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Archaeopress: Publishing Scholarly Archaeology since 1997
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide.

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in scholarly books and journals in the field of archaeology and related heritage subjects.

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NEW: Roma prima del mito Abitati e necropoli dal neolitico alla prima eta’ dei metalli nel territorio di roma (VI-III millennio a.C.) edited by Anna Paola Anzidei† and Giovanni Carboni. 2 volumes; Paperback; 1648 pages; 1,746 figures, 136 tables. Italian text. 635 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693089. £160.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693096. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £160.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The area corresponding to the modern city of Rome is usually known for the magnificent remains of the Roman civilization and the myths of its foundation in 753 BC. Less known is evidence of the prehistoric occupation occurring until the Bronze Age along the territory corresponding to the city of Rome and the surrounding area, called "Campagna Romana". Indeed, until a few years ago, the archaeological evidence relating to the phases of recent prehistory, from the Neolithic to the beginning of the Bronze Age, were completely, or almost completely, unknown. Recent excavations, mainly related to preventive archaeology, led to the identification of settlements and necropolises associated with a complex cultural scenario and shed light on the social and cultural aspects of daily life of the human groups who occupied this territory before the Latium civilization.

Anna Paola Anzidei† (1946-2017) was a prehistoric archaeologist who worked for the Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Roma from 1979 to 2012. She published many relevant scientific articles concerning the population of the area of Rome from the Palaeolithic period to the Copper Age and was a member of several scientific associations. ;

Giovanni Carboni is a prehistoric archaeologist specializing in the Neolithic and Copper Age periods of central Italy and is a member of the Department of Classics at the Sapienza University of Rome. He has been working for the Museo delle Origini of Sapienza University of Rome since 1991.

Italian Description:
Della città di Roma, ben nota per le maestose vestigia riguardanti la civiltà romana e per i miti che precedono la sua fondazione avvenuta nel 753 a.C., sono poco conosciute le fasi antecedenti l’età del Bronzo finale , sia nell’area urbana, che nel territorio al di fuori delle mura, definito come “Campagna Romana” che va dal Neolitico antico fino agli inizi dell'età del Bronzo. Scavi recenti, legati principalmente all’archeologia preventiva, hanno portato all’individuazione di insediamenti e necropoli riferibili ad un complesso ed articolato panorama culturale, gettando luce su aspetti della vita quotidiana, sociale e culturale di gruppi umani che hanno occupato questo territorio prima della formazione della civiltà laziale.

Anna Paola Anzidei† è stata un funzionario archeologo specialista in preistoria (Paleolitico, Neolitico e Eneolitico) nella Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Roma dal 1979 al 2012. Ha scritto numerosi contributi specialistici di notevole importanza sulla preistoria della città di Roma e del suo suburbio. è stata socio ordinario AIQUA, ISIPU e dell’Istituto Italiano di Preistoria e Protostoria. ;

Giovanni Carboni è un archeologo specialista del Neolitico e dell’Eneolitico dell’Italia centrale e afferisce al Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Antichità della Sapienza Università di Roma e presta servizio presso il Museo delle Origini della stessa Università fin dal 1991. Dal 2005 è socio ordinario dell’Istituto Italiano di Preistoria e Protostoria.
NEW: Coton Park, Rugby, Warwickshire: A Middle Iron Age Settlement with Copper Alloy Casting by Andy Chapman. Paperback; 205x290mm; 186 pages; 103 figures, 79 tables (colour throughout). 633 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696455. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696462. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A total area of 3.1ha, taking in much of a settlement largely of the earlier Middle Iron Age (c.450 to c.150BC), was excavated in 1998 in advance of development. Two small pit groups, radiocarbon dated to the Middle Bronze Age, produced a bronze dagger and a small pottery assemblage. The Iron Age settlement comprised several groups of roundhouse ring ditches and associated small enclosures forming an open settlement set alongside a linear boundary ditch. Its origin lay in the 5th century BC with a single small roundhouse group. Through the 4th and 3rd centuries BC the settlement expanded with the original structures replaced by a principal roundhouse group accompanied by at least a further two groups of roundhouses and enclosures and minor outlying structures. A group of structures and enclosures set apart from the main domestic area was the focus for copper alloy casting, producing an assemblage of crucibles and fragments from investment moulds for the production of horse fittings, as well as bone, antler and horn working debris. The site also produced good assemblages of pottery and animal bone, an assemblage of saddle querns and a potin coin. The settlement had been abandoned by the middle of the 2nd century BC, although the main boundary ditch survived at least as an earthwork. By the early 1st century AD a series of ditched enclosures were created to the north of the boundary ditch, perhaps a small ladder settlement, which fell out of use soon after the Roman conquest. One enclosure contained two small roundhouses and other curvilinear gullies may have formed animal pens in the corners of two enclosures. This final phase is dated by some Late Iron Age pottery, an Iron Age and a Roman rotary quern, and a small quantity of Roman roof tile.

The discussion considers the physical, social and economic structure of the settlement. The distribution of finds around the ring ditches is examined as well as the size of enclosed roundhouses. There is an overview of the Iron Age roundhouse in the Midlands, using well preserved sites as exemplars for the range of evidence that can survive. A typology and chronology for Iron Age pottery is provided, and the date of introduction of the rotary quern is discussed, and the consequent effect on the size of storage jars is examined.

Middle Bronze Age pits and a small cremation cemetery, and Late Iron Age to early Roman settlement on the site of the nearby deserted medieval village of Coton are also described.

With contributions by Trevor Anderson, Paul Blinkhorn, Pat Chapman, Steve Critchley, Karen Deighton, Tora Hylton, Dennis Jackson, Ivan Mack, Anthony Maull, Gerry McDonnell, Matthew Ponting and Jane Timby. Illustrations by Andy Chapman, Pat Walsh and Mark Roughley.
NEW: Aristotle’s Μετεωρολογικά: Meteorology Then and Now by Anastasios A. Tsonis and Christos Zerefos. Hardback; 175x245mm; 126pp; 34 figures (17 in colour). 631 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696370. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696387. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Aristotle’s Μετεωρολογικά concentrates on the meteorological aspects of Aristotle’s work published as Meteorologica (Μετεωρολογικά or Meteorology) books A-D, and on how they compare now with our understanding of meteorology and climate change. In other words, how well did Aristotle fair when he tried to explain weather 2,300 years ago when there was only logic, eye observation, and past experience, with only primitive instrumentation and a few personalized measurements? While there are scientific issues behind Aristotle’s writings, this book is written for the non-specialist. The book uses simple examples to present its case, which will be easily followed by general readers.

About the Author
Anastasios Tsonis is an Emeritus Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) and an Adjunct Research Scientist at the Hydrologic Research Center in San Diego, CA. His research interests include Chaos theory, Climate dynamics, and Networks. He is the author of more than 135 peer reviewed scientific publications and he has been invited speaker in numerous conferences. He is also the author of nine books.

Christos Zerefos is Head of the Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens, Professor of Atmospheric Physics at the Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki, and Visiting Professor at the Universities of Boston, Minnesota and Oslo. He is State Representative for Climate Change for Greece. He has published numerous scientific papers and books in the fields of atmospheric physics and climatology.
NEW: Working at Home in the Ancient Near East edited by Juliette Mas and Palmiro Notizia. Paperback; 175x245mm; 124 pages; 30 figures, 4 tables. 628 2020 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695915. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695922. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Working at Home in the Ancient Near East brings together the papers and discussions from an international workshop organized within the framework of the 10th International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East held in Vienna in April 2016. The volume examines the organization, scale, and the socio-economic role played by institutional and non-institutional households, as well as the social use of domestic spaces in Bronze Age Mesopotamia. The invited speakers – archaeologists, philologists, and historians specializing in ancient Mesopotamia – who approached these topics from different perspectives and by analyzing different datasets were encouraged to exchange their views and to discuss methodological concerns and common problems.

This volume includes seven archaeological- and philological-oriented essays focusing on specific sites and archives, from northern Mesopotamia to southern Babylonia. The contributions assembled in the present volume seek to bridge the gap between archaeological records and cuneiform sources, in order to provide a more accurate reconstruction of the Mesopotamian economies during the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC.

About the Editors
Juliette Mas is an archaeologist specializing in Near Eastern pre-classic pottery and domestic architecture. She completed her PhD in 2013 at Lyon 2 University (France) and was awarded a Post-doctoral fellowship (2013-2016) at the University of Liege (Belgium), where she was also a scientific collaborator. She is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the Collège de France (UMR 7192 - PROCLAC). Since 2001, she has been involved in various international archaeological missions in the Near East and has overseen the study and publication of Bronze age pottery collections from Syrian and Iraqi archaeological sites.

Palmiro Notizia is a post-doctoral researcher in Assyriology at the Università di Pisa. Previously, he was a JAE-Doctor fellow at the Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales (CSIC, Madrid) and a postdoctoral researcher at the Università degli Studi di Messina. His research interests focus on the social and economic history of Mesopotamia in the third and second millennia BCE. He has edited and studied unpublished cuneiform documents in the British Museum, the Yale Babylonian Collection, the Harvard Semitic Museum and the Cornell University Cuneiform Collections.
NEW: Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus by Paweł Gołyźniak. Hardback; 618 pages; fully illustrated catalogue containing 1,015 figures (in colour). 627 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 65. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695397. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695403. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus deals with small, but highly captivating and stimulating artwork – engraved gemstones. Although in antiquity intaglios and cameos had multiple applications (seals, jewellery or amulets), the images engraved upon them are snapshots of people's beliefs, ideologies, and everyday occupations. They cast light on the self-advertising and propaganda actions performed by Roman political leaders, especially Octavian/Augustus, their factions and other people engaged in the politics and social life of the past.

Gems can show both general trends (the specific showpieces like State Cameos) as well as the individual and private acts of being involved in politics and social affairs, mainly through a subtle display of political allegiances, since they were objects of strictly personal use. They enable us to analyse and learn about Roman propaganda and various social behaviours from a completely different angle than coins, sculpture or literature.

The miniaturism of ancient gems is in inverse proportion to their cultural significance. This book presents an evolutionary model of the use of engraved gems from self-presentation (3rd-2nd century BC) to personal branding and propaganda purposes in the Roman Republic and under Augustus (until 14 AD). The specific characteristics of engraved gems, their strictly private character and the whole array of devices appearing on them are examined in respect to their potential propagandistic value and usefulness in social life.

The wide scope of this analysis provides a comprehensive picture covering many aspects of Roman propaganda and a critical survey of the overinterpretations of this term in regard to the glyptic art. The aim is the incorporation of this class of archaeological artefacts into the well-established studies of Roman propaganda, as well as the Roman society in general, brought about by discussion of the interconnections with ancient literary sources as well as other categories of Roman art and craftsmanship, notably coins but also sculpture and relief.

About the Author
Paweł Gołyźniak works as a Research Fellow in the Institute of Archaeology, Jagiellonian University in Krakow. His research interests include engraved gems (ancient and neo-classical), Roman Republican and Augustan numismatics, history of antiquarianism, collecting and scholarship as well as 18th century drawings of intaglios and cameos and the legacy of antiquary and connoisseur Philipp von Stosch (1691-1757).
NEW: An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology 2nd Edition edited by Werner Steinhaus, Simon Kaner, Megumi Jinno and Shinya Shoda. Paperback; 210x297mm; 352 pages; 209 figures, 248 plates (full colour throughout). 273 2016 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology 1. ISBN 9781789693959. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology provides for the first time a comprehensive visual introduction to a wide range of sites and finds from the earliest occupation of the Japanese archipelago prior to 35,000 years ago to the early historical periods and the establishment of the Chinese-style capital at Heijo, modern-day Nara, in the 8th century AD. The volume originated in the largest ever exhibition of Japanese archaeological discoveries held in Germany in 2004, which brought together over 1500 exhibits from 55 lenders around Japan, and research by over 100 specialists. The Illustrated Companion brings the fruits of this project to an English-reading audience and offers an up-to-date survey of the achievements of Japanese archaeology.

About the Editors
Werner STEINHAUS is Lecturer in Archaeology at Hiroshima University and an Academic Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures. ;

Simon KANER is Executive Director of the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures (www.sainsbury-institute.org), where he is also Head of the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage, and Director of the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. ;

Megumi JINNO is Chief Researcher of the Department of Palace Investigations at Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties in Japan. ;

Shinya SHODA is Head of the International Cooperation Section at Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties in Japan, and an Academic Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures, UK.
NEW: Paisajes en un sector de la Quebrada de Humahuaca durante la Etapa Agroalfarera Arqueología de Tumbaya (Jujuy, Argentina) by Agustina Scaro. Paperback; 203x276mm; 304pp; 216 figures, 58 plates. Spanish text. Print RRP £52.00.. 116 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694895. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694901. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Quebrada de Humahuaca is the center of important and diverse continuous cultural developments and presents places that are key references in the archaeology of Argentina. However, numerous spaces, such as Tumbaya, have not yet been the subject of systematic and intensive research. There, the study began as a response to the interest of the local aboriginal community to know the pre-Hispanic past of the area. Tumbaya, in the central-south sector of Quebrada de Humahuaca, is a particular space since its environmental and geomorphological characteristics have allowed important interactions between the groups that inhabited the area and those of other regions, added to a social dynamic that gives a distinctive character to the sector. Within this framework, the landscapes that were configured in the central-south sector of Quebrada during the agricultural-ceramist period were studied, concerning its social identity and the links it may have had with other sectors of the circumpuneña area. The landscape approach, understood from a comprehensive perspective, allowed consideration of the natural, social and symbolic environment of the inhabitants of the area throughout its occupational history, including the materiality generated and manipulated to configure the landscape and define a particular identity. Thus, the landscape was conceived as a dynamic space, socially built by the daily activities, beliefs and value system of the social actors who carry out an act of memory that is constitutive of both their identity, their conception and legitimation of the territory.

About the Author
Agustina Scaro, Assistant Researcher of the National Council of Scientific and Technological Research of Argentina, studies Landscape and Materiality issues in the Central-South Andes. She has worked in Quebrada de Humahuaca (northern Argentina) for more than a decade, with the aim of understanding local pre-Inca societies and the impact of Inca domination on them from different lines of evidence.

Spanish description: La Quebrada de Humahuaca ha sido espacio de importantes y diversos desarrollos culturales continuados y presenta lugares que son referencias claves en la arqueología de Argentina. Sin embargo, numerosos espacios, como Tumbaya, aún no han sido objeto de una investigación sistemática e intensiva. Allí, el estudio se inició frente al interés de la comunidad aborigen local de conocer el pasado prehispánico de la zona. Tumbaya, en el sector centro-sur de la Quebrada de Humahuaca, es un espacio particular ya que sus características ambientales y geomorfológicas han permitido importantes interacciones entre los grupos que habitaron la zona y los de otras regiones, sumada a una dinámica social que dan un carácter diferenciador al sector. En este marco, se ha buscado comprender los paisajes que se configuraron en el sector centro-sur de la Quebrada durante la etapa agroalfarera, en relación con su identidad social y las vinculaciones que pudo tener con otros sectores del área circumpuneña. El enfoque del paisaje, entendido desde una perspectiva abarcadora, permitió considerar el entorno natural, social y simbólico de los habitantes de la zona a lo largo de su historia ocupacional, incluyendo la materialidad generada y manipulada para configurar el paisaje y definir una identidad particular. Así, se concibió al paisaje como un espacio dinámico, socialmente construido por las actividades diarias, creencias y sistema de valores de los actores sociales quienes al habitar el paisaje, llevan a cabo un acto de memoria que es constitutivo tanto de su identidad como de su concepción y legitimación del territorio.

Agustina Scaro: Actual Investigadora Asistente del Concejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas de Argentina, Agustina Scaro estudia temas de Paisaje y Materialidad en los Andes Centro-Sur. La autora ha trabajado en la Quebrada de Humahuaca (norte de Argentina) por más de una déc
NEW: Before/After: Transformation, Change, and Abandonment in the Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean edited by Paolo Cimadomo, Rocco Palermo, Raffaella Pappalardo and Raffaella Pierobon Benoit. Paperback; 203x276mm; 126 pages; 39 figures (8 plates in colour). Print RRP: £30.00. 112 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695991. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696004. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Before/After explores various aspects related to transformation and change in the Roman and Late Antique world through the archaeological and historical evidence. The seven chapters of the volume range from the evolution of settlement patterns to spatial re-configuration after abandonment processes. Geographically the volume aims to cover – through case studies – the enlarged Roman world from Spain, to Cyprus, from the Rhine area borderland to the Red Sea. The book is the result of a workshop organized as part of the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference, held in Rome during March 2016.

About the Editors
Paolo Cimadomo is a Post-Doc Research Fellow at the University of Naples ‘Federico II’ (Italy). His main research interests are the Hellenistic and Roman Near East. He has worked in different areas of the Eastern Mediterranean (Israel, Jordan, Syria, Turkey) and is the author of The Southern Levant during the first centuries of the Roman rule (64 BCE-135 CE) (Oxbow Books, 2019) ;

Rocco Palermo is a Researcher and Lecturer at the University of Groningen (Netherlands), and Associate Director of the Erbil Plain Archaeological Survey (Iraqi Kurdistan, Harvard University). He has carried out extensive fieldwork in the Middle East (Syria, Jordan, Iraq), where he explores the formation and development of imperial landscapes through the archaeological record. He is the author of On the Edge of Empires. North Mesopotamia during the Roman Period (Routledge, 2019). ;

Raffaella Pappalardo obtained her PhD in Ancient History from University of Naples ‘Federico II’ (Italy). As a pottery specialist she has taken part in many archaeological projects in Syria, Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon, where she was in charge of the ceramic assemblages. Her publication record reflects her interest in the socio-cultural role of pottery in the ancient world, and specifically in the period between the Late Antique and the Islamic world. ;

Raffaella Pierobon Benoit is associate member of Arts and Sciences Academy of Naples (Italy), and was Professor of Archaeology of the Roman Provinces at the University of Naples ‘Federico II’ until 2015. She has carried out extensive fieldwork in Italy and directed archaeological projects in France (Anderitum/Javols) and Turkey (Mandalya Gulf Survey). She was Associate Director of the Italian Archaeological Expedition at Tell Barry (Syria) from 1989 to 2004, and Project Director since 2005.
NEW: The Urban Landscape of Bakchias: A Town of the Fayyūm from the Ptolemaic-Roman Period to Late Antiquity by Paola Buzi and Enrico Giorgi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 120 pages; 76 figures, 6 plates. 624 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 66. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695670. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695687. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Urban Landscape of Bakchias: A Town of the Fayyūm from the Ptolemaic-Roman Period to Late Antiquity summarises the results of field research conducted on the archaeological site of Bakchias, located in the north-eastern part of the Fayyūm region. Historical, historico-religious and papyrological studies are also presented. The book provides a clear and comprehensive overview of the rise and fall of the kome of Bakchias. The settlement was a thriving centre from at least the 26th dynasty up until the ninth or tenth centuries CE, although with differing levels of economic prosperity and urban development. Equal weight is given not only to the archaeological and topographical aspects but also to the historical and the religious, whilst never forgetting the relationship between the urban settlement and other villages of the Arsinoite nomos, which is famously a peculiar exception in Egyptian geography.

About the Author
Paola Buzi is Full Professor of Egyptology and Coptic Studies at the Sapienza University of Rome and Honorary Professor of the same disciplines at Hamburg University. She is President-Elect of the International Association for Coptic Studies. Since 2002, she has been a member of the Archaeological Mission in Bakchias (Fayyūm ) and co-director of the same mission since 2008.

Enrico Giorgi is Associate Professor in Archaeological Research Methodologies at the University of Bologna. Since 1997, he has been a member of the Archaeological Mission in Bakchias (Fayyūm ) and co-director of the same mission since 2008. He is Director of archaeological projects of his university in Agrigento, Butrint, Burnum, Pompei, Paestum, Suasa and Monte Rinaldo.
NEW: The Genesis of the Textile Industry from Adorned Nudity to Ritual Regalia The Changing Role of Fibre Crafts and Their Evolving Techniques of Manufacture in the Ancient Near East from the Natufian to the Ghassulian by Janet Levy. Paperback; 205x290mm; 350pp; 171 figures, 13 tables. RRP: £52.00. 623 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694482. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694499. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £52.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Genesis of the Textile Industry from Adorned Nudity to Ritual Regalia documents and evaluates the changing role of fibre crafts and their evolving techniques of manufacture and also their ever-increasing wider application in the lives of the inhabitants of the earliest villages of the Ancient Near East. It is a broad-spectrum enquiry into fibre working in a broad swathe from Mesopotamia across Persia and Anatolia to the Nile Valley. It focuses, however, on the southern Levant from incipient sedentism in the Natufian culture, c. 13,000 cal BCE to the Ghassulian culture, c. 4500-3800/3700 cal BCE.

This is the first comprehensive study addressing the fibre technologies of the southern Levant on a long chronological axis. Currently, fibre crafts play only a minor role in archaeological thinking. This research demonstrates the magnitude and also the indispensable role that fibre crafts have played in the quotidian events, activities and practices of the inhabitants of the region. It has created an awareness of the substantial, often invisible, presence of fibre-craft products which was hitherto lacking in archaeological thought.

About the Author
Janet Levy is affiliated with the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel. Her research focuses on a broad spectrum of fibre technologies attested from initial sedentism in the southern Levant c.13,000 BCE and their role within the regional cultures. In addition to the study of archaeological sources, her approach is based on experimental replication in tandem with ethnographic input, primarily from beyond the southern Levant.
NEW: I templi del Fayyum di epoca tolemaico-romana: tra fonti scritte e contesti archeologici Per una classificazione degli edifici sacri nell’Egitto tolemaico e romano by Ilaria Rossetti. Paperback; 205x290mm; 284 pages; 165 figures, 6 tables. Italian text. RRP: £45.00. 622 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 27. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694956. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694963. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

During the Ptolemaic period, Egyptian temples were divided into three ranks: first, second and third class. There was no trace of this classification of sacred buildings in the papyri of the Roman period when only the most important temples were classified by the epithet logima hiera. This work aims to understand the rules according to which Egyptian sacred buildings were classified and how these first, second and third-class temples were planned and arranged.

To do this, an integrated analysis of different kinds of sources was carried out: all the Graeco-Roman papyri and the inscriptions, which contain rank epithets, were examined and different archaeological data about the temples of the Fayyum region were investigated. Based on these sources, it was possible to put forward different hypotheses on the administration and architectural aspects of these sacred buildings.

About the Author
Ilaria Rossetti is currently an archaeology officer at the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities. She obtained a Master’s Degree cum laude and a post-graduate degree at the Bologna University in Egyptology. In 2015 she obtained a PhD at Siena University. From 2015-2017 she was junior researcher at Bologna University, where she was involved in numerous archaeological projects. Since 2012, she has been field-director of archaeological Mission at Bakchias coordinated by the two co-directors Prof. Enrico Giorgi (Bologna University) and Prof. Paola Buzi (Sapienza University of Rome).

Italian Description: La documentazione amministrativa di epoca tolemaica testimonia una divisione di tutti i complessi sacri dell’Egitto in primo, secondo e terzo rango. Questa classificazione sembra non aver lasciato traccia nei documenti di epoca romana, quando solo i templi principali sembrano essere considerati e indicati come logima hiera. A tuttora non sono ancora state definite né le ragioni e i criteri secondo cui gli edifici sacri furono suddivisi in classi, né se vi sia stato un riscontro di questa ripartizione nei dati archeologici. Nel I templi del Fayyum in epoca tolemaico-romana: Per una classificazione degli edifici sacri nell’Egitto tolemaico e romano aims si tenterà di rispondere a questi interrogativi mettendo a confronto e integrando dati desumibili sia dai documenti amministrativi sia dai contesti archeologici dei vari complessi templari della regione del Fayyum, alla quale è stata limitata questa seconda categoria di dati.

Ilaria Rossetti è attualmente funzionario archeologo presso il Mibact. Ha ottenuto la laurea con lode e il diploma di scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia presso l'Università di Bologna. Nel 2015 ha conseguito il dottorato di ricerca presso la Scuola di Dottorato dell'Università di Siena. Dal 2015 al 2017 è stata assegnista di ricerca presso l'Università di Bologna, dove è stata coinvolta in numerosi progetti archeologici, come egittologa, archeologa e topografa. Dal 2012 è field-director della Missione archeologica a Bakchias coordinata dai due co-direttori Prof. Enrico Giorgi (Università di Bologna) e Prof. Paola Buzi (Università di Roma La Sapienza). Dal 2017 al 2018 è stata ricercatrice junior presso la Sapienza Università di Roma per il Progetto ERC -PAThs (P.I .: Paola Buzi), per il quale attualmente collabora. Ha pubblicato una monografia su uno dei templi di Bakchias, vari rapporti di scavo e diversi contributi.
NEW: Excavation, Analysis and Interpretation of Early Bronze Age Barrows at Guiting Power, Gloucestershire by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 290 pages. 620 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693591. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693607. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavation, Analysis and Interpretation of an Early Bronze Age Round Barrow at Guiting Power, Gloucestershire covers the full excavation, analysis and interpretation of two early Bronze Age round barrows at Guiting Power in the Cotswolds, a region where investigation and protection of such sites have been extremely poor, with many barrows unnecessarily lost to erosion, and with most existing excavation partial, and of low quality. One monument, Guiting Power 1, typical of many others in the region in terms of general form, was investigated to assess how far surviving evidence could be used to indicate original structure, as a basis for discussion of function as a funerary and ritual site.

The project is paired with the full excavation of a larger round barrow, of similar date, nearby, at Guiting Power 3 in the valley below. Both sites have been considered within their local environment and as part of the general pattern of settlement. The monuments have also provided data for a programme of experimental investigation of prehistoric cremation.

Discovery of a post ring with well-preserved basal structures, sealed under an early bronze age round barrow at Guiting Power 3, enables detailed analysis of its structure, associations, and place in the sequence. This review of a sample of other post rings from southern and western Britain places the example from Guiting Power within its archaeological context.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.
NEW: Middle Bronze Age and Roman Settlement at Manor Pit, Baston, Lincolnshire: Excavations 2002-2014 by Rob Atkins, Jim Burke, Leon Field and Adam Yates. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300 pages; 104 figures, 89 tables (82 plates in colour). 619 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695830. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695847. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Between 2002 and 2014 MOLA Northampton carried out evaluation and excavation work over an area of approximately 49.65ha ahead of mineral extraction for the quarry at the Manor Pit, Baston, Lincolnshire.

The earliest activity dated to the Neolithic with the first occupation dating to the early Bronze Age, but it was within the middle Bronze Age that significant occupation took place within the site. Part of a large co-axial field system was recorded over an area approximately c800m long and up to 310m wide. Cropmarks and the results from other archaeological excavations suggest the field system continued beyond Manor Pit for c4km and was up to 1km wide. The field system was a well-planned pastoral farming landscape at a scale suggesting that cattle and other animals were being farmed for mass trade.

The site was reoccupied in the early 2nd century AD when two adjacent Roman settlements were established. One of the settlements was arranged along a routeway which led from the Car Dyke whilst the other settlement connected to this routeway by a long straight boundary. In both settlements there were a series of fields/enclosures situated in a largely open environment, with some evidence for cultivation, areas of wet ground and stands of trees. Well/watering holes lay within these enclosures and fields indicating that stock management was a key component of the local economy.

In the later medieval period a trackway ran across the site, associated with which was a small enclosure, which perhaps contained fowl. During the early post-medieval period the land was subject to a final period of enclosure, with a series of small rectilinear fields established aligned with Baston Outgang Road, forming the basis of the current landscape.
NEW: The Hippodrome of Gerasa A Provincial Roman Circus by Antoni A. Ostrasz with Ina Kehrberg-Ostrasz. Paperback; 205x290mm; 504 pages; 261 figures (77 plates in colour). 616 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918132. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918149. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hippodrome of Gerasa: A Provincial Roman Circus publishes the unique draft manuscript by the late architect and restorer Antoni Ostrasz, the study of Roman circuses and the complex fieldwork for the restoration of the Jarash Hippodrome, a work in progress abruptly ended both in writing and in the field by his untimely death in October 1996. The manuscript is presented as it is in order to retain the authenticity of his work. It is, therefore, an unusual publication providing the researcher as well as restorer of ancient monuments with unparalleled insights of architectural studies for anastyloses. Compendia A and B have been added to supplement the incomplete segments of the manuscript with regard to his studies as well as archaeological data. This concerns the excavation and preparation for the restorations and the archaeological history or stratigraphic history of the site from the foundations to primary use as a circus to subsequent occupancies of the circus complex. The study of the architectural and archaeological remains at the hippodrome encapsulates the sequence of the urban history of the town from its early beginnings to Roman Gerasa and Byzantine and Islamic Jarash, including vestiges of the seventh century plague and still visible earthquake destructions, as well as Ottoman settlements.

About the Authors
Antoni Adam Ostrasz M.Eng PhD (Warsaw 1958, 1967) began his overseas work as research architect with the Polish Archaeological Centre in Cairo from 1961-1966 before joining expeditions to Alexandria, Palmyra and Nea Paphos. He was commissioned by the Syrian Authorities at Palmyra to prepare the restorations of several monuments, recently destroyed. He continued his architectural studies at Fustat and later joined the ‘Jarash Archaeological Project’ where he studied and restored the Umayyad House and the Church of Bishop Marianos. In 1984, the Dept of Antiquities appointed him as permanent director for the restoration project of the Hippodrome at Jarash. ;

Ina Kehrberg-Ostrasz graduated in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Sydney where she completed her postgraduate thesis on Cypriot ceramics. She began excavating in Jordan with the University of Sydney in 1975, followed by several international and long-term archaeological projects at Jarash and other Decapolis cities in Jordan. She became Hon. Research Fellow at the University of Sydney, and was made Hon. Lecturer at ANU/Canberra in 2019 where she offers Masterclasses in the study of ceramics and other artefacts.
NEW: The Antonine Wall: Papers in Honour of Professor Lawrence Keppie edited by David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson. Paperback; 206x255mm; 494 pages; 166 figures; 15 tables (exp. RRP £30.00). 613 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 64. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694505. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694512. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Antonine Wall, the Roman frontier in Scotland, was the most northerly frontier of the Roman Empire for a generation from AD 142. It is a World Heritage Site and Scotland’s largest ancient monument. Today, it cuts across the densely populated central belt between Forth and Clyde.

In this volume, nearly 40 archaeologists, historians and heritage managers present their researches on the Antonine Wall in recognition of the work of Lawrence Keppie, formerly Professor of Roman History and Archaeology at the Hunterian Museum, Glasgow University, who spent much of his academic career recording and studying the Wall. The 32 papers cover a wide variety of aspects, embracing the environmental and prehistoric background to the Wall, its structure, planning and construction, military deployment on its line, associated artefacts and inscriptions, the logistics of its supply, as well as new insights into the study of its history. Due attention is paid to the people of the Wall, not just the officers and soldiers, but their womenfolk and children.

Important aspects of the book are new developments in the recording, interpretation and presentation of the Antonine Wall to today's visitors. Considerable use is also made of modern scientific techniques, from pollen, soil and spectrographic analysis to geophysical survey and airborne laser scanning. In short, the papers embody present-day cutting edge research on, and summarise the most up-to-date understanding of, Rome's shortest-lived frontier.

The editors, Professors Bill Hanson and David Breeze, who themselves contribute several papers to the volume, have both excavated sites on, and written books about, the Antonine Wall.

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
List of Tables ;
List of Contributors ;
Abbreviations ;
1. Lawrence Keppie: an appreciation – David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson ;
2. The Antonine Wall: the current state of knowledge – William S. Hanson and David J. Breeze ;
3. The Landscape at the time of construction of the Antonine Wall – Mairi H. Davies ;
4. The Impact of the Antonine Wall on Iron Age Society – Lesley Macinnes ;
5. Pre-Antonine coins from the Antonine Wall – Richard J Brickstock ;
6. Planning the Antonine wall: an archaeometric reassesment of installation spacing – Nick Hannon, Lyn Wilson, Darrell J Rohl ;
7. The curious incident of the structure at Bar Hill and its implications – Rebecca H Jones ;
8. Monuments on the margins of Empire: the Antonine Wall sculptures – Louisa Campbell ;
9. Building an image: soldiers’ labour and the Antonine Wall Distance Slabs – Iain M. Ferris ;
10. New perspectives on the structure of the Antonine Wall – Tanja Romankiewicz, Karen Milek, Chris Beckett, Ben Russell and J. Riley Snyder ;
11. Wing-walls and waterworks. On the planning and purpose of the Antonine Wall – Erik Graafstal ;
12. The importance of fieldwalking: the discovery of three fortlets on the Antonine Wall – James J. Walker ;
13. The Roman temporary camp and fortlet at Summerston, Strathclyde – Gordon S. Maxwell and William S. Hanson ;
14. Thinking small: fortlet evolution on the Upper German Limes, Hadrian’s Wall, the Antonine Wall and Raetian Limes – Matthew Symonds ;
15. The Roman fort and fortlet at Castlehill on the Antonine Wall: the geophysical, LiDAR and early map evidence – William S. Hanson and Richard E. Jones ;
16. ‘... one of the most remarkable traces of Roman art ... in the vicinity of the Antonine Wall.’ A forgotten funerary urn of Egyptian travertine from Camelon, and related stone vessels from Castlecary – Fraser Hunter ;
17. The Kirkintilloch hoard revisited – J.D. Bateson ;
18. The external supply of pottery and cereals to Antoni
NEW: The Rock-Art Landscapes of Rombalds Moor, West Yorkshire Standing on Holy Ground by Vivien Deacon. Paperback; 205x290mm; 228 pages; 163 figures; 36 tables. 605 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694581. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694598. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This landscape study of the rock-art of Rombalds Moor, West Yorkshire, considers views of and from the sites. In an attempt to understand the rock-art landscapes of prehistory the study considered the environment of the moor and its archaeology along with the ethnography from the whole circumpolar region.

All the rock-art sites were visited, and the sites, motifs and views recorded. The data was analysed at four spatial scales, from the whole moor down to the individual rock. Several large prominent and impressive carved rocks, interpreted as natural monuments, were found to feature in the views from many much smaller rock-art sites. Several clusters of rock-art sites were identified. An alignment was also identified, composed of carved stones perhaps moved into position. Other perhaps-moved carved stones were also identified. The possibility that far-distant views might be significant was also indicated by some of the findings.

The physicality of carving arose as a major theme. The natural monuments are all difficult or dangerous to carve; conversely, the more common, simple sites mostly required the carver to kneel or crouch down. This, unexpectedly for British rock-art, raises comparisons with some North American rock-art, where some highly visible sites were carved by religious specialists, and others, inconspicuous and much smaller, were carved by ordinary people.

About the Author
Vivien Deacon is a Research Associate at the Department of Archaeology, University of York. Following a career in the NHS, she did a BA in Archaeology at York and went on to be awarded a PhD in 2018.

Table of Contents (Provisional)
Preface ;
Chapter One: Background to the study ;
Chapter Two: Encountering Rock-art ;
Chapter Three: Landscapes of Rock-art ;
Chapter Four: Rombalds Moor ;
Chapter Five: Methodology ;
Chapter Six: Results I - The Whole Moor ;
Chapter Seven: Results II - Natural Monuments in their Large Locales ;
Chapter Eight: Results III - Small Locales ;
Chapter Nine: Results IV - The individual carved rock ;
Chapter Ten: Discussion ;
Appendices
NEW: Khirbat Faris: Rural Settlement, Continuity and Change in Southern Jordan. The Nabatean to Modern Periods (1st century BC – 20th century AD) Volume 1: Stratigraphy, Finds and Architecture by Alison McQuitty, Holly Parton, Andrew Petersen. Paperback; 205x290mm; 428 pages; 271 figures, 60 tables. 601 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693898. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693904. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Khirbat Faris: Rural Settlement, Continuity and Change in Southern Jordan. The Nabatean to Modern Periods (1st century BC – 20th century AD) is the first of three volumes which chart the temporal, and spatial, occupational fluctuations at the site of Khirbat Faris in Southern Jordan and the stories of the communities that lived there. The detailed final excavation report follows the site and its environs throughout their many phases of use and occupation, from the 13th century BC to the present day. It provides a firm foundation for the succeeding discussions on key questions affecting our picture of the Nabatean, Late Antique and Islamic Levant. This well-illustrated book is essential reading for archaeologists, architectural historians, historical geographers, ethnographers: for anyone trying to understand the impact of varied environmental, social and economic forces upon settlement; for anyone seeking to unravel ways in which the use of ethnographic and historical data, together with archaeology and the types of excavation and analysis employed, can best respond to questions about rural settlement; for anyone eager to unpick the relationship between ‘The Desert’ and ‘The Sown’, between nomad and farmer, between tribe and state, between Christianity and Islam.

About the Authors
Alison McQuitty is an archaeologist who has worked on projects in England, Jordan and Syria with a particular interest in the post-mediaeval period, ethnoarchaeology and vernacular architecture. Alison became the first Director of the Council for British Research in the Levant. Alison is co-director of the Khirbat Faris Project.

Holly Parton is an archaeologist specialising in finds processing and storage management. She has worked on projects in Greece, Turkey, Italy, the Levant, Libya, Central Asia and Qatar, covering a wide range of periods from prehistoric through to the 19th century AD. She is particularly interested in mills, of all kinds, and is a longstanding member of The International Molinological Society (TIMS).

Andrew Petersen is Director of Research in Islamic Archaeology at the University of Wales Lampeter. He has carried out fieldwork in many parts of the Islamic world including Iraq, Oman, Jordan, Palestine, UAE and Qatar. For the last two years, he has been working on the archaeology of coastal settlement in northern Qatar in collaboration with the Qatar Museums Authority.
NEW: El instrumental de pesca en el Fretum Gaditanum Catalogación, análisis tipo-cronológico y comparativa regional edited by José Manuel Vargas Girón. Paperback; 205x290mm; 188 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Online catalogue. Papers in Spanish and English. 598 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693850. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693867. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

El instrumental de pesca en el Fretum Gaditanum : Catalogación, análisis tipo-cronológico y comparativa region analyses fishing tackle in the region known as Fretum Gaditanum (Straits of Gibraltar), where over a thousand pieces of fishing tackle have been identified. The book offers a typo-chronological classification of the material, which follows a diachronic discourse spanning from the Phoenician-Punic period to Late Antiquity. Special emphasis is given to the morphological-typological changes undergone by these artefacts and technological changes over time. In this way, a comprehensive picture of the fishing arts practised in the environment of Gades during Antiquity is drawn. The corpus is compared to assemblages found in other Atlantic and Mediterranean regions.

About the Editor
José Manuel Vargas Girón holds a BA degree in History (2008)—including an Extraordinary Graduation Prize—an MA in Archaeological-Historical Heritage (2010) and a PhD in Maritime History and Archaeology (2017), all awarded by the University of Cádiz. His research has focused on recording and studying fishing tackle in antiquity and has resulted in the elaboration of a corpus of reference, which includes over a thousand items of fishing tackle. He has participated in numerous research projects, both nationally and internationally (Italy and Morocco), and he has published his results in book chapters, articles, conference proceedings and catalogue entries.

Spanish Description
El estudio de los instrumentos de pesca constituye una reciente línea de investigación que está deparando interesantes resultados para el conocimiento de una de las actividades económicas de mayor arraigo en las sociedades marítimas del pasado: la pesca. Este libro constituye una primera aproximación a la problemática de este tipo de material arqueológico en la región conocida como Fretum Gaditanum, habiéndose elaborado un corpus documental donde se han inventariado casi mil evidencias de instrumental pesquero. En estas páginas el lector encontrará un análisis tipo-cronológico de los materiales catalogados, para lo cual seguiremos un discurso diacrónico, desde época fenicio-púnica hasta la Antigüedad Tardía, incidiendo en la evolución morfo-tipológica que han sufrido estos artefactos y valorándose los cambios tecnológicos que han ido produciéndose a lo largo de la historia. De esta manera, se ha conseguido obtener una visión de conjunto de las artes de pesca practicadas en el entorno gaditano durante la Antigüedad, habiéndose podido comparar el instrumental pesquero del Fretum Gaditanum con el de otras regiones atlánticas y mediterráneas.

José Manuel Vargas Girón es licenciado en Historia por la Universidad de Cádiz (2003-2008), obteniendo el Premio Extraordinario de Fin de Carrera. Realizó un máster en Patrimonio Histórico-Arqueológico en la Universidad de Cádiz (2009-2010). Obtuvo el grado de Doctor en Historia y Arqueológía Marítimas en la Universidad de Cádiz (2017). Su línea de investigación ha girado en torno a la documentación y estudio de los instrumentos de pesca en la Antigüedad, elaborando un corpus de referencia donde se han recopilado casi mil evidencias de instrumental pesquero. Su labor científica puede resumirse en los siguientes puntos: participación en numerosos proyectos de investigación tanto nacionales como internacionales (Italia y Marruecos); publicaciones científicas (libros, capítulos de libros, artículos científicos, actas de congresos, fichas de catálogo de exposiciones y recensiones); participación en reuniones científicas nacionales e internacionales; organización de actividades científicas; estancias internacionales de investigación en centros de excelencia.
NEW IN PAPERBACK: London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 by John Schofield, Lyn Blackmore and Jacqui Pearce, with Tony Dyson. Paperback; 210x297mm; xxiv+514 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (132 colour plates). English text with summaries in French and German.. 422 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695595. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918385. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Please note: 2018 hardback edition is now out of print. New paperback edition published in March 2020.

London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 presents and celebrates the mile-long Thames Street in the City of London and the land south of it to the River Thames as an archaeological asset. The argument is based on the reporting of four excavations of 1974–84 by the Museum of London near the north end of London Bridge: Swan Lane, Seal House, New Fresh Wharf and Billingsgate Lorry Park. Here the findings of the period 1100–1666 are presented.

Buildings and property development on sixteen properties south of Thames Street, on land reclaimed in many stages since the opening of the 12th century, include part of the parish church of St Botolph Billingsgate. The many units of land reclamation are dated by dendrochronology, coins and documents. They have produced thousands of artefacts and several hundred kilos of native and foreign pottery. Much of this artefactual material has been published, but in catalogue form (shoes, knives, horse fittings, dress accessories, textiles, household equipment). Now the context of these finds, their deposition in groups, is laid out for the first time. Highlights of the publication include the first academic analysis and assessment of a 13th- or 14th-century trumpet from Billingsgate, the earliest surviving straight trumpet in Europe; many pilgrim souvenirs; analysis of two drains of the 17th century from which suggestions can be made about use of rooms and spaces within documented buildings; and the proposal that one of the skeletons excavated from St Botolph’s church is John Reynewell, mayor of London in 1426–7 and a notable figure in London’s medieval history.

The whole publication encourages students and other researchers of all kinds to conduct further research on any aspect of the sites and their very rich artefactual material, which is held at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive. This is a significantly large and varied dataset for the archaeology and history of London in the period 1100 to 1666 which can be continuously interrogated for generations to come.

About the Authors
John Schofield was an archaeologist at the Museum of London from 1974 to 2008. He has written several well-received books on the archaeology of London and of British medieval towns; and as Cathedral Archaeologist for St Paul’s Cathedral, archaeological accounts of the medieval and Wren buildings. ;
Lyn Blackmore is a Senior Ceramics and Finds Specialist who has worked for MOLA and its predecessors since 1986. In 2009–14 she was Assistant Treasurer of the Medieval Pottery Research Group and in 2017 was elected co-editor of its journal Medieval Ceramics, a role she first held in 1989–94. ;
Jacqui Pearce is a Senior Ceramics Specialist with MOLA, focusing especially on medieval and later pottery, on which she has published widely. In 2017 she was elected President of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology. ;
Tony Dyson was the principal documentary historian and general editor at the Department of Urban Archaeology of the Museum of London from 1974 to 1998.

NEW: The Neglected Goat: A New Method to Assess the Role of the Goat in the English Middle Ages by Lenny Salvagno. Paperback; 203x276mm; 888 pages; 744 figures, 351 tables (colour throughout). 113 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696295. £120.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696301. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Distinguishing between the bones of sheep and goats is a notorious challenge in zooarchaeology. Several methods have been proposed to facilitate this task, largely based on macro-morphological traits.

This approach, which is routinely adopted by zooarchaeologists, although still valuable, has also been shown to have limitations: morphological discriminant traits can differ in different sheep/ goat populations and a correct identification is highly dependent upon experience, as well as the availability of appropriate reference collections and the degree to which a researcher is prepared to ‘risk’ an identification.

The Neglected Goat provides a new, more objective and transparent methodology, based on a combination of morphological and biometrical analyses, to distinguish between sheep and goat post cranial bones. Additionally, on the basis of the newly proposed approach, it reassesses the role of the goat in medieval England.

There are several historical and archaeological questions concerning the role of this animal that have so far remained unanswered: why is the goat commonly recorded in the Domesday Book, when it appears to be so scarce in the contemporary archaeological record? Is the goat under-represented in the archaeological record or over-represented in the Domesday Book? Why is this animal, when identified in English medieval animal bone assemblages, almost exclusively represented by horncores?

Through the investigation of a number of English sheep and goat medieval assemblages, this study sheds light on these questions, and suggests that the goat was indeed rarer than the Domesday Book suggests.

About the Author
Lenny Salvagno has an Honours Degree in Cultural Heritage with Archaeology from the University of Parma (Italy) and a PhD in zooarchaeology from the University of Sheffield (UK). At Sheffield, she also completed a two-year Post-Doc (funded by the Gerda Henkel Stiftung) focussing on changes in pig husbandry during the Late Medieval-Early Modern transition in England. She is now an Honorary Research Fellow at the Department of Archaeology in Sheffield and a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Post- Doctoral Fellow at the Institute of Palaeoanatomy, domestication research and veterinary history, at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich (Germany). Lenny’s main interests are in animal domestication and husbandry intensification, the use of animals in medieval and post-medieval Britain, as well as Bronze and Iron Age Italy, ritual deposits, and the use of statistics and geometric morphometrics in zooarchaeology. She is also passiona oarchaeology and the presentation of this field of study to the general public.
NEW: The Neolithic Lithic Industry at Tell Ain El-Kerkh Excavation Reports of Tell el-Kerkh, Northwestern Syria 1 by Makoto Arimura. Paperback; 205x290mm; 388 pages; 158 figures, 192 tables, 132 plates. Print RRP: £60.00. 618 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694567. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694574. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Northwest Syria during the Neolithic period has been less well studied than the rest of the northern Levant, where Neolithisation first took place in the Near East. The Neolithic Lithic Industry at Tell Ain El-Kerkh presents the first attempt to unveil the Neolithisation process in northwest Syria, with the techno-typological studies of the flintstone implements from Tell Ain el-Kerkh in the Rouj basin in Idlib, which was an important large Neolithic site occupied from the from the 9th to the 7th millennium BC.

Examination of the lithic record from Tell Ain el-Kerkh revealed techno-morphological changes in flint tools during the long Neolithic sequence from the Early Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB) to the end of the Pottery Neolithic. The author interprets such changes in stone tools in the socio-economic context of the Neolithic. Through the comparison between the data obtained from Tell Ain el-Kerkh and other Neolithic sites in the northern Levant, the regional characteristics of northwest Syria during the Neolithic period are highlighted. In the end, two important issues in the Neolithic Levant, diffusion of the PPNB culture and the PPNB collapse, are discussed based on the results of this study.

This volume includes substantial original data, drawings, and analysis of lithics from Neolithic sites in Syria, which will be useful for future discussion of the changes in material culture in relation with the Neolithisation process in the Near East.

About the Author
Makoto Arimura is a professor at Tokai University, Japan. He obtained his undergraduate degree in archaeology (1995) from the University of Tsukuba, Japan, under Professor Akira Tsuneki, and his PhD in archaeology (2007) from the Université Lumière Lyon 2, France, under Professor Olivier Aurenche and Dr Éric Coqueugniot. After a project assistant post at the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Kyoto (2006), he worked at the Tokyo National Research Institute for Cultural Properties (NRICP) as a research fellow (2007–2012). He taught at Kanazawa University as an associate professor in museology (2013–2016). Arimura has participated in the excavation of Near Eastern prehistoric sites such as Tell el-Kerkh and Dja’de el-Mughara, Syria. His primary research topic is the transformation of human society during Neolithisation, through changes in material culture, particularly the transition of stone tool manufacturing technology in the Neolithic Near East.
NEW: Late Prehistoric Fortifications in Europe: Defensive, Symbolic and Territorial Aspects from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age Proceedings of the International Colloquium ‘FortMetalAges’, Guimarães, Portugal edited by Davide Delfino, Fernando Coimbra, Gonçalo P. C. Cruz and Daniela Cardoso. Paperback; 205x290mm; 256 pages; 93 figures; 5 tables; 2 maps (colour throughout). 617 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692549. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692556. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Late Prehistoric Fortifications in Europe: Defensive, Symbolic and Territorial Aspects from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age presents the contributions to the International Colloquium ‘FortMetalAges’ (10th–12th November 2017, Guimarães, Portugal), The Colloquium was organised by the Scientific Commission ‘Metal Ages in Europe’ of the International Union of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP/ IUSPP) and by the Martin Sarmento Society of Guimarães. Nineteen papers discuss different interpretive ideas for defensive structures whose construction had necessitated large investment, present new case studies, and conduct comparative analysis between different regions and chronological periods from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age.

About the Editors
Davide Delfino obtained his PhD from the University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro. He is a Bronze Age specialist at the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities, Visiting Professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (UNESCO Chair in Humanity and Cultural Integrated Landscape Management), and an internal researcher of the Geosciences Centre (University of Coimbra). In 2015 Davide was appointed secretary of the UISPP/IUPPS Scientific Commission ‘Metal Ages in Europe’. ;

Fernando A. Coimbra holds a PhD in Prehistory and Archaeology (University of Salamanca ‘Extraordinary Prize’). Fernando is Visiting Professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar, and internal researcher of the Geosciences Centre (University of Coimbra), Portugal, where he completed post-doctoral research on the Bronze and Iron Age rock art of the Tagus Valley. He is a member of several research projects in Portugal, Italy, Malta and Greece. ;

Gonçalo P. C. Cruz graduated in History and Archaeology at the University of Minho (Braga, Portugal) and is a staff archaeologist at the Martins Sarmento Society, Guimarães. His work involves the research and management of the archaeological sites under the administration of the Society, namely the Citânia de Briteiros and Castro de Sabroso, as well as the functioning and activity in different nuclei of the Martins Sarmento Museum. ;

Daniela Cardoso graduated in Landscape Archaeology at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar, held an Erasmus award in Italy at the University of Ferrara in 2000, and completed in 2002 her Master of Advanced Studies degree at the Institute of Human Palaeontology, Paris. In 2015 she obtained her PhD in ‘Quaternário, Materiais e Culturas’ at the University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Portugal. She is currently Senior Museum Technician at the Martins Sarmento Society.
NEW: Tales of Three Worlds - Archaeology and Beyond: Asia, Italy, Africa A Tribute to Sandro Salvatori edited by Donatella Usai, Stefano Tuzzato and Massimo Vidale. Paperback; 205x290mm; 372 pages; 260 figures (128 plates in colour). 615 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694406. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694413. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Tales of Three Worlds collects, as a sign of gratitude and affection, a series of papers by many authors who, in different times, contexts and contingencies, had the luck to meet Sandro Salvatori, and share with him a path of knowledge and mutual personal acquaintance. The book is divided in three sections. Whatever was the apparent relevance of what he was documenting and protecting, Sandro always acted with a deep sense of personal responsibility and with the utmost care. The first section deals with his long years of work in Middle Asia, from the plains of Sistan to those of the Indus, the coasts of the Omani peninsula and southern Turkmenistan. Here, as all authors acknowledge, Sandro's papers have marked true benchmarks of archaeological research – milestones that will be used by others for many future decades for new outlines of the social evolution in the involved regions. The second tells about Sandro's activities in Italy, as an officer of the Archaeological Superintendency (Ministry of Cultural Heritage) of his region; for years, he was daily on duty for monitoring and preserving a wide range of cultural contexts, often far from the lights of the academic scenarios. Third comes a section on the prehistory of north-eastern Africa, a context in which Sandro could work in full scientific and familiar ease, as he was prevented from doing in other situations. The groundbreaking nature of his work here is self-evident. The editors and authors of the book know very well that the sign left by this book is certainly too little for what Sandro has actually done in our field and in the life of many friends and colleagues – but the sign is a long-due one, and it is sincere.

About the Editors
Donatella Usai graduated in Italian prehistory and holds a PhD in African Archaeology. She is director of the El-Salha/Al- Khiday Archaeological Project-CSS&S in Sudan since 2000; has published various monographs and numerous papers on prehistory of Africa and other areas where she has been working for the past thirty years.

Stefano Tuzzato specialised in classical and medieval archaeology at the Catholic University of Milan. He is a professional archaeologist and project manager in archaeology and permanent collaborator of the Superintendencies, conducting interventions for public bodies, for individuals and for companies mainly in Italy but also abroad (Nepal, Giordania, Turkmenistan, Sudan). He published numerous papers in specialised magazines and monographs.

Massimo Vidale has carried out archaeological and ethnoarchaeological studies in Italy, Asia and Africa for the last 45 years. His main focus is the study of ancient and traditional craft technologies, interlaced with the micro-stratigraphic study of ancient workshops and activity areas. He is Professor of Archaeology of Craft Production and Near Eastern Archaeology at the Department of Cultural Heritage of the University of Padova.
NEW: Archaeology: What it is, where it is, and how to do it (4th Edition) by Paul Wilkinson. Paperback; 190x250mm; 104 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout; additional material online. 612 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695311. £15.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695601. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £15.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

BACK IN PRINT: Archaeology: What It Is, Where It Is, and How to Do It has been written as a practical introduction on the investigation of the material remains of the past which can be interpreted with contemporary historical and literary evidence. The book also explains where to find this evidence and what to do next. Many aspects of archaeological investigation are discussed, including aerial and ground survey, excavation and fieldwork, recording methods, soil sampling and small finds.

‘A very useful basic introduction to archaeology’Mick Aston

‘I wish this book had been available when I started out in archaeology back in the 1960s. It tells you everything you need to know in order to decide what sort of archaeology you’d like to learn more about. It doesn’t just deal with digging; instead it introduces you to aerial photography, geophysics, surveying, recording, finds processing, soil science and how to take samples – in fact all the subjects you’ll need to master if you want to become a field archaeologist. It’s well written and beautifully illustrated in full colour throughout. It would be cheap at twice the price!’Francis Pryor

First published in 2007. 4th edition published in 2020.
NEW: Bringing Down the Iron Curtain Paradigmatic Change in Research on the Bronze Age in Central and Eastern Europe? edited by Klára Šabatová, Laura Dietrich, Oliver Dietrich, Anthony Harding and Viktória Kiss. Paperback; 205x290mm; 186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (30 pages in colour). 610 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694543. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694550. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Bringing down the Iron Curtain: Paradigmatic changes in research on the Bronze Age in Central and Eastern Europe? presents the researches of scholars of different generations from twelve countries (Hungary, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Serbia, Croatia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Germany, USA, Canada, Austria) who participated in a session of the same title at the 20th Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists in Istanbul, 2014. The papers addressed the question of change in the approaches to Bronze Age research in the Central and Eastern European countries from different points of view. It has been a quarter of a century since the fall of communism in Central and Eastern Europe and the opening up of these areas to the West. With this process, archaeology saw a large influx of new projects and ideas. Bilateral contacts, Europe-wide circulation of scholars and access to research literature has fuelled the transformation processes. This volume is the first study which relates these issues specifically to Bronze Age Archaeology. The contributions discuss not only theoretical issues, but also current developments in all aspects of archaeological practice.

About the Editors
Klára Šabatová studied archaeology at Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic, and teaches prehistory there. Her research focuses on Bronze Age and landscape archaeology in Central Europe. Her interests include the processing of large quantities of pottery and settlement archaeology. She has led excavations on Neolithic and Bronze Age sites in Moravia. At present she is particularly concerned with Bronze Age chronology and burial rites.

Laura Dietrich studied prehistoric archaeology in Bucharest and Berlin. She has worked on projects from south-eastern Europe to the Levant, and since 2011 has been a Research Assistant at the German Archaeological Institute. Her research focuses on the archaeology of food and conflict.

Oliver Dietrich studied prehistoric archaeology in Berlin and works at the German Archaeological Institute. His research focus is the Neolithic and Bronze Age between south-eastern Europe and the Near East. His interests include archaeology of religion and cult, metallurgy, agents of craft in prehistory and distribution modes of prehistoric innovations.

Anthony Harding is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology at the University of Exeter, UK, and an Affiliate of the Philosophical Faculty of Charles University, Prague. He specialises in European Bronze Age archaeology and has written several books and many articles on various aspects of the Bronze Age. He has led excavations in Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania as well as Britain. In recent years he has worked extensively on the archaeology of salt exploitation.

Viktória Kiss is a senior research fellow of the Institute of Archaeology, Research Centre for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. She specialises in Central European Bronze Age archaeology. She has written a book about Middle Bronze Age Encrusted Pottery in Western Hungary, and edited several other volumes concerning the Bronze Age archaeology of the region. In recent years she has worked on pottery, metal production, bioarchaeology and mobility.
NEW: Approaches to the Analysis of Production Activity at Archaeological Sites edited by Anna K. Hodgkinson and Cecilie Lelek Tvetmarken. Paperback; 205x290mm; 206 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (58 pages in colour). 609 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695571. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695588. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Approaches to the Analysis of Production Activity at Archaeological Sites presents the proceedings of an international and interdisciplinary workshop held in Berlin in 2018, which brought together scholars whose work focusses on manufacturing activities identified at archaeological sites. The various approaches presented here include new excavation techniques, ethnographic research, archaeometric approaches, GIS and experimental archaeology as well as theoretical issues associated with how researchers understand production in the past. These approaches are applied to research questions related to various technological and socio-economic aspects of production, including the organisation and setting of manufacturing activities, the access to and use of raw materials, firing structures and other production-related installations. The chapters discuss production activities in various domestic and institutional contexts throughout the ancient world, together with the production and use of tools and other items made of stone, bone, ceramics, glass and faience. Since manufacturing activities are encountered at archaeological sites on a regular basis, the wide range of materials and approaches presented in this volume provides a useful reference for scholars and students studying technologies and production activities in the past.

About the Editors
Anna K. Hodgkinson (PhD Liverpool 2014) has recently completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the Excellence Cluster Topoi. Her research focusses on Late Bronze Age (LBA) Egyptian settlement archaeology, LBA glass industries and chemical analysis of LBA glass objects. She has conducted archaeological fieldwork at the LBA Egyptian sites of Amarna, Gurob and Qantir.

Cecilie Lelek Tvetmarken (PhD Liverpool 2013) has worked as a post-doctoral researcher on several projects at the German Archaeological Institute (DAI), Berlin, and is currently involved in the joint Iranian-Danish research project ‘Tracking Cultural and Environmental Change’ (Razi University, Kermanshah, and the University of Copenhagen). Her research focusses on architecture and the use of space during the Neolithic in the Near East. She has conducted archaeological fieldwork at several Neolithic sites in Turkey, Jordan and Iran.
NEW: The Hypocephalus: An Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet by Tamás Mekis. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+356 pages; 95 figures, 36 plates. 586 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 25. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693331. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693348. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The hypocephalus is an element of Late Period and Ptolemaic funerary equipment – an amuletic disc placed under the head of mummies. Its shape emulates the sun’s disc, and its form is planar, although it occasionally has a concave shape (in such cases, it protects the head as a funerary cap). The earliest known example can be dated to the 4th century BC and the latest to the 2nd/1st century BC. The Hypocephalus: an Ancient Egyptian Funerary Amulet analyses both the written records and iconography of these objects. So far, 158 examples are known; several, unfortunately, from old descriptions only. The relatively low number shows that the object was not a widespread item of funerary equipment. Only priest and priestly families used them, those of Amon in Thebes, of Min in Akhmim, and the ones of Ptah in Memphis. Among the examples, no two are identical. In some details, every piece is an individualized creation. Ancient Egyptian theologians certainly interpreted hypocephali as the iris of the wedjat-eye, amidst which travels the sun-god in his hidden, mysterious and tremendous form(s). The hypocephalus can be considered as the sun-disk itself. It radiates light and energy towards the head of the deceased, who again becomes a living being, feeling him/herself as ‘one with the Earth’ through this energy. The texts and the iconography derive principally from the supplementary chapters of the Book of the Dead. Some discs directly cite the text of spell 162 which furnishes the mythological background of the invention of the disc by the Great Cow, who protected her son Re by creating the disc at his death.

About the Author
Tamás Mekis graduated from the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest in 2007 with a degree in Egyptology. In 2013 he defended his PhD dissertation with summa cum laude. In quest of hypocephalus amulets he spent his traineeship in Brussels at the Royal Museums of Art and History in 2008 and in Paris at the Louvre Museum in 2010. He conducted extended researches at the Egyptian Museum of Cairo in 2007-9 and 2014-15, where, together with the curators of the museum, he found a rare hypocepalus of the prophet-registrar of Min-Horus-Isis Djed-hor/Wesirwer in situ, under the head of his undisturbed mummy. Tamás is an independent researcher.
NEW: Ceramics and Atlantic Connections: Late Roman and Early Medieval Imported Pottery on the Atlantic Seaboard Proceedings of an International Symposium at Newcastle University, March 2014 edited by Maria Duggan, Mark Jackson and Sam Turner. Paperback; 210x297mm;vi+150; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (Print RRP: £30.00). 583 2019 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 15. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693379. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693386. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Atlantic Seaboard has attracted increasing interest as a zone of economic complexity and social connection during Late Antiquity and the early medieval period. A surge in archaeological and, in particular, ceramic research emerging from this region over the last decade has demonstrated the need for new models of exchange between the Mediterranean and Atlantic, and for new understandings of links between sites along the Western littoral of Europe. Ceramics and Atlantic Connections: Late Roman and Early Medieval Imported Pottery on the Atlantic Seaboard stems from the Ceramics and Atlantic Connections symposium, hosted by the School of History, Classics and Archaeology, Newcastle University, in March 2014. This represents the first international workshop to consider late Roman to early medieval pottery from across the Atlantic Seaboard. Reflecting the wide geographical scope of the original presentations by the invited speakers, these nine articles from ceramic specialists and archaeologists working across the Atlantic region, cover western Britain, Ireland, western France, north-west Spain and Portugal.

The principal focus is the pottery of Mediterranean origin which was imported into the Atlantic, particularly East Mediterranean and North African amphorae and red-slipped finewares (African Red Slip and Late Roman C and D), as well as ceramics of Atlantic production which had widespread distributions, including Gaulish Dérivées-de-Sigillées Paléochrétiennes Atlantique/DSPA, céramique à l’éponge’ and ‘E-ware’. Following the aims of the Newcastle symposium, the papers examine the chronologies and relative distributions of these wares and associated products, and consider the compositions of key Atlantic assemblages, revealing new insights into the networks of exchange linking these regions between c. 400-700 AD. This broad-scale exploration of ceramic patterns, together with an examination of associated artefactual, archaeological and textual evidence for maritime exchange, provides a window into the political, economic, cultural and ecclesiastical ties that linked the disparate regions of the Late Antique and early medieval Atlantic. In this way, this volume presents a benchmark for current understandings of ceramic exchange in the Atlantic Seaboard and provides a foundation for future research on connectivity in this zone.

About the Editors


Maria Duggan works on European Late Antique and early medieval archaeology, particularly focusing on late Roman and Byzantine pottery and long-distance exchange and contact. She is currently a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at Newcastle University and the British School at Athens, conducting research on the imported ceramic assemblage from Tintagel, Cornwall.

Mark Jackson is Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at Newcastle University. He teaches and researches Late Antique, Byzantine and early Islamic archaeology in the Mediterranean and has a particular research interest in ceramics.

Sam Turner works on medieval archaeology and the cultural heritage of landscapes, with particular interests in Britain, Europe and the Mediterranean. He has worked at Newcastle University since 2004, where he is now Professor of Archaeology and Director of the interdisciplinary McCord Centre for Landscape.
NEW: Eastern Roman Mounted Archers and Extraordinary Medico-Surgical Interventions at Paliokastro in Thasos Island during the ProtoByzantine Period The Historical and Medical History Records and the Archaeo-Anthropological Evidence by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+50 pages; 28 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 111 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696011. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696028. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Procopius’ History of the Wars, and the Strategikon offer important aspects of Eastern Roman military tactical changes adopted against their enemies that brought the mounted archer-lancer to domineer in the synthesis of the army, along with concise descriptions of their training, panoply, and effectiveness in the battlefield during the later ProtoByzantine period. Yet, evidence in the archaeo-anthropological records of these highly specialized military members has remained elusive.

A recent archaeological discovery at the strategically positioned, upland, site of Paliokastro in Thasos island, Greece, and the subsequent study of the human skeletal remains interred in four monumental funerary contexts, in a dedicated naiskos building, provide for the first time through the archaeological record of the region a unique insight of the mounted archers and their female kin during the turbulent ProtoByzantine period. The interdisciplinary study of the anthropological materials focusing on skeletal developmental, acquired skeleto-muscular manifestations and skeleto-anatomical changes recovered valuable evidentiary data on aspects of their in vivo long-term training and preparation, traumatisms and pathologies along with extraordinary traces of cranial and infra-cranial surgical interventions and medical regimens by the hands of a most experienced surgeon.

In conjunction with the archaeological and anthropological evidence, historical and medical history records are integrated aiming toward a nexus with the human dynamics that transpired at Paliokastro within the context of the catastrophic consequences of the ‘barbarian’ invasions in the Aegean Thraco-Macedonia, and the ravages afforded by the Justinian plague during the later component of the ProtoByzantine period.

About the Author
Anagnostis P. Agelarakis is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of History at Adelphi University in New York. He studied Classical Archaeology and European Ethnology as an undergraduate, and as graduate Environmental Studies at Lund University and Lund Polytechnic Institute in Sweden. He holds a M. Phil. and Ph.D. (1989) in Anthropology from Columbia University, New York.
NEW: Pottery of Manqabad A Selected Catalogue of the Ceramic Assemblage from the Monastery of ‘Abba Nefer’ at Asuyt (Egypt) by Ilaria Incordino. Paperback; 203x276mm; 128 pages; fully illustrated catalogue in colour. 110 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695137. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695144. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Pottery of Manqabad presents a catalogue of selected pottery from the monastic site of Manqabad (Asyut, Egypt), which has, since 2011, been the object of an ongoing study and conservation project at the University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’ (UNIOR). The ceramic material, dated to the Late Antique Period, derives mostly from the SCA warehouse of el-Ashmunein, where it was kept soon after its accidental discovery in 1965. About 40 items derive from the surface collection and survey conducted on the site during the last fieldwork season (2018). The typologies identified include the most relevant Byzantine classes and a particular link with production from the Middle Egypt region. Part of the field survey was devoted to the analysis of the pottery material still in situ, found in the Northern Sector of the site where a 230m long row of monastic housing units is located. Further investigations will hopefully support the hypothesis of a local pottery production area, which could be identified in a large ‘dump’ at the southern end of the site. More generally, the analysis of the ceramics from Manqabad has underlined the undoubtedly high cultural level of the local monastic community, which can be deduced also from the textual, architectural and wall depiction evidence from the site. Manqabad was largely unknown to the scientific community, but since the first season of work by the Italian-Egyptian project, it has emerged as an important venue for the religious development of Coptic culture between the second half of the Vth to the end of the VIII- early IXth century AD.

About the author
Ilaria Incordino is Research Fellow and Adjunct Professor of Egyptology (BA) at the University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’ (UNIOR). Since 2011 she has been Deputy Director of the Italian-Egyptian Project of Study and Conservation of the Monastery of Manqabad, Asuyt, Egypt (UNIOR, Rome University, SCA), in charge of the study of the Late Antique pottery. She was promoter of several academic events at UNIOR: the Summer School ‘Pottery of the Nile Valley. Classification, documentation and new technology of analysis’ (2019), the ‘Current Research in Egyptology conference’ (2017), the MA in ‘Egyptology: Research Methods and Technology’ (2010) and the ‘First Neapolitan Congress of Egyptology’ (2008). In 2016 she was Curator of the new exposition of the Egyptian Collection of the National Archaeological Museum in Naples (MANN). She was member of the UNIOR excavations in the Eastern Central Desert (UNIOR, Helwan University, Cairo University) and at Mersa/Wadi Gawasis (UNIOR, Boston University).