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Architecture militaire du Deccan: Une réponse défensive face à la guerre moderne Deccan Military Architecture: A response to early modern warfare by Nicolas Morelle. Paperback; 203x276mm; 428pp; 168 figures. French text with English introduction and conclusion. 124 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697445. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697452. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Architecture militaire du Deccan focuses on the Deccan region in central India between the medieval and modern period, a period at the interface between local Indian culture and the Persian world, followed by relations with the colonial enterprise European in Asia. This period was marked by many conflicts, but also by an inventive adaptation of new military technologies in response to new forms of modern warfare in India, with the arrival of artillery.

Using the most recent investigative techniques, such as photogrammetry and 3D modeling, this volume presents a wealth of new data. The author’s meticulous approach encompasses the study of urban maps, architectural plans and detailed descriptions of walls, bastions, moats, towers, gates, horsemen, granaries, hydraulic éléments, and more.

Through the study of four representative fortified sites, the author synthesizes the evolution of the military architecture of the Deccan.

One can only hope that this volume will inspire other scholars to work on other Indian fortified sites, not limited to the Deccan. Thus, a more complete understanding of the phases of evolution of Indian military architecture can emerge.

About the Author
Nicolas Morelle is an archaeologist, specialising in India (associated researcher of LA3M CNRS in France). After studies on crusaders fortifications and influences between East and West in terms of building techniques and military Architecture, he studied technical interactions in Indian fortifications as part of his PhD thesis on the evolution of Military Architecture in the four Deccan forts. In this context, he collaborated with many Indian and international institutions.

French description: L’extraordinaire conservatoire de fortifications que constitue l’Inde centrale enrichit la connaissance de l’architecture militaire de la période moderne. Les spécificités indiennes en matière de défense constituent un apport non négligeable sur le développement original des organes défensifs du Deccan.

En utilisant les techniques d’investigation les plus récentes, telles que la photogrammétrie et la modélisation 3D, Nicolas Morelle découvre une richesse de données jusqu’alors inconnues. Il présente ainsi une approche méticuleuse à travers des cartes urbaines, des plans d’architecture et des descriptions détaillées de murs, bastions, douves, tours, portes, cavaliers, greniers, éléments hydrauliques, …

Dans ce volume, Nicolas Morelle se concentre sur la région du Deccan dans le centre de l’Inde entre la période médiévale et moderne, période à l’interface entre la culture indienne locale et le monde persan, suivi des relations avec l’entreprise coloniale européenne en Asie. Cette période a été marquée par de nombreux conflits, mais aussi par une adaptation inventive, de nouvelles technologies militaires en réponse aux nouvelles formes de guerre moderne en Inde, avec l’arrivée de l’artillerie.

A travers l’étude de quatre sites fortifiés représentatifs, l’auteur élabore une synthèse de l’évolution de l’architecture militaire du Deccan.

On ne peut qu’espérer que le présent volume inspirera d’autres chercheurs à travailler sur d’autres sites fortifiés indiens, sans se limiter au Deccan. Ainsi, une compréhension plus complète des phases d’évolution de l’architecture militaire indienne pourra émerger.

Tiré d’une recherche doctorale récente, cet ouvrage est en français. Plusieurs parties sont traduites en anglais, dont la synthèse, afin d’améliorer sa diffusion vers le public international.

Nicolas Morelle est archéologue, spécialiste de l’Inde (chercheur associé du LA3M CNRS en France). Après des études sur les fortifications des croisades et les influences entre Orient et Occident dans l’architecture militaire, il a étudié les interactions techniques dans les fortifications indiennes dans le cadre de sa thèse de doctorat sur
The Global Connections of Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the Third International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 18th-19th March, 2019 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696950; Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout. 669 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696950. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696967. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Gandhāran art is often regarded as the epitome of cultural exchange in antiquity. The ancient region of Gandhāra, centred on what is now the northern tip of Pakistan, has been called the ‘crossroads of Asia’. The Buddhist art produced in and around this area in the first few centuries AD exhibits extraordinary connections with other traditions across Asia and as far as the Mediterranean. Since the nineteenth century, the Graeco-Roman associations of Gandhāran art have attracted particular attention. Classically educated soldiers and administrators of that era were astonished by the uncanny resemblance of many works of Gandhāran sculpture to Greek and Roman art made thousands of miles to the west. More than a century later we can recognize that the Gandhāran artists’ appropriation of classical iconography and styles was diverse and extensive, but the explanation of this ‘influence’ remains puzzling and elusive. The Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre was initiated principally to cast new light on this old problem.

This volume is the third set of proceedings of the project’s annual workshop, and the first to address directly the question of cross-cultural influence on and by Gandhāran art. The contributors wrestle with old controversies, particularly the notion that Gandhāran art is a legacy of Hellenistic Greek rule in Central Asia and the growing consensus around the important role of the Roman Empire in shaping it. But they also seek to present a more complex and expansive view of the networks in which Gandhāra was embedded. Adopting a global perspective on the subject, they examine aspects of Gandhāra’s connections both within and beyond South Asia and Central Asia, including the profound influence which Gandhāran art itself had on the development of Buddhist art in China and India.

About the Editors
Wannaporn Rienjang obtained her doctorate in Archaeology from University of Cambridge. She is now Lecturer in Archaeology, Museum and Heritage Studies at the Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University and a project consultant for the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. Her research focuses on the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Indian Ocean Trade and ancient working technologies of stone beads and vessels. ;

Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran a
EurASEAA14 Volume II: Material Culture and Heritage Papers from the Fourteenth International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists edited by Helen Lewis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; 164 figures, 27 tables. 115 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695939. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695946. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

EurASEAA14: Material Culture and Heritage is the second of two volumes comprising papers originally presented at the EurASEAA14 (European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists) conference in 2012, updated for publication. The aim of the EurASEAA is to facilitate communication between different disciplines, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research. This international initiative aims to foster international scholarly cooperation in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology, art history and philology.

This volume focuses substantially on topics under the broad themes of archaeology and heritage, material culture, environmental archaeology, osteoarchaeology, historic and prehistoric archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and long-distance contact, trade and exchange.

About the Editor
Helen Lewis is an associate professor at University College Dublin School of Archaeology. Her research in Southeast Asia has mostly focused on cave sites in Laos, Malaysian Borneo, and the Philippine island of Palawan, where she co-directs the Palawan Island Palaeohistory Research Project. She chaired the EurASEAA14 Conference in Dublin in 2012.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editorial introduction to EurASEAA14 Volumes 1 and 2 – Helen Lewis ;
Ceramics from the Musi riverbed – John N. Miksic ;
The social dynamics of porcelain trade in the eleventh to sixteenth centuries CE Philippines: a chemical composition study – Rory Dennison and Laura Junker ;
The kilns of Myinkaba – for pottery or glass? – Don Hein and W. Ross H. Ramsay ;
The iron smelting technology of the Bujang Valley, Malaysia – Naizatul Akma Mokhtar and Mokhtar Saidin ;
Guide to understanding Khmer stoneware characteristics, Angkor, Cambodia – Chhay Rachna, Tho Thon and Em Socheata ;
New data on the chronology of Khmer stonewares – Armand Desbat ;
The conical rollers of Ban Non Wat, northeastern Thailand – Christina Sewall ;
Late Pleistocene/Holocene ecological and cultural transition in the Philippines – Jonathan H. Kress ;
Middle Pleistocene sites in Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Perak, Malaysia – Nor Khairunnisa Talib, Mokhtar Saidin and Jeffrey Abdullah ;
Metabolism, mythology, magic or metaphor? Animals in the rock art of Thailand – Lauren Winch ;
Tooth blackening and betel nut chewing at the Early Iron Age sites of Gò Ô Chùa (Vietnam) and Prohear (Cambodia) – Simone Krais, Michael Francken and Andreas Reinecke ;
The cultural and biological context of the Song Keplek 5 specimen, East Java: implications for living conditions and human-environment interactions during the later Holocene – Sofwan Noerwidi, Harry Widianto and Truman Simanjuntak ;
Probable prehistoric Southeast Asian influences in New Guinea? New archaeological and anthropological approaches to former axioms – Henry Dosedla ;
Ancient settlement in the lakes area of East Java Province, Indonesia: the potential for archaeological research with public benefits – Gunadi Kasnowihardjo ;
The relevance of archaeology to contemporary concerns: the Department of Agriculture of the Philippines and ancient foodways – Michelle S. Eusebio ;
Toward an understanding of cultural heritage and sustainable management: a case study from Phrae Province, Thailand – Mizuho Ikeda ;
Bibliography
EurASEAA14 Volume I: Ancient and Living Traditions Papers from the Fourteenth International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists: Volume I edited by Helen Lewis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 244 pages; 170 figures, 13 tables. (Print RRP: £45.00). 114 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695052. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695069. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

EurASEAA14: Ancient and Living Traditions is the first of two volumes comprising papers originally presented at the EurASEAA14 (European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists) conference in 2012, updated for publication. The aim of the EurASEAA is to facilitate communication between different disciplines, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research. This international initiative aims to foster international scholarly cooperation in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology, art history and philology.

This volume focuses substantially on topics under the broad themes of archaeology and art history, epigraphy, philology, historic archaeology, ethnography, ethnoarchaeology, ethnomusicology, materials studies, and long-distance trade and exchange.

About the Editor
Helen Lewis is an associate professor at University College Dublin School of Archaeology. Her research in Southeast Asia has mostly focused on cave sites in Laos, Malaysian Borneo, and the Philippine island of Palawan, where she co-directs the Palawan Island Palaeohistory Research Project. She chaired the EurASEAA14 Conference in Dublin in 2012.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editorial introduction to EurASEAA14 Volumes 1 and 2 – Helen Lewis ;
Events in the Life of the Buddha: Pagan sculptures in the Hermitage collection and their context in the art of mainland Southeast Asia – Olga Deshpande and Pamela Gutman† ;
A note on two peculiar stone pedestals in the form of atlas dwarfish figures (yakṣas) – Valérie Zaleski ;
Representations of the female in Thai Buddhist manuscript paintings – Jana Igunma ;
Prajñāpāramitā in thirteenth century Java and Sumatra: two sculptures disconnected by textile designs – Lesley S Pullen ;
Islamic calligraphy, re-interpreted by local genius in Javanese mosque ornamentation, Indonesia (fifteenth century CE to present) – Hee Sook Lee-Niinioja ;
Understanding the Champa polity from archaeological and epigraphic evidence – a critical stocktaking – Bishnupriya Basak ;
A tale of two Khmer bronzecasting families, the Chhem and the Khat: how traditional bronzecasting revived in the area around Phnom Penh after the Khmer Rouge (1975-1979), and the expansion and modernization of that tradition in the 1990s: a preliminary report – Jane P. Allison ;
The history and distribution of the free-reed mouth-organ in SE Asia – Roger Blench ;
The ethnoarchaeology of Southeast Asian foragers: resiliency in Ata indigenous knowledge and cultural expression in the pre-Hispanic and Hispanic Philippines – Larissa Smith ;
Megalithic rituals of the Maram tribe of Manipur – Binodini Devi Potshangbam ;
The hidden, unique, bronze battleship from Mt. Dobo, East Flores, Indonesia, assumed to date to the Dong-So’n period – Herwig Zahorka† ;
Kattigara of Claudius Ptolemy and Óc Eo: the issue of trade between the Roman Empire and Funan in the Graeco-Roman written sources – Kasper Hanus and Emilia Smagur ;
Cowries in southwestern China, and trade with India and Myanmar in ancient and modern times – Xiao Minghua ;
The source of the seashells and ivories found in southwest China in the pre-Qin Period – Duan Yu ;
Southeast Asia and the development of advanced sail types across the Indian Ocean – Tom Hoogervorst ;
Mediaeval Fansur: a long-lost harbor in Aceh – Edmund Edwards McKinnon and Nurdin A.R. ;
‘The world turned upside down’: sago-palm processors in northeast India and the origins of Chinese civilization – Roger Blench ;
Bibliography
Hasanlu, the Southern Caucasus and Early Urartu by Megan Cifarelli. Pages 144-156 from Over the Mountains and Far Away: Studies in Near Eastern history and archaeology presented to Mirjo Salvini on the occasion of his 80th birthday edited by Pavel S. Avetisyan, Roberto Dan and Yervand H. Grekyan.Download Full PDF  

Abstract: The past decades witnessed an increasing recognition of the complexity of Hasanlu’s place in the Iron Age world that it shared with Assyria, due to research in the highlands to the north of Hasanlu and the proliferation of studies about the kingdom of Urartu. This paper explores evidence, ‘circumstantial’ and archaeological, for interaction between Hasanlu during Period IVb (1050-800 BC) and the incipient Urartian state. There is little question that during the latter half of Period IVb at Hasanlu, the entity that would become the kingdom of Urartu was coalescing in eastern Anatolia and northwestern Iran. The material culture of Hasanlu Period IVb provides hints of interaction between Hasanlu and the larger southern Caucasus region, and between Hasanlu and Urartu. The impact of this cultural contact is bilateral, although it is challenging to trace the steps by which the material culture of northwestern Iran contributed to the development of that in Urartu. This paper argues that material connections between Urartu and Hasanlu, the objects displayed on its citadel and the bodies of its citizens, in the rich and diverse collections safeguarded in storerooms and presumably taken as spoils by its destroyers, indicate the debt Urartu owed to northwest Iran.

Keywords: Hasanlu, Urartu, Iron Age, South Caucasus, trident, bident, lion pin
The Geography of Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the Second International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 22nd-23rd March, 2018 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789691863. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 plates in colour). (Print RRP £38.00). 533 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691863. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691870. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Gandhāran art is usually regarded as a single phenomenon – a unified regional artistic tradition or ‘school’. Indeed it has distinctive visual characteristics, materials, and functions, and is characterized by its extensive borrowings from the Graeco-Roman world. Yet this tradition is also highly varied. Even the superficial homogeneity of Gandhāran sculpture, which constitutes the bulk of documented artistic material from this region in the early centuries AD, belies a considerable range of styles, technical approaches, iconographic choices, and levels of artistic skill.

The geographical variations in Gandhāran art have received less attention than they deserve. Many surviving Gandhāran artefacts are unprovenanced and the difficulty of tracing substantial assemblages of sculpture to particular sites has obscured the fine-grained picture of its artistic geography. Well documented modern excavations at particular sites and areas, such as the projects of the Italian Archaeological Mission in the Swat Valley, have demonstrated the value of looking at sculptures in context and considering distinctive aspects of their production, use, and reuse within a specific locality. However, insights of this kind have been harder to gain for other areas, including the Gandhāran heartland of the Peshawar basin. Even where large collections of artworks can be related to individual sites, the exercise of comparing material within and between these places is still at an early stage. The relationship between the Gandhāran artists or ‘workshops’, particular stone sources, and specific sites is still unclear.

Addressing these and other questions, this second volume of the Gandhāra Connections project at Oxford University’s Classical Art Research Centre presents the proceedings of a workshop held in March 2018. Its aim is to pick apart the regional geography of Gandhāran art, presenting new discoveries at particular sites, textual evidence, and the challenges and opportunities of exploring Gandhāra’s artistic geography.

About the Editors
WANNAPORN RIENJANG is Project Assistant of the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. She completed her doctoral degree in Archaeology at the University of Cambridge on Buddhist relic cult in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Before starting her PhD, she worked as a research assistant for the Masson Project at the Department of Coins and Medals, the British Museum. Her research interests include the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Buddhist studies, and working technologies of stone containers and beads.

PETER STEWART is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran art and Roman sculpture.
India in the ‘India Book’: 12th century northern Malabar through Geniza documents by Elizabeth A. Lambourn. Pages 71-84 from Sur les chemins d’Onagre: Histoire et archéologie orientales Hommage à Monik Kervran edited by Claire Hardy-Guilbert, Hélène Renel, Axelle Rougeulle et Eric Vallet.Download Full PDF  

It is not quite a decade since the first three parts of S. D. Goitein’s ‘India Book’ were published as India Traders of the Middle Ages: Documents from the Cairo Geniza (‘India Book’) (Goitein and Friedman 2008), the culmination of over twenty-five years of work by Mordechai A. Friedman to complete the first phase of the project begun by his teacher. It is difficult to overemphasize the importance of the publication of these documents for the study of the western Indian Ocean. They span the mid-11th to late 13th centuries AD and as such represent the oldest surviving premodern documentary assemblage from the area, and one of only three identified so far (Guo 2004; Jāzim 2003–2005; Kaplony 2014). Hebrew editions of these three parts (Goitein and Friedman 2009, 2010a, 2010b) and now Part Four (Goitein and Friedman 2013; Friedman 2013) mean that essential transcriptions of the Judaeo-Arabic texts are also now available, although those who do not read modern Hebrew will have to wait until the volumes pertaining to Ḥalfon and Judah Ha-Levi (Part Four, A and B) are translated into English to appreciate the introductory essays and careful commentary. In the meantime, Parts One to Three are already so rich that they will keep scholars busy for decades to come.
Early Maritime Cultures in East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean Papers from a conference held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (African Studies Program) 23-24 October 2015, with additional contributions by Akshay Sarathi. Paperback; 203x276mm; viii+228 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 plates in colour). 66 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917128. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917135. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The East African coast and the Western Indian Ocean are regions of global historical significance. This volume contains papers first presented at the conference, Early Maritime Cultures of the East African Coast, held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 23-24, 2015. Rather than limiting publication to the proceedings of the conference, additional contributions were solicited to expand the scope of the research presented and to place East Africa in its broader geographic and cultural contexts. The resulting volume focuses broadly on East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean and unites the papers under the general themes of movement and connection.

These papers represent a multi-disciplinary effort to examine East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean. Multiple lines of evidence drawn from linguistics, archaeology, history, art history, and ethnography come together in novel ways to highlight different aspects of the region’s past and offer innovative avenues for future research. The papers cover a diverse array of topics, including but not limited to: subsistence, watercraft traditions, trade and exchange (especially concerning the Silk Routes), migration, food ways, and familial relationships. This volume is unique in that it includes some speculative research as well, intended to present novel methods to deal with data-poor topics and to start important conversations about understudied topics.

The goal of this volume is to showcase aspects of the complex cultures and histories of this vast region and to emphasize its importance to world history. Ideally, it will generate scholarly and popular interest in the histories and cultures of the region and bring to the fore Africa’s and the Western Indian Ocean’s important (yet often overlooked) role in world historical narratives. It may also serve as a more advanced introduction to East Africa’s and the Western Indian Ocean’s history of interaction with other regions of the Old World and as a survey of methods used to understand the region’s past.

About the Editor
AKSHAY SARATHI is a graduate student of Archaeology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include the zooarchaeology of maritime adaptations, Indian Ocean trade and exchange, and East African coastal archaeology. More specifically, his current research project focuses on the island of Zanzibar, where he has excavated the sites of Unguja Ukuu, Kizimkazi Dimbani, and Kuumbi Cave. Data from these sites will form the basis of his dissertation, which will examine how dietary preferences changed over time at each site in response to various stimuli over time. He currently resides in Madison, WI (USA) with his two feline overlords.

Reviews
'Overall the book represents a useful resource for those interested in understanding the role of East Africa and the Red Sea in global networks, acknowledges the contribution of hinterland communities in the success of these exchanges, and documents how these networks can be examined from different perspectives.'—Annalisa C. Christie, Journal of Maritime Archaeology, Volume 15 (2020)

'Ultimately, the editor should be commended for pulling together a diverse and compelling collection of chapters. So, too, should Archaeopress be commended for the Access Archaeology initiative, which enables such eclectic volumes to find a publisher and a readership.'—Matthew Pawlowicz, African Archaeological Review, Volume 38, 2021
Indonesian Megaliths: A Forgotten Cultural Heritage by Tara Steimer-Herbet. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+104 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (94 plates in colour). (Print RRP £30.00). 413 2018 Laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique UNIGE . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918439. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918446. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Indonesian Megaliths: A forgotten cultural heritage highlights aspects of Indonesian culture which are currently misunderstood and sometimes threatened by destruction. Although they are relatively recent in origin, the Indonesian megaliths offer similarities to their counterparts in the Middle East and Arabia: they reflect the rise to prominence of local chiefs in a context of acculturation which prompted the need to build megalithic monuments to bury the dead, and to honour, commemorate and communicate with ancestors. In societies of oral tradition, these stones punctuate the landscape to transmit the memory of men and social structure from one generation to the next.

Based on scientific documents (articles, archaeological reports) and field visits, this new exploration clarifies various elements of the Indonesian megaliths, including their function in the daily life of the tribes and the use of certain stones for musical purposes (lithophony). In Nias, Sumba and Toraya, the megalith tradition is still alive and ethno-anthropological studies of these three regions provide a unique chance to complement the archaeological perspectives on megalithic monuments abandoned for several centuries in the rest of the Archipelago. The book includes numerous photographs documenting the monuments which were taken during the author’s stay in Indonesia (2010-2013).

About the Author
TARA STEIMER-HERBET is a graduate of Paris 1 - Panthéon La Sorbonne where she carried out her doctoral research on developing a methodological approach to Middle Eastern archaeology. Her research led her to become particularly interested in megalithism, and the way this phenomenon is expressed in the cultural and funerary practices of the Levant and western Arabia during the 4th and 3rd millennia BC. In 2005 she excavated a sanctuary in Hadramawt (Yemen) and since 2010 has focussed on the megalithic phenomenon in Indonesia. Her research efforts currently concentrate on the preservation of megalithic monuments in the Akkar region of Lebanon as well as on characterising the megalithic phenomenon of the 3rd and 2d millennium BC in the Kuwait region of al-Subiya, Dr Steimer currently teaches ‘archaeological methodology’ and ‘megalithism in the world’ at the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology of the University of Geneva, Switzerland.

Reviews
'...the book succeeds in revealing the wealth of Indonesian traditions to enthusiasts and will hopefully spark a revival of interest in megaliths among professionals.'—Véronique Degroot, Bulletin de l'École française d'Extrême-Orient, Vol. 106
Problems of Chronology in Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the First International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 23rd-24th March, 2017 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781784918552. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). 419 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918552. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918569. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Since the beginning of Gandhāran studies in the nineteenth century, chronology has been one of the most significant challenges to the understanding of Gandhāran art. Many other ancient societies, including those of Greece and Rome, have left a wealth of textual sources which have put their fundamental chronological frameworks beyond doubt. In the absence of such sources on a similar scale, even the historical eras cited on inscribed Gandhāran works of art have been hard to place. Few sculptures have such inscriptions and the majority lack any record of find-spot or even general provenance. Those known to have been found at particular sites were sometimes moved and reused in antiquity. Consequently, the provisional dates assigned to extant Gandhāran sculptures have sometimes differed by centuries, while the narrative of artistic development remains doubtful and inconsistent.

Building upon the most recent, cross-disciplinary research, debate and excavation, this volume reinforces a new consensus about the chronology of Gandhāra, bringing the history of Gandhāran art into sharper focus than ever. By considering this tradition in its wider context, alongside contemporary Indian art and subsequent developments in Central Asia, the authors also open up fresh questions and problems which a new phase of research will need to address.

Problems of Chronology in Gandhāran Art is the first publication of the Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre, which has been supported by the Bagri Foundation and the Neil Kreitman Foundation. It presents the proceedings of the first of three international workshops on fundamental questions in the study of Gandhāran art, held at Oxford in March 2017.

About the Editors
WANNAPORN RIENJANG is Project Assistant of the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. She completed her doctoral degree in Archaeology at the University of Cambridge on Buddhist relic cult in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Before starting her PhD, she worked as a research assistant for the Masson Project at the Department of Coins and Medals, the British Museum. Her research interests include the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Buddhist studies, and working technologies of stone containers and beads.

PETER STEWART is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran art and Roman sculpture.

Reviews
'This book is therefore an essential contribution to Gandhāran studies,
Metallurgical Production in Northern Eurasia in the Bronze Age by Stanislav Grigoriev. 831 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 6 2015 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912758. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912369. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Copper is the first metal to play a large part in human history. This work is devoted to the history of metallurgical production in Northern Eurasia during the Bronze Age, based on experiments carried out by the author and analyses of ancient slag, ore and metal. It should be noted that archaeometallurgical studies include a huge range of works reflecting different fields of activity of ancient metallurgists. Often, all that unites these is the term ‘metallurgy’. This work considers the problems of proper metallurgy, i.e. extracting metal from ore. A number of accompanying operations are closely connected with it, such as charcoal-burning, ore dressing, furnace constructing, and preparation of crucibles. In some instances the author touches upon these operations; however the main topic of the work is the smelting process. The closing stage of the metallurgical production is metalworking including various casting and forging operations, and also auxiliary operations: making of crucibles, casting molds, stone tools for metal forging. These problems are, as a rule, out of frameworks of this research.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

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