada constituyen uno de los materiales arqueológicos más destacados del Bronce Final y de la Primera Edad del Hierro en los valles del Guadalquivir y del Guadiana, contexto en el que se desarrolló la cultura tartésica. En este trabajo se ha abordado un estudio exhaustivo sobre estos estilos cerámicos, definiendo sus características técnicas, dispersión geográfica, formas, decoración, simbolismo, cronología, uso y significado. A este estudio de conjunto se añaden varias piezas inéditas de Alarcos, algunas con análisis arqueométricos y de contenido cuyos resultados cuestionan su tradicional consideración como “cerámicas postcocción”.

Dicha caracterización permite una orientación en la clasificación de unos estilos tradicionalmente considerados como un conjunto monolítico, cuando realmente subyace un panorama mucho más complejo que obedece a diversas circunstancias cronológicas y culturales. Entre estas últimas destacan las relaciones y contactos establecidos entre las comunidades locales peninsulares y las poblaciones mediterráneas, dando lugar a fenómenos culturales de mestizaje o hibridación en el que se conjugó la tradición local con todas las aportaciones exógenas, una realidad fosilizada en estas producciones. En definitiva, se trata de la obra de conjunto más completa y actualizada sobre estas cerámicas, estudiadas desde la perspectiva de los nuevos enfoques teórico-metodológicos y las recientes interpretaciones.

Pedro Miguel Naranjo es graduado en Historia (premio Extraordinario Fin de Carrera) y doctor en Prehistoria por la Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM). Realizó el máster en Historia y Ciencias de la Antigüedad (UCM-UAM), con especialidad en culturas orientales. Sus investigaciones se centran en la Protohistoria de la península ibérica, concretamente fenicios, tartesios y griegos.
Lost Worlds of Ancient and Modern Greece Gilbert Bagnani: The Adventures of a Young Italo-Canadian Archaeologist in Greece, 1921-1924 by D. J. Ian Begg. Hardback; 380pp; 14 figures; 5 maps. 604 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694529. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694536. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

By day, young Gilbert Bagnani studied archaeology in Greece, but by night he socialised with the elite of Athenian society. Secretly writing for the Morning Post in London, he witnessed both antebellum Athens in 1921 and the catastrophic collapse of Christian civilisation in western Anatolia in 1922. While there have been many accounts by refugees of the disastrous flight from Smyrna, few have been written from the perspective of the west side of the Aegean. The flood of a million refugees to Greece brought in its wake a military coup in Athens, the exile of the Greek royal family and the execution or imprisonment of politicians, whom Gilbert knew.

Gilbert’s weekly letters to his mother in Rome reveal his Odyssey-like adventures on a voyage of discovery through the origins of western civilisation. As an archaeologist in Greece, he travelled through time seeing history repeat itself: Minoan Knossos, Byzantine Constantinople and Ottoman Smyrna were all violently destroyed, but the survivors escaped to the new worlds of Mycenaean Greece, Renaissance Venice and modern Greece.

At Smyrna in the twentieth century, history was written not only by the victors but was also recorded by the victims. At the same time, however, the twentieth century itself was so filled with reports of ethnic cleansings on such a scale that the reports brutalized the humanity of the supposedly civilized people reading about them, and the tragedy of Smyrna disappeared from public awareness between the cataclysmic upheavals of the First and Second World Wars.

About the Author
Ian Begg studied archaeology in Greece at the America School of Classical Studies in Athens. For this book, the author retraced Gilbert Bagnani's footsteps around Greece, the Aegean, Turkey and Libya. He has not only participated in excavations in Sicily, Greece, Crete and Egypt but also initiated a survey on the island of Karpathos especially for the chapter in this volume.

Reviews
Gilbert Bagnani, the subject of Ian Begg’s book, was unknown to me, and I am glad to have made his acquaintance. The book covers the period 1921-1924. Gilbert comes across as a fascinating character, who encountered the Levant at a critical time for both the Greece of Eleftherios Venizelos and the Turkey of Mustapha Kemal Atatürk. He was bilingual in Italian (from his father) and English (from his mother): an archaeologist but always more than that. He knew and was helped by the excellent William Miller, which led to his contributing incisive articles about the politics of Greece and the Levant to the Morning Post in London. As a member of the Italian School of Archaeology in Athens he travelled around Greece and the islands and found himself in Asia Minor at a critical phase of the Greek occupation and Kemal’s war of independence. All this and much more is described in Gilbert’s letters to his mother. His grasp of local and international politics was impressive. He and Begg paint sparkling pen pictures of personalities such as Bosdari, the Italian ambassador during the Great War, and later Governor of the Dodecanese, Prince Demidoff the Russian ambassador, Harold Lamb the British Consul at Smyrna and family, Greek personalities such as Stratos, Kalapothakis, Karapanos, and colleagues at the Italian School. Gilbert emerges as clever, sometimes arrogant, fascinated by people especially from high society, and with a weakness for royalty. Begg does him justice in a well sourced book. This is a lively account of a formidable personality, scholar and archaeologist in the making. The black and white photographs by Gilbert himself are excellent. – Sir Michael Llewellyn Smith, British Ambassodor to Greece 1996 – 1999 ;

Gilbert Bagnani, of Italian and Canadian extraction, arrived in Greece at the age of 21, already well-connected through his parents’ social and professional circles. He was ostensibly studying Greek A
Nel regno del fango: speleoarcheologia della Grotta di Polla (Salerno, Italia) Risultati delle prime campagne di scavo edited by Antonella Minelli and Sandra Guglielmi. Paperback; 203x276mm; 114 pages; 61 figures, colour throughout. Italian text. 123 . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691221. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691238. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Nel regno del fango presents the preliminary results of the archaeological excavations recently carried out in the Grotta di Polla, in the province of Salerno, in the Vallo di Diano area. Speleoarchaeological researches in recent years have revealed the considerable difficulty of operating methodologically in an environment, such as that of a cave which, in addition to being often characterized by the limitations caused by the darkness and tightness of the environments, has in this case led to the presence of a considerable amount of mud which made researches even more complex. The methodologies adopted for the preservation and conservation of archaeological materials and the results obtained are therefore illustrated. From an interpretative point of view, the cave is configured as an area that has been exploited with a certain continuity from the Neolithic to the whole Bronze Age with the specific function of a burial area.

About the Editors
Antonella Minelli is an academic researcher in the scientific field of Evolutionary Anthropology (BIO/08), at the Department of Humanities, Social and Formation Sciences of the University of Molise. ;

Sandra Guglielmi is a researcher in Physical Anthropology (BIO/08), at the Department of Humanities, Social and Formation Sciences of the University of Molise.

Italian Description
Il volume presenta i risultati preliminari degli scavi archeologici effettuati nella Grotta di Polla, ubicata in provincia di Salerno, nel territorio del Vallo di Diano, in Italia meridionale.

La grotta si configura come un’area sfruttata con una certa continuità, dal Neolitico finale a tutta l’Età del Bronzo, con la specifica funzione di area sepolcrale. Le informazioni acquisite nel corso delle ricerche e degli studi di natura archeostratigrafica, paleobiologica, archeobotanica, hanno permesso di tracciare un quadro significativo ed esaustivo delle modalità di sfruttamento del contesto ipogeico, inserendosi a pieno nei modelli comportamentali noti, per il periodo considerato, in Italia centro-meridionale.

Nel volume sono illustrate le metodologie adottate per la preservazione e la conservazione dei materiali archeologici. I risultati ottenuti sono - dunque - di un certo rilevo nonostante la notevole difficoltà di operare metodologicamente in un ambiente, come quello di grotta che, oltre a dover fare i conti con i limiti dovuti all’oscurità e all’ampiezza degli ambienti, è caratterizzato in questo caso da una considerevole quantità di fango, che ha reso le ricerche ancora più complesse.

Antonella Minelli è ricercatore confermato nel settore scientifico disciplinare di Antropologia, presso il Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Sociali e della Formazione dell’Università degli Studi del Molise. Ha lavorato come responsabile scientifico in contesti pre-protostorici in grotta e in open-air site in Italia e in Europa ed è stata direttore e collaboratore scientifico delle missioni archeologiche finanziate dal Ministero degli Affari Esteri italiano in Colombia e Paraguay. È autrice di diverse pubblicazioni. ;

Sandra Guglielmi è ricercatore a tempo determinato in Antropologia Fisica, presso il Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Sociali e della Formazione dell’Università degli Studi del Molise. L’area disciplinare della sua attività di ricerca è l’Antropologia Fisica e Biomolecolare applicata ai campioni archeologici. Ha svolto attività scientifica in diversi ambiti archeologici, da contesti protostorici a contesti storici, in Italia e in Sud America. È autrice di diverse pubblicazioni.
Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest edited by Federica Boschi, Enrico Giorgi, Frank Vermeulen. Paperback; 203x276mm, 230 pages; 96 figures (colour throughout). 121 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696998. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697001. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest: Landscape Archaeology and Material Culture is a coherent collection of papers presented at an International Workshop held in Ravenna (Italy) on 13-14 May 2019. The event, organized by the Universities of Bologna and Ghent and Arcadria, focussed on the transition between Italic culture and Romanised society in the central Adriatic area – the regions ager Gallicus and Picenum under Roman dominance – from the fourth to the second centuries BCE.

By bringing together the experience of international research on this topic, the volume highlights a period that marks a profound transformation in the whole of central Italy by analysing the relationships between the central settlements and their territories and, more generally, by measuring the impact of early Romanization on the territorial structure, social organization and cultural substrata of populations living here. The volume also discusses methodological aspects regarding best practices in fieldwork, landscape investigation and study of material culture, identifying research lines and perspectives for the future deepening of knowledge in this crucial period of central Adriatic archaeology.

About the Editors
Federica Boschi is senior researcher in Methods of Archaeological Research at the University of Bologna. She specialises in non-destructive methods of investigation, in particular geophysics and aerial photography for archaeology. She directs field projects in central Adriatic Italy and is a member of several teams conducting research of international significance. ;

Enrico Giorgi is Associate Professor of Methodology and Landscape Archaeology at the University of Bologna. He is the director of the journal ‘Groma: Documenting Archaeology’ and directs research on Adriatic archaeology. He conducts archaeological missions in Croatia, Albania and Egypt which are already the subject of publications. ;

Frank Vermeulen has been Professor of Roman Archaeology and Archaeological Methodology at Ghent University since 1999 and directed its Department of Archaeology from 2015-2018. He is particularly interested in Roman settlement archaeology and geo-archaeological approaches to ancient Mediterranean landscapes; he has a keen interest in IT applications in archaeology.
Ages and Abilities: The Stages of Childhood and their Social Recognition in Prehistoric Europe and Beyond edited by Katharina Rebay-Salisbury and Doris Pany-Kucera. Paperback; 176x252mm; 264 pages; illustrated throughout. 681 2020 Childhood in the Past Monograph Series 9. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697681. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697698. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Ages and Abilities explores social responses to childhood stages from the late Neolithic to Classical Antiquity in Central Europe and the Mediterranean and includes cross-cultural comparison to expand the theoretical and methodological framework. By comparing osteological and archaeological evidence, as well as integrating images and texts, authors consider whether childhood age classes are archaeologically recognizable, at which approximated ages transitions took place, whether they are gradual or abrupt and different for girls and boys. Age transitions may be marked by celebrations and rituals; cultural accentuation of developmental stages may be reflected by inclusion or exclusion at cemeteries, by objects associated with childhood such as feeding vessels and toys, and gradual access to adult material culture. Access to tools, weapons and status symbols, as well as children’s agency, rank and social status, are recurrent themes. The volume accounts for the variability in how a range of chronologically and geographically diverse communities perceived children and childhood, and at the same time, discloses universal trends in child development in the (pre-)historic past.

About the Editors
Katharina Rebay-Salisbury is an archaeologist with a research focus on the European Bronze and Iron Ages. She directs the research group ‘Prehistoric Identities’ at the Institute for Oriental and European Archaeology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and teaches at the University of Vienna. ;

Doris Pany-Kucera studied biological anthropology at the University of Vienna, focusing on muscle marks and joint changes on skeletal remains to reconstruct occupational stress and labour patterns (PhD 2015). She teaches at the Universities of Vienna and Pilsen.
El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico 20 años de excavaciones arqueológicas en el Sector III by Mª del Rosario García Huerta, Francisco Javier Morales Hervás and David Rodríguez González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 160 pages; 64 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 671 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696912. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696929. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico presents the results of archaeological work which has been carried out since 1997 in so-called Sector III of the Alarcos site, located on a hill next to the Guadiana river, a few kilometres from Ciudad Real. These archaeological campaigns have made it possible to obtain essential information to understand the communities that, from the end of the Bronze Age to the end of the Iron Age, inhabited this large town and its surrounding area.

An interesting set of structures and other evidence of material culture have been recovered, which allow us to characterize the daily activities of people between the 10th-11th century BC and, in addition, they enable us to understand the paleoenvironment of this territory and the nature of the economy and the food transformation activities of these protohistoric populations.

The use of this territory has been determined over the centuries, being originally a residential area which later, in Iberian times, assumed economic functionality, as it was intended for grain storage, grinding and cooking food.

The documentation of a wide and varied repertoire of ceramic materials and an interesting set of foreign ceramics corroborates the dynamism this settlement achieved, during both the Pre-Iberian period and the full Iberian period.

About the Authors
Mª del Rosario García Huerta holds a PhD in Prehistory and is Senior Lecturer on this subject at the University of Castilla-La Mancha. ;

Francisco Javier Morales Hervás was awarded an extraordinary prize during his bachelor's degree and holds a PhD in History from the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he is Associate Lecturer in Prehistory. ;

. David Rodríguez González is Lecturer in Prehistory at the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he also coordinates the Degree in History and is a member of the Governing Council. ;

Spanish Description
El objeto de este libro es dar a conocer los trabajos de investigación arqueológica que desde 1997 se han realizado en el denominado Sector III del yacimiento de Alarcos, ubicado en un cerro situado junto al río Guadiana, a pocos kilómetros de Ciudad Real. Estas campañas arqueológicas han permitido obtener una información esencial para poder conocer a las comunidades que, desde finales de la Edad del Bronce hasta finales de la Edad del Hierro, habitaron este gran poblado y su área circundante.

Se ha logrado recuperar un interesante conjunto de estructuras y otras evidencias de la cultura material, que permiten caracterizar las actividades cotidianas que desempeñaban estas personas entre el siglo X a.C. y el II a.C. y, además, nos posibilitan realizar una aproximación al paleoambiente de este territorio y a las características de la economía y de las actividades de transformación de alimentos de estas poblaciones protohistóricas.

Se ha determinado su uso a lo largo de los siglos, siendo en origen un área residencial que posteriormente, en época ibérica, asumió una funcionalidad económica al estar destinada al almacenamiento de grano, a molienda y cocción de alimentos.

La documentación de un amplio y variado repertorio de materiales cerámicos y de un interesante conjunto de cerámicas foráneas corrobora el dinamismo que alcanzará este asentamiento, tanto en época Preibérica como durante el Ibérico pleno.

Mª del Rosario García Huerta es doctora en Prehistoria y profesora titular de esta materia en la Universidad de Castilla- La Mancha. Sus líneas de investigación se han centrado en las culturas protohistóricas de la península ibérica, celtibérica e ibérica y, más recientemente, ha iniciado el estudio del simbolismo animal en la Prehistoria. Es investigadora principal de numerosos proyectos de investigación arqueológicos y autora de un gran número de libros
The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland The British School at Rome’s Tiber Valley Project by Helen Patterson, Robert Witcher and Helga Di Giuseppe. Paperback; 205x290mm; 372 pages; 131 figures, 21 tables (colour throughout). 665 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 70. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696158. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696165. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland presents a new regional history of the middle Tiber valley as a lens through which to view the emergence and transformation of the city of Rome from 1000 BC to AD 1000. Setting the ancient city within the context of its immediate territory, the authors reveal the diverse and enduring links between the metropolis and its hinterland. At the heart of the volume is a detailed consideration of the results of a complete restudy of the pioneering South Etruria Survey (c. 1955–1970), one of the earliest and most influential Mediterranean landscape projects. Between 1998 and 2002, an international team based at the British School at Rome conducted a comprehensive restudy of the material and documentary archive generated by the South Etruria Survey. The results were supplemented with a number of other published and unpublished sources of archaeological evidence to create a database of around 5000 sites across southern Etruria and the Sabina Tiberina, extending in date from the Bronze Age, through the Etruscan/Sabine, Republican and imperial periods, to the middle ages. Analysis and discussion of these data have appeared in a series of interim articles published over the past two decades; the present volume offers a final synthesis of the project results.

The chapters include the first detailed assessment of the field methods of the South Etruria Survey, an extended discussion of the use of archaeological legacy data, and new insights into the social and economic connectivities between Rome and the communities of its northern hinterland across two millennia. The volume as a whole demonstrates how the archaeological evidence generated by landscape surveys can be used to rewrite narrative histories, even those based on cities as familiar as ancient Rome.

Includes contributions by Martin Millett, Simon Keay and Christopher Smith, and a preface by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill.

About the Authors
Helen Patterson is the former Assistant Director (Archaeology) of the British School at Rome and director of the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project (1998–2002). She is a specialist in the archaeology of the late antique and early medieval periods, with particular interests in ceramic production and distribution. She has published a series of edited volumes including Bridging the Tiber (2004), Mercator Placidissimus (with F. Coarelli, 2008) and Veii: the historical topography of the ancient city (with R. Cascino & H. Di Giuseppe, 2012).

Robert Witcher is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University, UK. From 1999 to 2002, he was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. His research interests include landscape archaeology with a particular focus on the pre-Roman and Roman periods in Italy and the wider Mediterranean. He has published on aspects of ancient rural settlement, agriculture, demography and globalization. He is the editor of the world archaeology journal, Antiquity.

Helga Di Giuseppe specialises in Italian archaeology with particular interests in the classical and late antique periods. She has published widely on ancient landscape, Roman villas, and ceramic and textile production, and has edited several major excavation and conference volumes. From 1998 to 2002, she was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. She is currently project manager for Fasti Online with the International Association of Classical Archaeology and editorial manager with the publisher Scienze e Lettere.
A Catalogue of the Sculpture Collection at Wilton House by Peter Stewart with new photography by Guido Petruccioli. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 229x305mm; 438 pages; 14 figures and 154 plates in full colour throughout. 661 2020. ISBN 9781789696554. £90.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Wilton House sculptures constituted one of the largest and most celebrated collections of ancient art in Europe. Originally comprising some 340 works, the collection was formed around the late 1710s and 1720s by Thomas Herbert, the eccentric 8th Earl of Pembroke, who stubbornly ‘re-baptized’ his busts and statues with names of his own choosing. His sources included the famous collection of Cardinal Mazarin, assembled in Paris in the 1640s and 1650s, and recent discoveries on the Via Appia outside Rome. Earl Thomas regarded the sculptures as ancient – some of them among the oldest works of art in existence – but in fact much of the collection is modern and represents the neglected talents of sixteenth-and seventeenth-century artists, restorers and copyists who were inspired by Greek and Roman sculpture.

About half of the original collection remains intact today, adorning the Gothic Cloisters that were built for it two centuries ago. After a long decline, accelerated by the impact of the Second World War, the sculptures have been rehabilitated in recent years. They include masterpieces of Roman and early modern art, which cast fresh light on Graeco-Roman antiquity, the classical tradition, and the history of collecting.

Illustrated with specially commissioned photographs, this catalogue offers the first comprehensive publication of the 8th Earl’s collection, including an inventory of works dispersed from Wilton. It re-presents his personal vision of the collection recorded in contemporary manuscripts. At the same time, it dismantles some of the myths about it which originated with the earl himself, and provides an authoritative archaeological and art-historical analysis of the artefacts.

About the Author
Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. His research ranges across many aspects of Greek and Roman sculpture and the relationships between different artistic traditions. His previous publications include, Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008).

Guido Petruccioli is an Oxford University-trained classical archaeologist and professional photographer with specialist interests in Roman imperial portraiture and the documentation of ancient sculpture.
Human Transgression – Divine Retribution A Study of Religious Transgressions and Punishments in Greek Cultic Regulation and Lydian-Phrygian Propitiatory Inscriptions (‘Confession Inscriptions’) by Aslak Rostad. Paperback; 175x245; 252 pages. 629 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695250. £39.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695267. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £39.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Human Transgression – Divine Retribution analyses pagan concepts of religious transgressions, how they should be regarded and punished, as expressed in Greek cultic regulations from the 5th century BC to the 3rd century AD. Also considered are the so-called propitiatory inscriptions (often referred to as ‘confession inscriptions’) from the 1st to the 3rd century AD Lydia and Phrygia, in light of ‘cultic morality’, an ideal code of behaviour intended to make places, occasions, and worshippers suitable for ritual. This code is on the one hand associated with ‘purity’ (hagneia) and removal of pollution (miasma) caused by deaths, births and sexuality, and on the other with the protection of sacred property. This study seeks to explain the emphasis of divine punishments in the Lydian and Phrygian inscriptions, while rare in most Greek cultic regulations, as part of a continuum within pagan religion rather than as a result of an absolute division between Greek and Oriental religion.

About the Author
Aslak Rostad (born 1972) holds a PhD in Ancient Greek and is Associate Professor of Classics at Norwegian University of Technology and Science (NTNU), Trondheim.
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 4 2019 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297mm; 204 pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 4 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697841. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

JHP is an independent learned journal dedicated to the research of ceramics and objects of daily use of the Hellenistic period in the Mediterranean region and beyond. It aims at bringing together archaeologists, historians, philologists, numismatists and scholars of related disciplines engaged in the research of the Hellenistic heritage.

ARTICLES ;
Understanding the Jal el-Bahr Storage-Jar Assemblage – Donald T. Ariel ;
Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeologica Project: Excavations at Pyla-Vigla in 2019 – Justin Stephens, Brandon R. Olson, Thomas Landvatter & R. Scott Moore ;
A Hellenistic Farmhouse at the Entrance to the Town of El’ad – All Nagorsky ;
Cave 169 at Marisa: The Imported Ptolemaic Red Ware – Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom ;
Lissos in Illyria: Two Centuries of Hellenistic Pottery, and a Plea for the Publication of Contextual Material – Patricia Kögler ;

BOOK REVIEWS ;
Sarah James, Hellenistic Pottery. The Fine Wares, Corinth 7, 7 – Brice Erickson ;
Gabriel Mazor, Walid Atrash & Gerald Finkielsztejn, Bet She’an IV. Hellenistic Nisa-Scythopolis. The Amphora Stamps and Sealings from Tel Iztabba – Marek Palaczyk ;
Henrieta Todorova (ed.), Durankulak 3. Die hellenistischen Befunde – Reyhan Şahin ;
Idit Sagiv, Representations of Animals on Greek and Roman Engraved Gems. Meaning and Interpretations – Shua Amorai-Stark & Malka Hershkovitz ;
Kalliope Bairami, Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times – Natalia Kazakidi ;
Qumran, Unchecked Parallelomina, and Pseudonymity in Academic Publication, review article of Kenneth Silver, Alexandria and Qumran: Back to the Beginning – Dennis Mizzi
La guerra del fenicio Arqueología, política y turismo en el último rincón de Europa by Raúl Asensio. Paperback; 148x210mm; 286 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text. 28 2020. ISBN 9788416725250. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

In the midst of the crisis, Cádiz's Phoenician past became the axis of a project of economic, political and cultural transformation that aroused both adherence and discontent. The objective was to move from an industrial city to a model of urban development based on tourism. The three thousand years of history of the city should be the pillar on which the future was built. In this endeavour, politicians, journalists, archaeologists, intellectuals, businessmen and experts of all kinds were involved in endless polemics and controversies, alluding to the past and present of the city.

Hay ciudades que pueden ser muchas cosas y otras, en cambio, que sólo puede ser ellas mismas. En plena crisis, el pasado fenicio de Cádiz se convirtió en el eje de un proyecto de transformación económica, política y cultural que suscitó tanto adhesiones como descontentos. El objetivo era pasar de una ciudad industrial a un modelo de desarrollo urbano basado en el turismo. Los tres mil años de historia de la ciudad debían ser el pilar sobre el que se construyera el futuro. En este empeño, políticos, periodistas, arqueólogos, intelectuales, empresarios y expertos de todo tipo se vieron envueltos en polémicas y controversias sin fin, que aludían al pasado y al presente de la ciudad. Las "guerras patrimoniales" gaditanas, señala el autor, son un caso singular, pero al mismo tiempo también son un ejemplo de lo que ocurre en múltiples ciudades de la periferia europea, que en tiempos de globalización y deslocalización se ven obligadas a reinventarse a sí mismas en un esfuerzo por no perder su esencia.