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NEW: Current Perspectives in Sudanese and Nubian Archaeology A Collection of Papers Presented at the 2018 Sudan Studies Research Conference, Cambridge edited by Rennan Lemos and Samantha Tipper. Paperback; 203x276mm; 126 pages; 39 figures, 14 tables. 133 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698978. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698985. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Current Perspectives in Sudanese and Nubian Archaeology brings together papers presented at the 2nd Sudan Studies Research Conference, held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge. Scholars from various institutions around the world gathered to discuss the most recent trends in the field of Sudanese and Nubian archaeology, ranging from recent fieldwork in Sudan to scientific analysis of material culture and current theoretical approaches. The papers collected here focus on early administrative and mortuary material culture in the Nile valley and adjacent areas; religious beliefs and practices at Kerma; the adoption and local use of imported objects in the New Kingdom colonial period; and the role of Sudan and East Africa in human population history. Together, all papers represent the diversity of current approaches to the archaeology of Sudan and Nubia in various periods.

About the Author
Rennan Lemos is an ERC postdoctoral research fellow at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. He recently completed his PhD in Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology at the University of Cambridge, specialising in mortuary material culture in New Kingdom Nubia. ;

Samantha Tipper is a senior lecturer at the University of Lincoln. She is a bioarchaeologist and paleopathologist with experience working in both the commercial and academic sectors in human osteology, paleopathology and forensic anthropology.
NEW: Current Research in Egyptology 2019 Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Symposium, University of Alcalá, 17–21 June 2019 edited by Marta Arranz Cárcamo, Raúl Sánchez Casado, Albert Planelles Orozco, Sergio Alarcón Robledo, Jónatan Ortiz García, Patricia Mora Riudavets. Paperback; 203x276mm; 248 pages; 89 figures, 11 tables. 133 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699074. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699081. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Current Research in Egyptology 2019 presents the papers and posters from the twentieth meeting of the prestigious international student Egyptology conference, on this occasion held at the University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain. The conference took place 17–21 June 2019 at the Major College of San Ildefonso, the historic centre of the University of Alcalá, with almost 200 participants from various countries and institutions all over the world. The conference addressed a wide range of topics including all periods of ancient Egyptian History and different aspects of its material culture, archaeology, history, society, religion and language. Fifteen wide-ranging papers are published here with wider information on the scientific and cultural programme of the conference.

About the Editors
Marta Arranz holds a master’s degree in archaeology and heritage from the Autónoma University of Madrid, and she is a doctoral candidate in Egyptology at the University of Alcalá. ;

Raúl Sánchez Casado obtained a PhD in Egyptology at the University of Seville; he is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Granada. ;

Albert Planelles Orozco completed a master´s degree in ancient cultures and languages at the University of Barcelona; he is currently working on his PhD in Assyriology at the University of Alcalá. ;

Sergio Alarcón Robledo holds an MPhil in Egyptology at the University of Cambridge and an MA in archaeology from the University of California, Los Angeles; he is a PhD candidate in Egyptology at Harvard University. ;

Jónatan Ortiz García completed his PhD in Cultural Heritage at the University of Valencia; he is a Juan de la Cierva postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alcalá. ;

Patricia Mora Riudavets completed an MA in Egyptology at the University of Liverpool. She is a professional archaeological photographer.
NEW: Doors, Entrances and Beyond... Various Aspects of Entrances and Doors of the Tombs in the Memphite Necropoleis during the Old Kingdom by Leo Roeten. Paperback; 205x290mm; 202 pages; 169 figures, 11 tables (black & white throughout). 714 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 33. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698718. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698725. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Doors are more than a physical means to close off an entrance or an exit; doors can also indicate that a boundary between two worlds has been crossed. This is above all the case for the door into the chapel. Such a door constitutes a barrier between the world of the living and the world where the living and the dead can coexist, while, inside the chapel, the false door acts as a barrier between the world of the living and that of the dead. Taking into account both physical and non-physical aspects of the door, Doors, Entrances and Beyond... proposes that porticos, false doors, niches and mastaba chapel entrances are interconnected in their function as a barrier between two worlds, of which the entrance into the chapel is the most important. The different elements of the entrance have a signalling, identifying, inviting and in some cases a warning function, but once inside the entrance itself, the decoration of its corridor walls adds a guiding and an explanatory function to it. The main themes there are the tomb owner standing or seated with or without members of the family, and subsidiary figures. Over the course of time, decreasing tomb dimensions correlate with the decreasing size of the chosen decoration themes. At the same time, both on the walls of the corridor and the false door, a change of decoration themes took place which can be explained through the changing mode of supply of the k3 of the deceased.

About the Author
Leo Roeten obtained a Masters degree in biochemistry and plant physiology at the University of Amsterdam in 1972, which was followed by a career in this field, after which he completed a PhD in Egyptology at the University of Leiden in 2011. From then on he has been active as an independent researcher specializing in the Old Kingdom tombs of the Memphite necropoleis. This research has led to a number of articles and three books: The decoration of the cult chapel walls of the Old Kingdom at Giza (2014), Chronological developments in the Old Kingdom tombs in the necropoleis of Giza, Saqqara and Abusir (2016), and Loaves, beds, plants and Osiris (2018).
NEW: Daily Life in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence by Susan Thorpe. Paperback; 156x234mm; 136 pages. 713 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 32. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695076. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695083. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Representations and inscriptions on tomb and temple walls and individual stelae have provided considerable knowledge of ancient Egyptian daily life, religious custom and military achievements. However, as visual or eulogistic textual evidence they are unable to provide the insight into the people themselves, their personalities and the events and issues they were concerned with, insight which can be found in personal correspondence. Daily Life in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence addresses a selection of letters from the Old Kingdom up to and including the Twenty-first Dynasty. Under the topic headings of problems and issues, daily life, religious matters, military and police matters, it will show the insight they provide regarding aspects of belief, relationships, custom and behaviour, evidencing the distinctiveness of the data such personal correspondence can provide as a primary source of daily life in ancient Egypt – the extra dimension.

About the Author
Susan Thorpe moved to New Zealand from the UK in 1976. In 2003 she enrolled at the University of Auckland and graduated in 2008, majoring in Ancient History. Specialising in Egyptology, she achieved BA Honours (First Class) in 2009 and Masters (First class) in 2010. The topic for her PhD, which she commenced in 2011, was ‘Social Aspects found in Ancient Egyptian Personal Correspondence’. She graduated in 2016. Since then, she has held the position of Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Auckland. She has attended and presented at conferences in Europe, the UK, Australia and New Zealand and had her work accepted for publication in conference proceedings and journals. This publication is the result of further research into the topic of ancient Egyptian personal letters.
NEW: Discurso, espacio y poder en las religions antiguas edited by Rafael A. Barroso-Romero and José Ángel Castillo Lozano. Paperback; 203x276mm; 212 pages; 12 figures, 1 table; Spanish text. 132 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698848. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698855. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas aims to reflect on how the wielders of power, be they religious, social or political, shape the discourses that justify their power within the framework of a society or a specific group, and how space participates in these discourses. Intellectuals, aristocrats, holy men or even the dead all needed to shape a discourse that would allow them to justify their hierarchies, whether they were internal or common to all of society, to reach a social consensus and to sustain them over time. The forms in which power used religion to express itself were quite diverse, such as ritual violence, martyrdom, sacrifice, or even divine trickery. Sometimes certain spaces became places whose political and religious control brought about conflicts, whose resolution was found through the legitimisation generated by the complex theological discourse, which reinforced the extraordinary qualities of the gods to reaffirm their authority, or through the cohesive value of the rites. This volume analyses these questions through fourteen works by sixteen researchers from different institutions. It includes studies carried out with materials from a wide range of sources: epigraphy, the archaeological record, and literary sources.

About the Editors
Rafael A. Barroso-Romero is a doctoral researcher at the Max-Weber-Kolleg, Universität Erfürt and at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where he lectures as a member of the Department of Ancient History. He is currently developing his doctoral research on materiality, spatiality, and the body in unusual burials in the Roman West. ;

José Ángel Castillo Lozano completed his Doctorate in History at the Universidad de Murcia. He is currently a High School teacher. His area of specialisation lies in the world of Late Antiquity, on which he has published around fifteen papers.

Spanish Description
Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas pretende reflexionar acerca de cómo el poder da forma a los discursos que lo justifican en el marco de una sociedad o de un grupo concreto y cómo el espacio participa de aquellos. Intelectuales, aristócratas, hombres santos o incluso los difuntos, todos ellos necesitaron configurar un discurso que permitiera justificar sus jerarquías −ya fueran internas o comunes a toda la sociedad− consensuarlas socialmente y sustentarlas en el tiempo. Las formas en las que el poder utilizaba a la religión para expresarse fueron muy diversas, como la violencia ritual, el martirio, el sacrificio, o incluso el engaño divino. A veces, determinados espacios se convirtieron en lugares cuyo control político y religioso generaba conflictos, cuya solución se encontró en la legitimación generada por el complejo discurso teológico, que refuerza las cualidades extraordinarias de los dioses para reafirmar su autoridad, o por el valor cohesivo de los ritos. Este volumen analiza tales cuestiones a través de catorce trabajos de dieciséis investigadores procedentes de diversos centros. Recoge investigaciones realizadas con materiales de muy diversa procedencia: la epigrafía, el registro arqueológico o las fuentes literarias.

Rafael A. Barroso-Romero es Graduado en Historia (UCO) y Máster en Ciencias de las Religiones (UCM). Actualmente es investigador predoctoral en el Max-Weber-Kolleg (IGS “Resonant Self- World Relations in Ancient and Modern Socio-Religious Practices”) de la Universität Erfürt y al mismo tiempo en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, donde imparte docencia como miembro del Departamento de Prehistoria, Historia Antigua y Arqueología. ;

José A. Castillo-Lozano (1991) es graduado en Historia en la Universidad de Murcia. En la actualidad es profesor de secundaria (funcionario de carrera) y doctor en historia. Su ámbito de especialización radica en el mundo de la Antigüedad Tardía del cual ha publicado un
Invisible Connections: An Archaeometallurgical Analysis of the Bronze Age Metalwork from the Egyptian Museum of the University of Leipzig by Martin Odler and Jiří Kmošek. Paperback; 205x290mm; 200 pages; 176 figures, 15 tables (colour throughout). 692 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 31. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697407. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697414. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Egyptian Museum of the University of Leipzig has the largest university collection of ancient Egyptian artefacts in Germany. It includes important objects from the excavations of the most prolific excavator among the museum’s curators, Georg Steindorff, at the sites of Abusir, Aniba, and Giza, complemented by objects from Abydos, Thebes, and Kerma. The catalogue represents the results of an interdisciplinary project by Egyptologist and archaeologist Martin Odler, archaeometalurgist Jiří Kmošek and other participating researchers. A selection of 86 artefacts was analysed using a range of archaeometallurgical methods (X-ray fluorescence; metallography; neutron activation analysis; lead isotope analysis), providing a diachronic sample of Bronze Age Egyptian copper alloy metalwork from Dynasty 1 to Dynasty 19.

Besides currently popular focus on the ore provenance, the selection of the applied methods aimed also at the description of practical physical properties of the objects. The question of differences between full-size functional artefacts and models is addressed, as is the problem of 'imports' and their ethnic interpretation. The analyses brought many unexpected results to light, the most surprising being a bowl (ÄMUL 2162) made of arsenical copper high in nickel, which has parallels in Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Anatolia, and was featured in an article in the Journal of Archaeological Science in 2018. The corpus presented here involves the largest analysed metalwork assemblage from the Nubian C-Group and the Egyptian New Kingdom, and it addresses the issue of the use of local Nubian ore sources versus the sources of copper from Cyprus and elsewhere.

About the Authors
Martin Odler defended his PhD thesis 'The social context of copper in ancient Egypt down to the end of Middle Kingdom' in 2020. In 2016, he published the monograph 'Old Kingdom Copper Tools and Model Tools', the first of its kind in Egyptology, with Archaeopress. In Abusir (Egypt), he led, together with Marie Peterková Hlouchová, an excavation of a new type of Egyptian tomb (AS 103) and of the latest known tomb of a transitional type from early Dynasty 4 (AS 104).

Jiří Kmošek is an archaeometallurgist, a PhD candidate at the Institute for Natural Sciences and Technology in the Arts, Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. He has analysed not only ancient Egyptian material but also Bronze Age metalwork from the Czech Republic.
Travelling the Korosko Road: Archaeological Exploration in Sudan’s Eastern Desert edited by W. Vivian Davies and Derek A. Welsby. Hardback; 205x290mm; 252 pages; 493 plates, 74 figures (colour throughout). 688 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 24. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698039. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698046. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume publishes accounts of archaeological exploration carried out during the last 30 years or so in the Sudanese Eastern Desert. It is divided into two related parts.

The first and foremost covers results from the work of the Centro Ricerche sul Deserto Orientale (CeRDO), which is based at Varese in northern Italy. Between 1989 and 2006, CeRDO, directed by the brothers Alfredo and Angelo Castiglioni, ran a pioneering programme of expeditions, which traversed the so-called ‘Korosko Road’ (the main desert route connecting Egypt and Sudan) and followed multiple other tracks throughout the Eastern Desert. They encountered in the process a rich archaeological landscape, hundreds of previously undocumented sites, many frequented over millennia, prominent among them gold-production areas and their associated settlements. The CeRDO record, the photographic database, the material retrieved, to which several of the papers published here are devoted, are now all the more valuable, in that many of these sites have since been badly disturbed and some entirely destroyed by recent goldmining activities.

The second part, introduced by a concise account of the historical usage of the Korosko Road, reports in full on a single, short season of documentation, organized in 2013 under the auspices, and with the support, of the Sudan Archaeological Research Society. Its main aim was detailed recording of a group of pharaonic rock-inscriptions discovered by CeRDO expeditions, most located along the Korosko Road and almost all related to the colonial gold-working industry. The project included also a degree of investigation and mapping of the wider context, as well as the recording and study of associated archaeological material, in particular of ceramic remains. The results complement and usefully extend in part those of CeRDO.
Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing Patterns of Travel to the Middle East from Medieval to Modern Times edited by Paul and Janet Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; 422 pages; Illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (91 pages in colour). 686 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697520. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697537. Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing patterns of travel to the Middle East from medieval to modern times comprises a varied collection of seventeen papers presented at the biennial conference of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) held in York in July 2019, which together will provide the reader with a fascinating introduction to travel in and to the Middle East over more than a thousand years.

As in previous ASTENE volumes, the material presented ranges widely, from Ancient Egyptian sites through medieval pilgrims to tourists and other travellers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The papers embody a number of different traditions, including not only actual but also fictional travel experiences, as well as pilgrimage or missionary narratives reflecting quests for spiritual wisdom as well as geographical knowledge. They also reflect the shifting political and cultural relations between Europe and the Near and Middle East, and between the different religions of the area, as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region over the centuries. The men and women travellers discussed travelled for a wide variety of reasons — religious, commercial, military, diplomatic, or sometimes even just for a holiday! — but whatever their primary motivations, they were almost always also inspired by a sense of curiosity about peoples and places less familiar than their own. By recording their experiences, whether in words or in art, they have greatly contributed to our understanding of what has shaped the world we live in. As Ibn Battuta, one of the greatest of medieval Arab travellers, wrote: ‘Travelling — it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller!’

Table of Contents (provisional)
Introduction – Paul and Janet Starkey ;
1. Pilgrimage as Travel – Jacke Phillips ;
2. Ibn Jubayr’s Riḥla Reconsidered – Paul Starkey ;
3. ‘Gardens of Paradise’ – Janet Starkey ;
4. ‘Wady Ghrásheca’: an unknown Christian site in Sir Gardner Wilkinson’s unpublished manuscripts from the Eastern Desert – Jan Ciglenečki & Blaž Zabel ;
5. Exploring the Ottoman Empire: the travels of Peter Mundy (1597–c.1667) in Turkey 1617–1620 – Jennifer Scarce ;
6. With a radius most accurately divided into 10,000 parts: John Greaves and his scientific survey of Egypt in 1638–1639 – Ronald E. Zitterkopf ;
7. Dimitrie Cantemir, the ‘Orpheus of the Turkish Empire’ (1673– 1723) – Cristina Erck ;
8. The Artist William Page (1794–1872) and his travels in Greece and western Turkey in the first half of the nineteenth century – Brian J. Taylor ;
9. Jacob Röser: a Bavarian physician travelling the Ottoman Empire in 1834–1835 – Joachim Gierlichs ;
10. Publishing with ‘Modern Taste and Spirit’ – Paulina Banas ;
11. ‘Mr and Mrs Smith of England’: a tour to Petra and east of Jordan in 1865 – David Kennedy ;
12. Anton Prokesch-Osten Jr (1837–1919) – Angela Blaschek ;
13. William Wing Loring, George Brinton McClellan and Ulysses S. Grant: American Civil War Generals in Egypt during the 1870s – Mladen Tomorad ;
14. Consular Agents and Foreign Travellers in Upper Egypt in the Nineteenth Century – Terence Walz ;
15. A Luxor Room with a View at Pagnon’s Hotels – Sylvie Weens ;
16. Richard A. Bermann, the Desert and the Mahdi: an Austrian writer’s fascination with Egypt and the Sudan – Ernst Czerny ;
17. Unlawful Acts and Supernatural Curses: the fictional traveller in Bram Stoker’s The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903) – Rebecca Bruce ;
Notes on Contributors ;
Index
Racconto d’Egitto: Trascrizione e traduzione del manoscritto di ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī (con brevi note di commento) by Ahmed F. Kzzo and Nikola D. Bellucci. Paperback; 156x234mm; 218pp; 3 maps; transcript of the original Arabic text; translation, commentary and additional material in Italian. 679 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697827. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697834. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Kitāb al-ʾifādah wa al-ʾiʿtibār fī al-ʾumur al-mušāhadah wa al-ḥawādiṯ al-muʿāyanah bi-arḍ Miṣr, by ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī (1162-1231 AD) is a fascinating work; it represents one of the best known and most important manuscripts concerning Egypt during the period between the twelfth and thirteenth centuries AD. The author, through his gaze and with a clear and shrewd use of language and style, describes several characteristic aspects of the Nile country: the landscape, the animals, the plants, the monuments, the boats, the peculiar dishes, without forgetting the effects of the famine, or the misery caused by the ailments and hunger that hit the country between 1200 and 1202 AD.

Translated into German (1790), Latin (1800), French (1810), and more recently into English (1965), there was, until now, still no translation into Italian of this masterful work. This omission prompted the authors to work over a period of several years on the present volume which, in addition to providing the first Italian translation (accompanied by the transcription of the original Arabic manuscript), provides essential and necessary commentary notes aimed at explaining different passages of the manuscript. Some preliminary chapters also attempt to focus on themes, the author and his philosophy in order to provide the reader with a wider image of the conceptions of the period in which he lived and what this description represented and still represents: a masterpiece of realism which continues to stir the imagination in the modern age.

Italian Description
Davanti ad un’opera come quella del Kitāb al-ʾifādah wa al-ʾiʿtibār fī al-ʾumur al-mušāhadah wa al-ḥawādiṯ al-muʿāyanah bi-arḍ Miṣr di ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī è difficile non rimanere affascinati. Esso infatti rappresenta uno dei più noti ed importanti manoscritti riguardanti l’Egitto durante il periodo a cavallo fra il dodicesimo e il tredicesimo secolo d. C. L’autore, attraverso il suo sguardo e con un linguaggio e uno stile chiaro e accorto descrive diversi aspetti caratteristici del paese del Nilo: il paesaggio, gli animali, le piante, i monumenti, le imbarcazioni, le pietanze peculiari senza dimenticare gli effetti della carestia e della miseria dei malanni e della fame che si abbatterono sul paese tra gli anni 1200 e 1202 d.C.

Tradotta in tedesco (nel 1790), latino (nel 1800), francese (nel 1810), e a metà del secolo passato in inglese (nel 1965), di tale opera magistrale non esisteva ancora traduzione in lingua italiana. Proprio tale mancanza ci ha spinto ad iniziare diversi anni addietro tale lavoro che qui si presenta e che oltre a fornire la prima traduzione italiana (accompagnata dalla trascrizione del manoscritto arabo originale) è corredata da essenziali ma necessarie note di commento volte a spiegare diversi passi del manoscritto. Alcuni capitoli preliminari tenteranno inoltre di mettere a fuoco la tematica, l’autore e la sua filosofia al fine di fornire al lettore una più ampia immagine del pensiero del periodo in cui egli visse e cosa rappresentò e ancora oggi rappresenta tale descrizione. Un capolavoro di realismo che tuttavia continua a suscitare la fantasia dei moderni.

Ahmed F. Kzzo è un archeologo specializzato in antico Medio Oriente. Dottore di ricerca presso l’Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, ha partecipato a vari progetti archeologici, tra cui scavi ad al-Bimarestan al-Nuri (Aleppo), Ebla (Siria) e Çatalhöyük (Turchia). È stato Post-doc presso l’Università di Berna ed è attualmente membro del Columbia Global Center Amman (Columbia University). ;

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) e dottore magistrale in Archeolo
Environment and Religion in Ancient and Coptic Egypt: Sensing the Cosmos through the Eyes of the Divine Proceedings of the 1st Egyptological Conference of the Hellenic Institute of Egyptology, Co–Organized with the Writing & Scripts Centre of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the Institute of Coptic Studies (University of Alexandria), at the People’s University of Athens, under the High Auspices of His Eminence Mgr Damianos, Archbishop of Sinai. Athens: Wednesday 1st, Thursday 2nd & Friday 3rd February 2017 edited by Alicia Maravelia and Nadine Guilhou. Paperback; 210x297mm; 582 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour. 673 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 30. ISBN 9781789696394. £90.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Environment and Religion in Ancient and Coptic Egypt: Sensing the Cosmos through the Eyes of the Divine presents the proceedings of a conference held in Athens between 1st-3rd February 2017. The Hellenic Institute of Egyptology, in close collaboration with the Writing & Scripts Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the University of Alexandria, organized the conference concerning the ancient Egyptian religion, Coptic Christianity and Environment. Thus, the endeavour was to sense the Cosmos, through a virtual Einfahlung, as a manifestation of the Divine and the manifestations of the Divine in the environmental, cosmic and societal spheres. Egyptians were particularly pious and they considered their surroundings and the Universe itself as a creation and a direct immanence of the Divine, being also convinced that they were congenital parts of the Cosmos and adoring their divinities, who were also personifications of environmental and/or cosmic aspects and forces. There are many examples (epigraphic, textual, monumental, & c.) corroborating these relations and that ancient Egyptian piety was rooted on the bi-faceted texture of the ancient Egyptian religion, containing a solar and an astral component: the former was related to Rec, while the latter was related to Osiris. The conference took place with participations of a pleiade of Egyptologists, archaeologists, archaeoastronomers, theologians, historians and other scholars from more than 15 countries all over the world. In this unique volume are published most of the contributions of the delegates who sent their papers for peer-reviewing, enriching the bibliographic resources with original and interesting articles. This publication of more than 580 pages containing 34 fresh and original papers (plus 2 abstracts) on the ancient Egyptian religion, Environment and the Cosmos, fruitfully connects many interdisciplinary approaches and Egyptology, archaeology, archaeoastronomy, geography, botany, zoology, ornithology, theology and history.

About the Editors
Alicia Maravelia is Founder and President of the Hellenic Institute of Egyptology (2011). She is Professor of Egyptology at the People's University of Athens and Institute's Seminar. A member of the Editorial Board of several peer-reviewed journals, she is the Editor in Chief of the JHIE. She is Coordinator of the Athens Mummy Project. ;

Nadine Guilhou studied French Literature, History of Art & Archaeology in the University Paul-Valery, Montpellier, obtaining her PhD in Egyptology under Prof. Dr Fr. Daumas. She specializes in ritual and funerary texts from the OK to the PP and has published many books and papers concerning this topic.
Egypt and Austria XII - Egypt and the Orient: The Current Research Proceedings of the Conference Held at the Faculty of Croatian Studies, University of Zagreb (September 17th-22nd, 2018) edited by Mladen Tomorad. Paperback; 148x210mm; 418 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 672 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697643. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697650. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The 12th Egypt and Austria conference (Zagreb, 17–22 September 2018) was organised by the Egypt and Austria Society and the Faculty of the Croatian Studies of the University of Zagreb. The event took place in the Croatian Institute of History (Opatička 10, Zagreb). The main theme of the conference was current research related to the interactions between Egypt and the states of the former Habsburg Monarchy and the Ottoman Empire up to the middle of the 20th century. During the conference more than 39 papers were presented, of which 26 are presented in this proceedings volume.

About the Editor
Mladen Tomorad is a senior researcher and professor of Ancient History at the Department of History, University of Zagreb. He has a masters degree in History and a PhD in Ancient History and Museology, and he has also studied Egyptology at the University of Manchester.
L’Egitto dei Flavi: Sintesi e prospettive d’indagine alla luce della documentazione papirologica ed epigrafica egiziana by Nikola D. Bellucci and Brunella L. Longo. Paperback; 156x234mm; 184 pages. Italian text.. 654 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 69. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696738. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696745. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

L’Egitto dei Flavi, providing synthesis and new prospects of investigation, offers an overall review of the various information obtainable from sources from the Roman province of Egypt in the moment of transition from the Julio-Claudian dynasty to the new Flavian dynasty. Within the investigations, an attempt was made to focus on the province of Egypt during the period of Flavian domination with the aim of providing a compendium and a more balanced examination of the technical and economic organization of the country in a historical period that still would seem complex to want to define in its entirety. This operation made it necessary to start from the various documentary sources (papyrus, ostraka, epigraphs and wooden tablets) which bore testimony of the aspects that were intended to be emphasized. The texts examined were therefore carefully selected in the context of the substantial material available.

About the Authors
Nikola D. Bellucci, master's degree in Classical Philology (Th. Papyrology) and master's degree in Archaeology and Cultures of the Ancient World (Th. Egyptology) at the Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, is today PhD f. and department member of the University of Bern.

Brunella L. Longo, master's degree in Classical Philology (Th. Papyrology) at Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna, currently teaches classical literature at the Filzi State High School in Rovereto (Italy). She has dealt with scientific popularization (with particular reference to Classical Philology and Ancient History).

Italian Description
L’Egitto dei Flavi, fornendo sintesi e nuove prospettive d’indagine, vuole ritenersi un pratico strumento riguardante le molteplici informazioni ricavabili dalle fonti provenienti dalla provincia romana d’Egitto nel momento di passaggio dalla dinastia giulio-claudia alla nuova dinastia flavia proponendo una revisione d’insieme specie di queste ultime. Nel corso delle indagini si è tentato di mettere a fuoco la provincia d’Egitto durante il periodo di dominazione flavia con l’intento di fornire un compendio e un esame più calibrato dell’organizzazione tecnica ed economica del paese in un periodo storico che ancora parrebbe complesso voler definire nella sua completezza. Tale operazione ha reso necessario partire dalle varie fonti documentarie (papiri, ostraka, epigrafi e tavolette lignee) che portavano testimonianza degli aspetti che si intendeva maggiormente porre in rilievo. I testi esaminati sono pertanto stati attentamente selezionati nel contesto del consistente materiale disponibile.

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) e dottore magistrale in Archeologia e Culture del Mondo Antico (Th. Egittologia) presso l’Alma Mater Studiorum – Università di Bologna, è oggi PhD f. presso l’Università di Berna. Autore di numerosi articoli scientifici, è anche membro di alcuni tra i maggiori istituti scientifici internazionali d’antichità.

Brunella L. Longo, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) presso l’Alma Mater Studiorum – Università di Bologna, insegna attualmente Letteratura classica presso il Liceo Filzi di Rovereto. Si occupa inoltre di divulgazione scientifica (specie negli ambiti della Filologia Classica e della Storia Antica).
The Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963-69: The Pharaonic Sites edited by David N. Edwards. Hardback; 205x290mm; 468 pages; 812 figures, 2 tables (16 plates in colour). 652 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 23. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696493. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696509. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Of the Nubian Archaeological Campaigns responding to the construction of the Aswan High Dam, the survey and excavations carried out within Sudanese Nubia represent the most substantial achievement of the larger enterprise. Many components of the larger project of the UNESCO – Sudan Antiquities Service Survey have been published, in addition to the reports of a number of other major projects assigned separate concessions within the region. However, the results of one major element, the Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia (ASSN) between the Second Cataract and the Dal Cataract remain largely unpublished. This volume, focusing on the pharaonic sites, is the first of a series which aims to bring to publication the records of the ASSN. These records represent a major body of data relating to a region largely now lost to flooding. This is also a region of very considerable importance for understanding the archaeology and history of Nubia more generally, not least in relation to the still often poorly understood relationships between Lower Nubia to the north and the surviving areas of Middle and Upper Nubia, to the south.

The ASSN project fieldwork was undertaken over six years between 1963 and 1969, investigating c.130km of the river valley between Gemai, at the south end of the Second Cataract, and Dal.
‘Blood Is Thicker Than Water’ – Non-Royal Consanguineous Marriage in Ancient Egypt An Exploration of Economic and Biological Outcomes by Joanne-Marie Robinson. Paperback; 175x245mm; 246 pages; 21 figures, 14 tables (11 colour pages). 646 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 29. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695434. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695441. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Discussions on consanguineous marriage within Egyptology usually focus on brother-sister marriages recorded in census returns from Roman Egypt, or royal sibling marriages amongst the ruling Ptolemies. However, no wide-ranging review exists of non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt despite the economic and biological implications of such relationships. This is the first time that evidence for nonroyal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt has been collated from select sources spanning the Middle Kingdom to the Roman Period and a method created to investigate the potential economic and biological outcomes of these unions, particularly beyond the level of sibling and half-sibling unions. The working definition of consanguineous marriage used throughout this study is that used by clinical geneticists: unions contracted between cousins biologically related as second cousins or closer biological kin. This research argues that for some families, and under certain conditions, consanguineous marriage was a preferred economic strategy in terms of gifts given at marriage and in inheritance, and that families who married consanguineously may have received greater levels of intra-familial support without the expectation of reciprocity. Although there may have been adverse biological outcomes arising from congenital anomalies and genetic disorders in the offspring of consanguineous marriages, the research suggests that it is unlikely that these physical or cognitive disorders were distinguished from other medical disorders in the general health environment of ancient Egypt. The investigation focuses primarily on ancient Egyptian documentary and archaeological sources, including human remains, and is informed by research on consanguinity from a range of disciplines including anthropology, demography, economics and pathology.

About the Author
Joanne-Marie Robinson is a Visiting Scholar at the KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology at the University of Manchester. She has a research interest in non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean, and the socio-cultural and religious factors that influence this choice of marriage partner. Her work also considers the potential biological outcomes of consanguineous marriage and investigates the reception to congenital physical and cognitive anomalies in ancient Egypt. This book presents the outcomes of a research project. The author holds a PhD in Egyptology and has worked as a lecturer, writer and advisor for television and radio programmes focusing on religion and history.
On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids by David Ian Lightbody. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696578; Paperback; 203x276mm; 100 pages; 47 figures. 118 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696578. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696585. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids is a treatise on the subject of encircling symbolism in pharaonic monumental tomb architecture. The study focuses on the Early Dynastic Period and the Old Kingdom of ancient Egypt; from the first dynasty through the sixth. During that time, encircling symbolism was developed most significantly and became most influential. The cartouche also became the principal symbol of the pharaoh for the first time. This work demonstrates how the development of the cartouche was closely related to the monumental encircling symbolism incorporated into the architectural designs of the Old Kingdom pyramids. By employing a new architectural style, the pyramid, and a new iconographic symbol, the cartouche, the pharaoh sought to elevate his status above that of the members of his powerful court. These iconic new emblems emphasized and protected the pharaoh in life, and were retained in the afterlife. By studying the available evidence, the new and meaningful link between the two artistic media; iconographic and architectural, is catalogued, understood, and traced out through time.

Table of Contents
David Ian Lightbody, PhD., BEng (Hons), is an archaeologist with a special interest in the origins of architectural and scientific principles, most notably in the ancient Egyptian and Greek cultures. In 2016 he founded the Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture (JAEA) with co-editor Franck Monnier. He has published several journal articles, a monograph, and most recently, the Great Pyramid Haynes Operations Manual (2,590 B.C. onwards).
The Festivals of Opet, the Valley, and the New Year Their Socio-Religious Functions by Masashi Fukaya. Paperback; 205x290mm; 306 pages; 37 figures, 26 tables. Print RRP: £45.00. 636 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 28. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695953. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695960. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Festivals of Opet, the Valley, and the New Year: Their socio-religious functions compares the religious and social functions of these three Festivals, the first two of which were often regarded by the Egyptians as a pair; the New Year Festival stands out on account of its corpus of surviving material and importance. Until now, detailed study of the New Year Festival has only been carried out with reference to the Greco-Roman period; this study turns its attention to the New Kingdom. The book analyses the broad perspectives that encompass Egyptian religion and cult practices which provided the context not only for worship and prayer, but also for the formation of social identity and responsibility. The festivals are examined in the whole together with their settings in the religious and urban landscapes. The best example is New Kingdom Thebes where large temples and burial sites survive intact today with processional routes connecting some of them. Also presented are the abundant written sources providing deep insight into those feasts celebrated for Amun-Re, the king of the gods. The volume also includes a list of dated records which provides a concordance for the Egyptian calendars.

About the Author
Masashi Fukaya comes from the city Tokai to the south of Nagoya. After studying at the University of Tsukuba he completed his doctoral thesis at the University of Oxford in 2014. He has long focused on religious festivals where the general public would communicate with the god in various forms, and also been extending his interests to women, foreigners, and the socially weak. At present he teaches as a visiting researcher at Aichi Prefectural University, Japan.
The Urban Landscape of Bakchias: A Town of the Fayyūm from the Ptolemaic-Roman Period to Late Antiquity by Paola Buzi and Enrico Giorgi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 120 pages; 76 figures, 6 plates. 624 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 66. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695670. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695687. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Urban Landscape of Bakchias: A Town of the Fayyūm from the Ptolemaic-Roman Period to Late Antiquity summarises the results of field research conducted on the archaeological site of Bakchias, located in the north-eastern part of the Fayyūm region. Historical, historico-religious and papyrological studies are also presented. The book provides a clear and comprehensive overview of the rise and fall of the kome of Bakchias. The settlement was a thriving centre from at least the 26th dynasty up until the ninth or tenth centuries CE, although with differing levels of economic prosperity and urban development. Equal weight is given not only to the archaeological and topographical aspects but also to the historical and the religious, whilst never forgetting the relationship between the urban settlement and other villages of the Arsinoite nomos, which is famously a peculiar exception in Egyptian geography.

About the Author
Paola Buzi is Full Professor of Egyptology and Coptic Studies at the Sapienza University of Rome and Honorary Professor of the same disciplines at Hamburg University. She is President-Elect of the International Association for Coptic Studies. Since 2002, she has been a member of the Archaeological Mission in Bakchias (Fayyūm ) and co-director of the same mission since 2008.

Enrico Giorgi is Associate Professor in Archaeological Research Methodologies at the University of Bologna. Since 1997, he has been a member of the Archaeological Mission in Bakchias (Fayyūm ) and co-director of the same mission since 2008. He is Director of archaeological projects of his university in Agrigento, Butrint, Burnum, Pompei, Paestum, Suasa and Monte Rinaldo.
The Genesis of the Textile Industry from Adorned Nudity to Ritual Regalia The Changing Role of Fibre Crafts and Their Evolving Techniques of Manufacture in the Ancient Near East from the Natufian to the Ghassulian by Janet Levy. Paperback; 205x290mm; 350pp; 171 figures, 13 tables. RRP: £52.00. 623 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694482. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694499. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £52.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Genesis of the Textile Industry from Adorned Nudity to Ritual Regalia documents and evaluates the changing role of fibre crafts and their evolving techniques of manufacture and also their ever-increasing wider application in the lives of the inhabitants of the earliest villages of the Ancient Near East. It is a broad-spectrum enquiry into fibre working in a broad swathe from Mesopotamia across Persia and Anatolia to the Nile Valley. It focuses, however, on the southern Levant from incipient sedentism in the Natufian culture, c. 13,000 cal BCE to the Ghassulian culture, c. 4500-3800/3700 cal BCE.

This is the first comprehensive study addressing the fibre technologies of the southern Levant on a long chronological axis. Currently, fibre crafts play only a minor role in archaeological thinking. This research demonstrates the magnitude and also the indispensable role that fibre crafts have played in the quotidian events, activities and practices of the inhabitants of the region. It has created an awareness of the substantial, often invisible, presence of fibre-craft products which was hitherto lacking in archaeological thought.

About the Author
Janet Levy is affiliated with the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel. Her research focuses on a broad spectrum of fibre technologies attested from initial sedentism in the southern Levant c.13,000 BCE and their role within the regional cultures. In addition to the study of archaeological sources, her approach is based on experimental replication in tandem with ethnographic input, primarily from beyond the southern Levant.

Reviews
'This is a book of evidence. Levy has the tenacity of a bulldog in pursuing and dragging in every possible form of evidence for a very elusive subject that has been central to human existence for many millennia.'—E.J.W. Barber, American Journal of Archaeology, January 2021
I templi del Fayyum di epoca tolemaico-romana: tra fonti scritte e contesti archeologici Per una classificazione degli edifici sacri nell’Egitto tolemaico e romano by Ilaria Rossetti. Paperback; 205x290mm; 284 pages; 165 figures, 6 tables. Italian text. RRP: £45.00. 622 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 27. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694956. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694963. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

During the Ptolemaic period, Egyptian temples were divided into three ranks: first, second and third class. There was no trace of this classification of sacred buildings in the papyri of the Roman period when only the most important temples were classified by the epithet logima hiera. This work aims to understand the rules according to which Egyptian sacred buildings were classified and how these first, second and third-class temples were planned and arranged.

To do this, an integrated analysis of different kinds of sources was carried out: all the Graeco-Roman papyri and the inscriptions, which contain rank epithets, were examined and different archaeological data about the temples of the Fayyum region were investigated. Based on these sources, it was possible to put forward different hypotheses on the administration and architectural aspects of these sacred buildings.

About the Author
Ilaria Rossetti is currently an archaeology officer at the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities. She obtained a Master’s Degree cum laude and a post-graduate degree at the Bologna University in Egyptology. In 2015 she obtained a PhD at Siena University. From 2015-2017 she was junior researcher at Bologna University, where she was involved in numerous archaeological projects. Since 2012, she has been field-director of archaeological Mission at Bakchias coordinated by the two co-directors Prof. Enrico Giorgi (Bologna University) and Prof. Paola Buzi (Sapienza University of Rome).

Italian Description: La documentazione amministrativa di epoca tolemaica testimonia una divisione di tutti i complessi sacri dell’Egitto in primo, secondo e terzo rango. Questa classificazione sembra non aver lasciato traccia nei documenti di epoca romana, quando solo i templi principali sembrano essere considerati e indicati come logima hiera. A tuttora non sono ancora state definite né le ragioni e i criteri secondo cui gli edifici sacri furono suddivisi in classi, né se vi sia stato un riscontro di questa ripartizione nei dati archeologici. Nel I templi del Fayyum in epoca tolemaico-romana: Per una classificazione degli edifici sacri nell’Egitto tolemaico e romano aims si tenterà di rispondere a questi interrogativi mettendo a confronto e integrando dati desumibili sia dai documenti amministrativi sia dai contesti archeologici dei vari complessi templari della regione del Fayyum, alla quale è stata limitata questa seconda categoria di dati.

Ilaria Rossetti è attualmente funzionario archeologo presso il Mibact. Ha ottenuto la laurea con lode e il diploma di scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia presso l'Università di Bologna. Nel 2015 ha conseguito il dottorato di ricerca presso la Scuola di Dottorato dell'Università di Siena. Dal 2015 al 2017 è stata assegnista di ricerca presso l'Università di Bologna, dove è stata coinvolta in numerosi progetti archeologici, come egittologa, archeologa e topografa. Dal 2012 è field-director della Missione archeologica a Bakchias coordinata dai due co-direttori Prof. Enrico Giorgi (Università di Bologna) e Prof. Paola Buzi (Università di Roma La Sapienza). Dal 2017 al 2018 è stata ricercatrice junior presso la Sapienza Università di Roma per il Progetto ERC -PAThs (P.I .: Paola Buzi), per il quale attualmente collabora. Ha pubblicato una monografia su uno dei templi di Bakchias, vari rapporti di scavo e diversi contributi.
Approaches to the Analysis of Production Activity at Archaeological Sites edited by Anna K. Hodgkinson and Cecilie Lelek Tvetmarken. Paperback; 205x290mm; 206 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (58 pages in colour). 609 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695571. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695588. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Approaches to the Analysis of Production Activity at Archaeological Sites presents the proceedings of an international and interdisciplinary workshop held in Berlin in 2018, which brought together scholars whose work focusses on manufacturing activities identified at archaeological sites. The various approaches presented here include new excavation techniques, ethnographic research, archaeometric approaches, GIS and experimental archaeology as well as theoretical issues associated with how researchers understand production in the past. These approaches are applied to research questions related to various technological and socio-economic aspects of production, including the organisation and setting of manufacturing activities, the access to and use of raw materials, firing structures and other production-related installations. The chapters discuss production activities in various domestic and institutional contexts throughout the ancient world, together with the production and use of tools and other items made of stone, bone, ceramics, glass and faience. Since manufacturing activities are encountered at archaeological sites on a regular basis, the wide range of materials and approaches presented in this volume provides a useful reference for scholars and students studying technologies and production activities in the past.

About the Editors
Anna K. Hodgkinson (PhD Liverpool 2014) has recently completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the Excellence Cluster Topoi. Her research focusses on Late Bronze Age (LBA) Egyptian settlement archaeology, LBA glass industries and chemical analysis of LBA glass objects. She has conducted archaeological fieldwork at the LBA Egyptian sites of Amarna, Gurob and Qantir.

Cecilie Lelek Tvetmarken (PhD Liverpool 2013) has worked as a post-doctoral researcher on several projects at the German Archaeological Institute (DAI), Berlin, and is currently involved in the joint Iranian-Danish research project ‘Tracking Cultural and Environmental Change’ (Razi University, Kermanshah, and the University of Copenhagen). Her research focusses on architecture and the use of space during the Neolithic in the Near East. She has conducted archaeological fieldwork at several Neolithic sites in Turkey, Jordan and Iran.
The Hypocephalus: An Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet by Tamás Mekis. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+356 pages; 95 figures, 36 plates. 586 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 25. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693331. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693348. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The hypocephalus is an element of Late Period and Ptolemaic funerary equipment – an amuletic disc placed under the head of mummies. Its shape emulates the sun’s disc, and its form is planar, although it occasionally has a concave shape (in such cases, it protects the head as a funerary cap). The earliest known example can be dated to the 4th century BC and the latest to the 2nd/1st century BC. The Hypocephalus: an Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet analyses both the written records and iconography of these objects. So far, 158 examples are known; several, unfortunately, from old descriptions only. The relatively low number shows that the object was not a widespread item of funerary equipment. Only priest and priestly families used them, those of Amon in Thebes, of Min in Akhmim, and the ones of Ptah in Memphis. Among the examples, no two are identical. In some details, every piece is an individualized creation. Ancient Egyptian theologians certainly interpreted hypocephali as the iris of the wedjat-eye, amidst which travels the sun-god in his hidden, mysterious and tremendous form(s). The hypocephalus can be considered as the sun-disk itself. It radiates light and energy towards the head of the deceased, who again becomes a living being, feeling him/herself as ‘one with the Earth’ through this energy. The texts and the iconography derive principally from the supplementary chapters of the Book of the Dead. Some discs directly cite the text of spell 162 which furnishes the mythological background of the invention of the disc by the Great Cow, who protected her son Re by creating the disc at his death.

About the Author
Tamás Mekis graduated from the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest in 2007 with a degree in Egyptology. In 2013 he defended his PhD dissertation with summa cum laude. In quest of hypocephalus amulets he spent his traineeship in Brussels at the Royal Museums of Art and History in 2008 and in Paris at the Louvre Museum in 2010. He conducted extended researches at the Egyptian Museum of Cairo in 2007-9 and 2014-15, where, together with the curators of the museum, he found a rare hypocepalus of the prophet-registrar of Min-Horus-Isis Djed-hor/Wesirwer in situ, under the head of his undisturbed mummy. Tamás is an independent researcher.
Pottery of Manqabad A Selected Catalogue of the Ceramic Assemblage from the Monastery of ‘Abba Nefer’ at Asuyt (Egypt) by Ilaria Incordino. Paperback; 203x276mm; 128 pages; fully illustrated catalogue in colour. 110 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695137. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695144. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Pottery of Manqabad presents a catalogue of selected pottery from the monastic site of Manqabad (Asyut, Egypt), which has, since 2011, been the object of an ongoing study and conservation project at the University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’ (UNIOR). The ceramic material, dated to the Late Antique Period, derives mostly from the SCA warehouse of el-Ashmunein, where it was kept soon after its accidental discovery in 1965. About 40 items derive from the surface collection and survey conducted on the site during the last fieldwork season (2018). The typologies identified include the most relevant Byzantine classes and a particular link with production from the Middle Egypt region. Part of the field survey was devoted to the analysis of the pottery material still in situ, found in the Northern Sector of the site where a 230m long row of monastic housing units is located. Further investigations will hopefully support the hypothesis of a local pottery production area, which could be identified in a large ‘dump’ at the southern end of the site. More generally, the analysis of the ceramics from Manqabad has underlined the undoubtedly high cultural level of the local monastic community, which can be deduced also from the textual, architectural and wall depiction evidence from the site. Manqabad was largely unknown to the scientific community, but since the first season of work by the Italian-Egyptian project, it has emerged as an important venue for the religious development of Coptic culture between the second half of the Vth to the end of the VIII- early IXth century AD.

About the author
Ilaria Incordino is Research Fellow and Adjunct Professor of Egyptology (BA) at the University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’ (UNIOR). Since 2011 she has been Deputy Director of the Italian-Egyptian Project of Study and Conservation of the Monastery of Manqabad, Asuyt, Egypt (UNIOR, Rome University, SCA), in charge of the study of the Late Antique pottery. She was promoter of several academic events at UNIOR: the Summer School ‘Pottery of the Nile Valley. Classification, documentation and new technology of analysis’ (2019), the ‘Current Research in Egyptology conference’ (2017), the MA in ‘Egyptology: Research Methods and Technology’ (2010) and the ‘First Neapolitan Congress of Egyptology’ (2008). In 2016 she was Curator of the new exposition of the Egyptian Collection of the National Archaeological Museum in Naples (MANN). She was member of the UNIOR excavations in the Eastern Central Desert (UNIOR, Helwan University, Cairo University) and at Mersa/Wadi Gawasis (UNIOR, Boston University).
‘Scènes de Gynécées’ Figured Ostraca from New Kingdom Egypt by Joanne Backhouse. Paperback; 205x290mm; 136 pages; 170 figures approx. (Print RRP: £28.00). 600 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 26. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693454. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693461. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

‘Scènes de Gynécées’ Figured Ostraca from New Kingdom Egypt: Iconography and intent examines images of women and children drawn on ostraca from Deir el-Medina, referred to in previous scholarship as ‘Scènes de Gynécées’. The images depict women with children either sitting on beds in a domestic setting or in outdoor kiosks. The former are likely to show celebrations carried out in the home to mark the birth of a child. This may have included the bringing of gifts, mainly consumables and small household items. It is possible this was recorded in hieratic texts, also on ostraca, described in earlier research as gift-giving lists. The kiosk scenes may have depicted the place women gave birth in or more likely the place of confinement after birth. However, given the dense nature of settlement at Deir el-Medina it is possible these scenes were symbolic evoking the protection of Isis who nurtured Horus in the papyrus thicket of the Delta. In order to understand the purpose and intent of these images, repeat motifs are considered and their similarities to wall paintings within the village are examined. The objects are important as they represent rare examples of regional art, found only at Deir el-Medina. Also, women are the main protagonists in the scenes, which is unusual in Egyptian art as women are generally depicted alongside the male patron of the work, as his wife, daughter or sister. This publication represents the first systematic study of this material and it brings together ostraca from museums worldwide to form a corpus united contextually, thematically and stylistically.

About the Author
Joanne Backhouse completed her PhD at the University of Liverpool in 2016. Her research interests focus on depictions of non-royal women in ancient Egypt, both two and three-dimensional. She teaches in the Continuing Education department at the University of Liverpool and a variety of educational venues in the North West of England, focusing on the material culture of ancient Egypt.
Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit II: Coin Finds 2012–2016 / Late Roman and Early Islamic Pottery from Kom al-Ahmer by Michele Asolati, Cristina Crisafulli and Cristina Mondin with contributions by Maria Lucia Patanè and Mohamed Kenawi. Hardback; 205x290mm; xii+340 pages; 41 figures; 22 tables; 127 plates (88 colour pages). (Print RRP £65.00). 592 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693966. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693973. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit were ideally placed to take advantage of the Mediterranean trade given their close proximity to the Egyptian ports of Thonis-Heracleion, Alexandria, and Rosetta during the Hellenistic, Roman, Late Roman, and early Islamic period. The social and economic vitality of the sites has been revealed during investigations undertaken by the Italian archaeological mission between 2012 and 2016 and published in Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt ca. 700 BC – AD 100.

This volume presents over 1070 coins (ca. 310 BC–AD 641) and 1320 examples of Late Roman and Early Islamic pottery, testimony to the considerable commercial activity in the region during the Late Antique period. Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit emerge as centers of an exchange network involving large-scale trade of raw materials to and from the central and eastern Mediterranean.

About the Authors
Michele Asolati is Associate Professor of Numismatics at the University of Padua. His research focuses on Late Roman and Early Medieval coinage and on the coin finds of the Mediterranean area, having published extensively on the subject.

Cristina Crisafulli is Curator of the Numismatic Collections of the Correr Museum in Venice. Her research focuses on the Roman coins of the third century AD and on coin finds of the Mediterranean area, especially North Africa.

Cristina Mondin is the coordinator of the Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit Archaeological Project and Manager of the Asolo Museum. She authored many articles on Roman and Late Roman pottery from contexts in Italy, Egypt, Turkey, and Croatia. Her research focuses on the economy and the trade in the Mediterranean.
Egypt in Croatia: Croatian Fascination with Ancient Egypt from Antiquity to Modern Times edited by Mladen Tomorad. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 369 illustrations in colour and black & white. 585 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 24. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693393. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693409. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

At first sight, it seems that ancient Egyptian history and culture have no meaningful ties with present-day Croatia. However, when we scratch beneath the surface of the common idea of Egypt, that of a distant and ancient civilisation, we notice that its elements have been present in Croatia ever since antiquity. Egypt in Croatia provides a closer look at many aspects of the presence and fascination of ancient Egyptian culture in Croatia, from antiquity to the present. The topics explored are the artefacts discovered in present-day Croatia (mostly from the early 19th century), Croatian travellers to Egypt from the 16th to the middle of the 20th century, Egyptian collections in Croatia and early collectors from the 1820s until the 1950s, an overview of the development of Egyptology of study within Croatia as well as the various elements of ‘Egyptomania’ found in Croatia, mostly from the beginning of the 19th century.

About the Editor
Mladen Tomorad is a senior researcher and professor of Ancient History at the Department of History, University of Zagreb. He has a masters degree in History and a PhD in Ancient History and Museology, and he has also studied Egyptology at the University of Manchester.
Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt ca. 700 BC – AD 1000 edited by Mohamed Kenawi. Hardback; xxviii+350 pages; 358 figures, 52 tables. (Print RRP £65.00). 575 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692983. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692990. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Cristina Mondin, Michele Asolati Louise Bertini, Audrey Eller, Urška Furlan, Ole Herslund, Israel Hinojosa Baliño, Marie-Caroline Livaditis, Giorgia Marchiori, Marcus Müller, Benjamin T. Pennington and Amy Wilson.

In 2012, fieldwork began at two large sites in the Beheira Province in the western Nile Delta: Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit (ancient Metelis). Being close to the important ports of Thonis-Heracleion, Alexandria, and Rosetta meant that they had been ideally placed to take advantage of the trade between the Mediterranean and Egypt. The sites are being thoroughly investigated to reveal their archaeological significance.

Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt presents the results of the Italian archaeological mission between 2012 and 2016. It provides details of the survey and excavation results from different occupation phases. A complete town beneath the Nile silt was revealed using a combination of modern scientific techniques. Hellenistic houses and a temple enclosure wall were investigated at Kom Wasit; while at Kom al-Ahmer, a Late Roman house, an amphora storage building, a cistern and an early Islamic cemetery were revealed.

Dating from the Late Dynastic to the Early Islamic period, the remains found at Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit demonstrate for the first time the rich archaeological heritage of this region.

About the Editor
Mohamed Kenawi is a Researcher and Training Manager at the School of Archaeology, University of Oxford, for the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa project. He was Head Researcher (2011–16), followed by Acting Director (2016–17), of the Hellenistic Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria. He taught at the American University in Cairo and at Catania University. He has participated in various archaeological missions in Libya, Italy, and Egypt, among them those at Kom al-Ahmer/Kom Wasit, Athribis, Dionysias, and Manqbad. He currently collaborates on projects with Padua University and Tübingen University. He has published various articles about his research, in addition to his monograph, Alexandria’s Hinterland: Archaeology of the Western Nile Delta, Egypt (2014). He published a co-authored book with G. Marchiori entitled Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology: the Italian Contribution (2018). He is Egypt Coordinator for the Manar al-Athar open access photo-archive.
Invisible Archaeologies: Hidden aspects of daily life in ancient Egypt and Nubia edited by Loretta Kilroe. Paperback; 203x276mm; ii+128 pages. 100 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693751. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693768. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Invisible Archaeologies: hidden aspects of daily life in ancient Egypt and Nubia brings together eight of the papers presented at a conference held in Oxford in 2017. The theme aimed to bring together international early-career researchers applying novel archaeological and anthropological methods to the ‘overlooked’ in ancient Egypt and Nubia – and included diverse topics such as women, prisoners, entangled communities and funerary displays.

The papers use a range of archaeological and textual material and span from the Predynastic period to the Late Period. By applying methodology used so successfully within the discipline of archaeology over the past 20 years, they offer a different perspective on Egyptological research, and demonstrate how such theoretical models can broaden scholarly understanding of the Nile Valley.

About the Editor
Loretta Kilroe is an Egyptologist who completed her PhD from the University of Oxford in 2019. She specialises in ancient Egyptian and Nubian ceramics and has participated in several excavations in Sudan with the Sudan Archaeological Research Society. She now works as Project Curator: Sudan and Nubia at the British Museum.
Geophysical Phenomena and the Alexandrian Littoral by N. Evelpidou, C. Repapis, C. Zerefos, H. Tzalas and C. Synolakis. Hardback; 175x245mm; x+132 pages; 51 figures, 2 tables (51 pages in colour). 561 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692341. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692358. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Alexandria is located on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt, bordered by Egypt’s Western Desert and the fertile Nile Delta. For many centuries, Alexandria was the major port city in the Eastern Mediterranean and it has been repeatedly struck by natural disasters, such as earthquakes, tsunamis and land subsidence, in its ~2400-year history. This book focuses on the geomorphological and archaeological evidence on the coastal zone of Alexandria, attempting to provide a comprehensive review of its evolution, taking into consideration long-term and short-term factors.

The book provides an extensive background on the geomorphology and recent geoarchaeological history of Alexandria, discussing historical maps and natural disasters. In the coastal area of Alexandria there is numerous archaeological evidence, such as burial sites, quarry activities and ancient building remnants, as well as geomorphological features, all revealing a complex evolution of the coastal zone. New evidence, such as fish tanks and ship wrecks in order to discuss the Late Holocene evolution of the coastal zone. Detailed illustrations and maps accompany the book chapters providing the reader the opportunity to gain an extensive view of Alexandria’s features.

About the Authors
Niki Evelpidou is a Professor of Geomorphology and Geoinformatics at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Faculty of Geology and Geoenvironment, and Faculty Affiliate of the Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences of the College of Charleston, USA. Prof. Evelpidou is actively involved in the research fields of geomorphology, coastal geomorphology, sea level changes, palaeogeography, geology, spatial technologies, study and modelling of natural hazards, while emphasizing on the use of new technologies and innovation.

Christos Repapis was Director of the Research Centre of Atmospheric Physics and Climatology of the Academy of Athens (1985-2005) and has remained as Research Associate of the Centre since his retirement.

Christos Zerefos heads the Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens and is president-elect of the General Assembly of the Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation. Other roles academic posts include Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Physics (Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki), Visiting Professor (Universities of Minnesota and Boston) and Samarbeidspartnere (University of Oslo).

Harry Tzalas has conducted a range of innovative experimental archaeological studies relating to ancient sea vessels. In 1997 he formed the Hellenic Institute of Ancient and Mediaeval Alexandrian Studies and obtained a concession from the Egyptian Authorities for an underwater survey of 14 kilometers of the eastern littoral of Alexandria; 28 campaigns were successfully conducted.

Costas Synolakis is Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Southern California and a a member of the Academy of Athens holding the Chair of Earth Sciences. His research studies the impact of natural hazards, and particularly tsunamis and extreme flooding events on beaches. He has participated or led 30 scientific expeditions in 21 countries, practically in all of the world’s oceans and seas.
The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual by Glennise West. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 362 figures (colour and black & white), 1 table. 539 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 23. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691825. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691832. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

What is the Tekenu? What was its function? What are its origins? These are questions upon which Egyptologists have long pondered. However, Egyptologists, until now, have avoided any major work on the topic. Previous treatments of the Tekenu largely adopt a selective approach focusing on a specific form. Rarely has the Tekenu been examined profoundly in all of its forms or contexts with its possible origins commented upon merely in passing. The aim of The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual is to provide a provocative examination and interpretation of the Tekenu in an endeavour to proffer plausible answers hitherto eluding scholars. Attested from the Fifth Dynasty until, and including the Saite Period, the Tekenu is a puzzling icon which is depicted within the funerary scenes in the tombs of some ancient Egyptian nobles. In this work four distinct types of Tekenu are identified and classified and then a Corpus Catalogue is formed. The Tekenu is appraised within the context of the wall scene. Two tombs are dealt with in greater detail.

About the Author
Glennise West graduated from the University of Sydney and taught English and History at secondary school level. Later she followed her lifelong interest in ancient Egypt obtaining MA and PhD from Macquarie University, Sydney. The topic of this book was the subject of her PhD dissertation. She lives in Sydney.

Reviews
'The great worth of this volume is that it gathers all the sources for the tekenu in one place and presents them with copious illustrations, many of them in colour. The catalogue is certainly the longest and most-detailed part of the book and will be of considerable use to anyone who is interested in Egyptian funerals and their representation on tomb walls.'—Christian Knoblauch, Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt, Volume 56, 2020
Journeys Erased by Time: The Rediscovered Footprints of Travellers in Egypt and the Near East edited by Neil Cooke. Paperback; 160x230mm; xvi+350 pages; Illustrated throughout (89 colour pages). 557 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692402. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692419. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Members of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE), founded in 1997, continue to research, hold international conferences, and publish books and essays in order to reveal the lives, journeys and achievements of these less well-known men and women who have made such a contribution to the present day historical and geographical knowledge of this region of the world and who have also given us a better understanding of its different peoples, languages and religions.

The men and women from the past who are written about in this volume are a mixture of the incredibly rich or the very poor, and yet they have one thing in common, the bravery to tackle an adventure into the unknown without the certainty they would ever return home to their families. Some took up the challenge as part of their job or to create a new business, one person travelled to learn how to create and manage a harem at his house in London, others had no choice because as captives in a military campaign they were forced to make journeys into Ottoman controlled lands not knowing exactly where they were, yet every day they were looking for an opportunity to escape and return to their homes, while hoping the next person they met would guide them towards the safest route.

Apart from being brave, many of these men and women travellers have something else in common: they and others they encountered have left a collective record describing their travels and their observations about all manner of things. It is these forgotten pioneers who first gathered the facts and details that now fill numerous modern guidebooks, inflight magazines and websites.