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Archaeopress: Publishing Scholarly Archaeology since 1997
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide.

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in scholarly books and journals in the field of archaeology and related heritage subjects.

SEASONAL OFFER: Save 35% on all Archaeopress books, eBooks and subscriptions until 31/12/2020. Discount applies to prices listed online and in our new Winter Catalogue. To claim your discount, order using this form.

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Myster-E Box: 5 eBooks for £5!. Only available as e-version. £5.00 (Exc. VAT) Buy Now

TODAY'S DAILY MYSTER-E BOX THEME IS ROMAN ARCHAEOLOGY: Get 5 mystery eBooks for £5!
From 1st December we will be hosting a daily 'Mystery Box' on our website, offering five eBooks for £5 for one day only (weekdays only). Although the identity of the mystery titles will be a secret, each day will be themed and this theme will be listed on the website each day, and publicised via the Archaeopress Alert and our social media channels. The typical value of the eBooks included will be £80.*

The theme of the first four boxes will be:
Tuesday 1st December: Roman
Wednesday 2nd December: Pre-Columbian America
Thursday 3rd December: British Prehistory
Friday 4th December: Egypt and Sudan


HOW TO ORDER
The Mystery box will be available to purchase via this page from approx. 10 AM tomorrow (1st December). The box will be listed as an eBook product. Once purchased you will be able to download all 5 eBooks immediately following payment (individual eBook PDFs will be bundled together in a single zipped file).

*Based on five eBooks sold separately at our standard price of £16. No free download or Open Access eBook titles will be included in the offer. No refunds, exchanges, or returns will be offered.
NEW: Corpus des amphores romaines produites dans les centres de mer Noire Collections des musées de la côte turque de la mer Noire (Ereğli, Amasra, Sinop, Samsun, Giresun, Ordu, Trabzon et Amasya) by Dominique Kassab Tezgör. Paperback; 205x290mm; 198 pages; 4 tables, 48 plates. French text. 689 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 74. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696974. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696981. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Black Sea cities of Turkey's northern coast – Ereğli , Amasra, Sinop, Samsun, Giresun, Ordu, Trabzon, and inland Amasya – are endowed with museums whose holdings include important collections of amphorae. Their state of preservation is also exceptional since the majority were recovered intact from the sea. Most were produced in the big manufacturing centres around the Black Sea during the Roman period, between the 2nd/3rd centuries BCE and the 7th century CE. This Corpus brings them together and analyses them in the light of recent investigations. The production lines of Sinop and Colchis are especially well represented and can be followed without interruption over several centuries. The size of the assemblage – ca. 450 vessels – provides an overview of manufacturing trends for Black Sea amphorae, and brings out the similarities and differences in technique and morphology that distinguished one workshop from another. Research on this corpus has also offered an opportunity to consider questions inherent to amphora studies, such as what commercial goods they contained; how vessel shapes related to the regional resources for which they were designed; standardized volumes; and the use of amphoras in paying the annona.

About the Author
Dominique Kassab Tezgör was the scientific director of the excavation of a workshop of amphorae settled close to the ancient city of Sinope on the Turkish Black Sea coast. A large part of her research has been devoted to the amphorae of Sinop and the Black Sea amphorae of the Roman and Late antiquity periods. She is a professor in the Department of Archaeology of Bilkent University at Ankara (Turkey).

French Description
Les villes d'Ereğli, Amasra, Sinop, Samsun, Giresun, Ordu, et Trabzon qui sont implantées sur la côte nord de la Turquie, ainsi qu'Amasya à l'intérieur des terres, sont dotées d'un musée. Les amphores constituent une part importante de leur collection et sont dans un très bon état de conservation, car elles ont été trouvées en mer. La plupart ont été produites dans les grands centres installés sur le pourtour de la mer Noire à l'époque romaine entre le IIe/IIIe s. et le VIIe s. de nè. Réunies dans ce Corpus, elles sont étudiées à la lumière des recherches les plus récentes. Les productions de Sinope et de la Colchide sont particulièrement bien représentées et peuvent être suivies sur plusieurs siècles sans interruption. Cet assemblage de près de 450 conteneurs offre une vue générale de l'activité amphorique en mer Noire et montre des similitudes et les différences dans les traits techniques et morphologiques d'un atelier à l'autre.Il a également permis d'aborder quelques questions qui sont inhérentes à l'étude des amphores, comme les produits commercialisés, l'association de la forme et des ressources régionales, ou encore la standardisation des volumes et le paiement de l'annona.

Dominique Kassab Tezgör a été la directrice scientifique de la fouille de l'atelier amphorique implanté près de la ville antique de Sinope sur la côte turque de la mer Noire. Une grande partie de ses recherches porte sur les amphores de Sinope et de mer Noire à l'époque romaine et pendant l'antiquité tardive. Elle est professeur au département d'archéologie de l'université de Bilkent à Ankara (Turkey).
NEW: Animal Husbandry and Hunting in the Central and Western Balkans Through Time edited by Nemanja Marković and Jelena Bulatović. Paperback; 205x290mm; 198 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 687 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696936. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696943. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Herding and hunting, along with farming, represented the economic basis of subsistence of communities in the past. The strategies of animal husbandry and hunting were diverse and different between communities, whilst they also changed over time. The differences and variations were sometimes caused by local or regional environmental conditions, but were also the result of social, cultural, political, and even religious factors.

Animal Husbandry and Hunting in the Central and Western Balkans Through Time brings new results of research on animal herding and hunting in the central and western Balkans during prehistoric and historic periods. The investigations presented here cover a wide range of topics related to animal exploitation strategies; they range from broad syntheses to specific case studies and, moreover, include interdisciplinary studies that use zooarchaeological and historical data, iconographic representations and modern laboratory analysis.

About the Editors
Nemanja Marković is a research associate, zooarchaeologist at the Institute of Archaeology, Belgrade (Serbia). The focus of his research is the reconstruction of past human-animal relationships, mainly in the field of animal economy, strategies in animal husbandry and palaeopathology. ;

Jelena Bulatović is a research associate at the Laboratory for Bioarchaeology, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade (Serbia). Her research interests focus on zooarchaeology, studying human-animal interrelationships in the central and western Balkans from the Early Neolithic to the Late Iron Age.
NEW: Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing Patterns of Travel to the Middle East from Medieval to Modern Times edited by Paul and Janet Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; 422 pages; Illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (91 pages in colour). 686 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697520. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697537. Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Pious Pilgrims, Discerning Travellers, Curious Tourists: Changing patterns of travel to the Middle East from medieval to modern times comprises a varied collection of seventeen papers presented at the biennial conference of the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) held in York in July 2019, which together will provide the reader with a fascinating introduction to travel in and to the Middle East over more than a thousand years.

As in previous ASTENE volumes, the material presented ranges widely, from Ancient Egyptian sites through medieval pilgrims to tourists and other travellers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The papers embody a number of different traditions, including not only actual but also fictional travel experiences, as well as pilgrimage or missionary narratives reflecting quests for spiritual wisdom as well as geographical knowledge. They also reflect the shifting political and cultural relations between Europe and the Near and Middle East, and between the different religions of the area, as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region over the centuries. The men and women travellers discussed travelled for a wide variety of reasons — religious, commercial, military, diplomatic, or sometimes even just for a holiday! — but whatever their primary motivations, they were almost always also inspired by a sense of curiosity about peoples and places less familiar than their own. By recording their experiences, whether in words or in art, they have greatly contributed to our understanding of what has shaped the world we live in. As Ibn Battuta, one of the greatest of medieval Arab travellers, wrote: ‘Travelling — it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller!’

Table of Contents (provisional)
Introduction – Paul and Janet Starkey ;
1. Pilgrimage as Travel – Jacke Phillips ;
2. Ibn Jubayr’s Riḥla Reconsidered – Paul Starkey ;
3. ‘Gardens of Paradise’ – Janet Starkey ;
4. ‘Wady Ghrásheca’: an unknown Christian site in Sir Gardner Wilkinson’s unpublished manuscripts from the Eastern Desert – Jan Ciglenečki & Blaž Zabel ;
5. Exploring the Ottoman Empire: the travels of Peter Mundy (1597–c.1667) in Turkey 1617–1620 – Jennifer Scarce ;
6. With a radius most accurately divided into 10,000 parts: John Greaves and his scientific survey of Egypt in 1638–1639 – Ronald E. Zitterkopf ;
7. Dimitrie Cantemir, the ‘Orpheus of the Turkish Empire’ (1673– 1723) – Cristina Erck ;
8. The Artist William Page (1794–1872) and his travels in Greece and western Turkey in the first half of the nineteenth century – Brian J. Taylor ;
9. Jacob Röser: a Bavarian physician travelling the Ottoman Empire in 1834–1835 – Joachim Gierlichs ;
10. Publishing with ‘Modern Taste and Spirit’ – Paulina Banas ;
11. ‘Mr and Mrs Smith of England’: a tour to Petra and east of Jordan in 1865 – David Kennedy ;
12. Anton Prokesch-Osten Jr (1837–1919) – Angela Blaschek ;
13. William Wing Loring, George Brinton McClellan and Ulysses S. Grant: American Civil War Generals in Egypt during the 1870s – Mladen Tomorad ;
14. Consular Agents and Foreign Travellers in Upper Egypt in the Nineteenth Century – Terence Walz ;
15. A Luxor Room with a View at Pagnon’s Hotels – Sylvie Weens ;
16. Richard A. Bermann, the Desert and the Mahdi: an Austrian writer’s fascination with Egypt and the Sudan – Ernst Czerny ;
17. Unlawful Acts and Supernatural Curses: the fictional traveller in Bram Stoker’s The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903) – Rebecca Bruce ;
Notes on Contributors ;
Index
NEW: The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire A Juridical and Functional Approach to Town Life in Roman Gaul, Germania Inferior and Britain by Frida Pellegrino. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 164 figures (83 pages in colour). 685 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 72. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697742. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697759. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £48.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire investigates the development of urbanism in the north-western provinces of the Roman empire. Key themes include the continuities and discontinuities between pre-Roman and Roman ‘urban’ systems, the relationships between cities’ juridical statuses and their levels of monumentality, levels of connectivity and economic integration as illuminated by the geographical distribution of cities and town-like settlements belonging to various size brackets, and the shapes and nature of regional urban hierarchies, as reconstructed on the basis of not only the administrative centres but - crucially - all places that fulfilled urban ‘functions’.

About the Author
Frida Pellegrino graduated with honours in 2008, after completing a BA course in Archaeology at the University of Padua. She then enrolled in the MA course at the University of Padua and spent a year abroad, studying at Southampton University (UK), with the Erasmus project. She graduated summa cum laude in 2011, specialising in Roman archaeology. She completed her PhD at the University of Leiden in 2018.
NEW: Carving a Professional Identity: The Occupational Epigraphy of the Roman Latin West by Rada Varga. Paperback; 156x234mm; 126 pages; 13 graphs. 684 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 73. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694642. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694659. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Carving a Professional Identity: The occupational epigraphy of the Roman Latin West presents the results of long-term research into the occupational epigraphy from the Latin-language provinces of the Roman Empire. It catalogues stone epigraphs of independent professionals (thus excluding state workers, imperial slaves, freedmen and military personnel), comprising some 690 people, providing quantitative as well as qualitative analyses of the raw data. A glossary translating the occupational titles is also included. The book reveals a very lively work market, where specialisation responded to demand and brought social and economic status to the worker. The coherence of epigraphic habits and manifestations within a professional group, along with all the other existing clues for a rather unitary use of symbols, endorse once more the existence of a Roman provincial, commercial, middle class.

About the Author
Rada Varga is a researcher at Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania) specialising in Latin epigraphy, digital classics, prosopography and provincial archaeology (co-directing the excavations at the fortress of ala I milliaria Batavorum from Dacia). Her main project is Romans1by1, a prosopographical database for people attested in ancient epigraphy. Currently, Dr Varga is a member of the executive committee of EADH (The European Association for Digital Humanities).
NEW: Definición y caracterización de las cerámicas a mano con decoración pintada del sur de la península ibérica en época tartésica by Pedro Miguel Naranjo. Paperback; 203x276mm; 476 page; 136 figures; illustrated catalogue consisting of 99 colour plates. Spanish text. 682 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697728. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697735. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Handmade ceramics with painted decoration constitute one of the most outstanding archaeological materials from the Late Bronze Age and the First Iron Age in the Guadalquivir and Guadiana valleys, the context in which the Tartessian culture developed. In this work, an exhaustive study of these ceramic styles has been attempted, defining their technical characteristics, dispersion, forms, decoration, symbolism, chronology, use and meaning. To this overall study are added several unpublished pieces by Alarcos, some with archeometric and content analysis, the results of which allow questioning their traditional consideration as 'post-firing ceramics'.

This characterization allows an orientation in the classification of some styles traditionally considered as a monolithic set when really, there is a much more complex panorama due to different chronological and cultural circumstances. Among the latter, the relationships and contacts established between local communities and Mediterranean populations stand out, giving rise to cultural phenomena of miscegenation or hybridization in which local tradition was combined with all exogenous contributions, a fossilized reality in these productions. This book presents the most complete and up-to-date work on these ceramics, studied from the perspective of new theoretical-methodological approaches and recent interpretations.

About the Author
Pedro Miguel Naranjo has a degree in History (Extraordinary Award) and a doctorate in Prehistory from the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM). He completed a master's degree in History and Ancient Sciences (UCM-UAM), specializing in oriental cultures. His research focuses on the Protohistory of the Iberian Peninsula, specifically the Phoenicians, Tartessians and Greeks.

Spanish Description
Las cerámicas a mano con decoración pintada constituyen uno de los materiales arqueológicos más destacados del Bronce Final y de la Primera Edad del Hierro en los valles del Guadalquivir y del Guadiana, contexto en el que se desarrolló la cultura tartésica. En este trabajo se ha abordado un estudio exhaustivo sobre estos estilos cerámicos, definiendo sus características técnicas, dispersión geográfica, formas, decoración, simbolismo, cronología, uso y significado. A este estudio de conjunto se añaden varias piezas inéditas de Alarcos, algunas con análisis arqueométricos y de contenido cuyos resultados cuestionan su tradicional consideración como “cerámicas postcocción”.

Dicha caracterización permite una orientación en la clasificación de unos estilos tradicionalmente considerados como un conjunto monolítico, cuando realmente subyace un panorama mucho más complejo que obedece a diversas circunstancias cronológicas y culturales. Entre estas últimas destacan las relaciones y contactos establecidos entre las comunidades locales peninsulares y las poblaciones mediterráneas, dando lugar a fenómenos culturales de mestizaje o hibridación en el que se conjugó la tradición local con todas las aportaciones exógenas, una realidad fosilizada en estas producciones. En definitiva, se trata de la obra de conjunto más completa y actualizada sobre estas cerámicas, estudiadas desde la perspectiva de los nuevos enfoques teórico-metodológicos y las recientes interpretaciones.

Pedro Miguel Naranjo es graduado en Historia (premio Extraordinario Fin de Carrera) y doctor en Prehistoria por la Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM). Realizó el máster en Historia y Ciencias de la Antigüedad (UCM-UAM), con especialidad en culturas orientales. Sus investigaciones se centran en la Protohistoria de la península ibérica, concretamente fenicios, tartesios y griegos.
NEW: Die Bestattungsgruben in Bat by Conrad Schmidt, with contributions by Stefan Giese und Christian Hübner and Steve Zäuner. Hardback; 210x297mm; 374pp; 250 figures; 187 tables (97 pages of colour). German text. 680 2020 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697391. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697858. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Volume 1 of the series Arabia Orientalis presents the first comprehensive study of two Umm an-Nar (2700—2000 BC) burial pits from the UNESCO World Heritage site Bat in the Sultanate of Oman. They were excavated between 2010 and 2012 by the University of Tübingen. Each burial pit represents one of the largest closed finds of the Early Bronze Age in the region. Finds largely include beads and other items of personal adornment, as well as pottery and human bones. Detailed typologies of all objects are the basis for in-depth statistical analyses of the different categories of finds and the reconstruction of burial customs at Bat. Furthermore, imports and imitations from other regions including the Indus Valley, Iran, and Mesopotamia illuminate Bat’s foreign relations and integration into the interregional exchange and communication system. The interpretation of the unearthed human remains conducted by Steve Zauner offer, not only the number of individuals, sex, and age of the deceased, but also insights into lifestyle, diseases, and stress of the people in the past.

German description
Die Umm an-Nar-Zeit (2700–2000 v. Chr.) auf der östlichen Arabischen Halbinsel gilt als Periode tiefgreifender Veränderungen in der ökonomischen und sozialen Organisation der Gesellschaft sowie der Ausbeutung von Ressourcen. Einer der größten und bedeutendsten Fundplätze dieser Zeit im Sultanat Oman ist der seit 1988 auf der Welterbeliste der UNESCO stehende Fundort Bat in der Provinz Al-Dhahirah. Von 2010 bis 2015 führte die Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen ein Projekt zur Erforschung der Entwicklung der beiden Nekropolen von Bat und Al-Ayn sowie der Siedlung von Al-Zebah durch. Im Mittelpunkt der Untersuchungen stand die Frage nach den Gründen und Ursachen des sozioökonomischen Umbruchs im 3. Jahrtausend v. Chr. und wie sich dieser in den Lebensverhältnissen der damaligen Bevölkerung widerspiegelt.

Die vorliegende Publikation stellt den ersten Band der Endberichte des Forschungsprojekts des Instituts für die Kulturen des Alten Orients der Universität Tübingen in Bat, Al-Zebah und Al- Ayn dar. Das Werk beinhaltet die vollständige Auswertung der beiden Umm an-Nar-zeitlichen Bestattungsgruben A-Inst. 0006 und A-Inst. 0025 in Bat einschließlich anthropologischer Analysen und einer geophysikalischen Prospektion in der Nekropole von Bat. Beide Gruben zählen zu den größten jemals im Oman untersuchten geschlossenen Fundkontexten der frühen Bronzezeit. Zur Publikation gehört ein online unter https://tinyurl. com/9781789697391-der-fundekatalog publizierter Katalog, der sämtliche Einzelnachweise zu den Funden aus den beiden Bestattungsgruben enthält.
NEW: Racconto d’Egitto: Trascrizione e traduzione del manoscritto di ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī (con brevi note di commento) by Ahmed F. Kzzo and Nikola D. Bellucci. Paperback; 156x234mm; 218pp; 3 maps; transcript of the original Arabic text; translation, commentary and additional material in Italian. 679 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697827. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697834. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Kitāb al-ʾifādah wa al-ʾiʿtibār fī al-ʾumur al-mušāhadah wa al-ḥawādiṯ al-muʿāyanah bi-arḍ Miṣr, by ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī (1162-1231 AD) is a fascinating work; it represents one of the best known and most important manuscripts concerning Egypt during the period between the twelfth and thirteenth centuries AD. The author, through his gaze and with a clear and shrewd use of language and style, describes several characteristic aspects of the Nile country: the landscape, the animals, the plants, the monuments, the boats, the peculiar dishes, without forgetting the effects of the famine, or the misery caused by the ailments and hunger that hit the country between 1200 and 1202 AD.

Translated into German (1790), Latin (1800), French (1810), and more recently into English (1965), there was, until now, still no translation into Italian of this masterful work. This omission prompted the authors to work over a period of several years on the present volume which, in addition to providing the first Italian translation (accompanied by the transcription of the original Arabic manuscript), provides essential and necessary commentary notes aimed at explaining different passages of the manuscript. Some preliminary chapters also attempt to focus on themes, the author and his philosophy in order to provide the reader with a wider image of the conceptions of the period in which he lived and what this description represented and still represents: a masterpiece of realism which continues to stir the imagination in the modern age.

Italian Description
Davanti ad un’opera come quella del Kitāb al-ʾifādah wa al-ʾiʿtibār fī al-ʾumur al-mušāhadah wa al-ḥawādiṯ al-muʿāyanah bi-arḍ Miṣr di ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī è difficile non rimanere affascinati. Esso infatti rappresenta uno dei più noti ed importanti manoscritti riguardanti l’Egitto durante il periodo a cavallo fra il dodicesimo e il tredicesimo secolo d. C. L’autore, attraverso il suo sguardo e con un linguaggio e uno stile chiaro e accorto descrive diversi aspetti caratteristici del paese del Nilo: il paesaggio, gli animali, le piante, i monumenti, le imbarcazioni, le pietanze peculiari senza dimenticare gli effetti della carestia e della miseria dei malanni e della fame che si abbatterono sul paese tra gli anni 1200 e 1202 d.C.

Tradotta in tedesco (nel 1790), latino (nel 1800), francese (nel 1810), e a metà del secolo passato in inglese (nel 1965), di tale opera magistrale non esisteva ancora traduzione in lingua italiana. Proprio tale mancanza ci ha spinto ad iniziare diversi anni addietro tale lavoro che qui si presenta e che oltre a fornire la prima traduzione italiana (accompagnata dalla trascrizione del manoscritto arabo originale) è corredata da essenziali ma necessarie note di commento volte a spiegare diversi passi del manoscritto. Alcuni capitoli preliminari tenteranno inoltre di mettere a fuoco la tematica, l’autore e la sua filosofia al fine di fornire al lettore una più ampia immagine del pensiero del periodo in cui egli visse e cosa rappresentò e ancora oggi rappresenta tale descrizione. Un capolavoro di realismo che tuttavia continua a suscitare la fantasia dei moderni.

Ahmed F. Kzzo è un archeologo specializzato in antico Medio Oriente. Dottore di ricerca presso l’Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, ha partecipato a vari progetti archeologici, tra cui scavi ad al-Bimarestan al-Nuri (Aleppo), Ebla (Siria) e Çatalhöyük (Turchia). È stato Post-doc presso l’Università di Berna ed è attualmente membro del Columbia Global Center Amman (Columbia University). ;

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) e dottore magistrale in Archeolo
NEW: An Educator's Handbook for Teaching about the Ancient World edited by Pınar Durgun. Paperback; 156x234mm; 248 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 670 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697605. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697612. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

With the right methods, studying the ancient world can be as engaging as it is informative. Many K-12 teachers, university instructors, and museum educators use hands-on, project-based, and experiential activities in their classes to increase student engagement and learning. This book aims to bring together such pedagogical methods and teaching activities about the ancient world for any educator to use. The teaching activities in this book are designed in a cookbook format so that educators can replicate these teaching "recipes” (which include materials, budget, preparation time, levels of students) in their ancient art, archaeology, social studies, and history classes. They can be implemented online or in-person, in schools, universities, libraries, museums, or at home. Find out more about the book and the contributors here.

About the Editor
Pınar Durgun is an art historically-trained archaeologist with a background in anthropology, cultural heritage, and museums, passionate about outreach and education. She received her Ph.D. from Brown University and has been teaching for about a decade in universities, museums, and school classrooms about archaeology and the ancient world. As a dedicated public scholar and educator, Dr. Durgun hopes to make academic information about the ancient world accessible, fun, and inclusive.
NEW: Lost Worlds of Ancient and Modern Greece Gilbert Bagnani: The Adventures of a Young Italian Archaeologist in Greece, 1921-1924 by D. J. Ian Begg. Hardback; 380pp; 14 figures; 5 maps. 604 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694529. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694536. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

By day, young Gilbert Bagnani studied archaeology in Greece, but by night he socialised with the elite of Athenian society. Secretly writing for the Morning Post in London, he witnessed both antebellum Athens in 1921 and the catastrophic collapse of Christian civilisation in western Anatolia in 1922. While there have been many accounts by refugees of the disastrous flight from Smyrna, few have been written from the perspective of the west side of the Aegean. The flood of a million refugees to Greece brought in its wake a military coup in Athens, the exile of the Greek royal family and the execution or imprisonment of politicians, whom Gilbert knew.

Gilbert’s weekly letters to his mother in Rome reveal his Odyssey-like adventures on a voyage of discovery through the origins of western civilisation. As an archaeologist in Greece, he travelled through time seeing history repeat itself: Minoan Knossos, Byzantine Constantinople and Ottoman Smyrna were all violently destroyed, but the survivors escaped to the new worlds of Mycenaean Greece, Renaissance Venice and modern Greece.

At Smyrna in the twentieth century, history was written not only by the victors but was also recorded by the victims. At the same time, however, the twentieth century itself was so filled with reports of ethnic cleansings on such a scale that the reports brutalized the humanity of the supposedly civilized people reading about them, and the tragedy of Smyrna disappeared from public awareness between the cataclysmic upheavals of the First and Second World Wars.

About the Author
Ian Begg studied archaeology in Greece at the America School of Classical Studies in Athens. For this book, the author retraced Gilbert Bagnani's footsteps around Greece, the Aegean, Turkey and Libya. He has not only participated in excavations in Sicily, Greece, Crete and Egypt but also initiated a survey on the island of Karpathos especially for the chapter in this volume.

Reviews
Gilbert Bagnani, the subject of Ian Begg’s book, was unknown to me, and I am glad to have made his acquaintance. The book covers the period 1921-1924. Gilbert comes across as a fascinating character, who encountered the Levant at a critical time for both the Greece of Eleftherios Venizelos and the Turkey of Mustapha Kemal Atatürk. He was bilingual in Italian (from his father) and English (from his mother): an archaeologist but always more than that. He knew and was helped by the excellent William Miller, which led to his contributing incisive articles about the politics of Greece and the Levant to the Morning Post in London. As a member of the Italian School of Archaeology in Athens he travelled around Greece and the islands and found himself in Asia Minor at a critical phase of the Greek occupation and Kemal’s war of independence. All this and much more is described in Gilbert’s letters to his mother. His grasp of local and international politics was impressive. He and Begg paint sparkling pen pictures of personalities such as Bosdari, the Italian ambassador during the Great War, and later Governor of the Dodecanese, Prince Demidoff the Russian ambassador, Harold Lamb the British Consul at Smyrna and family, Greek personalities such as Stratos, Kalapothakis, Karapanos, and colleagues at the Italian School. Gilbert emerges as clever, sometimes arrogant, fascinated by people especially from high society, and with a weakness for royalty. Begg does him justice in a well sourced book. This is a lively account of a formidable personality, scholar and archaeologist in the making. The black and white photographs by Gilbert himself are excellent. – Sir Michael Llewellyn Smith, British Ambassodor to Greece 1996 – 1999 ;

Gilbert Bagnani, of Italian and Canadian extraction, arrived in Greece at the age of 21, already well-connected through his parents’ social and professional circles. He was ostensibly studying Greek A
NEW: Public Archaeologies of Frontiers and Borderlands edited by Kieran Gleave, Howard Williams and Pauline Clarke. Paperback; 203x276mm; 270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 126 . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698015. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698022. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

From IndyRef and Brexit to the Refugee Crisis and Trump’s Wall, the construction and maintenance, subversion and traversing of frontiers and borderlands dominate our current affairs. Yet, while archaeologists have long participated in exploring frontiers and borderlands, their public archaeology has been starkly neglected. Incorporating the select proceedings of the 4th University of Chester Archaeology Student conference hosted by the Grosvenor Museum, Chester, on 20 March 2019, this is the first book to investigate realworld ancient and modern frontier works, the significance of graffiti, material culture, monuments and wall-building, as well as fictional representations of borders and walls in the arts, as public archaeology. Key themes include the heritage interpretation for linear monuments, public archaeology in past and contemporary frontiers and borderlands, and archaeology’s interactions with mural practices in politics, popular culture and the contemporary landscape. Together, the contributors show the necessity of developing critical public archaeologies of frontiers and borderlands.

About the Editors
Kieran Gleave is currently an archaeologist with the University of Salford. He graduated from the University of Chester in 2019 after graduating with a BA (Hons) Archaeology degree. ;

Howard Williams is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester and researches public archaeology and archaeologies of death and memory. He writes an academic blog: Archaeodeath. ;

Pauline Magdalene Clarke is a postgraduate researcher at the University of Chester, having recently completed both her BA (Hons) and MA there. She has a particular interest in material culture, and how it can demonstrate change (or not) in borderlands in the Anglo-Saxon period. She has recently published a review of the PAS finds from Cheshire for that period.
NEW: El Palacio: Historiography and new perspectives on a pre-Tarascan city of northern Michoacán, Mexico edited by Marion Forest. Paperback; 203x276mm; 314 pages; 143 figures, 52 tables; papers in English and Spanish. 125 2020 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 53. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697964. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697971. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

In the centuries that preceded the European conquest in 1521, the central-northern region of the state of Michoacán, West Mexico, was a place of significant socio-political changes materialized by important transformations of settlement pattern and material culture. The archaeological site of El Palacio (also known as La Crucita or Mich. 23), located in the Zacapu Basin, constituted a major center throughout these regional events. The site has been mentioned in the archaeological literature as early as the end of the nineteenth century, and dispersed subsequent research has documented changes in site morphology, function, and degree of integration into interregional networks of cultural interaction. The present volume offers the first monographic publication about El Palacio. It is composed of a series of eleven contributions looking at both legacy and archive data (1896–1995) and results derived from recent archaeological investigations (2012–2017). The systematic review and analysis of the chrono-stratigraphy, material culture, urbanism, and economic and ritual practices at the site yields critical information that allows discussion of the role of El Palacio and the context of its development at both local and extra-local scales, between A.D. 850 and 1521. Beyond this central concern, this volume provides extended material for cultural comparisons with West, Northwest and Central Mexico during this time period, as well as for broader discussions about the complex social mechanisms involved in the rise, transformation, and fall of premodern urban centers.

About the Editor
Marion Forest received her PhD in archaeology from the University Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Anthropology of Brigham Young University. She specializes in urbanization processes in western and central Mexico. Her current research includes a survey and excavation field project at Teotihuacan and further developments in the integration of LiDAR data in archaeology.

Spanish Description
En los siglos que precedieron a la conquista española de 1521, la región centro-norte del estado de Michoacán, occidente de México, fue el escenario de cambios sociopolíticos importantes, materializados a través de transformaciones significativas en el patrón de asentamiento y la cultura material a escala regional. El sitio arqueológico de El Palacio (también conocido como La Crucita o Mich. 23), localizado en la cuenca de Zacapu, constituye un centro mayor que fue ocupado entre 850 y 1521 d. C y transformado de manera continua a lo largo de su historia ocupacional. El Palacio atrajo la atención de diversos investigadores desde finales del siglo diecinueve y fue sujeto a investigaciones subsecuentes. Si bien las intervenciones en el sitio fueron dispersas, éstas permitieron documentar ciertos cambios en la morfología del asentamiento, su función, y su grado de integración en las redes de interacción culturales a larga distancia. El presente volumen constituye la primera publicación monográfica sobre El Palacio. Se compone de once contribuciones enfocadas tanto en la reevaluación de la información existente del sitio (obtenida entre los años 1896 y 1995) como en el estudio de los datos adquiridos durante las investigaciones recientes (de 2012 a 2017). La revisión y análisis sistemático de la cronoestratigrafía, la cultura material, el urbanismo, y las prácticas rituales y económicas que caracterizan la ocupación prehispánica del sitio, produjeron una documentación que permite discutir el papel de El Palacio y su contexto de desarrollo en una escala local y regional. El presente volumen ofrece, asimismo, un contenido con material extensivo útil para ser retomado en estudios comparativos, sobre todo con respecto a las regiones Oeste, Noroeste y Central de México durante los periodos Epiclásico y Postclásico. Finalmente esta obra contribuye a generar una reflexión en tor
NEW: Architecture militaire du Deccan: Une réponse défensive face à la guerre moderne Deccan Military Architecture: A response to early modern warfare by Nicolas Morelle. Paperback; 203x276mm; 428pp; 168 figures. French text with English introduction and conclusion. 124 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697445. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697452. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Architecture militaire du Deccan focuses on the Deccan region in central India between the medieval and modern period, a period at the interface between local Indian culture and the Persian world, followed by relations with the colonial enterprise European in Asia. This period was marked by many conflicts, but also by an inventive adaptation of new military technologies in response to new forms of modern warfare in India, with the arrival of artillery.

Using the most recent investigative techniques, such as photogrammetry and 3D modeling, this volume presents a wealth of new data. The author’s meticulous approach encompasses the study of urban maps, architectural plans and detailed descriptions of walls, bastions, moats, towers, gates, horsemen, granaries, hydraulic éléments, and more.

Through the study of four representative fortified sites, the author synthesizes the evolution of the military architecture of the Deccan.

One can only hope that this volume will inspire other scholars to work on other Indian fortified sites, not limited to the Deccan. Thus, a more complete understanding of the phases of evolution of Indian military architecture can emerge.

About the Author
Nicolas Morelle is an archaeologist, specialising in India (associated researcher of LA3M CNRS in France). After studies on crusaders fortifications and influences between East and West in terms of building techniques and military Architecture, he studied technical interactions in Indian fortifications as part of his PhD thesis on the evolution of Military Architecture in the four Deccan forts. In this context, he collaborated with many Indian and international institutions.

French description: L’extraordinaire conservatoire de fortifications que constitue l’Inde centrale enrichit la connaissance de l’architecture militaire de la période moderne. Les spécificités indiennes en matière de défense constituent un apport non négligeable sur le développement original des organes défensifs du Deccan.

En utilisant les techniques d’investigation les plus récentes, telles que la photogrammétrie et la modélisation 3D, Nicolas Morelle découvre une richesse de données jusqu’alors inconnues. Il présente ainsi une approche méticuleuse à travers des cartes urbaines, des plans d’architecture et des descriptions détaillées de murs, bastions, douves, tours, portes, cavaliers, greniers, éléments hydrauliques, …

Dans ce volume, Nicolas Morelle se concentre sur la région du Deccan dans le centre de l’Inde entre la période médiévale et moderne, période à l’interface entre la culture indienne locale et le monde persan, suivi des relations avec l’entreprise coloniale européenne en Asie. Cette période a été marquée par de nombreux conflits, mais aussi par une adaptation inventive, de nouvelles technologies militaires en réponse aux nouvelles formes de guerre moderne en Inde, avec l’arrivée de l’artillerie.

A travers l’étude de quatre sites fortifiés représentatifs, l’auteur élabore une synthèse de l’évolution de l’architecture militaire du Deccan.

On ne peut qu’espérer que le présent volume inspirera d’autres chercheurs à travailler sur d’autres sites fortifiés indiens, sans se limiter au Deccan. Ainsi, une compréhension plus complète des phases d’évolution de l’architecture militaire indienne pourra émerger.

Tiré d’une recherche doctorale récente, cet ouvrage est en français. Plusieurs parties sont traduites en anglais, dont la synthèse, afin d’améliorer sa diffusion vers le public international.

Nicolas Morelle est archéologue, spécialiste de l’Inde (chercheur associé du LA3M CNRS en France). Après des études sur les fortifications des croisades et les influences entre Orient et Occident dans l’architecture militaire, il a étudié les interactions techniques dans les fortifications indiennes dans le cadre de sa thèse de doctorat sur
NEW: Nel regno del fango: speleoarcheologia della Grotta di Polla (Salerno, Italia) Risultati delle prime campagne di scavo edited by Antonella Minelli and Sandra Guglielmi. Paperback; 203x276mm; 114 pages; 61 figures, colour throughout. Italian text. 123 . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691221. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691238. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Nel regno del fango presents the preliminary results of the archaeological excavations recently carried out in the Grotta di Polla, in the province of Salerno, in the Vallo di Diano area. Speleoarchaeological researches in recent years have revealed the considerable difficulty of operating methodologically in an environment, such as that of a cave which, in addition to being often characterized by the limitations caused by the darkness and tightness of the environments, has in this case led to the presence of a considerable amount of mud which made researches even more complex. The methodologies adopted for the preservation and conservation of archaeological materials and the results obtained are therefore illustrated. From an interpretative point of view, the cave is configured as an area that has been exploited with a certain continuity from the Neolithic to the whole Bronze Age with the specific function of a burial area.

About the Editors
Antonella Minelli is an academic researcher in the scientific field of Evolutionary Anthropology (BIO/08), at the Department of Humanities, Social and Formation Sciences of the University of Molise. ;

Sandra Guglielmi is a researcher in Physical Anthropology (BIO/08), at the Department of Humanities, Social and Formation Sciences of the University of Molise.

Italian Description
Il volume presenta i risultati preliminari degli scavi archeologici effettuati nella Grotta di Polla, ubicata in provincia di Salerno, nel territorio del Vallo di Diano, in Italia meridionale.

La grotta si configura come un’area sfruttata con una certa continuità, dal Neolitico finale a tutta l’Età del Bronzo, con la specifica funzione di area sepolcrale. Le informazioni acquisite nel corso delle ricerche e degli studi di natura archeostratigrafica, paleobiologica, archeobotanica, hanno permesso di tracciare un quadro significativo ed esaustivo delle modalità di sfruttamento del contesto ipogeico, inserendosi a pieno nei modelli comportamentali noti, per il periodo considerato, in Italia centro-meridionale.

Nel volume sono illustrate le metodologie adottate per la preservazione e la conservazione dei materiali archeologici. I risultati ottenuti sono - dunque - di un certo rilevo nonostante la notevole difficoltà di operare metodologicamente in un ambiente, come quello di grotta che, oltre a dover fare i conti con i limiti dovuti all’oscurità e all’ampiezza degli ambienti, è caratterizzato in questo caso da una considerevole quantità di fango, che ha reso le ricerche ancora più complesse.

Antonella Minelli è ricercatore confermato nel settore scientifico disciplinare di Antropologia, presso il Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Sociali e della Formazione dell’Università degli Studi del Molise. Ha lavorato come responsabile scientifico in contesti pre-protostorici in grotta e in open-air site in Italia e in Europa ed è stata direttore e collaboratore scientifico delle missioni archeologiche finanziate dal Ministero degli Affari Esteri italiano in Colombia e Paraguay. È autrice di diverse pubblicazioni. ;

Sandra Guglielmi è ricercatore a tempo determinato in Antropologia Fisica, presso il Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Sociali e della Formazione dell’Università degli Studi del Molise. L’area disciplinare della sua attività di ricerca è l’Antropologia Fisica e Biomolecolare applicata ai campioni archeologici. Ha svolto attività scientifica in diversi ambiti archeologici, da contesti protostorici a contesti storici, in Italia e in Sud America. È autrice di diverse pubblicazioni.
NEW: Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest edited by Federica Boschi, Enrico Giorgi, Frank Vermeulen. Paperback; 203x276mm, 230 pages; 96 figures (colour throughout). 121 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696998. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697001. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest: Landscape Archaeology and Material Culture is a coherent collection of papers presented at an International Workshop held in Ravenna (Italy) on 13-14 May 2019. The event, organized by the Universities of Bologna and Ghent and Arcadria, focussed on the transition between Italic culture and Romanised society in the central Adriatic area – the regions ager Gallicus and Picenum under Roman dominance – from the fourth to the second centuries BCE.

By bringing together the experience of international research on this topic, the volume highlights a period that marks a profound transformation in the whole of central Italy by analysing the relationships between the central settlements and their territories and, more generally, by measuring the impact of early Romanization on the territorial structure, social organization and cultural substrata of populations living here. The volume also discusses methodological aspects regarding best practices in fieldwork, landscape investigation and study of material culture, identifying research lines and perspectives for the future deepening of knowledge in this crucial period of central Adriatic archaeology.

About the Editors
Federica Boschi is senior researcher in Methods of Archaeological Research at the University of Bologna. She specialises in non-destructive methods of investigation, in particular geophysics and aerial photography for archaeology. She directs field projects in central Adriatic Italy and is a member of several teams conducting research of international significance. ;

Enrico Giorgi is Associate Professor of Methodology and Landscape Archaeology at the University of Bologna. He is the director of the journal ‘Groma: Documenting Archaeology’ and directs research on Adriatic archaeology. He conducts archaeological missions in Croatia, Albania and Egypt which are already the subject of publications. ;

Frank Vermeulen has been Professor of Roman Archaeology and Archaeological Methodology at Ghent University since 1999 and directed its Department of Archaeology from 2015-2018. He is particularly interested in Roman settlement archaeology and geo-archaeological approaches to ancient Mediterranean landscapes; he has a keen interest in IT applications in archaeology.
NEW: A Latin Lexicon: An Illustrated Compendium of Latin Words and English Derivatives by Caroline K. Mackenzie. Illustrations by Amanda Short. Hardback; 156x234mm; 142 pages; colour design throughout, 20 full-colour illustrations. 677 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697629. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697636. £19.99 (Exc. VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A charming compendium of Latin words and English derivatives, encompassing over 365 words required for Latin GCSE, one for each day of the year. Each Latin entry is accompanied by key notes on grammar, translations and some playful and memorable derivatives. A concise introduction and a glossary of Latin in common usage combine to make this a vade-mecum (essential companion) for all learners of Latin as well as cruciverbalists. The text is imaginatively punctuated by 20 full-colour illustrations by Amanda Short.

About the Author
Caroline K. Mackenzie read classics at Pembroke College, Cambridge. After a legal career in London, she became Head of Classics at a school in Sevenoaks. In 2018 Caroline was awarded distinction in an MA in Classical Art and Archaeology at King’s College London. Caroline offers online private tutoring in Latin and Greek and runs online Classical reading groups for all ages and abilities. Caroline’s first book, Culture and Society at Lullingstone Roman Villa was published by Archaeopress in 2019.

Praise for This Volume:
Carpe verba! (Grasp the words!) A hugely fun and useful tool for Latin learners. I wish I’d had this book when I was learning Latin.’ – Caroline Lawrence, author of The Roman Mysteries. ;

‘The narrator of a recent French historical novel muses: 'My whole life I owe to Greek. If I hadn't known how to conjugate the aorist, where to put the stresses, how to recite -mi verbs, I would never have been able to escape my menial little existence. Declensions proved to be the instrument of my ascent'. Pari passu and mutatis mutandis, that surely is what every reader will say after reading, marking and inwardly digesting Caroline Mackenzie's brilliant Latin Compendium.’ – Professor Paul Cartledge, University of Cambridge. ;

‘A handsome and lively introduction to Latin through its core vocabulary and derivatives. Everyone should have a copy.’ – Dr Daisy Dunn, author of In the Shadow of Vesuvius. ;

‘This delightful, illustrated book will serve two purposes: the straightforward English derivatives will help students remember their Latin vocabulary, and the recondite ones will give a head start for the Scrabble board or cryptic crossword.’ – Dr John Taylor, author of Essential GCSE Latin. ;

‘Latin can be fun, who knew? A real must for anyone learning Latin or interested in language. I genuinely LOVE this book. It is a fantastic idea and looks absolutely beautiful.’ – Celia Rees, author and former English teacher. ;

‘Elegantly presented, entertaining, and educational.’ – Ruth Downie, author. ;

'The perfect book for anyone who, like me, wishes they had understood Latin at school. Why did our teachers tell us it is a "dead language", and not how useful it would be in real life?’ – Janie Hampton, author. ;

‘A thoroughly helpful volume, great for both reference and pleasure, ideal for both the crossword and the classroom.’ – Michelle Lovric, author.

‘This is a well-presented book, packed with information for teachers, students and anyone interested in language, and Latin in particular.’ – Mike Smith, Classics for All, November 2020
NEW: Ages and Abilities: The Stages of Childhood and their Social Recognition in Prehistoric Europe and Beyond edited by Katharina Rebay-Salisbury and Doris Pany-Kucera. Paperback; 176x252mm; 264 pages; illustrated throughout. 681 2020 Childhood in the Past Monograph Series 9. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697681. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697698. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Ages and Abilities explores social responses to childhood stages from the late Neolithic to Classical Antiquity in Central Europe and the Mediterranean and includes cross-cultural comparison to expand the theoretical and methodological framework. By comparing osteological and archaeological evidence, as well as integrating images and texts, authors consider whether childhood age classes are archaeologically recognizable, at which approximated ages transitions took place, whether they are gradual or abrupt and different for girls and boys. Age transitions may be marked by celebrations and rituals; cultural accentuation of developmental stages may be reflected by inclusion or exclusion at cemeteries, by objects associated with childhood such as feeding vessels and toys, and gradual access to adult material culture. Access to tools, weapons and status symbols, as well as children’s agency, rank and social status, are recurrent themes. The volume accounts for the variability in how a range of chronologically and geographically diverse communities perceived children and childhood, and at the same time, discloses universal trends in child development in the (pre-)historic past.

About the Editors
Katharina Rebay-Salisbury is an archaeologist with a research focus on the European Bronze and Iron Ages. She directs the research group ‘Prehistoric Identities’ at the Institute for Oriental and European Archaeology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and teaches at the University of Vienna. ;

Doris Pany-Kucera studied biological anthropology at the University of Vienna, focusing on muscle marks and joint changes on skeletal remains to reconstruct occupational stress and labour patterns (PhD 2015). She teaches at the Universities of Vienna and Pilsen.
NEW: Networks and Monumentality in the Pacific Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 7 Session XXXVIII edited by Aymeric Hermann, Frédérique Valentin, Christophe Sand, Emilie Nolet. Paperback; 205x290mm; 104 pages; illutsrated throughout. 678 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697155. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697162. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Sessions XXXVIII-1,2 of UISPP 2018 in Paris were dedicated to monumental constructions and to complex exchange networks in the Pacific. Both topics have been extensively commented on and described by indigenous experts, explorers, missionaries, and scholars over the last two centuries, however these have been made famous only for the most impressive examples such as the moai statues of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) or the kula exchange system of the Trobriand Islands. Some of the latest research on these key aspects of Pacific islands societies are made available in this volume to researchers focusing on the region, but also to a more global scientific community and to the general public. The volume reflects the tremendous progress made in Pacific island archaeology in the last 60 years which has considerably advanced our knowledge of early Pacific island societies, the rise of traditional cultural systems, and their later historical developments from European contact onwards. Interdisciplinarity is particularly stimulating in the Pacific region, where the study of the archaeological record and of chronological sequences are often combined with other kinds of information such as ethnohistorical accounts, oral traditions, and linguistic reconstructions, in the French tradition of ethnoarchéologie and the American tradition of historical anthropology.

About the Editors
Aymeric Hermann is a post-doctoral researcher at the Max-Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Since 2010, he has directed archaeological projects in several archipelagos of French Polynesia as well as in central Vanuatu. ;

Frédérique Valentin is a researcher in Oceanic archaeology at CNRS (UMR 7041, MSH Mondes, Nanterre, France). She specialises in funerary archaeology and biological anthropology. ;

Christophe Sand is Head Archaeologist for the New Caledonia Government at the IRD Research Centre in Nouméa, working on Southern Melanesia, Western Polynesia and Western Micronesia. ;

Emilie Nolet is an Assistant Professor in Archaeology at the University Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne.
NEW: El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico 20 años de excavaciones arqueológicas en el Sector III by Mª del Rosario García Huerta, Francisco Javier Morales Hervás and David Rodríguez González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 160 pages; 64 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 671 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696912. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696929. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico presents the results of archaeological work which has been carried out since 1997 in so-called Sector III of the Alarcos site, located on a hill next to the Guadiana river, a few kilometres from Ciudad Real. These archaeological campaigns have made it possible to obtain essential information to understand the communities that, from the end of the Bronze Age to the end of the Iron Age, inhabited this large town and its surrounding area.

An interesting set of structures and other evidence of material culture have been recovered, which allow us to characterize the daily activities of people between the 10th-11th century BC and, in addition, they enable us to understand the paleoenvironment of this territory and the nature of the economy and the food transformation activities of these protohistoric populations.

The use of this territory has been determined over the centuries, being originally a residential area which later, in Iberian times, assumed economic functionality, as it was intended for grain storage, grinding and cooking food.

The documentation of a wide and varied repertoire of ceramic materials and an interesting set of foreign ceramics corroborates the dynamism this settlement achieved, during both the Pre-Iberian period and the full Iberian period.

About the Authors
Mª del Rosario García Huerta holds a PhD in Prehistory and is Senior Lecturer on this subject at the University of Castilla-La Mancha. ;

Francisco Javier Morales Hervás was awarded an extraordinary prize during his bachelor's degree and holds a PhD in History from the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he is Associate Lecturer in Prehistory. ;

. David Rodríguez González is Lecturer in Prehistory at the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he also coordinates the Degree in History and is a member of the Governing Council. ;

Spanish Description
El objeto de este libro es dar a conocer los trabajos de investigación arqueológica que desde 1997 se han realizado en el denominado Sector III del yacimiento de Alarcos, ubicado en un cerro situado junto al río Guadiana, a pocos kilómetros de Ciudad Real. Estas campañas arqueológicas han permitido obtener una información esencial para poder conocer a las comunidades que, desde finales de la Edad del Bronce hasta finales de la Edad del Hierro, habitaron este gran poblado y su área circundante.

Se ha logrado recuperar un interesante conjunto de estructuras y otras evidencias de la cultura material, que permiten caracterizar las actividades cotidianas que desempeñaban estas personas entre el siglo X a.C. y el II a.C. y, además, nos posibilitan realizar una aproximación al paleoambiente de este territorio y a las características de la economía y de las actividades de transformación de alimentos de estas poblaciones protohistóricas.

Se ha determinado su uso a lo largo de los siglos, siendo en origen un área residencial que posteriormente, en época ibérica, asumió una funcionalidad económica al estar destinada al almacenamiento de grano, a molienda y cocción de alimentos.

La documentación de un amplio y variado repertorio de materiales cerámicos y de un interesante conjunto de cerámicas foráneas corrobora el dinamismo que alcanzará este asentamiento, tanto en época Preibérica como durante el Ibérico pleno.

Mª del Rosario García Huerta es doctora en Prehistoria y profesora titular de esta materia en la Universidad de Castilla- La Mancha. Sus líneas de investigación se han centrado en las culturas protohistóricas de la península ibérica, celtibérica e ibérica y, más recientemente, ha iniciado el estudio del simbolismo animal en la Prehistoria. Es investigadora principal de numerosos proyectos de investigación arqueológicos y autora de un gran número de libros
NEW: The Global Connections of Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the Third International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 18th-19th March, 2019 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696950; Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout. 669 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696950. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696967. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Gandhāran art is often regarded as the epitome of cultural exchange in antiquity. The ancient region of Gandhāra, centred on what is now the northern tip of Pakistan, has been called the ‘crossroads of Asia’. The Buddhist art produced in and around this area in the first few centuries AD exhibits extraordinary connections with other traditions across Asia and as far as the Mediterranean. Since the nineteenth century, the Graeco-Roman associations of Gandhāran art have attracted particular attention. Classically educated soldiers and administrators of that era were astonished by the uncanny resemblance of many works of Gandhāran sculpture to Greek and Roman art made thousands of miles to the west. More than a century later we can recognize that the Gandhāran artists’ appropriation of classical iconography and styles was diverse and extensive, but the explanation of this ‘influence’ remains puzzling and elusive. The Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre was initiated principally to cast new light on this old problem.

This volume is the third set of proceedings of the project’s annual workshop, and the first to address directly the question of cross-cultural influence on and by Gandhāran art. The contributors wrestle with old controversies, particularly the notion that Gandhāran art is a legacy of Hellenistic Greek rule in Central Asia and the growing consensus around the important role of the Roman Empire in shaping it. But they also seek to present a more complex and expansive view of the networks in which Gandhāra was embedded. Adopting a global perspective on the subject, they examine aspects of Gandhāra’s connections both within and beyond South Asia and Central Asia, including the profound influence which Gandhāran art itself had on the development of Buddhist art in China and India.

About the Editors
Wannaporn Rienjang obtained her doctorate in Archaeology from University of Cambridge. She is now Lecturer in Archaeology, Museum and Heritage Studies at the Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University and a project consultant for the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. Her research focuses on the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Indian Ocean Trade and ancient working technologies of stone beads and vessels. ;

Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran a
NEW: The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland The British School at Rome’s Tiber Valley Project by Helen Patterson, Robert Witcher and Helga Di Giuseppe. Paperback; 205x290mm; 372 pages; 131 figures, 21 tables (colour throughout). 665 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 70. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696158. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696165. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland presents a new regional history of the middle Tiber valley as a lens through which to view the emergence and transformation of the city of Rome from 1000 BC to AD 1000. Setting the ancient city within the context of its immediate territory, the authors reveal the diverse and enduring links between the metropolis and its hinterland. At the heart of the volume is a detailed consideration of the results of a complete restudy of the pioneering South Etruria Survey (c. 1955–1970), one of the earliest and most influential Mediterranean landscape projects. Between 1998 and 2002, an international team based at the British School at Rome conducted a comprehensive restudy of the material and documentary archive generated by the South Etruria Survey. The results were supplemented with a number of other published and unpublished sources of archaeological evidence to create a database of around 5000 sites across southern Etruria and the Sabina Tiberina, extending in date from the Bronze Age, through the Etruscan/Sabine, Republican and imperial periods, to the middle ages. Analysis and discussion of these data have appeared in a series of interim articles published over the past two decades; the present volume offers a final synthesis of the project results.

The chapters include the first detailed assessment of the field methods of the South Etruria Survey, an extended discussion of the use of archaeological legacy data, and new insights into the social and economic connectivities between Rome and the communities of its northern hinterland across two millennia. The volume as a whole demonstrates how the archaeological evidence generated by landscape surveys can be used to rewrite narrative histories, even those based on cities as familiar as ancient Rome.

Includes contributions by Martin Millett, Simon Keay and Christopher Smith, and a preface by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill.

About the Authors
Helen Patterson is the former Assistant Director (Archaeology) of the British School at Rome and director of the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project (1998–2002). She is a specialist in the archaeology of the late antique and early medieval periods, with particular interests in ceramic production and distribution. She has published a series of edited volumes including Bridging the Tiber (2004), Mercator Placidissimus (with F. Coarelli, 2008) and Veii: the historical topography of the ancient city (with R. Cascino & H. Di Giuseppe, 2012).

Robert Witcher is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University, UK. From 1999 to 2002, he was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. His research interests include landscape archaeology with a particular focus on the pre-Roman and Roman periods in Italy and the wider Mediterranean. He has published on aspects of ancient rural settlement, agriculture, demography and globalization. He is the editor of the world archaeology journal, Antiquity.

Helga Di Giuseppe specialises in Italian archaeology with particular interests in the classical and late antique periods. She has published widely on ancient landscape, Roman villas, and ceramic and textile production, and has edited several major excavation and conference volumes. From 1998 to 2002, she was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. She is currently project manager for Fasti Online with the International Association of Classical Archaeology and editorial manager with the publisher Scienze e Lettere.
NEW: A Catalogue of the Sculpture Collection at Wilton House by Peter Stewart with new photography by Guido Petruccioli. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 229x305mm; 438 pages; 14 figures and 154 plates in full colour throughout. 661 2020. ISBN 9781789696554. £90.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Wilton House sculptures constituted one of the largest and most celebrated collections of ancient art in Europe. Originally comprising some 340 works, the collection was formed around the late 1710s and 1720s by Thomas Herbert, the eccentric 8th Earl of Pembroke, who stubbornly ‘re-baptized’ his busts and statues with names of his own choosing. His sources included the famous collection of Cardinal Mazarin, assembled in Paris in the 1640s and 1650s, and recent discoveries on the Via Appia outside Rome. Earl Thomas regarded the sculptures as ancient – some of them among the oldest works of art in existence – but in fact much of the collection is modern and represents the neglected talents of sixteenth-and seventeenth-century artists, restorers and copyists who were inspired by Greek and Roman sculpture.

About half of the original collection remains intact today, adorning the Gothic Cloisters that were built for it two centuries ago. After a long decline, accelerated by the impact of the Second World War, the sculptures have been rehabilitated in recent years. They include masterpieces of Roman and early modern art, which cast fresh light on Graeco-Roman antiquity, the classical tradition, and the history of collecting.

Illustrated with specially commissioned photographs, this catalogue offers the first comprehensive publication of the 8th Earl’s collection, including an inventory of works dispersed from Wilton. It re-presents his personal vision of the collection recorded in contemporary manuscripts. At the same time, it dismantles some of the myths about it which originated with the earl himself, and provides an authoritative archaeological and art-historical analysis of the artefacts.

About the Author
Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. His research ranges across many aspects of Greek and Roman sculpture and the relationships between different artistic traditions. His previous publications include, Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008).

Guido Petruccioli is an Oxford University-trained classical archaeologist and professional photographer with specialist interests in Roman imperial portraiture and the documentation of ancient sculpture.
NEW: The Later Saxon and Early Norman Manorial Settlement at Guiting Power, Gloucestershire: Archaeological Investigation of a Domesday Book Entry by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 124 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 658 2020. ISBN 9781789693652. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This report outlines investigation of the early manor at Guiting Power, a village in the Cotswolds with Saxon origins, lying in an area with interesting entries in the Domesday Survey of 1086.

Excavation has shown that, during the later Saxon period, a lightly defended compound contained a principal area of habitation, with an adjacent, more open ‘working area’ partly divided by ditched sub-enclosures, perhaps related to subsidiary settlement, or other economic activity. This complex may have formed the main estate-centre for a more extensive land-holding, scattered over the northern Cotswolds, and leased from the king, its last Saxon tenant being one ‘Alwin’, as sheriff of the county a thegn of some standing.

During the major economic and social changes following the Conquest, under a change to Norman lordship, the manorial perimeter was reinforced, and a small apsidal church was constructed within it, now restored as a standing monument. Subsequently, a new complex of manorial buildings was established on a fresh site within the enclosure, the precursor of the present parish church was constructed nearby, with further development of manor and village into the full medieval period.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.
NEW: The Development of an Iron Age and Roman Settlement Complex at The Park and Bowsings, near Guiting Power, Gloucestershire: Farmstead and Stronghold by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 204 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. (RRP: £32.00). 657 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693638. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693645. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This report outlines excavation of a small complex of iron age and Roman settlement near Guiting Power in the Cotswolds. A relatively undefended farmstead of middle iron age date was abandoned, to be followed by an adjacent, more substantial, ditched enclosure of the mid to later iron age, which appears to have been a stronghold of higher status, with less directly agrarian associations. This latter site became dilapidated, or was perhaps slighted, during the latest iron age or early Roman period, with a Romanised farmstead developing over the traditional habitation area, this providing evidence for occupation until the late 4th century AD. The sequence of settlement indicates social, economic, and environmental changes occurring in the area from the ‘proto-Dobunnic’ to late Roman periods.

Excavation of pits at the site has provided the basis for experimental investigation of grain storage.

Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general but not exclusive interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects, which include the following: -application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments, with related experimental work; -structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; -investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and NW’n Europe.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.
NEW: Human Transgression – Divine Retribution A Study of Religious Transgressions and Punishments in Greek Cultic Regulation and Lydian-Phrygian Propitiatory Inscriptions (‘Confession Inscriptions’) by Aslak Rostad. Paperback; 175x245; 252 pages. 629 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695250. £39.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695267. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £39.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Human Transgression – Divine Retribution analyses pagan concepts of religious transgressions, how they should be regarded and punished, as expressed in Greek cultic regulations from the 5th century BC to the 3rd century AD. Also considered are the so-called propitiatory inscriptions (often referred to as ‘confession inscriptions’) from the 1st to the 3rd century AD Lydia and Phrygia, in light of ‘cultic morality’, an ideal code of behaviour intended to make places, occasions, and worshippers suitable for ritual. This code is on the one hand associated with ‘purity’ (hagneia) and removal of pollution (miasma) caused by deaths, births and sexuality, and on the other with the protection of sacred property. This study seeks to explain the emphasis of divine punishments in the Lydian and Phrygian inscriptions, while rare in most Greek cultic regulations, as part of a continuum within pagan religion rather than as a result of an absolute division between Greek and Oriental religion.

About the Author
Aslak Rostad (born 1972) holds a PhD in Ancient Greek and is Associate Professor of Classics at Norwegian University of Technology and Science (NTNU), Trondheim.
NEW: Foragers in the middle Limpopo Valley: Trade, Place-making, and Social Complexity by Tim Forssman. Paperback; 203x276mm; 140 pages; 54 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 122 2020 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 100. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696851. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696868. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Between the last centuries BC and the early second millennium AD, central southern Africa witnessed massive social change. Several landscapes hosted a variety of socio-political developments that led to the establishment of state-level society at Mapungubwe, c. 1220 AD in the middle Limpopo Valley. These different landscapes were connected through various forms of circuitry, including social, political, economic and topographic networks. While most often these systems and developments are discussed in the context of farmer societies, local forager communities also saw associated shifts. They were present from before the arrival of farmers and not only witnessed but also participated in local systems leading to the appearance of complex society. Despite numerous studies in the valley, this has not been explored; generally, forager involvement in socio-political developments has been ignored and only farmer sequences have been considered. However, from the early first millennium AD, foragers themselves transformed their own society. Changes have been noted in settlement patterns, craft production, trade relations, social interactions, wealth accumulation, and status. Moreover, these changes occurred unevenly across the landscape; at different forager sites, different responses to shifting social networks have been recorded. When viewed together, the spectrum of change suggests that valley foragers developed social complexity.

About the Author
Tim Forssman is a senior lecturer at the University of Pretoria. Previously, he managed a dam development mitigation project in Lesotho and was a postdoctoral reader at the Universities of the Witwatersrand and Pretoria. His research interests include forager-farmer interactions, forager economies, trade dynamics, landscape archaeology, and rock art.
NEW: Ash-Sharq - Bulletin of the Ancient Near East Vol 4 2020 Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). Paperback; 175x254mm; 324 pages; illustrated throughout. Papers in English and Arabic. 4 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697803. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697810. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £68.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Please note the 2020 volume has been released in one extended issue, rather than in two separate parts.

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NEW: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 4 2019 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297mm; 204 pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 4 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697841. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

JHP is an independent learned journal dedicated to the research of ceramics and objects of daily use of the Hellenistic period in the Mediterranean region and beyond. It aims at bringing together archaeologists, historians, philologists, numismatists and scholars of related disciplines engaged in the research of the Hellenistic heritage.

ARTICLES ;
Understanding the Jal el-Bahr Storage-Jar Assemblage – Donald T. Ariel ;
Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeologica Project: Excavations at Pyla-Vigla in 2019 – Justin Stephens, Brandon R. Olson, Thomas Landvatter & R. Scott Moore ;
A Hellenistic Farmhouse at the Entrance to the Town of El’ad – All Nagorsky ;
Cave 169 at Marisa: The Imported Ptolemaic Red Ware – Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom ;
Lissos in Illyria: Two Centuries of Hellenistic Pottery, and a Plea for the Publication of Contextual Material – Patricia Kögler ;

BOOK REVIEWS ;
Sarah James, Hellenistic Pottery. The Fine Wares, Corinth 7, 7 – Brice Erickson ;
Gabriel Mazor, Walid Atrash & Gerald Finkielsztejn, Bet She’an IV. Hellenistic Nisa-Scythopolis. The Amphora Stamps and Sealings from Tel Iztabba – Marek Palaczyk ;
Henrieta Todorova (ed.), Durankulak 3. Die hellenistischen Befunde – Reyhan Şahin ;
Idit Sagiv, Representations of Animals on Greek and Roman Engraved Gems. Meaning and Interpretations – Shua Amorai-Stark & Malka Hershkovitz ;
Kalliope Bairami, Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times – Natalia Kazakidi ;
Qumran, Unchecked Parallelomina, and Pseudonymity in Academic Publication, review article of Kenneth Silver, Alexandria and Qumran: Back to the Beginning – Dennis Mizzi
Archaeogaming Una introducción a la arqueología en y de los videojuegos by Andrew Reinhard. Paperback; 148x210mm; 298 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text. 30 2020. ISBN 9788416725083. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Video games are an example of material objects, resources and spaces that people use to define their culture. They also serve as archaeological sites in their traditional sense of place. Places where evidence of past activity is preserved and archaeological methodology can be applied. This book serves as a general introduction to archaeogaming: it describes the intersection between archaeology and video games, and applies archaeological theory and method to understand video games as sites as well as artifacts. It is also history, sociology and ontology; and everything that is necessary to define a culture, that of videogames, that is no longer emerging, but has been completely established in the humanity of the Anthropocene and late capitalism. What makes its valuation and cataloging more necessary as digital heritage.