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H 297 x W 210 mm

364 pages

417 figures, 91 plates

Published Jan 2022

Archaeopress Archaeology

ISBN

Paperback: 9781789699531

Digital: 9781789699548

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Keywords
Prehistory; Northern Ireland; Artefacts; Small Finds; Catalogue

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The Prehistoric Artefacts of Northern Ireland

By Harry Welsh, June Welsh

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£65.00
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£16.00

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The last in a trilogy of monographs designed to provide a baseline survey of the prehistoric sites of Northern Ireland, this monograph considers the prehistoric artefacts that have been found in Northern Ireland. It aims to provide a basis for further research, and also to stimulate local interest in the prehistory of Northern Ireland.

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Contents

INTRODUCTION ;
Background and Acknowledgements ;
Northern Ireland in a Historical Context ;
A Short History of Prehistoric Archaeology in Northern Ireland ;
Methodology ;
Classifications Used in Irish Archaeology ;
Classifications Used in the Inventory ;
Abbreviations Used in the Text ;

INVENTORY ;
County Antrim ;
County Armagh ;
County Down ;
County Fermanagh ;
County Londonderry ;
County Tyrone ;

DISCUSSION ;
Summary of Artefact Sites ;
Current Location of Artefacts ;
Recording of Prehistoric Artefacts Over Time ;
Artefacts in a Wider Context ;
Conclusion ;

GLOSSARY ;

RADIOCARBON DATES ;

BIBLIOGRAPHY

About the Author

Harry Welsh is an archaeologist and historian. After retiring from the fire service in 2003, he worked as a field archaeologist within the commercial sector and at the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork, Queens University Belfast. By 2006 he had achieved his Doctorate and a Master’s degree in archaeology. He has directed archaeological excavations and written numerous books and articles. He was Vice President of the Ulster Archaeological Society from 2009 to 2015 and Honorary Fieldwork Co-ordinator from 2004 until 2020. ;

June Welsh retired from a thirty-five year career in teaching in 2006 and focused upon her interests in history and archaeology. She has been a member of the field survey group of the Ulster Archaeological Society since its establishment in 2005 and has taken part in numerous excavations and surveys. She participated in a Royal Irish Academy research project on the prehistoric people of Ireland and has published many archaeological survey reports.