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NEW: The Antonine Wall: Papers in Honour of Professor Lawrence Keppie
edited by David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson. Paperback; 206x255mm; 494 pages; 166 figures; 15 tables (exp. RRP £30.00). 613 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 64. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694505. Epublication ISBN 9781789694512.
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The Antonine Wall, the Roman frontier in Scotland, was the most northerly frontier of the Roman Empire for a generation from AD 142. It is a World Heritage Site and Scotland’s largest ancient monument. Today, it cuts across the densely populated central belt between Forth and Clyde.

In this volume, nearly 40 archaeologists, historians and heritage managers present their researches on the Antonine Wall in recognition of the work of Lawrence Keppie, formerly Professor of Roman History and Archaeology at the Hunterian Museum, Glasgow University, who spent much of his academic career recording and studying the Wall. The 32 papers cover a wide variety of aspects, embracing the environmental and prehistoric background to the Wall, its structure, planning and construction, military deployment on its line, associated artefacts and inscriptions, the logistics of its supply, as well as new insights into the study of its history. Due attention is paid to the people of the Wall, not just the officers and soldiers, but their womenfolk and children.

Important aspects of the book are new developments in the recording, interpretation and presentation of the Antonine Wall to today's visitors. Considerable use is also made of modern scientific techniques, from pollen, soil and spectrographic analysis to geophysical survey and airborne laser scanning. In short, the papers embody present-day cutting edge research on, and summarise the most up-to-date understanding of, Rome's shortest-lived frontier.

The editors, Professors Bill Hanson and David Breeze, who themselves contribute several papers to the volume, have both excavated sites on, and written books about, the Antonine Wall.

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
List of Tables ;
List of Contributors ;
Abbreviations ;
1. Lawrence Keppie: an appreciation – David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson ;
2. The Antonine Wall: the current state of knowledge – William S. Hanson and David J. Breeze ;
3. The Landscape at the time of construction of the Antonine Wall – Mairi H. Davies ;
4. The Impact of the Antonine Wall on Iron Age Society – Lesley Macinnes ;
5. Pre-Antonine coins from the Antonine Wall – Richard J Brickstock ;
6. Planning the Antonine wall: an archaeometric reassesment of installation spacing – Nick Hannon, Lyn Wilson, Darrell J Rohl ;
7. The curious incident of the structure at Bar Hill and its implications – Rebecca H Jones ;
8. Monuments on the margins of Empire: the Antonine Wall sculptures – Louisa Campbell ;
9. Building an image: soldiers’ labour and the Antonine Wall Distance Slabs – Iain M. Ferris ;
10. New perspectives on the structure of the Antonine Wall – Tanja Romankiewicz, Karen Milek, Chris Beckett, Ben Russell and J. Riley Snyder ;
11. Wing-walls and waterworks. On the planning and purpose of the Antonine Wall – Erik Graafstal ;
12. The importance of fieldwalking: the discovery of three fortlets on the Antonine Wall – James J. Walker ;
13. The Roman temporary camp and fortlet at Summerston, Strathclyde – Gordon S. Maxwell and William S. Hanson ;
14. Thinking small: fortlet evolution on the Upper German Limes, Hadrian’s Wall, the Antonine Wall and Raetian Limes – Matthew Symonds ;
15. The Roman fort and fortlet at Castlehill on the Antonine Wall: the geophysical, LiDAR and early map evidence – William S. Hanson and Richard E. Jones ;
16. ‘... one of the most remarkable traces of Roman art ... in the vicinity of the Antonine Wall.’ A forgotten funerary urn of Egyptian travertine from Camelon, and related stone vessels from Castlecary – Fraser Hunter ;
17. The Kirkintilloch hoard revisited – J.D. Bateson ;
18. The external supply of pottery and cereals to Antonine Scotland – Paul Bidwell ;
19. The army of the Antonine Wall: its strength and implications – David J. Breeze ;
20. Why was the Antonine Wall made of turf rather than stone? – Nick Hodgson ;
21. Antoninus Pius’ Guard Prefect Marcus Gavius Maximus with an Appendix on new evidence for the Fasti of Britain under Antoninus – Anthony R. Birley ;
22. Civil settlement and extra-mural activity on the Antonine Wall – William S. Hanson ;
23. Roman women in Lowland Scotland – Lindsay Allason-Jones, Carol van Driel-Murray and Elizabeth M. Greene ;
24. Where did all the veterans go? Veterans on the Antonine Wall – Alexander Meyer ;
25. ‘So the great Romans with unwearied care’: Sir John Clerk’s museum – Iain Gordon Brown ;
26. John Anderson and the Antonine Wall – Geoff B Bailey and James Mearns ;
27. Reconstructing Roman lives – Jim Devine ;
28. The power of vivid images in Antonine Wall reconstructions: re-examining the archaeological evidence – Christof Flügel and Jürgen Obmann ;
29. The Antonine Wall: some challenges of mapping a complex linear monument – Peter McKeague ;
30. Connecting museums and sites Advanced Limes Applications – a Creative Europe project – Erik Dobat ;
31. The Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site: People, priorities and playparks – Patricia Weeks ;
32. Then ’twas the Roman, now ’tis I – Iain Gordon Brown ;
Index


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