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NEW: The Not Very Patrilocal European Neolithic Strontium, aDNA, and Archaeological Kinship Analyses by Bradley E. Ensor. Paperback; 174x245mm; 252 pages; 24 figures, 18 tables. 776 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699807. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699814. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Two decades of strontium isotope research on Neolithic European burials – reinforced by high-profile ancient DNA studies – has led to widespread interpretations that these were patrilocal societies, implying significant residential mobility for women. The Not Very Patrilocal European Neolithic questions that narrative from a social anthropological perspective on kinship. It introduces models for inferring residence and descent with isotope and genetic data and provides in-depth descriptions of archaeological kinship analysis. From social anthropological insights to reassessments of data, an alternative perspective on the social dynamics of Neolithic European societies emerges from this new guide for prehistorians working with biological and archaeological materials.

About the Author Bradley E. Ensor (PhD 2003, University of Florida) is a professor of anthropology at Eastern Michigan University (2003-present). He teaches archaeology, social anthropology, and physical anthropology. His research addresses theory and methods in archaeology, bioarchaeology, and ethnology emphasizing the intersections of political economy, kinship, and gender. His publications include Crafting Prehispanic Maya Kinship (2013), The Archaeology of Kinship (2013), Oysters in the Land of Cacao (2020), 17 journal articles, and 7 chapters in edited volumes.
NEW: Rock Art Studies: News of the World VI edited by Paul G. Bahn, Natalie Franklin and Matthias Strecker. Paperback; 205x290mm; 370 pages; 149 figures, 3 tables (colour throughout). 772 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699623. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699630. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rock Art Studies: News of the World VI, like the previous editions in the series, covers rock art research and management all over the world over a five-year period, in this case, the years 2015 to 2019 inclusive. The current volume once again shows the wide variety of approaches that have been taken in different parts of the world and reflects the expansion and diversification of perspectives and research questions. One constant has been the impact of new techniques of recording rock art. This is especially evident in the realm of computer enhancement of the frequently faded and weathered rock imagery. As has been the case in past volumes, this collection of papers includes all of the latest discoveries, including in areas hitherto not known to contain rock art. While relatively little has happened in some areas, a great deal has occurred in others. Rock art studies continue to go through a period of intense scientific and technological development, but at the same time – due to the problems of preservation and vandalism – it is crucial to educate local people and the young about the importance of this fragile heritage.

About the Editors Paul G. Bahn studied archaeology at Cambridge and wrote his doctoral thesis on the prehistory of the French Pyrenees. He then held postdoctoral fellowships at Liverpool and London, plus a Getty postdoctoral fellowship in the History of Art and the Humanities. Since the mid-80s, he has devoted himself to writing and editing books on archaeology and lecturing on numerous archaeological tours. His main speciality is prehistoric art, especially rock art of the world, most notably Palaeolithic art, as well as Easter Island. ;

Natalie Franklin is an internationally renowned rock art specialist. She has published widely in academic journals, co-edited the previous three volumes of Rock Art News of the World and contributed chapters to the entire series. She has extensive experience in recording rock art and developing management plans for rock art sites. Natalie currently works as a cultural heritage consultant in Brisbane, Australia. ;

Matthias Strecker is an educator and rock art expert. Both in Bolivia and internationally, Strecker has contributed signifi cantly to the knowledge, appreciation and conservation of rock art. He has carried out fi eldwork in Mexico, Bolivia and Peru and has published numerous studies of rock art in Latin America. Since 1987 he has been Secretary of the Sociedad de Investigación del Arte Rupestre de Bolivia (SIARB) and editor of its publications.
NEW: A Vanishing Landscape: Archaeological Investigations at Blakeney Eye, Norfolk by Naomi Field. Paperback; 205x290mm; 240 pages; 65 figures, 76 plates, 71 tables (colour throughout). 769 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698404. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698411. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A Vanishing Landscape: Archaeological Investigations at Blakeney Eye, Norfolk documents the results of several archaeological investigations undertaken on Blakeney Eye on behalf of the Environment Agency after the decision was taken for a managed retreat of the area. The Eye is a part of the north Norfolk coastline that has been under constant pressure of erosion for centuries.

Excavation revealed evidence for multi-period occupation, with abandonments driven by the ever-changing climate. Neolithic features and artefacts were the earliest remains present. Fragmentary remains of an enclosed 13-14th century farmstead were identified, mainly preserved beneath the two-celled flint building of 16th-17th century date (the scheduled monument known locally as Blakeney Chapel). Archaeological evidence for the function of this building is discussed in conjunction with the documentary sources. The archaeological remains throw light on the trading links between the medieval and post-medieval port of Cley and the Continent, as well as the storms and tidal influxes of the past that resulted in repeated abandonments of the area.

Includes contributions from Kathryn Blythe, Michael Clark, Jacqueline Churchill, Jane Cowgill, John Giorgi, Alison Locker, Adrian Marsden, Graham Morgan, Quita Mould, Andrew Peachey, Sara Percival, James Rackham, Ian Rowlandson, Zoe Tomlinson, Alan Vince†, Hugh Willmott, Jane Young.

About the Author
Naomi Field MCIfA has been a Senior Archaeological Consultant at Prospect Archaeology Ltd since 2011. She was Director of Lindsey Archaeological Services Ltd from 1987-2009, the company that undertook the excavations at Blakeney Eye in 2004-5. Her many publications include the Lincolnshire excavations of an Iron Age timber causeway at Fiskerton and the medieval timber-framed building, Gainsborough Old Hall. She was archaeology advisor on the Lincoln Diocesan Advisory Committee for over 30 years and her present interests are focused on the recording of historic buildings.
NEW: The Shaping of the English Landscape: An Atlas of Archaeology from the Bronze Age to Domesday Book by Chris Green and Miranda Creswell. Paperback; 219x297mm; 134 pages; illustrated in colour throughout. 767 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270609. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270616. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Shaping of the English Landscape is an atlas of English archaeology covering the period from the middle Bronze Age (c. 1500 BC) to Domesday Book (AD 1086), encompassing the Bronze and Iron Ages, the Roman period, and the early medieval (Anglo-Saxon) age. It was produced as part of the English Landscape and Identities (EngLaId) project at the University of Oxford, which took place from 2011 to 2016, funded by the European Research Council.

In this book, you will find maps (produced by Chris Green) and discussion of themes including landscape agency, settlement, foodways and field systems, belief and the treatment of the dead, mobility and defence, making things, and material culture. Alongside are artworks (produced by Miranda Creswell) dealing with similar themes and depicting archaeological sites from across England. The authors hope to inspire and encourage debate into the past history of the English landscape.

Includes contributions from Anwen Cooper, Victoria Donnelly, Tyler Franconi, Roger Glyde, Chris Gosden, Zena Kamash, Janice Kinory, Sarah Mallet, Dan Stansbie, John Talbot, and Letty Ten Harkel.

About the Contributors
Chris Green is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the School of Archaeology within the University of Oxford. He worked on English Landscape and Identities throughout the lifespan of the project. Chris specialises in applications of Geographic Information Systems and data science in archaeology. He particularly enjoys making maps. ;

Miranda Creswell is a visual artist based in Oxford. She is currently Artist in Residence at the School of Archaeology and previously worked within the team on English Landscape and Identities, documenting working methods and also creating the Recording England artworks presented in this book.
NEW: Prehistoric Fisherfolk of Oman: The Neolithic Village of Ras Al-Hamra RH-5 by Lapo Gianni Marcucci, Emilie Badel & Francesco Genchi. Paperback; 210x297mm; 248 pages; 164 figures, 7 tables (colour throughout). 764 2021 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 6. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781803270340. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270357. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Prehistoric Fisherfolk of Oman reports on excavations at the prehistoric site Ras Al-Hamra RH-5, located on a large promontory in the Qurum area of Muscat, conducted by the Italian Archaeological Mission in Oman with support from the Ministry of Heritage and Tourism. The site dates from the late fifth to the end of the fourth millennia BC and comprises an accumulation of superimposed food discards deriving from continuous and repeated subsistence activities such as fishing, collecting shells, hunting and herding. Dwellings and household installations, including objects of daily use and ornaments, have also been found throughout the occupation sequence. Excavations at RH-5 yielded unprecedented data on the economic and social dynamics of Neolithic societies in eastern Arabia. The exploitation of different ecological niches supplied all the necessary requirements for year-round sedentary human occupation. The lifestyle of fisher-gatherer communities during the Middle Holocene represents a fundamental step of the neolithisation process in Oman.

About the Authors
Lapo Gianni Marcucci obtained his Ph.D in partnership between the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne and the University of Bologna. Working in Oman since 1998 on the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods, he has directed various excavations including Ras Al-Hamra RH-5 and RH-6. Marcucci researches Neolithic coastal villages and manufacturing process with a particular focus on shell. Since 2006, he is working on rescue archaeology for various institutes in France and is a consultant for museums in Oman. ;

Emilie Badel is Associated Researcher at the Vepmo laboratory of French CNRS. She obtained her Ph.D from the University of Paris 1 Panthéon- Sorbonne. Badel specializes in the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods of the Near East and researches on technological revolution that has coincided with the emergence of complex societies, in particular for what concerns man-shaped bitumen assemblages. She worked on the field in Oman, at the archaeological sites of Ras Al-Hamra RH-5 and RH-6 from 2009 to 2013. ;

Francesco Genchi is a Research Fellow at the Sapienza–University of Rome. He is a professional archaeologist specializing in stratigraphic excavation and 3D digital documentation, as well as in archaeological survey and landscape mapping. Genchi participated in excavations at Ras Al-Hadd, Ras Al-Jinz and Ras Al-Hamra and was also field-director for the Ministry of Heritage and Culture in several rescue projects. He is presently directing the excavation of Iron Age collective graves at Dibbā Al-Bayah in the Musandam Governorate.
NEW: Understanding and Accessibility of Pre-and Proto-Historical Research Issues: Sites, Museums and Communication Strategies Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 17, Session XXXV-1 edited by Davide Delfino and Valentino Nizzo. Paperback; 205x290mm; 94 pages; 40 figures, 3 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English, one in French. 770 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270784. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270791. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Understanding and Accessibility of Pre-and Protohistorical Research Issues: Sites, Museums and Communication Strategies presents the papers from Session XXXV-1 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). Museums are increasingly seen as the place where scientific research and heritage education meet, rather than being simply a location for exhibitions. The eight contributions from Italy, the United Kingdom, Senegal, Spain and the Netherlands address the following related issues: the mediation of language from research usage to public usage, making the museum visit an educational experience, universal accessibility, involvement of the local community in the management of the sites and museums, use of media and new technology to bring scientific content to the public.

About the Editors
Davide Delfino is an archaeologist in the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities – Regional Direction of Museums of Molise, visiting professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (UNESCO Chair in Humanity and Cultural Integrated Landscape Management), internal researcher of the Geosciences Centre (University of Coimbra), and member of the Land and Memory Institute of Mação (Portugal). He has been Secretary of the UISPP/IUPPS Scientific Commission ‘Metal Ages in Europe’ from 2015. His scientific interests focus on warfare and landscape occupation in the Metal Ages, excavation of hill-top settlements, archaeological forgeries, and museology. He is the author of about 90 national and international scientific publications and has organised several international conferences and conference sessions in Portugal, Brazil, France and Spain.

Valentino Nizzo completed his studies at the ‘Sapienza’ University of Rome with a PhD in Etruscology. He carried out post-doctoral work on ‘Global Archaeology’ at the Italian Institute of Human Sciences in Florence, and then was appointed in 2010 to the Ministry of Cultural Heritage, first at the National Archaeological Museum of Ferrara and then at the General Directorate for Museums. In 2014 he became associate professor of archaeology, and in 2017 director of the National Etruscan Museum of Villa Giulia. His interests focus on the historical and material culture issues of Etruscan- Italic civilisations, on the earliest Greek colonisation, on the comparison between archaeology and anthropology, on funerary ideology and the mechanisms of archaeological communication.
NEW: New Advances in the History of Archaeology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 16 (Sessions Organised by the History of Archaeology Scientific Commission at the XVIII World UISPP) edited by Sophie A. de Beaune, Alessandro Guidi, Oscar Moro Abadía, Massimo Tarantini. Paperback; 205x290mm; 244 pages; 106 figures, 4 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. 768 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270722. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270739. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

New Advances in the History of Archaeology presents the papers from three sessions organised by the History of Archaeology Scientific Commission at the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The first session, From stratigraphy to stratigraphic excavation in pre- and protohistoric archaeology organised by Massimo Tarantini and Alessandro Guidi, reviews the development of stratigraphical methods in archaeology in many European countries. The second session, Epistemology, History and Philosophy of Science: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the History of Archaeology, organised by Sophie A. de Beaune and Oscar Moro Abadia, is characterised by different examples of intersections between archaeology and other disciplines like history and the philosophy of science. Finally, four papers discuss the development of different types of interdisciplinarity in Europe and South America. These were presented in the third session, Archaeology and interdisciplinarity, from the 19th century to present-day research, organized by Laura Coltofean, Géraldine. Delley, Margarita Díaz-Andreu and Marc-Antoine Kaeser.

About the Editors
Sophie Archambault de Beaune is Professor at the University of Lyon and researcher at the ‘Archaeology and Ancient Sciences’ laboratory in Nanterre. She works on the technical behaviour and cognitive skills of prehistoric man and is also interested in the history of prehistory. In particular, she has published Pour une archéologie du geste and L’homme et l’outil (CNRS Éditions, 2000 and 2015), Qu’est-ce que la Préhistoire ? (Gallimard, 2016), and, with Antoine Balzeau, Notre Préhistoire: La grande aventure de la famille humaine (Belin, 2016) and co-directed Cognitive Archaeology and Human Evolution (Cambridge, CUP, 2009). She directs the collection ‘Le passé recomposé’ which she created at CNRS Éditions. ;

Alessandro Guidi has been Full Professor of Palethnology at the University of Roma Tre since 2004. He has been concerned mainly with the proto-history of the Italian peninsula, paying particular attention to the problem of the birth of the city and the state, to the history of prehistoric studies, and to theoretical archaeology and methodology. Among his books are Storia della paletnologia (1988), I metodi della ricerca archeologica (1994, 2005), Preistoria della complessità sociale (2000). ;

Oscar Moro Abadía works as Associate Professor at Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada). He specializes in the study of the history and the epistemology of Pleistocene art. His research on rock art has been published in Cambridge Archaeological Journal, Journal of Archaeological Research, Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, World Art, History of Human Sciences, Journal of Anthropological Research, and Journal of Social Archaeology. ;

Massimo Tarantini works as functionary archaeologist at the Italian Ministry of Culture. His research experience concentrates in the fields of prehistoric mining archaeology and in the history of archaeology. He is the author / editor of Evoluzione, preistoria dell’uomo e società contemporanea (with L. Sarti, 2007), Le miniere preistoriche del Gargano (with A. Galiberti, 2011), La nascita della paletnologia in Italia (2012), and Archivi dell’archeologia italiana (with Andrea Pessina, 2021).
NEW: Iron Age and Roman Settlement at Highflyer Farm, Ely, Cambridgeshire by James Fairclough. Paperback; 205x290mm; 154 pages; 91 figures, 28 tables (colour throughout). 765 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698428. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698435. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Iron Age and Roman settlement at Highflyer Farm, Ely, Cambridgeshire presents the results of archaeological work carried out by MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) at Highflyer Farm in 2018. Remains dating from the Neolithic to the post-medieval period were recorded, with most of the activity occurring between the early Iron Age and late Roman periods. Excavations in 2000 at Prickwillow Road, undertaken directly to the south of Highflyer Farm, had recorded the southern extent of this Iron Age to Roman settlement.

Two features, a pit and a posthole, were dated to the late Neolithic to early Bronze Age. In the 5th to 4th centuries BC a small open early Iron Age settlement was established and was at the lower end of the settlement hierarchy, perhaps occupied by a single family or a seasonal group. In the middle Iron Age, there was a well-planned linear settlement split into three main sections, which consisted of a similar large rounded enclosure at its northern and southern extent, both probably domestic. A complex sub-rectangular arrangement of enclosures and boundaries lay within the centre, a roughly equal distance apart from the circular enclosures. In the late Iron Age and then the early Roman periods, a significant reorganisation of the site occurred with successive enclosures and rectilinear field systems established.

In the middle Roman period, the settlement was reorganised around three routeways with two distinct areas of linked paddocks and compartmentalised enclosures. There were three probable different separate areas of domestic activity, including a rectangular posthole structure centrally located in the main enclosure system. It is possible that there was significant export and trade of livestock occurring from this relatively wealthy settlement with cattle dominating. The routeway system continued into the later Roman period though the number of enclosures reduced. On balance, it is more likely the Roman settlement finished in the late 4th century, but an early 5th-century date should not be ruled out. Post-Roman activity was sparser, with a single sunken feature building identified as well as a waterhole and a few other features dated to the 5th and/or 6th century.

Includes contributions by Sander Aerts, Rob Atkins, Paul Blinkhorn, Andy Chapman, Chris Chinnock, Nina Crummy, Mary Ellen Crothers, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Sarah Percival, Adam Sutton and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray.

Illustrations by Sofia Turk.

About the Author
James Fairclough is a Project Officer with MOLA Northampton, where he has worked since 2014, leading numerous sites, including the Saxon cemetery at Great Ryburgh and areas on the A14 infrastructure project. Between joining MOLA and graduating with a degree and Masters from the University of Manchester in 2012, he worked for Archaeological Solutions on sites across East Anglia. As well as working in the commercial field, James continues to help supervise research projects in the Vale of Pickering in North Yorkshire, targeting preserved Mesolithic sites. This work has been in conjunction with a number of universities and has included sites such as Star Carr and No Name Hill.
NEW: Epigraphy in the Digital Age Opportunities and Challenges in the Recording, Analysis and Dissemination of Inscriptions edited by Isabel Velázquez Soriano and David Espinosa Espinosa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 258 pages; 123 figures, 15 tables (colour throughout). 762 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699876. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699883. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Epigraphy in the Digital Age: Opportunities and Challenges in the Recording, Analysis and Dissemination of Inscriptions originates from the International Conference El patrimonio epigráfico en la era digital: Documentación, análisis y socialización (Madrid, 20–21 June 2019), organized by the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Santiago de Compostela. Taking the results of the conference as a starting point, the book presents epigraphic research using digital and computational tools, bringing together and comparing the outcomes of both well-established projects and newer ones, so as to establish a comprehensive view according to the most innovative trends in investigation. 21 contributions have been gathered together, involving 38 scholars, which address issues related to open-access databases, SfM Photogrammetry and Digital Image Modelling applied to textual restoration, EpiDoc (TEI-XML edition), and Linked Open Data. In this manner, the book offers a dialogue based on very different perspectives and previous experiences to generate common research questions, methodologies, practical solutions, and significant results. The outcome is intended more a starting point and platform for future research than as a definitive point of arrival in terms of so-called ‘digital epigraphy’.

About the Editors
Isabel Velázquez Soriano is Professor of Latin Philology in the Department of Classical Philology at the Complutense University of Madrid. She is the principal Investigator of the Research Group ‘Textos epigráficos antiguos de la Península Ibérica y el Mediterráneo griego’ (TEAPIMeG no. 930750) at the Complutense University of Madrid, Director of the Epigraphic Archive of Hispania, and editor of Hispania Epigraphica series at the same university. Isabel Velázquez Soriano is a specialist in the study of epigraphic and literary texts from Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. ;

David Espinosa Espinosa has a PhD in Ancient History from the Complutense University of Madrid. A Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Santiago de Compostela and the University of Vienna, he is now Lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Oviedo. His research focuses on the granting of Latin rights in the western Roman provinces, the Roman civil wars during the Republic, and Roman epigraphy. Director of the digital epigraphic corpus Epigraphica 3.0, he has among his book publications Plinio y los ‘oppida de antiguo Lacio’. El proceso de difusión del Latium en Hispania Citerior (2014).
NEW: Taymāʾ II: Catalogue of the Inscriptions Discovered in the Saudi-German Excavations at Taymāʾ 2004–2015 by Michael C. A. Macdonald. Hardback; 210x297mm; 264 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 717 2020 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698763. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698770. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Taymāʾ II is a Catalogue which contains all the inscriptions discovered during the 24 seasons of the Saudi- German excavations at Taymāʾ from 2004–15 which were funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The 113 objects carry inscriptions in different languages and scripts, illustrating the linguistic diversity of the oasis through time. Although the majority are fragmentary, they provide an important source for the history of the oasis in ancient and mediaeval times.

The Babylonian cuneiform inscriptions in this volume confirm for the first time the ten-year sojourn at Taymāʾ of the last Babylonian king Nabû-na’id (556–539 BC). In addition, Imperial Aramaic inscriptions dated by the reigns of Lihyanite kings, based at Dadan (modern al-ʿUlā), reveal for the first time that they ruled Taymāʾ at a period in the second half of the first millennium BC.

As well as editing the volume, Michael C. A. Macdonald edited the Imperial Aramaic inscriptions found from 2010–15, plus those in the form of the Aramaic script which developed in Taymāʾ, and the Nabataean, Dadanitic, and Taymanitic texts. In addition, Hanspeter Schaudig edited the cuneiform inscriptions; Peter Stein, the Imperial Aramaic texts found from 2004–09; and Frédéric Imbert, the Arabic inscriptions. Arnulf Hausleiter and Francelin Tourtet provided archaeological contributions, while Martina Trognitz curated the virtual edition of many of the texts recorded by RTI. The indexes contain the words and names from all known texts from the oasis, including those in the Taymāʾ Museum and other collections which will be published as Taymāʾ III.

About the Author
Michael C. A. Macdonald is an Honorary Fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford, and Fellow of the British Academy. He works on the languages, scripts and ancient history of Arabia and directs the Online Corpus of the Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia (http://krc.orient.ox.ac.uk/ociana/). He has been working at Taymāʾ since 2010. ;

With contributions by:
Arnulf Hausleiter is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula. He has been co-directing the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 with Ricardo Eichmann. ;

Frédéric Imbert is Professor at the Institut de recherches et d’études sur les mondes arabes et musulmans, Aix-Marseille University. ;

Hanspeter Schaudig is Associate Professor of Assyriology at the Seminar für Sprachen und Kulturen des Alten Orients at the University of Heidelberg. ;

Peter Stein is Associate Professor for Semitic studies at the Faculty of Theology / Ancient Languages Division at the University of Jena. ;

Francelin Tourtet is a PhD candidate at the Freie Universität Berlin working on his dissertation on Bronze and Iron Age pottery from Taymāʾ. ;

Martina Trognitz is member of the Austrian Centre of Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage at the Austrian Academy of Sciences.
NEW: La industria lítica del núcleo urbano maya de La Blanca, Petén, Guatemala Tecnología y tipología by Ricardo Torres Marzo. Paperback; 203x276mm; 188pp; 123 black & white figures, 8 tables. 144 2021 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 54. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781803270289. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781803270296. Institutional Price £10.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The ancient Maya used mainly stone tools, made of either ground stone and chipped stone, to achieve their extraordinary development. However, works focused on this aspect are still rare. This book presents the techno-typological analysis of lithic materials from La Blanca, a Mayan archaeological site located in the heart of the Southern Lowlands, which was mainly inhabited during the Late Classic and Terminal Classic periods. In addition, a general methodology for the techno-typological analysis and classification of Mayan lithic artefacts is presented, which is complemented by an extensive graphic section that includes the technical drawings of most of the chipped stone tools.

Ricardo Torres Marzo received his Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Valencia, Spain, in 2014 and is currently a teacher of archaeology at the Postgraduate Program in Mesoamerican Studies at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). His research focuses on Lowland Maya archaeology with an emphasis on technical and typological analysis of lithic artifacts. He has directed and collaborated in different archaeological projects in Mexico, Guatemala and Spain.

Los antiguos mayas emplearon fundamentalmente herramientas de piedra, tanto tallada como pulida, para lograr su extraordinario desarrollo. Sin embargo, los trabajos centrados en este aspecto todavía son poco frecuentes. En este trabajo se presenta el análisis tecno-tipológico de los materiales líticos de La Blanca, un sitio arqueológico maya situado en el corazón de las Tierras Bajas del Sur, cuyo momento de ocupación más destacado se sitúa entre los períodos Clásico Tardío y Terminal. Además, se plantea una metodología general para el análisis tecno-tipológico y la clasificación de artefactos líticos mayas, que se ve complementada por un amplio apartado gráfico en el que se incluyen los dibujos técnicos de la mayor parte de los artefactos tallados.

Ricardo Torres Marzo es doctor en Historia del Arte por la Universidad de Valencia, España, desde 2014 y actualmente es tutor y profesor de arqueología en el Posgrado en Estudios Mesoamericanos de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Sus trabajos de investigación se han centrado fundamentalmente en la arqueología de las Tierras Bajas mayas y más concretamente en el estudio tecnológico y tipológico de los materiales líticos. Asimismo, ha participado como director y colaborador en numerosos proyectos arqueológicos en México, Guatemala y España.
NEW: La necropoli romana di Melano (Canton Ticino – Svizzera) by Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess. Paperback; 203x276mm; 118 pages; 20 colour figures, 6 black & white figures, 12 black & white plates. Italian text. 140 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699784. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699791. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Roman necropolis of Melano (Canton Ticino, Switzerland), excavated in 1957 and 1979, is one of the few from this period discovered in the Sottoceneri region, where the findings are mostly isolated burials or those in small groups. It consists of 26 cremation and inhumation tombs and stands out for its variety of types and the materials used in their construction. Cremation burials, the most numerous, range from the simplest, single-chamber burials, up to double-chamber and multiple cinerary niches. Inhumation tombs, generally belonging to children or adolescents, have yielded clues as to the use of wooden boxes as coffins or the placement of the body on a cot or stretcher. The grave goods include all the main material classes of the Roman period typical of the region, together with finds that bear the imprint of a centre that developed along the shores of Lake Ceresio and activities related to it, such as fishing. The stratigraphy of the necropolis and the grave goods indicate continuous use from the 1st to the 3rd century AD.

About the Author
Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess graduated in 1990 from the University of Zurich, majoring in Classical Archaeology, Egyptology and Ancient History. In 2001, she completed her PhD thesis, ‘Aspects of Roman Pottery in Canton Ticino (Switzerland)’, at the University of Nottingham (UK). She has pursued various studies in Classical and medieval archaeology, focusing in particular on Roman pottery and since 2000 has taken part in the excavation of the multi-period site of Tremona-Castello.

in italiano
La necropoli romana di Melano (Canton Ticino – Svizzera), scavata nel 1957 e nel 1979, costituisce a tutt’oggi una delle poche di quest’epoca scoperte nel Sottoceneri dove i rinvenimenti sono invece perlopiù sepolture isolate o riunite in piccoli gruppi. È costituita da 26 tombe fra cremazioni e inumazioni e si distingue per la loro varietà a livello tipologico e per i materiali impiegati nella loro costruzione. Fra le sepolture a cremazione, le più numerose, vi sono quelle più semplici, a vano singolo, fino a quelle a doppia camera e a loculo cinerario multiplo. Le tombe a inumazione, generalmente pertinenti a bambini o adolescenti, hanno restituito indizi riguardo all’uso di deporre il corpo in cassa lignea o su un lettino o barella. Nei corredi funerari sono presenti tutte le principali classi materiali d’epoca romana tipiche della regione unitamente a reperti che recano l’impronta di un centro sviluppatosi lungo le rive del lago Ceresio e dedito a particolari attività ad esso collegate, come la pesca. La stratigrafia verticale della necropoli e gli oggetti di corredo ne indicano un uso continuato dal I al III sec. d.C.

Christiane M. A. De Micheli Schulthess si è laureata nel 1990 all’Università di Zurigo, specializzandosi in Archeologia classica, Egittologia e Storia antica. Nel 2001 ha completato la sua tesi di dottorato Aspetti della ceramica romana nel Canton Ticino (Svizzera) presso l’Università di Nottingham (GB). Ha svolto diversi studi di archeologia classica, in particolare sulla ceramica romana, e medievale. Dal 2000 partecipa agli scavi archeologici del sito multiperiodico di Tremona-Castello.
NEW: Big Data and Archaeology Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 15, Session III-1 edited by François Djindjian and Paola Moscati. Paperback; 205x290mm; 106 pages; 33 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. 761 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697216. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697223. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Big Data and Archaeology presents the papers from two sessions of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018): Session III-1 (CA): ‘Big data, databases and archaeology’, and Session III-1 (T): ‘New advances in theoretical archaeology’. The advent of Big Data is a recent and debated issue in Digital Archaeology. Historiographic context and current developments are illustrated in this volume, as well as comprehensive examples of a multidisciplinary and integrative approach to the recording, management and exploitation of excavation data and documents produced over a long period of archaeological research. In addition, specific attention is paid to neoprocessual archaeology, as a new platform aimed at renewing the theoretical framework of archaeology after thirty years of post-modernism, and to the refinement of the concept of archaeological cultures, combining processual, contextual and empirical approaches.

About the Editors
François Djindjian is ancien professeur at the University of Paris I Pantheon Sorbonne (chair of archaeological methods and theory) and associate member of the CNRS UMR 7041. He is President of the International Union for Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP), member of the executive committee of the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH) of Unesco, and delegate member of the International Academic Union (UAI).

Paola Moscati is research director at the Institute of Heritage Science of the National Research Council of Italy. As an archaeologist, specialised in computer applications in archaeology, she is Vice President of the UISPP Commission IV, editor in chief of the international journal ‘Archeologia e Calcolatori’ and scientific coordinator of the international project ‘The Virtual Museum of Archaeological Computing’, jointly promoted with the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei.
NEW: Studies on the Palaeolithic of Western Eurasia Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 14, Session XVII-4 & Session XVII-6 edited by György Lengyel, Jarosław Wilczyński, Marta Sánchez de la Torre, Xavier Mangado, Josep Maria Fullola. Paperback; 205x290mm; 262 pages; 109 figures, 34 tables (54 pages in colour). Papers in English (one in French). 760 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697179. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697186. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Studies on the Palaeolithic of Western Eurasia presents the papers from Sessions XVII-4 and XVII-6 of the 18th UISPP World congress (Paris, June 2018). The geographic areas discussed in the Session 4, Central and Eastern Europe, are prehistorically strongly articulated, their cultural successions are highly similar, and they share several common archaeological issues for investigation. The papers disseminate a wealth of archaeological data from Bavaria to the Russian Plain, and discuss Aurignacian, Gravettian, Epigravettian, and Magdalenian perspectives on lithic tool kits and animal remains. The papers of Session 6 are concerned with lithic raw material procurement in the Caucasus and in three areas of the Iberian peninsula.

About the Editors György Lengyel an associate professor at the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology of the University of Miskolc, Hungary, and research associate at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He graduated at the University of Miskolc, and received a PhD degree from the University of Haifa, Israel. His main field of research is the Upper Palaeolithic of Central Europe. The focus of his research is hunter-gatherer subsistence strategy and the formation of the corresponding archaeological record. He conducts research projects on the Upper Palaeolithic of the Levant and Central Europe. ORCID: 0000-0002-7803-3043 ;

Jarosław Wilczyński is head of the Department of Vertebrate Zoology of the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He graduated in archaeology at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, and received his PhD in archaeozoology at the Institute of Systematics and Evolution of Animals, Polish Academy of Sciences. His interests are two-pronged, including studying Upper Palaeolithic and Neolithic lithic inventories, as well as Pleistocene and Holocene faunal assemblages. He conducts research projects on the Gravettian and the Epigravettian of Central Europe. ORCID: 0000-0002-9786-0693 ;

Marta Sánchez de la Torre is currently a Beatriu de Pinós postdoctoral researcher at the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona. Her research has mainly focused on the analysis of lithic raw materials by Palaeolithic groups settled in the Pyrenean region by the use of traditional approaches as well as geochemical methods. She is currently directing archaeological seasons at several sites in NE Iberia and participates in different projects in France and Spain. ;

Xavier Mangado is a professor in prehistory at the University of Barcelona and researcher at the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona. He specialise in the analysis of lithic raw materials, mostly by using petrographic and micropalaeontological tools. His research is mainly focused on the study of Palaeolithic groups settled in NE Iberia and he has also participated in several international projects at Portugal, France and Jordan. ;

Josep Maria Fullola has been a professor in prehistory at the University of Barcelona since 1985. In 1986 he created the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar (SERP) of the University of Barcelona, a research group that promotes advanced research in prehistoric archaeology, being since its creation the main director. He has directed archaeological seasons in several Palaeolithic sites in NE Iberia, but he has also been involved in international projects in Baja California, France and Portugal.
NEW: Die Gräber von Bat und Al-Ayn und das Gebäude II in Bat by Stephanie Döpper. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699494. Hardback; 210x297mm; 394pp; 357 figures, 256 tables, 21 plates (colour throughout). Print RRP: £80.00. 741 2021 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699494. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699500. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Early Bronze Age in third-millennium-BC Eastern Arabia was a period of fundamental change, which is apparent in the development of social complexity, the exploitation of new resources and the emergence of new modes of life. Hallmarks of this period include monumental structures, so-called towers, and stone-built circular tombs.

The second volume of the series Arabia Orientalis is dedicated to the archaeological investigation of the Early Bronze Age necropolises of the UNESCO world heritage sites Bat and Al-Ayn in the Sultanate of Oman, as well as the monumental tower structure Building II at Bat. It encompasses detailed reports on the architecture and stratigraphy, as well as the find assemblages from the excavated buildings, including pottery and small finds, along with anthropological as well as anthracological studies. The publication presents insights into changing burial customs, as well as the function of the monumental tower structures. Three out of the four excavated Hafit- and Umm an-Nar-period tombs in the necropolises featured evidence for reuse at later times, especially during the Samad period, where new inhumations were placed into the Bronze Age tombs. The early Umm an-Nar tower Building II is surrounded by a large ditch system that might have served as protection against flooding from the nearby wadi.

About the Author
Stephanie Döpper is a postdoctoral researcher at Goethe University Frankfurt with an interest in mobile and sedentary communities of the Bronze Age in Eastern Arabia, as well as the reuse of prehistoric tombs and early modern mud-brick villages in the region. To facilitate public engagement with archaeological sites, she co-developed the ArchaeoTrail app for self-guided smartphone tours at archaeological sites.

German Description
Die frühe Bronzezeit im dritten Jahrtausend v. Chr. in Südostarabien ist eine Zeit grundlegender Veränderungen, die sich in der Entwicklung sozialer Komplexität, der Ausbeutung neuer Ressourcen und dem Aufkommen neuer Lebensformen zeigt. Kennzeichen dieser Epoche sind monumentale Bauwerke, sogenannte Türme, und aus Stein gebaute runde Gräber.

Der zweite Band der Reihe Arabia Orientalis widmet sich der archäologischen Untersuchung der frühbronzezeitlichen Nekropolen der UNESCO-Welterbestätten Bat und Al-Ayn im Sultanat Oman sowie dem monumentalen Turm Gebäude II in Bat. Er umfasst ausführliche Abhandlungen zur Architektur und Stratigraphie sowie zu den Fundeassemblagen aus den ausgegrabenen Bauwerken, darunter Keramik-, Kleinfunde-, anthropologische sowie anthrakologische Untersuchungen. Die Publikation präsentiert Einblicke in sich verändernde Bestattungssitten und die Funktion des monumentalen Turms. Drei der vier ausgegrabenen Hafit- und Umm an-Nar-zeitlichen Gräber in den Nekropolen belegen spätere Nachnutzungen, vor allem in der Samad-Zeit, in der neue Bestattungen in die bronzezeitlichen Gräber eingebracht wurden. Das Gebäude II aus der frühen Umm an-Nar-Zeit ist von einer großen Grabenanlage umgeben, die möglicherweise als Schutz vor Überschwemmungen des nahen Wadis diente.

Stephanie Döpper ist wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin an der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt und beschäftigt sich mit mobilen und sesshaften Gesellschaften der Bronzezeit in Südostarabien sowie der Nachnutzung prähistorischer Gräber und frühneuzeitlicher Lehmziegeldörfer in dieser Region. Um der Öffentlichkeit den Zugang zu archäologischen Stätten zu erleichtern, hat sie die ArchaeoTrail-App für selbstgeführte Smartphone-Touren an archäologischen Stätten mitentwickelt.
NEW: A Monumental Hellenistic Funerary Ensemble at Callatis on the Western Black Sea The Documaci Tumulus: Volume I edited by Valeriu Sîrbu, Maria-Magdalena Ștefan and Dan Ștefan. Paperback; 205x290mm; 342 pages; 191 figures, 20 tables. 757 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694369. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694376. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

A Monumental Hellenistic Funerary Ensemble at Callatis on the Western Black Sea presents one of the most spectacular early Hellenistic funerary monuments, recently excavated on the western Black Sea coast by a Romanian-Bulgarian-Polish interdisciplinary research team. Documaci Tumulus, covering a painted tomb, and marked by a monumental statue, was built at the threshold of the 4th to 3rd centuries BC in the cemetery of the Greek City of Callatis. The sophisticated construction techniques and the remains of commemorative rituals attest to the dynamic political arena of the Diadochi wars in the Black Sea area and offer a glimpse into a complex and interconnected world of Hellenistic architects and artists. The monument will fuel discussions about the mechanisms of ritualised identity expression in mixed cultural environments, functioning under the pressure of political change, or about community membership, symbolic discourse and ancestors— all reflected in ‘le jeu des miroirs’ of the funerary practices.



About the editors
Valeriu Sîrbu is a senior archaeologist of the second Iron Age with more than forty years of experience. His main contributions are in the archaeology of ritual, magic, human and animal sacrifices, and sacred places and fortifications in Pre-Roman Dacia. ;

Maria-Magdalena Ștefan is an archaeologist dealing with tumuli graves in the Lower Danube area, Hellenistic tomb architecture and decoration, multi-cultural interactions in border zones and ancient identities. ;

Dan Ștefan is an archaeologist and geophysicist and an experienced analyst of archaeological landscapes with non-invasive methods, including LiDAR and aerial prospection. He has worked at more than one hundred archaeological sites in Romania, the Republic of Moldavia, Bulgaria and Greece.
NEW: Orientation of Prehistoric Monuments in Britain: A Reassessment by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 203x276mm; 704pp; 2 printed figures, extensive online image archive. 756 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697056. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697063. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £85.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Orientation of Prehistoric Monuments in Britain: A Reassessment views the type of major axial alignment seen at many megalithic ritual and funerary monuments of Neolithic to Bronze Age date in Britain and Ireland, not in terms of more abstract astronomical concerns, but rather as an expression of repeated seasonal propitiation, basically solar, involving community, agrarian economy, and the ancestors in a combined attempt to mitigate variable environmental conditions. The analysis is supported by over 800 images, open-source, for unrestricted use, and available digitally.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.
NEW: Ramla: City of Muslim Palestine, 715-1917 Studies in History, Archaeology and Architecture edited by Andrew Petersen and Denys Pringle. Paperback; 205x290mm; 332 pages; 320 figures, 8 tables (black & white throughout). 754 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697766. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697773. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ramla presents a comprehensive overview of the history, archaeology and architecture of the city of Ramla from the time of its foundation as the capital of Umayyad Palestine around 715 until the end of Ottoman rule in 1917. It begins with a historical outline covering in turn the early Islamic (Robert Hoyland), Crusader (Peter Edbury), Ayyubid-Mamluk (Donald S. Richards) and Ottoman periods (Matthew Elliot). In the archaeological section, Gideon Avni’s synthesis of the results of excavations on the early Islamic city is followed by discussions of the Umayyad-period aqueduct (Amir Gorzalczany) and the historical interpretation of First World War aerial photographs (Benjamin Z. Kedar). Architectural studies include a complete corpus of the surviving Muslim buildings (Andrew Petersen), a reassessment of the remains of the White Mosque (Michael H. Burgoyne), an account of the Christian buildings (Denys Pringle), and an analysis of late Ottoman alterations to the Great Mosque (Katia Cytryn-Silverman). The final section on numismatics and epigraphy includes chapters on the coinage of Umayyad Ramla (Nikolaus Schindel), the Arabic inscriptions (Mehmet Tütüncü) and late medieval Christian pilgrims’ graffiti (Denys Pringle). The volume concludes with three appendices, including a hitherto unpublished report on the White Mosque (1919–20) by K.A.C. Creswell, a gazetteer of settlements in the Crusader lordships of Ramla, Lydda and Mirabel, and the endowment deed for a house dated 1713 (Maher Abu-Munshar).

About the Editors
Andrew Petersen is Professor and Director of Research in Islamic Archaeology at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David. He is currently directing excavations at the eighteenth-century site of Ruwayda in northern Qatar. He has published many articles and several books on Islamic archaeology, including Bones of Contention: Muslim Shrines In Palestine (2018), The Medieval and Ottoman Hajj Route in Jordan; an Archaeological and Historical Study (2012), The Archaeology of Towns in Muslim Palestine (2005), Gazetteer of Medieval and Ottoman Buildings in Muslim Palestine (2001) and A Dictionary of Islamic Architecture (1998). ;

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013). His detailed historical and archaeological study of the town walls of Byzantine, early Islamic and Crusader Ascalon has recently appeared in Ashkelon 8 (2019).

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
Notes on Contributors ;
Preface ;
Chapter 1: Early Islamic Ramla (715-1099) – Robert Hoyland ;
Chapter 2: The Crusader Town and Lordship of Ramla (1099–1268) – Peter Edbury ;
Chapter 3: Ramla in the Ayyubid and Mamluk Periods (1187–1516) – D. S. Richards ;
Chapter 4: Ramla in the Ottoman Period (1516–1917) – Matthew Elliot ;
Chapter 5: Excavations in Ramla, 1990–2018: Reconstructing the Early Islamic City – Gideon Avni ;
Chapter 6: The Gezer Aqueduct to Umayyad Ramla – Amir Gorzalczany ;
Chapter 7: World War I Aerial Photographs of Ramla – Benjamin Z. Kedar ;
Chapter 8: Muslim Buildings – Andrew Petersen ;
Chapter 9: The White Mosque – Michael H. Burgoyne ;
Chapter 10: The Christian Buildings of Ramla – Denys Pringle ;
Chapter 11: The West Door of the Great (al-ʿUmarī) Mosque of Ramla and its Late Ottoman Transformation – Katia Cytryn-Silverman ;
Chap
NEW: Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle by András Márton. Paperback; 205x290mm; 482 pages; 299 figures; 379 maps (black & white throughout). French text. 752 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 81. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698077. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698084. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle aims to provide an overview of Roman burial practices in the Gallia Lugdunensis province during the Early Roman Empire.

Among the different approaches proposed by R. Reece for the study of Roman cemeteries, this work focuses on grave treatment and grave furnishing. The funerary practices are thus apprehended through the study of the structure of the tombs and the selection and treatment of the grave goods and human remains. The main objective was to propose a synthesis of the published finds which could serve as a basis for future research.

The analysis consists of a documentary review of the published data (presented in the catalogue and numerous tables) as complete as possible, accompanied by a detailed analysis of the latest information available to highlight trends regarding the entire province, and the peculiarities seen at a regional level. Many graphics and maps support this analysis.

Many general trends, common to the western provinces of the Roman Empire, were detected, but also many particularities linked to the regional nature of the funerary practices and the economic and social situation of the communities. Some of these particularities reflect more profound cultural differences due to the unequal penetration of Mediterranean funerary practices into the territory of the province. They reflect the somewhat 'artificial' formation of the Gallia Lugdunensis, which incorporated tribes belonging to different cultural spheres (sharing particularities with Aquitania and the Belgic Gaul or more exposed to the Mediterranean influences).

About the Author
András Márton was born in Budapest. He studied at the Eötvös Lorand University where he obtained two master degrees, one in History and another in Archaeology specializing in Roman provincial and Classical archaeology. After graduation, he worked at the Hungarian National Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest. He defended his thesis summa cum laude at the Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest under the direction of Professor Patrick Galliou. He lives in France and is involved in research programs at the Louvre and the Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon. He has published many scientific papers and co-authored several books. His research interests are pottery studies and ancient funerary practices.

En français
Les pratiques funéraires en Gaule lyonnaise de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle, qui est la publication non remaniée d’une partie de la thèse de doctorat de l’auteur soutenue, avec félicitations, à l’Université de Bretagne occidentale (Brest, France) en 2013, vise à donner un aperçu des pratiques funéraires romaines dans la Gaule Lyonnaise au cours du Haut-Empire. Parmi les diffff érentes approches de l’étude des nécropoles romaines, ce travail se concentre sur les tombes et le traitement du mobilier. Les pratiques funéraires sont ainsi appréhendées à travers l’étude de la structure des tombes, de la sélection et du traitement du mobilier funéraire et des restes humains. L’objectif principal est de proposer une synthèse des résultats publiés qui puisse servir de base aux recherches futures. L’analyse consiste en une reprise documentaire (présentée dans le catalogue et les nombreux tableaux) aussi complète que possible des données publiées, accompagnée d’une analyse détaillée des informations aujourd’hui disponibles afifi n de mettre en évidence les tendances concernant l’ensemble de la province, mais aussi les particularités que l’on peut distinguer au niveau régional. L’analyse est soutenue par de nombreux graphiques et cartes. Bien sûr, des tendances générales, communes aux provinces occidentales de l’Empire romain, peuvent être détectées, mais des particularités liées aux spécififi cités régionales et à la situation économique et sociale
NEW: Mammoths and Neanderthals in the Thames Valley by Katharine Scott and Christine M. Buckingham. Paperback; 174x245mm; 272 pages; 133 figures, 55 tables (colour throughout). 752 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699647. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699654. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Today the Upper Thames Valley is a region of green pastures and well-managed farmland, interspersed with pretty villages and intersected by a meandering river.

The discovery in 1989 of a mammoth tusk in river gravels at Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire, revealed the very different ancient past of this landscape. Here, some 200,000 years ago, mammoths, straight-tusked elephants, lions, and other animals roamed across grasslands with scattered trees, occasionally disturbed by small bands of Neanderthals.

The pit where the tusk was discovered, destined to become a waste disposal site, provided a rare opportunity to conduct intensive excavations that extended over a period of 10 years. This work resulted in the recording and recovery of more than 1500 vertebrate fossils and an abundance of other biological material, including insects, molluscs, and plant remains, together with 36 stone artefacts attributable to Neanderthals. The well-preserved plant remains include leaves, nuts, twigs and large oak logs. Vertebrate remains notably include the most comprehensive known assemblage of a distinctive small form of the steppe mammoth, Mammuthus trogontherii, that is characteristic of an interglacial period equated with marine isotope stage 7 (MIS 7).

Richly illustrated throughout, Mammoths and Neanderthals in the Thames Valley offers a detailed account of all these finds and will be of interest to Quaternary specialists and students alike.

About the Authors
Katharine Scott is internationally recognised for her work on Middle and Upper Pleistocene vertebrate fossils. Her fieldwork at various Upper Thames Quaternary sites concentrated especially on the 10-year excavation of 200,000-year-old fossiliferous deposits at Stanton Harcourt near Oxford. This now comprises the largest collection of excavated mammoths in Britain. She is an Emeritus Fellow of St Cross College Oxford and an Honorary Associate of the Oxford University Museum. ;

Christine Buckingham was born and educated in Oxford. Between 1989 and 1999, Christine was co-director of the excavations at Stanton Harcourt with overall responsibility for recording the geology and stratigraphy and also carried out fieldwork at several other Upper Thames sites. Christine graduated with a DPhil from Oxford Brookes University (in collaboration with the Donald Baden-Powell Quaternary Research Centre, Oxford University) in 2004. She is an Honorary Associate of the Oxford University Museum.
NEW: The Archaeology of ‘Underdog Sites’ in the Douro Valley From Prehistory to the Modern Age edited by Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez, Sonia Díaz-Navarro, Javier Fernández-Lozano and Javier Jiménez Gadea. Paperback; 203x276mm; 390 pages; colour illustrations throughout. Papers in English and Spanish. 139 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699890. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699906. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Archaeology of ‘Underdog Sites’ in the Douro Valley brings together the best presentations from the eighth and ninth meetings of Archaeology of the Douro Valley, held in Ávila and Astorga (Spain), respectively in 2018 and 2019. However, instead of a simple collection of articles, the aim of this publication is to show the importance of projects that have been left in the background despite obtaining interesting archaeological data about the occupation of this valley and its evolution. Moreover, we must take into account that many of these projects support new activity in a rural territory that is increasingly neglected politically and economically. Hence the use of the term ‘underdog’, defined as a person or group of people with less power or money than the rest of society. Overall, the volume provides a general and interdisciplinary view of the different types of occupation in the territory of the Douro Valley. The chapters are divided into four sections, three of them chronological: Prehistory and Protohistory; Antiquity and Late Antiquity; and the medieval and modern ages. The last section is thematic and includes diachronic studies, museology, and the archaeology of mining. Therefore, the present volume is a medium to showcase the latest research carried out in this important territory and to contribute to knowledge of its history, updating the archaeological state of the art in the valley and presenting results that may be used in the most diverse types of comparative studies.

About the Editors
Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez is a pre-doctoral researcher at the University of Salamanca (Junta de Castilla y León and European Social Fund). His main research focuses on Latin epigraphy in Hispania. ;

Sonia Díaz-Navarro is a pre-doctoral researcher at the University of Valladolid (Junta de Castilla y León and European Social Fund). Her research is based on the osteoarchaeological study of the peninsular populations of recent prehistory (Neolithic-Bronze Age). ;

Javier Fernández-Lozano is assistant professor at the University of León. His main lines of research are the archaeology of mining and the study of the geological processes responsible for the formation of mountains in the Iberian Peninsula, using techniques based on 3D laser, spectral analysis and gravimetry. ;

Javier Jiménez Gadea is director of the Museum of Avila. He specialises in the Middle Ages, Islam and heritage management.

En español
Esta monografía reúne las mejores contribuciones presentadas en las VIII y IX Jornadas de Arqueología del Valle del Duero, celebradas en Ávila y Astorga en 2018 y 2019, respectivamente. Más allá de constituir una recopilación de artículos, el objetivo de esta obra es poner de manifiesto la importancia de proyectos arqueológicos que han sido relegados a un segundo plano, a pesar de arrojar interesantes resultados sobre la ocupación del Valle del Duero y su evolución y constituir un recurso de dinamización de un territorio, eminentemente rural, cada vez más abandonado. A ello se debe que el título de este monográfico empleé el término ‘underdog’, definido como una persona o un grupo de personas con menos poder o dinero que el resto de la sociedad.

A lo largo de la obra el lector encontrará una visión general e interdisciplinar de los diferentes modos de ocupación y explotación del territorio en torno al valle del Duero. Los capítulos están estructurados en cuatro secciones: tres de corte cronológico –Prehistoria y Protohistoria, Antigüedad y Antigüedad Tardía y Épocas medieval y moderna– y una temática –Varia– que recoge trabajos de corte diacrónico, museológico o sobre la Arqueología de la minería.

Santiago Sánchez de la Parra-Pérez trabaja actualmente como investigador predoctoral en la Universidad de Salamanca (Junta de Castilla y León y Fondo Social Europeo). Su investigac
Flint Procurement and Exploitation Strategies in the Late Lower Paleolithic Levant by Aviad Agam. Paperback; 174x245mm; 216 pages; 84 figures, 54 tables. 753 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699340. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699357. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Flint Procurement and Exploitation Strategies in the Late Lower Paleolithic Levant examines twelve lithic assemblages from Qesem Cave. Potential flint sources were located, petrographic thin sections of archaeological and geologic samples were studied, and a geochemical analysis was performed. The results show that flint from local Turonian sources was often brought to the cave, forming most of the identified flint. Flint from non-Turonian geologic origins was also used in noteworthy proportions, in specific typotechnological categories. The availability of desired flints around the cave, highly suitable for the production of the commonly-used blades, as well as for the production of other tools, probably played a role in the decision to settle there. The notable proportions of non-Turonian flint types, a pattern that repeats itself through time, demonstrate consistency in accessing sources containing non-local flint, implying the existence of knowledge transmission mechanisms concerning the distribution of sources and the suitability of specific flint types for the production of specific blanks/tools.

About the Author Aviad Agam is a researcher at Tel Aviv University, Israel. He specializes in lithic technology, strategies of lithic procurement and exploitation during Paleolithic and Neolithic times, the use of fire among early humans, and human-proboscidea relations during prehistory. He is a team member of projects at the Acheulo-Yabrudian site Qesem Cave (Israel, 420,000-200,000 years before the present day) and the Late Acheulian sites Revadim and Jaljulia (both in Israel, ~500,000 years before the present day).
Banquets, Rations et Offrandes Alimentaires au Proche-Orient ancien 10,000 ans d’histoire alimentaire révélée by Daniel Bonneterre. Paperback; 175x245mm; 410 pages; 40 figures, 5 maps (34 pages in colour). 751 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699746. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699753. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Banquets, Rations et Offrandes alimentaires au Proche-Orient ancien investigates the essential question of food consumption in the ancient Near East, in particular between the 4th and 1st millennium BC. Thanks to archaeological discoveries and to abundant textual documentation, historians are well equipped to reconstruct the food supply of the cities of Mesopotamia and have a better idea of the variety of products available, a far greater range than might be imagined. The analysis of the treatment of ingredients also reveals techniques unsuspected in pre-industrial times. The codification of culinary recipes developed for the use of temples also reflects a high stage of development. Religious rituals were based on a structured code of food consumption, of which prohibitions and taboos are only one facet. The book presents some aspects of everyday life in a new light. First and foremost, the banquet is seen as a critical institution in shaping urban behaviour. The representation of feasts and banquets in temples and palaces are classic themes of ancient art and literature. Understanding the importance of the meal as a rite of social cohesion, furthermore, allows us to better envision events that would unfold centuries later.

About the Author
Daniel Bonneterre is a specialist in ancient history and an Associate Professor at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières. He gained his doctorate in languages and civilizations of the Ancient Near East from Johns Hopkins University. He has taught in the United States and Canada and has conducted archaeological research in France, Italy, Syria, and Israel. His publications focus on the relationships (or discrepancies) between textual sources and anthropological realities.

En français
L’ouvrage se propose de présenter la question essentielle de la consommation alimentaire dans le Proche-Orient ancien, notamment entre le IVe et le Ier millénaire av. J.-C. Grâce aux découvertes archéologiques et surtout grâce à une abondante documentation textuelle, les historiens disposent aujourd’hui de sources fiables décrivant les approvisionnements des cités de Mésopotamie. Ainsi voit-on mieux la variété des produits disponibles, celle-ci était largement plus grande que ce que l’on pouvait imaginer il y a peu. La transformation des ingrédients fait aussi apparaître des techniques insoupçonnées à une époque préindustrielle. La codification en recettes culinaires élaborées pour l’usage des temples reflète également un haut développement. Les rituels religieux s’appuyaient sur un code alimentaire structuré, dont les interdits et les tabous ne forment que l’une des facettes. Certains aspects de la vie quotidienne sont présentés sous un jour nouveau. Au premier chef le banquet qui est envisagé comme une véritable institution modelant des comportements urbains. De fait, la représentation des festins et des banquets dans les temples et les palais constituent des thèmes classiques de l’art et de la littérature antique. Comprendre l’importance du repas comme rite de cohésion sociale permet incidemment de mieux envisager des événements qui se dérouleront des siècles plus tard.

Daniel Bonneterre est spécialiste de l’histoire antique et docteur en langues et civilisations du Proche-Orient ancien (Ph D). Il a enseigné aux États-Unis ainsi qu’au Canada, et a mené des recherches archéologiques (France, Italie, Syrie, Israël). Ses publications portent sur les rapports entre sources textuelles et réalités anthropologiques.
Visual Culture, Heritage and Identity: Using Rock Art to Reconnect Past and Present edited by Andrzej Rozwadowski and Jamie Hampson. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 90 illustrations (colour throughout). 750 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698466. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698473. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Visual Culture, Heritage and Identity: Using Rock Art to Reconnect Past and Present sets out a fresh perspective on rock art by considering how ancient images function in the present. In recent decades, archaeological approaches to rock paintings and engravings have significantly advanced our understanding of rock art in regional and global terms. On the other hand, however, little research has been done on contemporary uses of rock art. How does ancient rock art heritage influence contemporary cultural phenomena? And how do past images function in the present, especially in contemporary art and other media? In the past, archaeologists usually concentrated more on reconstructing the semantic and social contexts of the ancient images. This volume, on the other hand, focuses on how this ancient heritage is recognised and reified in the modern world, and how this art stimulates contemporary processes of cultural identity-making. The authors, who are based all over the world, off er attractive and compelling case studies situated in diverse cultural and geographical contexts.

About the Editors
Andrzej Rozwadowski is Associate Professor at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, where he also completed his PhD. He is also an honorary Research Fellow of the Rock Art Research Institute of Wits in Johannesburg and has been involved in rock art research since the 1990s. ;

Jamie Hampson is a Senior Lecturer in the Humanities Department at the University of Exeter. He has a PhD and MPhil in archaeology from the University of Cambridge. He has written more than forty articles on Indigenous rock art and heritage.

Reviews
'This is a fascinating book that breathes new life into a subject dominated so long by traditional exegetic interpretations of prehistoric rock art which have achieved little collective consensus, although it is fair to say they have advanced our understanding. It is illustrated with beautiful and vibrant images throughout, and its anthropological/ethnoarchaeological approach is highly commended.'—Mark Merrony, ANTIQVVS Volume 3, Issue 4
Fores et Fenestrae: A Computational Study of Doors and Windows in Roman Domestic Space by Lucia Michielin. Paperback; 205x290mm; 296 pages; 146 figures, 39 tables, 52 renders. 749 2021 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 82. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696172. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696189. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Fores et Fenestrae aims to analyse Roman doors and windows and their role as an essential part of daily life. They are the structures that connect not only rooms but also houses themselves to the outside world. They relate to privacy, security, and light in domestic spaces. Until very recently, the role of doors and windows in shaping the life and structure of Roman private dwellings has been greatly underestimated. The reason for this lies primarily in the difficulties linked to their study. The low level of preservation of walls and the widespread use of perishable and recyclable materials hinder in many cases a correct assessment of these structures. To achieve greater understanding, the author followed a computational approach. The two cores of the research are the analysis of the database and the observation of results based on new 3D models. 1855 doors and windows were surveyed across eight towns of Roman imperial Italy. The information collected has been organised in a database comprised of nine tables and mined through statistical analyses. Three 3D models of different dwelling types have been generated simulating natural materials and light conditions to observe the role of doors and windows in context.

The work is subdivided into three sections. The first explains the study’s methodology and analyses previous scholarship on the topic, highlighting how the issue of doors and windows has often be ignored or only superficially considered. The second section collects typologies of complementary sources to better comprehend the results of the statistical analyses and to integrate the 3D models; literary, epigraphic, and visual sources are considered. To these are added the analysis of the archaeological sources. The third part constitutes the core of the analysis. It is composed of two chapters, the fi rst of which provides a detailed overview of the statistical analyses produced from the sample collected. The latter chapter investigates the results of the renders and analyses views and natural light in the Roman house.

About the Author
Lucia Michielin holds an MSc in Geotechnologies for Archaeology (Università degli Studi di Siena) and an MA in Classical Archaeology (Università degli Studi di Padova). In 2019 she obtained a PhD at Edinburgh University. She has previously worked in commercial archaeology and has been involved in many surveys and cultural heritage projects in Italy and Croatia, in cooperation with UK, US, and Italian universities and research centres. She currently holds the post of Digital Skills Training Manager at Edinburgh University.
Enemy – Stranger – Neighbour: The Image of the Other in Moche Culture by Janusz Z. Wołoszyn. Paperback; 205x290mm; 200 pages; 350 figures, 4 tables (colour throughout). 748 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698824. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698831. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Enemy – Stranger – Neighbour: The Image of the Other in Moche Culture is dedicated to artistic renderings of the Recuay people in Moche art, in all available and preserved media. The Moche and the Recuay were the creators of the two main cultures of northern Peru in the Early Intermediate Period (approx. 100-750 CE). They were both illiterate and they left no written documents concerning the nature of their mutual contacts. The Moche, however, represented the Recuay quite extensively in their ceremonial art, which served as a powerful ideological tool of social influence and control. Its iconography gives an exceptional opportunity to study the mechanisms of perceiving and presenting the ‘other’ in a traditional society. This study offers an analysis of a set of several dozen complex, painted and bas-relief scenes, as well as several hundred mould-pressed, sculpted depictions of foreigners in Moche art. It tries to answer the questions of how the message regarding the ‘other’ was created and communicated, what its concept may have been and what social functions it may have served among the groups living in the Southern Moche Region. The attitude to foreigners – as reconstructed on the basis of Moche iconography – was not unidimensional. It was characterized by a combination of extreme feelings and emotions such as fear and admiration, resentment and interest, repulsion and fascination. It has many features of a typical approach to all ‘others’ studied by specialists of different disciplines in various contexts and cultures. The observations made in this book will prove of interest not only to Moche scholars, Andean archaeologists or, people interested in the pre-Columbian cultures of South America, but also – if only as an analogy – to historians, art historians, sociologists and anthropologists dealing with the issue of alterity.

About the Author
Janusz Z. Wołoszyn is Associate Professor of Archaeology at the University of Warsaw. He is author of four books and numerous articles on the archaeology and iconography of Pre-Columbian Andean cultures.
Living Opposite to the Hospital of St John: Excavations in Medieval Northampton 2014 by Jim Brown. Paperback; 205x290mm; 362 pages; 205 figures, 91 tables (colour throughout). 747 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789699364. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699371. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Living Opposite to the Hospital of St John: Excavations in Medieval Northampton 2014 presents the results of archaeological investigations undertaken on the site of new county council offices being built between St. John’s street and Angel Street, Northampton in 2014. The location was of interest as it lay directly opposite the former medieval hospital of St. John, which influenced the development of this area of the town.

Initially open ground situated outside the Late Saxon burh, the area was extensively quarried for ironstone during the earlier part of the 12th century, and by the mid-12th century, a few dispersed buildings began to appear. Domestic pits and a bread oven were located to the rear of Angel Street along with a carver’s workshop, which, amongst other goods, produced high-quality antler chess pieces. This workshop is currently without known parallel. The timber workshop was refurbished once and then replaced in stone by the mid-13th century. During the late 12th and early part of the 13th centuries, brewing and baking were undertaken in the two plots adjacent to the workshop. A stone building with a cobbled floor lay towards the centre of the St. John’s street frontage, and behind the building were four wells, a clay-lined tank for water drawn from the well, and several ovens, including at least two bread ovens and three malting ovens. This activity ceased at around the time that the carver’s workshop was replaced in stone, and much of the frontage was cleared.

Subsequently, although there was still one building standing on St. John’s street in the early 15th century, the former cleared ground was gradually incorporated back into the plots, perhaps as gardens adjoining the surviving late medieval tenement. The stone tenement was extended and refurbished in the late 15th century and was occupied until c. 1600. Another building was established on Fetter Street after c. 1450 but had disappeared by c. 1550. However, this is the first archaeological indication for the existence of Fetter Street, and further demarcation occurred in this period with a rear boundary ditch being established along the back of the Angel Street plot, separating the land to the south. In the 17th–18th centuries, the area was covered by the dark loamy soils of gardens and orchards until the construction of stables and terraced buildings on the site, which would stand into the Victorian period and beyond.
Roots of Reform: Contextual Interpretation of Church Fittings in Norfolk During the English Reformation by Jason Robert Ladick. Paperback; 205x290mm; 182pp; 17 black & white figures, 21 tables, 62 colour plates. 746 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697667. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697674. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Roots of Reform provides a thorough examination of the impact of the English Reformation through a detailed analysis of medieval and early modern church fittings surviving at parish churches located throughout the county of Norfolk in England. By utilizing an archaeological approach along with the written record, a deeper and more nuanced understanding of public worship reveals the theological imperatives of the reformers and conformers. This study compiled data from both rural and urban parish churches which provides a regional approach to engaging the issues of visuality, space and identity. Church fittings were selected based on their liturgical function and propensity to feature decorative iconography. This includes baptismal fonts, screens, wall paintings, and sculptures. Through an extensive analysis of church fittings, this research is the first to suggest that the Bible-centric component to Protestant theology provided the framework which contributed to the success of the Reformation. The religious identity of England was transformed as visual continuity enabled an entire generation to continue their religious experience in a traditional context despite the moderate alteration to liturgy and comprehensive transformation of doctrine. This criterion eased the transition, as liturgical continuity and selective iconoclasm forged a new physical religious environment that retained enough elements to satiate traditionalist. Furthermore, an assessment of post-Reformation innovations reveals the use of vernacular Biblical text as a preferred mode of decoration, with an increase in the use of secular heraldry and commemoration directly on church fittings.

Jason Robert Ladick is an independent researcher and public library administrator in Long Island, NY. Ladick recently completed his PhD and MA in Historical Archaeology from the University of Leicester and MS in Library and Information Science from Long Island University. His research interests lie in the late medieval/early modern period and historical archaeology, with a particular interest in the archaeology of standing buildings and the transformation of religious architecture in the period following the 16th-century Protestant Reformation.
Frontiers of the Roman Empire: The Roman Frontier in Egypt Frontières de l’empire romain : la frontière romaine en Égypte by David J. Breeze and Michel Reddé. Paperback; 185x248mm; 96pp; 150 figures (colour throughout). Full text in English and French. Print RRP: £14.99. 745 2021 Frontiers of the Roman Empire (FRE) . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699456. £14.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699463. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The frontiers of the Roman empire together form the largest monument of one of the world’s greatest states. They stretch for some 7,500km through 20 countries which encircle the Mediterranean Sea. The remains of these frontiers have been studied by visitors and later by archaeologists for several centuries. Many of the inscriptions and sculpture, weapons, pottery and artefacts created and used by the soldiers and civilians who lived on the frontier can be seen in museums. Equally evocative of the lost might of Rome are the physical remains of the frontiers themselves. The aim of this series of books is not only to inform the interested visitor about the history of the frontiers but to act as a guidebook as well.

The Roman military remains of Egypt are remarkable in their variety and in their state of preservation. They deserve to be better known. They include forts, quarries under the authority of the army and whose materials were used in the monumental buildings of Rome, as well as the roads which crossed the desert landscape and brought the Mediterranean into con¬tact with the Indian Ocean. It is hoped that each reader of this book will enjoy learning more about the remarkable Roman inheritance of Egypt.

The full text is presented side-by-side dual-language in English and French.

About the Authors
Professor David J. Breeze has published several books on Roman frontiers and the Roman army. He is a former chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier Studies and led the team which successfully nominated the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site. ;

Michel Reddé is a professor emeritus at the School for Advanced Studies at the Paris Sciences et Lettres University. He has directed or collaborated on several archaeological sites in Egypt and in France (Alésia). He has been director of the European project on studying north-east Roman Gaul.

French Description
Prises ensemble, les frontières de l’Empire romain constituent le monument le plus important de ce qui fut l’un des plus grands États du monde. Elles s’étendent sur environ 7.500 km à travers une ving-taine de pays autour de la Méditerranée. Depuis plusieurs siècles, les vestiges de ces frontières ont fait l’objet d’études par des curieux puis plus tardivement par des archéologues. Bon nombre des inscriptions, sculptures, armes, poteries et autres objets créés et utilisés par les militaires et les civils qui peuplaient ces frontières sont visibles dans les musées. Mais les vestiges physiques de ses frontières sont tout aussi évocateurs de la puissance que fut Rome. La présente séries de livres est conçue non seulement pour informer le visiteur curieux de l’histoire des frontières mais également pour servir de guide sur le terrain.

Les vestiges militaires romains en Égypte sont remarquables tant par leur diversité que par leur état de conservation : ils méritent d’être mieux connus. On y dénombre des forts, des carrières exploitées sous l’autorité des militaires et dont les matériaux ont servi aux constructions monumentales de Rome, ainsi que des pistes qui traversent des paysages désertiques et mettaient la Méditerranée en relation avec l’Océan Indien. Nous espérons que le lecteur prendra plaisir à en apprendre davantage sur l’étonnant héritage romain en Égypte.

Le Professeur David J. Breeze a publié plusieurs livres sur les frontières et l’armée romaines. Il est ancien président du Congrès International d’Études sur les Frontières Romaines et il a dirigé l’équipe qui a réussi à faire inscrire le mur d’Antonin au patrimoine Mondial. ;

Michel Reddé est professeur (ém.) à l’École pratique des Hautes Études/Université de Paris Sciences et Lettres. Il a dirigé ou collaboré à de nombreux chantiers archéologiques en Égypte et en France (Alésia). Il a été directeur du projet ERC Rurland.
Pharmacy and Medicine in Ancient Egypt Proceedings of the conference held in Barcelona (2018) edited by Rosa Dinarès Solà, Mikel Fernàndez Georges and Maria Rosa Guasch-Jané. Paperback; 174x245mm; 156 pages; 76 figures, 14 tables. 744 2021 Archaeopress Egyptology 34. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697704. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697711. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Pharmacy and Medicine in Ancient Egypt presents the proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Pharmacy and Medicine in Ancient Egypt (Barcelona, October 25-26, 2018). The conference included presentations on new research and advances in the topics covered in the first two conferences (Cairo, 2007 and Manchester, 2008). It showcased the most recent pharmaceutical and medical studies on human remains and organic and plant material from ancient Egypt, together with related discussions on textual and iconographic evidence, to evaluate the present state of knowledge and the advances we have made on pharmacy and veterinary and human medicine in Ancient Egypt. The conference program combined plenary sessions, oral communications and posters with discussions that established interdisciplinary collaborations between researchers and research groups to formulate breakthrough approaches in these fi elds. Participation in the conference and poster sessions ranged from distinguished researchers and professors from academic institutions, museums and universities, to postgraduates and doctoral students at the beginning of their careers.

About the Editors
Dr Rosa Dinarès Solà holds a BSc in Medicine (1980), specialising in radiology and a MA in Egyptology (2000) from the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB). She was President of the Catalan-Balearic Association of Paleopathology (2014-2017) and has conducted research in missions at Luxor (Egypt) practicing radiographs on mummies and human remains. ;

Dr Mikel Fernandez Georges has obtained BScs in both Biology (1995) and Linguistics (2005) from the University of Barcelona. He has a MA in Egyptology (1999) from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and a PhD in Linguistics (2015) from the University of Barcelona. Dr Fernandez took part in the excavation campaign (1986) of Tertiary fauna at the palaeontological site of Incarcal. He currently teaches at the INS Frederica Montseny secondary school at Badia del Vallès. ;

Dr Maria Rosa Guasch-Jané holds a BSc in Pharmacy (1996), MSc in Nutrition and Food Science (1998), MA in Egyptology (2000) and PhD in Pharmacy (2005). Dr Guasch has been director of the Study of Viticulture and Oenology in Egyptian Tombs research project (2011-2014) at Nova University, Lisbon, and post-doctoral researcher Marie-Sklodowska Curie on the EGYWINE European project (2016-2018) at the Mondes Pharaoniques lab (UMR 8167 ‘Orient et Méditerranée’) of Sorbonne University in Paris.