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Archaeopress: Publishing Scholarly Archaeology since 1997
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide.

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in scholarly books and journals in the field of archaeology and related heritage subjects.
 
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NEW: Mobility and Exchange across Borders: Exploring Social Processes in Europe during the First Millennium BCE – Theoretical and Methodological Approaches Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 9, Sessions XXXIV-4 and XXXIV-5 edited by Veronica Cicolani. Paperback; 205x290mm; 144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French. 707 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697292. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697308. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Mobility and Exchange across Borders presents the proceedings of Sessions XXXIVIV and XXXIV-V of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). Over the last few decades, the study of cultural interactions in the Iron Age has been considerably renewed thanks to the application of new methods and tools, opening the way to new research perspectives. The papers provide different examples from various archaeological contexts and regions while applying new methodologies able to highlight the diversity of cultural transfers. Their purpose is to stimulate a debate on human interactions and cultural transfers in order to open up new analytical perspectives on this topic and to critically examine the markers and approaches traditionally used to identify human and object mobility during the first millennium BC. Through the different approaches and perspectives presented herein, this volume aims to contribute to the renewal of the scientific debate on mobility and interactions as important drivers of societal change and to stimulate future research and debate.

About the editor
Veronica Cicolani is a permanent researcher at the CNRS French Institute, AOrOc UMR8546 CNRS-PSL and member of editorial team of Etudes Celtiques. Archaeologist specialist of European protohistory, and of the history of museum collections, her research focuses on technological and cultural interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds and on Italic craft practices. Since 2005, she has been a scientific collaborator of the National Museum of Saint-Germain-en-Laye (MAN), where she also co-curated the Golasecca French exhibition (2009-2010). She has been involved in international research programmes on Celtic-Italic interactions (DFG Die sitzbanck of Hochdorf, ANR Caecina) and led a French-Italian research program on Ligurian bronze craft production (Labex Archimede 2015-2016). During the past few years, she has been exploring new inter-disciplinary approaches to the study of cultural and technological interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds.
NEW: Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past. Volume 2 A biography of a Soviet archaeologist (1960s – 1980s) by A. K. Konopatskii, translated by Richard L. Bland and Yaroslav V. Kuzmin. Paperback; 148x210mm; 576 pages; 29 figures. 705 2021 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697070. £34.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697087. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past (Volume II) is about the life and works of Aleksei P. Okladnikov (1908–1981), a prominent archaeologist who spent more than 50 years studying prehistoric sites in various parts of the Soviet Union and in Mongolia. This part of Okladnikov’s biography concentrates on his works in 1961–1981, when he was organiser (1961–1966) and since 1966 the Director of the Institute of History, Philology, and Philosophy, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences, in Novosibirsk. This institute was a part of large-scale project of Akademgorodok (Academic Town) built in 1957– 1964, the unique phenomenon of Soviet science. In Novosibirsk, Okladnikov continued active fieldworks in Siberia, Russian Far East, Central Asia and Mongolia, and writing of books and articles on different subjects of archaeology and history. He also created the Novosibirsk school of archaeologists who continue to work in Siberia and the neighbouring regions of Asia until today. In 1974, Okladnikov with four colleagues participated in joint US–Soviet expedition to the Aleutian Islands, where W. S. Laughlin and he directed the excavations of early sites. The book is for archaeologists, historians, and everyone who is interested in the history of scholarship (particularly the humanities) in the twentieth century.

About the Contributors
Aleksander K. Konopatskii joined the Institute of History, Philology and Philosophy, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences in 1972 where he was closely associated with Aleksei P. Okladnikov, assisting in fieldwork, travel and the preparation of scientific reports. Since 1998 he has been an assistant professor at the Novosibirsk General Military Academy where he teaches humanities. ;

Richard L. Bland studied Alaskan prehistory in the 1970s – 1990s (PhD 1996, University of Oregon). He has translated numerous books and articles on the archaeology of Northeastern Siberia and the Russian Far East, helping to bring the rich Soviet/Russian records of prehistory and early history to the international scholarly community. ;

Yaroslav V. Kuzmin has been studying geoarchaeology of the Russian Far East, Siberia and neighbouring Northeast Asia since 1979 (PhD 1991; DSc. 2007). He has also assisted in translating and editing books on the archaeology of eastern Russia.
NEW: Archaeological Mission of Chieti University in Libya: Reports 2006-2008 by Oliva Menozzi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 350 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 702 2020 RES: Reports, Excavations and Studies of the Archaeological Unit of the University G. d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694468. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694475. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The RES Series (Reports, Excavations and Studies of the Archaeological Unit of the University G. d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara) is dedicated to the projects and the researches of the different teams of the university of Chieti-Pescara working on archaeological projects in Italy and abroad. This first volume is dedicated to the Archaeological Mission in Cyrenaica, starting with the reports and researches of the seasons from 2006 to 2008. Chieti University has been working in Libya with a large international team since 1997. The emphasis of the publication is to present archaeological data to form part of an archive of finds, sites and monuments: a resource and reference point for archaeologists from Libya and elsewhere. At this moment the chora (territory) of Cyrene is facing multiple threats, even the potential loss of important monuments. It is hoped that this publication will contribute to the preservation of the local archaeological heritage.

About the Author
Oliva Menozzi began her studies at Chieti University and completed her doctorate at Oxford in 2001. She has been Researcher and Lecturer in Classical Archaeology and Archaeology of Greek Colonization at the University G.d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara (Italy) since 2002 and is now Associate Professor. She has been Director of the CAAM-Centre of the Athenaeum for Archaeometry and Microanalysis since 2015 and of the Master STARch (Sciences and Technologies for Archaeology at risk) since 2019.
NEW: András Bodor and the History of Classical Studies in Transylvania in the 20th century by Csaba Szabo. Paperback; 156x234mm; 222 pages; 59 figures. 701 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698343. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698350. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

András Bodor and the history of classical studies in Transylvania in the 20th century is the first comprehensive work focusing on the life of a classicist from Transylvania, presenting in detail the life and academic heritage of András Bodor (1915-1999). Based on 1348 newly identified letters, 209 photographs (including 25 portraits), András Bodor’s complete bibliography and his unpublished memoir from 1915-1959, the work offers also the first publication of Bodor’s academic correspondence (107 letters) and also extracts from his unpublished journal. Based on a large number of unpublished documents and the major works of Bodor, the book tries to reconstruct the life and academic heritage of a classicist from the periphery of Europe, a region that changed so many times over the long course of the 20th century. András Bodor appears as a student torn between theology and classical studies, a Transylvanian Hungarian who ended up at Oxford, a lecturer at the Hungarian University of Cluj, a researcher who had the idea of establishing a new school of classics, marginalised and compromising, a quiet teacher of the newly established Babeș-Bolyai University and also a senior professor engaged in education policy. The personality and work of Bodor is presented through the short history of classics in Transylvania, Romania, reflecting on the European and global changes of the discipline.

About the Author
Csaba Szabó (1987) is an assistant lecturer at the University of Lucian Blaga, Sibiu (Romania) and research fellow of the University of Szeged (Hungary). His current research is focusing on Roman religious communication and space sacralisation in the Danubian provinces, history of archaeology and classics in Transyslvania, and public archaeology in Romania.
NEW: The World of Disney: From Antiquarianism to Archaeology by David W. J. Gill. Paperback; 156x234mm; 154 pages; 44 figures. 700 2020 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698275. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698282. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dr John Disney (1779-1857) was the benefactor of the first chair in archaeology at a British university. He also donated his major collection to the University of Cambridge. The sculptures continue to be displayed in the Fitzwilliam Museum.

The Disney family traced its origins back to the Norman invasion of England, and the family home was at Norton Disney in Lincolnshire. Disney’s father, the Reverend John Disney DD (1746-1816) left the Church of England to become a minister at the Unitarian Essex Street Chapel in London. A major sponsor of the chapel was Thomas Brand-Hollis of The Hyde, Essex, who bequeathed the house and his Grand Tour collection (formed with Thomas Hollis) on his death in 1804 to the Reverend John Disney. Disney inherited part of the classical collection of his uncle and father-in-law Lewis Disney-Ffytche, owner of the 18th century pleasure gardens, Le Désert de Retz, outside Paris. Disney’s brother-in-law was Sir William Hillary, founder of the RNLI. Disney was instrumental in the creation of the Chelmsford Museum through the Chelmsford Philosophical Society, and the formation of the Essex Archaeological Society.

About the Author
Professor David Gill is Honorary Professor in the Centre for Heritage at the University of Kent, and Academic Associate in the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage in the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures at the University of East Anglia (UEA). He is a Fellow of the RSA and the Society of Antiquaries. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Archaeological Institute of America for his research on cultural property.
NEW: Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience: Barbarian perspectives and Roman strategies to deal with new threats edited by Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß. Paperback; 205x290mm; 244 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 699 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 76. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696813. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696820. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience deals with the Roman Empire’s responses to the threats which were caused by the new geostrategic situation brought on by the crisis of the 3rd century AD, induced by the ‘barbarians’ who – often already part of Roman military structures as mercenaries and auxiliaries – became a veritable menace for the Empire. Rome adopted different strategies: they oscillated between inclusion, warfare and other means of exerting influence. The contributions to this volume explore the archaeological evidence for Roman practice and especially the varying strategies of power and influence in the central regions on the one hand, and the south-eastern parts of the European ‘Barbaricum’ on the other. They show how ‘Divide et impera’ functioned as practical policy based on alliances, as well as consequent warfare, and diplomatic initiatives, which are traceable by prestige-goods and subsidia treasures found in the Barbaricum. The comparison of Roman imports in different parts of Iron-Age Europe can help understand better a complex process of shifting power and influence in an emerging new Europe, which transformed the Empire towards medieval ‘Herrschaft’ and social structure.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel holds a PhD in Ancient history and a second one in German literature. He was appointed a senior research fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and associated professor at Cuza University in Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. ;

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is a Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main.
NEW: Vernacular Buildings and Urban Social Practice: Wood and People in Early Modern Swedish Society by Andrine Nilsen. Paperback; 205x290mm; 336 pages; illustrated throughout. 698 2021. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696776. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696783. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Wooden buildings housed the majority of Swedish urban populations during the early modern era, but many of these buildings have disappeared as the result of fire, demolition, and modernisation. They were built during periods of urban transformation; disdained for their rural look and for the fire hazard they represented they were nevertheless valued for being warm, affordable and movable. This study reveals the fundamental role played by the wooden house in the formation of urban Sweden and Swedish history. Wooden buildings were particularly suited to mass production and relocation, which helped to realise the ideal town plan in the transformation of Swedish urban space. Early modern wooden houses feature more as archaeological remains and less as preserved buildings every year, thus examination and comparison of these two distinct datasets combined with historical records is important in this study. The author establishes how log construction, timber framing and post and plank buildings were used for a wide range of functions in both central and peripheral locations, and within all strata of society. New strategies were developed to create affordable warm housing while the housing stock featured both change and continuity of layout; the storeyed house contributed to evolution of the multiple unit structure. Surprisingly, this study establishes that timber-framing was more prevalent geographically and functionally than previous research indicated.

About the Author
Andrine Nilsen has historical urban buildings archaeology as a special interest and undertook her doctoral studies at the Department of Historical Studies at the University of Gothenburg. Before this she worked in the project The early modern town - between the local and the global publishing on the subject of medieval wooden houses and early modern town plans.
NEW: Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context: An Exploration into Culture, Society, and the Study of European Prehistory. Part 2 Practice – The Social, Space, and Materiality by Tobias L. Kienlin. Paperback; 210x297mm; 250 pages; 169 figures (colour throughout). 697 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697506. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697513. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Practice – The Social, Space, and Materiality forms the second part of Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context: An exploration into culture, society, and the study of European prehistory. It studies Bronze Age tells and our approaches towards an understanding of this fascinating way of life, drawing on the material remains of long-term architectural stability and references back to ancestral place. While the first volume challenged Neo-Diffusionist models of the influence of Mediterranean palatial centres on the development of tell communities in the Carpathians and an attendant focus on social stratification, the second part sets out an alternative theoretical approach, which foregrounds architecture and the social use of space. Unlike the reductionist macro perspective of mainstream social modelling, inspired by aspects of practice theory outlined in this book, the account given seeks to allow for what is truly remarkable about these sites, and what we can infer from them about the way of life they once framed and enabled. The stability seen on tells, and their apparent lack of change on a macro scale, are specific features of the social field, in a given region and for a specific period of time. Both stability and change are contingent upon specific historical contexts, including traditional practices, their material setting and human intentionality. They are not an inherent, given property of this or that ‘type’ of society or social structure. For our tells, it is argued here, underneath the specific manifestation of sociality maintained, we clearly do see social practices and corresponding material arrangements being negotiated and adjusted. Echoing the argument laid out in the first part of this study, it is suggested that archaeology should take an interest in such processes on the micro scale, rather than succumb to the temptation of neat macro history and great narratives existing aloof from the material remains of past lives.

About the Author
Tobias L. Kienlin is professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Cologne, Germany. His research interests include the European Neolithic, Copper and Bronze Ages, settlement archaeology, archaeological theory, social archaeology, material culture studies and archaeometallurgy. Current projects include BORBAS (Borsod Region Bronze Age Settlement) on Early Bronze Age tell sites in north-eastern Hungary and the Toboliu project in north-western Romania.
NEW: The Tangible and Intangible Cultural Landscape of Wadi Bani Kharus Investigations in the Sultanate of Oman by Moawiyah M. Ibrahim and Laura M. Strachan. Paperback; 210x297mm; 454 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 696 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698053. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698060. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Tangible & Intangible Cultural Landscape of Wadi Bani Kharus: Investigations in the Sultanate of Oman presents the result of the project sponsored by Oman’s Ministry of Heritage and Culture (now Heritage and Tourism) to survey one of the country’s most significant valleys. The primary objective was to gain greater understanding of the area’s past and present through its tangible and intangible cultural heritage. Traditional archaeological methods were bridged with those of cultural anthropology to create a wider lens for exploration and analysis. The book provides an eclectic overview of the wadi’s twenty-nine communities including ancient fortresses and water distribution systems, sundials, cemeteries, tombstones and period architecture in addition to oral histories highlighting past lifeways and recent transformations.

About the Authors
M.M. Ibrahim is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology, Yarmouk University, Jordan ;
L.M. Strachan is Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University, Saudi Arabia
NEW: The Mysterious Spheres on Greek and Roman Ancient Coins by Raymond V. Sidrys. Paperback; 175x245mm; 290pp; 90 figures, colour throughout. 690 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697902. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697919. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Buy Now

This book is not a standard coin catalogue, but it focuses on quantities and percentages of the mysterious 5950 sphere images on Roman (76BC-AD 476) coin reverses, and a few Greek coins. This research identifies which Emperors, Deities and Personifications are most frequently shown with a sphere, during reigns and eras, and determines the political, cultural, religious and propaganda trends associated with the coin sphere images, and provides a variety of new findings. The book has 257 illustrations of spheres shown on Roman and a few Greek coins, as well as 109 images of statues, reliefs, mosaics, and other ancient art. Consider that the ancient Greeks (620 BC-30 BC) had the first astronomers in Europe (influenced by Egyptian and Babylonian astronomy) who created the celestial and terrestrial sphere theories, including the popular geocentric theory (Earth is the centre of the Universe). But at that time the Greeks very rarely showed sphere images on their coins – far less than 1%! In comparison, the later Romans during 76 BCAD 476 issued coin reverse sphere types as 15% of their total coin types, and therefore millions of these important coin sphere types were minted. The author explores Constantine’s BEATA TRANQVILLITAS Sphere Reverses (AD 321 – 324) and offers a new interpretation of Christian Trinity symbolism that opposes Arianism. Starting in the late 4th century, the Roman religion began to transfer to Christianity, and coins promoted Emperors holding a Christian cross on a globe or a winged Victory/Angel also holding a globus cruciger. At the end of the book, the Epilogue shows the continuous worldwide use (from 5th to 21st century) of sphere images on coins, reliefs, sculptures, astronomical models, drawings, paintings and large monuments, and some of them suggest that Imperial Roman sphere coins created a long legacy.

About the Author
Raymond Sidrys was born in Manhattan, New York; received his B.A. (1971) in Anthropology at Northwestern University (also 1969 summer school at Harvard University), and M.A. (1973) and Ph.D. (1976) in Anthropology/Archaeology at UCLA. He lectured at several Universities in southern California and in Lithuania.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction ;
Chapter 2: Sun Disk Images in Ancient Cultures ;
Chapter 3: Greek Concepts of Celestial and Terrestrial Spheres ;
Chapter 4: Early Greek Coins With Few Sphere Symbols (520 BC – 76 BC) ;
Chapter 5: Prior Research on Roman Coin Sphere Symbols ;
Chapter 6: Astrological/Astronomical Sphere Symbols Move to Rome ;
Chapter 7: Winged Victory vs. Sphere Symbols on Roman Coins ;
Chapter 8: First Spheres on Late Republican Coinage (76 BC - 31 BC) ;
Chapter 9: Spheres Frequent on Roman Imperial Coinage ;
Chapter 10: Chronological Trends for Top Coin Sphere Images ;
Chapter 11: General Conclusions ;
Chapter 12: Appendices ;
Bibliography ;
Index ;
List of Figures and Credits ;
Acknowledgements ;
About the Author
NEW: In the Shadow of the Ancestors: The Prehistoric Foundations of the Early Arabian Civilization in Oman Second Expanded Edition by Serge Cleuziou & Maurizio Tosi. Edited by Dennys Frenez and Roman Garba. Paperback; 582 pages; highly illustrated in colour throughout. 683 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697889. £88.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697896. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £88.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The first edition of In the Shadow of the Ancestors (2007) was the first and only summary of decades of archaeological research in the Oman Peninsula. This second expanded had a long and winding journey toward publication. The passing away of Serge Cleuziou not long after the release of the first edition left Maurizio Tosi alone in completing this challenging enterprise. For this reason, and out of respect for his lifelong friend and colleague, he decided not to intervene too extensively on the main contents, but to add instead to the original eleven chapters a number of new ‘windows’ written by other scholars, in order to include more recent research and interpretations. In addition to the main contents, the new contributions by this younger generation of scholars, most of whom were students and collaborators of Cleuziou and Tosi, offers great testament to the legacy the authors leave behind them.

About the Authors
Serge Cleuziou (1945–2009). French archaeologist and social scientist at the University of Paris «Sorbonne», Serge Cleuziou was deeply interested in studying the multifaceted relationships between population and environmental resources by reconstructing ancient landscapes and manufacturing processes. He has been one of the founding fathers of archaeological research in Southeastern Arabia, where he excavated first at Hili and later along the Ja’alan coast in Oman.

Maurizio Tosi (1944–2017). Italian archaeologist and palaeoeconomist at the University of Naples «Orientale» and the University of Bologna, Maurizio Tosi researched the formation processes of prehistoric societies in Middle Asia. In 1977 he pioneered the archaeological research in Oman excavating Neolithic necropoleis and fishermen camps at Ras Al-Hamra.
NEW: On the Borders of World-Systems: Contact Zones in Ancient and Modern Times by Yervand Margaryan. Paperback; 156x230mm; 148pp; 32 figures. 599 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693416. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693423. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

On the Borders of World-Systems: Contact Zones in Ancient and Modern Times draws on a diverse set of disciplines to explore historical, archaeological, and political interpretations of world-systems theory and geocivilizational analysis. The monograph has a prospective character, the main goal of which is the solution of a major problem – the study of worldwide practice, oriented towards the problems of the modern social world as a system. The principal focus is on the borderland - limes, which has been perceived variously as an impenetrable cordon, and as an open, interactive environment. In this locus of inter-world encounters, different civilizations developed, and an exchange of goods and ideas took place. Macrosociological issues of ancient and modern history are analyzed through five case studies of the Taurus-Caucasus region and its role as a contact zone in different periods.

About the Author Yervand Margaryan, Head of the Department of World History and Foreign Regional Studies of the Russian-Armenian University at Yerevan and Leading Researcher at the Institute of History, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, is a leading historian from the Republic of Armenia. His research focuses on the Ancient World, particularly problems of Classical period social relations, religion (Mithraism), identity and world-systems theory.
NEW IN PAPERBACK: Natter’s Museum Britannicum: British gem collections and collectors of the mid-eighteenth century by John Boardman, Julia Kagan and Claudia Wagner with contributions by Catherine Phillips. Paperback ; iv+304 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Print RRP: £55.00. 379 2017. ISBN 9781789698107. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The German gem-engraver, medallist, and amateur scholar Lorenz Natter (1705- 1763), was so impressed by the size and quality of the collections of ancient and later engraved gems which he found in Britain that he proposed the publication of an extraordinarily ambitious catalogue – Museum Britannicum – which would present engravings and descriptions of the most important pieces. He made considerable progress to this end, producing several hundred drawings, but in time he decided to abandon the near completed project in the light of the apparent lack of interest shown in Britain. Only one of the intended plates in its final form ever appeared, in a catalogue which he published separately for Lord Bessborough’s collection. On Natter’s death the single copy of his magnum opus vanished mysteriously, presumed lost forever.

All hope of recovering Natter’s unpublished papers seemed vain, and their very existence had come to be doubted. Yet they were to be found more than two hundred years after his death, in Spring 1975, when the classical scholar and renowned expert in gems, Oleg Neverov, chanced upon them at the bottom of a pile of papers in the archives of the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg. Neverov and his colleague Julia Kagan carried out the initial research on the Hermitage manuscripts and produced the first published account of this archival treasure.

The present volume builds upon their earlier work to produce the first comprehensive publication of Museum Britannicum, offering full discussion in English and presenting Natter’s drawings and comments alongside modern information on the gems that can be identified and located through fresh research. This book is the result of a ten-year collaboration between scholars on the Beazley Archive gems research programme at Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre and the State Hermitage Museum. It fulfills Natter’s vision for the Museum Britannicum – albeit two and a half centuries late – to the benefit of art historians, cultural historians, curators, and gem-lovers of today.

Please note, the hardback edition (ISBN 9781784917272) is now sold out.

NEW: L’arte rupestre nella penisola e nelle isole italiane: rapporti tra rocce incise e dipinte, simboli, aree montane e viabilità Rock art in the Italian peninsula and islands: issues about the relation between engraved and painted rocks, symbols, mountain areas and paths edited by Francesco M. P. Carrera, Renata Grifoni Cremonesi and Anna Maria Tosatti. Paperback; 203x276mm; 484 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 129 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698237. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698244. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

L’arte rupestre nella penisola e nelle isole italiane presents the proceedings of IFRAO 2018 – Session 2H: Rock Art in the Italian Peninsula and Islands: Issues about the Relation between Engraved and Painted Rocks, Symbols, Mountain Areas and Paths. The various papers present a remarkable synthesis of current knowledge on inscriptions, engraved and painted, on the rock walls of the Italian peninsular. In recent years an increasing amount of data has been collected, characterized by a regional and peculiar iconography with some common elements: anthropomorphic figures, weapons, daggers, halberds and other several symbols, all stylised. A peculiarity of this research is the site’s locations within small shelters, inappropriate for habitation or in places suitable for supervising mountain and territory roads; this research demonstrates similarities to that carried out in the Western Mediterranean Sea. A new subject of relates to the possible interpretations of some engravings as solar and stellar symbols related to the measuring of time and to economic, daily and seasonal factors.

L’ouvrage «Art rupestre de la Péninsule italienne, de la Sicile, de la Sardaigne et de la Corse» qui publie les actes du 20ème Congrès International « Rock Art Congres IFRAO 2018 », dont les différentes communications ont été réunies par Francesco Carrera, Renata Grifoni Cremonesi et Anna Maria Tosatti, présente une remarquable synthèse des connaissances actuelles sur les inscriptions gravées et peintes sur les parois rocheuses des régions prises en compte. Le plus souvent très schématiques, difficilement datables, elles correspondent soit à des pictogrammes qui évoquent des objets de la vie courante, soit à des idéogrammes qui transmettent des idées liées à la pensée symbolique des peuples protohistoriques qui les ont réalisées. Quelques articles sont consacrés aux cupules creusées sur des roches en plein air pour récupérer l’eau de pluie, d’autres à des rainures très profondes qui correspondent à des “polissoirs”. – Henry de Lumley - Institut de Paléontologie Humaine, Paris
ARAMAZD: Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies Volume XIV. 1-2 2020 edited by Aram Kosyan (Editor in Chief). Paperback; 165x235mm; Vol XIV 1-2 contained in one printed volume. 14 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698534. £50.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £70.00 (No VAT). £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £79.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Volume XIV is presented in one volume containing both issues (both for print and online editions). Note for institutional subscribers: Please be sure to log in first via your institution's unique URL - this page will then display download options. Otherwise only purchase options will display. If you experience difficulties logging in please consult your librarian or contact Archaeopress directly via the following email: info@archaeopress.com
NEW: Offa's Dyke Journal: Volume 2 for 2020 edited by Howard Williams and Liam Delaney. Paperback; 176x250mm; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 2 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698527. £35.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

As the first and only open-access peer-reviewed academic journal about the landscapes, monuments and material culture of frontiers and borderlands in deep-time historical perspective, the Offa’s Dyke Journal (ODJ) has a concerted focus on the Anglo-Welsh borderlands given its sponsorship from the University of Chester and the Offa’s Dyke Association in support of the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory. Yet ODJ also provides a venue for original research on frontiers and borderlands in broader and comparative perspective. While Offa’s Dyke and Wat’s Dyke remain key foci, the contents of volumes 1 and 2 together illustrate the wider themes, debates and investigations encapsulated by ODJ concerning boundaries and barriers, edges and peripheries, from prehistory through to recent times, as well as considerations of the public archaeology and heritage of frontiers and borderlands.

Table of Contents
Collaboratory, Coronavirus and the Colonial Countryside – Howard Williams ;
Two Chimeras in the Landscape – Mark Bell ;
The ‘Wall of Severus’: Pseudoarchaeology and the West Mercian Dykes – Keith Fitzpatrick-Matthews ;
Saxon Kent versus Roman London? Presenting Borderland Heritage at the Faesten Dic in Joyden’s Wood, Kent – Ethan Doyle White ;
Living after Offa: Place-Names and Social Memory in the Welsh Marches – Howard Williams ;
Offa’s and Wat’s Dykes – David Hill ;
Grim’s Ditch, Wansdyke, and the Ancient Highways of England: Linear Monuments and Political Control – Tim Malim
NEW: Stone Tools of Prehistoric Arabia: Papers from the Special Session of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held on 21 July 2019 Supplement to the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 50 2020 edited by K. Bretzke, R. Crassard and Y.H. Hilbert. Paperback; 206x255mm; 205 pages; colour throughout. PSAS50 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697377. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697384. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

During the Seminar for Arabian Studies held in Leiden (July 2019), a special one-day session on the stone tools of prehistoric Arabia was held. Stone tools are generally associated with the oldest archaeological periods of human existence, the Palaeolithic, and are the most lasting vestiges of our ancestors’ productive activities. In Arabia, stone tools (or lithics) are found on the deflated surfaces close to raw material outcrops, high on the top of mountains and deep within valleys and terraces, on lake relics at the heart of the many sand seas, and even under water. For a long time, however, stratified archaeological records were rare and developing chronological frameworks was therefore a challenge. The discoveries made by international archaeological projects conducted across Arabia in recent years have made vital contributions to the field; the archaeological investigation of human origins in the Arabian Peninsula and a better understanding of cultural diversification throughout prehistory are good examples. The interpretation of the new finds provides alternative scenarios for how prehistoric human populations interacted with the diverse landscapes of Arabia, suggesting the Peninsula was not merely a crossroads or superhighway of expansion for anatomically modern humans but also functioned as a human habitat throughout the Pleistocene. The present Supplement to Volume 50 of the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies addresses these and many particularly emerging interests on the deep past of the Arabian Peninsula.
NEW: Archaeology Today: A Colouring Book by Cornelius Holtorf and Daniel Lindskog. Paperback; 210x297mm; 16 pages; black & white throughout. 704 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698190. £4.99 (No VAT). Download Full PDF   Buy Now

This colouring book offers a short introduction to the world of the contemporary archaeologist, exploring new approaches and theories of investigation. With text by professional archaeologist Cornelius Holtorf and beautiful, highly detailed illustrations by archaeologically trained professional illustrator Daniel Lindskog, each page is full of information to explore, and designs to colour.

About the Contributors
Cornelius Holtorf is Professor of Archaeology at Linnaeus University in Sweden. ;

Daniel Lindskog is a professional illustrator with a degree in archaeology.
NEW: Deposit of Amphorae in the Quarter of St. Theodore, Pula by Alka Starac. Paperback; 205x290mm; 704 pages; 75 figures, 10 tables, 21 graphs plus appendices and illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). Print RRP: £95.00. 695 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 75. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698480. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698497. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £95.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Deposit of Amphorae in the Quarter of St. Theodore, Pula examines a large group of amphorae which were placed in the quarter of St. Theodore in Pula during the construction of the terrace of the Roman temple complex and adjacent public thermae in the mid-1st century BC, in order to enable drainage and levelling of the slope. The total number of amphorae from deposits registered in the 2005-2007 excavations amounted to 2119, of which 1754 were extracted and thoroughly documented.

About the Author
Alka Starac has worked in the fields of Roman archaeology, epigraphy, history and economy since defending her PhD dissertation Roman rule in Histria and Liburnia’in 1996 at the University of Zagreb. She has published more than eighty scholarly papers in international archaeological publications, ten monographs (either as author or editor) and has worked on several archaeological exhibitions dealing with Roman Istria.
NEW: In Context: the Reade Festschrift edited by Irving Finkel and St John Simpson. Paperback; 205x290mm; 345 pages; illustrated throughout. 694 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696073. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696080. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In Context: the Reade Festschrift is a collection of invited and peer-reviewed essays by friends and colleagues of Julian Edgeworth Reade, sometime Mesopotamia curator at the British Museum from 1975 to 2000. Its coverage is designed to reflect the breadth of the recipient’s professional interests, from Assyria and Mesopotamia in general, to the relations between Mesopotamia and other regions and the impact of nineteenth-century discoveries on the field of Assyriology. They include both syntheses and archaeological research, as well as reports on archival discoveries. Context is always crucial. Here is fresh work from which any reader can gain a new appreciation of the importance of the ancient Near East.

About the Editors
Irving Finkel is the senior curator responsible for the cuneiform tablet collection in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum. He is a specialist in medical and magical works in Akkadian and particularly interested in esoteric inscriptions that concern ancient thought and speculation. He has been responsible for exhibitions inside and outside the museum, including Asian Games: The Art of Conquest (Asia Society New York, 2004) and Babylon: Myth and Reality (British Museum, 2008). He is the author of books for adults and children, including the bestselling The Ark Before Noah, matched by The Lifeboat that Saved the World. He is a world expert on ancient games and Founder of the Great Diary Project.

St John Simpson is also a senior curator in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum where he is responsible for the collections from Iran, Central Asia and Arabia. He specialises in the archaeology of the Sasanian and early medieval periods and has excavated extensively in the Middle East and Central Asia. During his time at the museum, he has curated exhibitions on ancient South Arabia (Queen of Sheba: Treasures from Ancient Yemen, 2002), Afghanistan (Afghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World, 2011) and Eurasian nomads (Scythians: Warriors of Ancient Siberia, 2017/2018), as well as the Rahim Irvani Gallery for Ancient Iran (2007) and several smaller displays. Recently he has assumed museum-wide responsibility for repatriation of trafficked antiquities identified in Britain to their countries of origin.
NEW: ‘For My Descendants and Myself, a Nice and Pleasant Abode’ – Agency, Micro-history and Built Environment Buildings in Society International BISI III, Stockholm 2017 edited by Göran Tagesson, Per Cornell, Mark Gardiner, Liz Thomas and Katherine Weikert. Paperback; 205x290mm; 190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 693 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695816. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695823. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Agency, Micro-History and Built Environment examines how people have been making, using and transforming buildings and built environments in general, and how the buildings have been perceived. It also considers a diversity of built constructions – including dwellings and public buildings, sheds and manor houses, secular and sacral structures. Comparisons between different regions and parts of the globe, important when addressing buildings from a social perspective, are presented with studies from the UK, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Germany and Mexico. The chronological framework spans from the classical Byzantine period, over the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period and ends in 20th century Belfast.

About the Editors
Göran Tagesson is Associate Professor in Historical Archaeology at Lund University and Project Leader at The Archaeologists, The National Historical Museums, Sweden. ;

Per Cornell is Professor in Archaeology at the University of Gothenburg. ;

Mark Gardiner is Associate Professor of Archaeology at the University of Lincoln. ;

Liz Thomas is a Research Fellow in The Beam and is also an Affiliate Researcher at the Institute for Cultural Practices, University of Manchester. ;

Katherine Weikert is a Senior Lecturer in Early Medieval History at the University of Winchester.
NEW: Invisible Connections: An Archaeometallurgical Analysis of the Bronze Age Metalwork from the Egyptian Museum of the University of Leipzig by Martin Odler and Jiří Kmošek. Paperback; 205x290mm; 200 pages; 176 figures, 15 tables (colour throughout). 692 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 31. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697407. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697414. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Egyptian Museum of the University of Leipzig has the largest university collection of ancient Egyptian artefacts in Germany. It includes important objects from the excavations of the most prolific excavator among the museum’s curators, Georg Steindorff, at the sites of Abusir, Aniba, and Giza, complemented by objects from Abydos, Thebes, and Kerma. The catalogue represents the results of an interdisciplinary project by Egyptologist and archaeologist Martin Odler, archaeometalurgist Jiří Kmošek and other participating researchers. A selection of 86 artefacts was analysed using a range of archaeometallurgical methods (X-ray fluorescence; metallography; neutron activation analysis; lead isotope analysis), providing a diachronic sample of Bronze Age Egyptian copper alloy metalwork from Dynasty 1 to Dynasty 19.

Besides currently popular focus on the ore provenance, the selection of the applied methods aimed also at the description of practical physical properties of the objects. The question of differences between full-size functional artefacts and models is addressed, as is the problem of 'imports' and their ethnic interpretation. The analyses brought many unexpected results to light, the most surprising being a bowl (ÄMUL 2162) made of arsenical copper high in nickel, which has parallels in Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Anatolia, and was featured in an article in the Journal of Archaeological Science in 2018. The corpus presented here involves the largest analysed metalwork assemblage from the Nubian C-Group and the Egyptian New Kingdom, and it addresses the issue of the use of local Nubian ore sources versus the sources of copper from Cyprus and elsewhere.

About the Authors
Martin Odler defended his PhD thesis 'The social context of copper in ancient Egypt down to the end of Middle Kingdom' in 2020. In 2016, he published the monograph 'Old Kingdom Copper Tools and Model Tools', the first of its kind in Egyptology, with Archaeopress. In Abusir (Egypt), he led, together with Marie Peterková Hlouchová, an excavation of a new type of Egyptian tomb (AS 103) and of the latest known tomb of a transitional type from early Dynasty 4 (AS 104).

Jiří Kmošek is an archaeometallurgist, a PhD candidate at the Institute for Natural Sciences and Technology in the Arts, Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. He has analysed not only ancient Egyptian material but also Bronze Age metalwork from the Czech Republic.
NEW: Travelling the Korosko Road: Archaeological Exploration in Sudan’s Eastern Desert edited by W. Vivian Davies and Derek A. Welsby. Hardback; 205x290mm; 252 pages; 493 plates, 74 figures (colour throughout). 688 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 24. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698039. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698046. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume publishes accounts of archaeological exploration carried out during the last 30 years or so in the Sudanese Eastern Desert. It is divided into two related parts.

The first and foremost covers results from the work of the Centro Ricerche sul Deserto Orientale (CeRDO), which is based at Varese in northern Italy. Between 1989 and 2006, CeRDO, directed by the brothers Alfredo and Angelo Castiglioni, ran a pioneering programme of expeditions, which traversed the so-called ‘Korosko Road’ (the main desert route connecting Egypt and Sudan) and followed multiple other tracks throughout the Eastern Desert. They encountered in the process a rich archaeological landscape, hundreds of previously undocumented sites, many frequented over millennia, prominent among them gold-production areas and their associated settlements. The CeRDO record, the photographic database, the material retrieved, to which several of the papers published here are devoted, are now all the more valuable, in that many of these sites have since been badly disturbed and some entirely destroyed by recent goldmining activities.

The second part, introduced by a concise account of the historical usage of the Korosko Road, reports in full on a single, short season of documentation, organized in 2013 under the auspices, and with the support, of the Sudan Archaeological Research Society. Its main aim was detailed recording of a group of pharaonic rock-inscriptions discovered by CeRDO expeditions, most located along the Korosko Road and almost all related to the colonial gold-working industry. The project included also a degree of investigation and mapping of the wider context, as well as the recording and study of associated archaeological material, in particular of ceramic remains. The results complement and usefully extend in part those of CeRDO.
NEW: Conversations in Human Evolution: Volume 1 edited by Lucy Timbrell. Paperback; 203x276mm; 124 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 128 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695854. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695861. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Conversations in Human Evolution is an ongoing science communication initiative seeking to explore the breadth and interdisciplinarity of human evolution studies. This volume reports twenty interviews (referred to as ‘conversations’ as they are informal in style) with scholars at the forefront of human evolution research, covering the broad scientific themes of quaternary and archaeological science, Palaeolithic archaeology, biological anthropology and palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary anthropology and evolutionary genetics. This project features academics at various different stages in their careers and from all over the world; in this volume alone, researchers are based at institutions in seven different countries (namely the United Kingdom, Australia, the United States of America, Germany, Denmark, India, and China), covering four continents.

Having arisen at the start of the COVID19 pandemic, Conversations in Human Evolution aims to encourage engagement with both human evolutionary studies and the broader socio-political issues that persist within academia, the latter of which is particularly pertinent during this time of global uncertainty. The conversations delve deeply into the study of our species’ evolutionary history through the lens of each sub-discipline, as well as detailing some of the most current advances in research, theory and methods. Overall, Conversations in Human Evolution seeks to bridge the gap between the research and researcher through contextualisation of the science with personal experience and historical reflection.

About the Editor
Lucy Timbrell is an AHRC-funded PhD researcher in the Archaeology of Human Origins Research Group at the University of Liverpool. Broadly, she is interested in the evolution of modern human diversity, with her doctoral research focussing on quantifying the population structure of early Homo sapiens in Late-Middle Pleistocene Africa. Alongside her PhD research, she organises the widely-known University of Liverpool Evolutionary Anthropology seminar series.
NEW: New Frontiers in Archaeology: Proceedings of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference 2019 edited by Kyra Kaercher, Monique Arntz, Nancy Bomentre, Xosé L. Hermoso-Buxán, Kevin Kay, Sabrina Ki, Ruairidh Macleod, Helena Muñoz-Mojado, Lucy Timbrell and Izzy Wisher. Paperback; 203x276mm; 308 pages; illustrated throughout (83 pages of colour). Print RRP: £48.00. 127 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697940. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697957. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume is the result of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference (CASA), held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research from September 13–15, 2019. CASA developed out of the Annual Student Archaeology Conference, first held in 2013, which was formed by students at Cambridge, Oxford, Durham and York. In 2017, Cambridge became the home of the conference and the name was changed accordingly. The conference was developed to give students (from undergraduate to PhD candidates) in archaeology and related fields the chance to present their research to a broad audience.

The theme for the 2019 conference was New Frontiers in Archaeology and this volume presents papers from a wide range of topics such as new geographical areas of research, using museum collections and legacy data, new ways to teach archaeology and new scientific or theoretic paradigms. From hunting and gathering in the Neolithic to the return of artefacts to Turkey, the papers contained within show a great variety in both geography and chronology. Discussions revolve around access to data, the role of excavation in today’s archaeology, the role of local communities in archaeological interpretation and how we can ask new questions of old data. This volume presents 18 papers arranged in the six sessions with the two posters in their thematic sessions.
NEW: Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History 22 edited by Helena Hamerow. Paperback; 210x297mm; 140 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 22 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697865. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697872. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £56.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History (ASSAH) is an annual journal concerned with the archaeology and history of England and its neighbours during the Anglo-Saxon period (circa AD 400-1100). ASSAH offers researchers an opportunity to publish new work in an inter- and multi-disciplinary forum that allows for a diversity of approaches and subject matter. Contributions placing Anglo-Saxon England in its international context are as warmly welcomed as those that focus on England itself.

About the Editor
Helena Hamerow is Professor of Early Medieval Archaeology at the School of Archaeology, University of Oxford. Her research interests include the archaeology of northwest Europe from AD 400-1000, Early medieval rural settlements and economy, the archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England, and the links between England and mainland Europe c.400-700.

Table of contents
Foreword – Helena Hamerow ;
Human faces with pointed ears: exploring lycanthropy in Early Anglo-Saxon England – Lisa Brundle ;
A Seventh-Century High-Status Settlement at Long Wittenham, Oxfordshire – Adam McBride, Helena Hamerow and Jane Harrison ;
Early Medieval Great Hall Complexes in England: Temporality and Site Biographies – Scull and Gabor Thomas ;
The excavation of a Mid Anglo-Saxon malthouse at Sedgeford, Norfolk: An interim report – Neil Faulkner and Eleanor Blakelock ;
Anglo-Saxon Sundials – Elizabeth Okasha ;
Sites of Power and Assembly in the Thames Valley in the Middle Ages – Alex Sanmark
NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 5 2020 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). DOI: 10.32028/9781789697926. Paperback; 205x290mm; 652 pages; colour throughout. 5 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697926. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697933. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Volume 5 is perhaps the richest and most diverse volume of the Journal of Greek Archaeology so far offered to readers. The editors have kept to the journal's core brief to cover all the major periods of Greek Archaeology in a literal sense, with articles from the Neolithic through Greco-Roman times and the Middle Ages and up to the 19th century AD. Geographically, papers range from Sicily through the Aegean to Turkey.

A major novelty is the inclusion of two Colloquia, one on the economics of Greek Protohistoric to Archaic ‘colonisation’ edited by Lieve Donnellan, the second on Byzantine landscape archaeology edited by Effie Athanassopoulos.

Alongside a wealth of period-based papers on settlements, ceramics, lithics and urban infrastructure, the volume also presents a major report on the nature and future of surface survey in Mediterranean lands, a group article – the fruit of some twenty years of twice-yearly conferences by the International Mediterranean Survey Workshop community.

The review section also ranges through prehistory to the recent past, including the historiography of research which includes and extensive and enlightening (but disturbing) review article by Margriet Haagsma on discrimination against female scholars in early 20th century Classical Archaeology.

NEW: KOINON: The International Journal of Classical Numismatic Studies Volume III, 2020 edited by Nicholas J. Molinari (General Editor). Paperback; 215x280mm; 144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 3 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789698114. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698121. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £56.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

As the name indicates, KOINON is a journal that encourages contributions to the study of classical numismatics from a wide variety of perspectives. The journal includes papers concerning iconography, die studies, provenance research, forgery analysis, translations of excerpts from antiquarian works, specialized bibliographies, corpora of rare varieties and types, ethical questions on laws and collecting, book reviews, and more. The editorial advisory board is made up of members from all over the world, with a broad range of expertise covering virtually all the major categories of classical numismatics from archaic Greek coinage to late Medieval coinage.

Table of Contents
The Unconquerable Sun: An introduction to Koinon III and brief note concerning the solace of numismatics – Nicholas J. Molinari ;
Overstruck sigloi of Azbaal and Baalmelek II of Kition – David Macdonald ;
Cast copies of a Neapolitan silver didrachm from the Berlin coin cabinet – John Voukelatos ;
Susa mint: 311-301 BC – Lloyd W. H. Taylor ;
Sidon to Tyre: the Macedonian administration and relative chronology – Lloyd W. H. Taylor ;
The Kerykeion mint control linked coinage of Andragoras and Sophytes – Lloyd W. H. Taylor ;
Αχελομορφωθ: magistrates of Akarnania. A Reconsideration of the iconographic fluctuations on Akarnanian federal coinage – Nicholas J. Molinari ;
Constantine’s decennalia and his fourth consulship on a follis from Lugdunum – Andrei Bontas ;
The emergence of fur money in medieval Russia – Dzmitry Huletski ;
Hungarian coins – Hebrew letters – Csaba Tóth and József Géza Kiss ;
The ant-nose coinage of ancient China – Thomas Walker ;
Catalogue of new varieties
NEW: The Land of the Anka Bird A Journey through the Turkic Heartlands by Caroline Eden, Photography by Ergun Çağatay. Paperback; 240x240mm; 152 pages; full colour photography throughout.ISBN 9780995756625. £25.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The Land of the Anka Bird: A journey through the Turkic heartland is a reflective visual essay introducing the powerful photographs of Ergun Çağatay. The book explores the cultural landscape and geography of the vast Turkic-speaking lands, from the mercantile cities of Uzbekistan to little-explored pockets of the Baltic. It is clear that while divided by distance, the diverse Turkic share far more than a linguistic heritage. Deep cultural connections highlight great mobility across many landscapes and centuries. Spanning both the nomadic and settled worlds, this book challenges assumptions about an intriguing swathe of our planet while celebrating its wildly varied traditions and environment.

About the Contributors
Caroline Eden is a writer contributing to the travel, food and arts pages of the Guardian, Financial Times and the Times Literary Supplement. The author of two books, Samarkand (Kyle Books, 2016) and Black Sea (Quadrille, 2018), she is currently working on a new travelogue with recipes entitled Red Sands to be published by Quadrille in autumn 2020. Twitter and Instagram: @edentravels.

Ergun Çağatay (1937–2018) began working on Central Asia in 1993 as a photographer after surviving a near-fatal bomb attack in Paris ten years earlier. Over the following decade, he travelled more than 100,000 miles and took more than 40,000 photographs, from Lithuania in the west to Yakutia in eastern Siberia. These became the basis of ‘The Turkic Speaking Peoples: 2,000 Years of Art and Culture from Inner Asia to the Balkans’ (Prestel, 2006), a book that combined his images with scholarly essays on the history, culture, cuisine and landscape of the broader Turkic world. His photographs, most of them unpublished, form a unique archive for anyone wishing to understand the complexities of Central Asia and the vast surrounding region since the Cold War. Çağatay died in 2018, just as he was embarking on a project to capture the Crimean Tatars, the peoples of the Balkans and the Uighurs of western China.
FORTHCOMING: Göytepe: Neolithic Excavations in the Middle Kura Valley, Azerbaijan edited by Yoshihiro Nishiaki and Farhad Guliyev. Hardback; 210x297mm; 384 pages; 285 figures, 37 tables (colour throughout). 708 2020. ISBN 9781789698787. Book contents pageBuy Now

Göytepe: Neolithic Excavations in the Middle Kura Valley, Azerbaijan, publishes the first round of fieldwork and research (2008-2013) at this key site for understanding the emergence and development of food-producing communities in the South Caucasus. Situated close to the Fertile Crescent of Southwest Asia, where Neolithisation processes occurred earlier, research in the South Caucasus raises intriguing research questions, including issues of diffusion from the latter and interaction with ‘incoming’ Neolithic communities as well as the possibility of independent local Neolithisation processes. In order to address these issues in the South Caucasus, a joint Azerbaijan–Japan research programme was launched in 2008 to investigate Göytepe, one of the largest known Neolithic mounds in the South Caucasus. The results of the first phase of the project (2008-2013) presented here provide rich archaeological data from multi-disciplinary perspectives: chronology, architecture, technology, social organisation, and plant and animal exploitation, to name a few. This volume is the first to present these details in a single report of the South Caucasian Neolithic site using a high-resolution chronology based on dozens of radiocarbon dates.

About the Editors
Yoshihiro Nishiaki, who received his BA and MA from the University of Tokyo and PhD from University College London, is a professor of prehistoric archaeology at the University of Tokyo and Director of its University Museum. His research involves the prehistory of Southwest Asia and its neighbouring regions through fieldwork and archaeological analyses of material remains. He has directed a number of field campaigns at Palaeolithic and Neolithic sites in Syria, Iran, Azerbaijan, and Uzbekistan. The Neolithisation processes of the South Caucasus have been a major target of his research in the past few decades. ;

Farhad Guliyev, a graduate of the Baku State University of the Republic of Azerbaijan, received his PhD from the Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences (ANAS) and currently serves as Director of the Museum of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, ANAS. His major research interests lie in the socio-economic development of the South Caucasus from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age. His recent international field projects besides Göytepe include the Neolithic sites of Hacı Elamxanlıtepe, Menteshtepe and Kiciktepe, also in western Azerbaijan.