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Archaeopress: Publishing Scholarly Archaeology since 1997
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide.

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in scholarly books and journals in the field of archaeology and related heritage subjects.
 
 
NEW: Scambi e commerci in area vesuviana I dati delle anfore dai saggi stratigrafici I.E. (Impianto Elettrico) 1980-81 nel Foro di Pompei edited by Darío Bernal-Casasola and Daniela Cottica. Paperback; 210x297mm; x+344 pages; 79 figures, 71 plates (90 pages in colour). 590 2019 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 14. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693232. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693249. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Transport amphorae are one of the best archaeological indicators for evaluating the economy and trade of societies in the ancient world. Scambi e commerci in area vesuviana: i dati delle anfore dai saggi stratigrafici I.E. (Impianto Elettrico) 1980-81 nel Foro di Pompei, produced by researchers from the University of Cadiz and the Ca' Foscari University of Venice, includes the study of nearly five hundred of these commercial containers, recovered during the pioneering stratigraphic excavations carried out in 1980-1981 at the Forum of Pompeii, called conventionally "Impianto Elettrico".

The work represents the first Pompeian monograph dedicated exclusively to the analysis of the amphoric evidence brought to light by archaeological excavation activities in the city buried by the eruption of Vesuvius and analyses in diachronic perspective the main productions in circulation between the VI / V BC and the year 79 AD. The chapters of the volume offer the reader data relating to archaic amphorae, Greek amphorae and Italic wine amphorae from the Republican era, which draw a commercial panorama of great vitality. The African amphorae, following Punic traditions, are then reviewed; then follow the Punic-Gaditan garum amphorae, identified for the first time in the Vesuvian area in this study; le Dressel 21-22, containers for the Italic fish-salting trade and, finally, the productions of the late Republican and Julio-Claudian period. The volume is completed by a series of complementary archaeometric studies carried out on some of the amphorae (paleocontent organic residue analysis and petrographic characterization of the fabrics).

All this material, analyzed with an integrated and interdisciplinary approach, allows us to draw multiple conclusions, fundamental to understanding the rich and articulated daily history of Pompeii, its merchants and its inhabitants (the consumers to whom the amphorae were intended) but also useful to better define the Economic History of some of the circum-Mediterranean regions (from Gades to the Aegean) with which Pompeii had strong trade ties in Antiquity, as evidenced by the amphorae presented here.

About the Editors
Darío Bernal-Casasola is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Cádiz.

Daniela Cottica is currently Senior Lecturer in Classical Archeology at the Ca 'Foscari University of Venice.

Italian Description:
Scambi e commerci in area vesuviana: i dati delle anfore dai saggi stratigrafici I.E. (Impianto Elettrico) 1980-81 nel Foro di Pompei rappresenta la prima monografia pompeiana dedicata esclusivamente all’analisi delle testimonianze anforiche portate alla luce da attività di scavo archeologico nella città sepolta dall’eruzione del Vesuvio, ed analizza in prospettiva diacronica tutte le produzioni in circolazione tra il VI/V secolo a.C. e l’anno 79 d.C. I quattordici capitoli del volume offrono al lettore i dati relativi alle anfore arcaiche, non abbondanti ma molto significative per le fasi più antiche dell’insediamento, e alle anfore greche, specialmente rodie di epoca ellenistica, che si distinguono per l’abbondanza di esemplari bollati. Sono poi presentate le anfore vinarie italiche di epoca repubblicana, che disegnano un panorama commerciale di grande vitalità, nel quale la Campania gioca un ruolo preminente, intrecciando le sue produzioni con quelle di altre aree della penisola. Si passano quindi in rassegna le anfore africane, o di tradizione punica, caratterizzate da una complessa seriazione tipologica che ben illustra gli intensi rapporti commerciali con il nordafrica e l’isola di Ibiza; seguono poi le anfore punico-gaditane da garum, identificate per la prima volta in area vesuviana proprio in questo studio, e le Dressel 21-22, contenitori per il commercio italico di salagione di recente caratterizzazione e, infine, le produzioni del periodo tardo-repubblicano e giulio-claudio.
NEW: Egypt in Croatia: Croatian Fascination with Ancient Egypt from Antiquity to Modern Times edited by Mladen Tomorad. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 369 illustrations in colour and black & white. 585 2019 Archaeopress Egyptology 24. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693393. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693409. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

At first sight, it seems that ancient Egyptian history and culture have no meaningful ties with present-day Croatia. However, when we scratch beneath the surface of the common idea of Egypt, that of a distant and ancient civilisation, we notice that its elements have been present in Croatia ever since antiquity. Egypt in Croatia provides a closer look at many aspects of the presence and fascination of ancient Egyptian culture in Croatia, from antiquity to the present. The topics explored are the artefacts discovered in present-day Croatia (mostly from the early 19th century), Croatian travellers to Egypt from the 16th to the middle of the 20th century, Egyptian collections in Croatia and early collectors from the 1820s until the 1950s, an overview of the development of Egyptology of study within Croatia as well as the various elements of ‘Egyptomania’ found in Croatia, mostly from the beginning of the 19th century.

About the Editor
Mladen Tomorad is a senior researcher and professor of Ancient History at the Department of History, University of Zagreb. He has a masters degree in History and a PhD in Ancient History and Museology, and he has also studied Egyptology at the University of Manchester.
NEW: Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt ca. 700 BC – AD 1000 edited by Mohamed Kenawi. Hardback; xxviii+350 pages; 358 figures, 52 tables. (Print RRP £65.00). 575 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692983. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692990. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Cristina Mondin, Michele Asolati Louise Bertini, Audrey Eller, Urška Furlan, Ole Herslund, Israel Hinojosa Baliño, Marie-Caroline Livaditis, Giorgia Marchiori, Marcus Müller, Benjamin T. Pennington and Amy Wilson.

In 2012, fieldwork began at two large sites in the Beheira Province in the western Nile Delta: Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit (ancient Metelis). Being close to the important ports of Thonis-Heracleion, Alexandria, and Rosetta meant that they had been ideally placed to take advantage of the trade between the Mediterranean and Egypt. The sites are being thoroughly investigated to reveal their archaeological significance.

Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt presents the results of the Italian archaeological mission between 2012 and 2016. It provides details of the survey and excavation results from different occupation phases. A complete town beneath the Nile silt was revealed using a combination of modern scientific techniques. Hellenistic houses and a temple enclosure wall were investigated at Kom Wasit; while at Kom al-Ahmer, a Late Roman house, an amphora storage building, a cistern and an early Islamic cemetery were revealed.

Dating from the Late Dynastic to the Early Islamic period, the remains found at Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit demonstrate for the first time the rich archaeological heritage of this region.

About the Editor
Mohamed Kenawi is a Researcher and Training Manager at the School of Archaeology, University of Oxford, for the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa project. He was Head Researcher (2011–16), followed by Acting Director (2016–17), of the Hellenistic Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria. He taught at the American University in Cairo and at Catania University. He has participated in various archaeological missions in Libya, Italy, and Egypt, among them those at Kom al-Ahmer/Kom Wasit, Athribis, Dionysias, and Manqbad. He currently collaborates on projects with Padua University and Tübingen University. He has published various articles about his research, in addition to his monograph, Alexandria’s Hinterland: Archaeology of the Western Nile Delta, Egypt (2014). He published a co-authored book with G. Marchiori entitled Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology: the Italian Contribution (2018). He is Egypt Coordinator for the Manar al-Athar open access photo-archive.
NEW: Imágenes y Paisajes: El Arte Rupestre del Noreste de Catamarca, Argentina by Eva Amanda Calomino. Paperback; ii+280 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English abstract. 102 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693911. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693928. Book contents pageDownload

In the Argentine Northwest, northeast of Catamarca, there are a set of shelters and caves located in the rainforest with rock art with virtually no background. Little is known about the occupants of these spaces and their past practices. In order to learn more about these, this book addresses the study and systematic analysis of the plastic-thematic-compositional repertoire of the rock art sites of ‘Los Algarrobales’ and their spatial and temporal distribution. In this way, it is possible to approach the understanding of the modalities of appropriation of the people of the inhabited area, the relationship that they would have maintained with the environment, as well as the distinction of various events and uses of different places and, in this way, contribute to the knowledge of the historical, social and cultural development of the area. Throughout the reading, we start to glimpse the archaeological landscapes related to rock art for this sector of the southern Andean area.

About the Author
Eva Amanda Calomino received her Doctorate in Archaeology from Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). She has participated in diverse research in the south Andean area (Argentine Northwest and Bolivia) as well as in Sinai and Luxor (Egypt) and has collaborated with multiple national and international research projects.

Spanish description
En el Noroeste Argentino, al noreste de Catamarca, se encuentran un conjunto de aleros y cuevas emplazados en las yungas con arte rupestre prácticamente sin antecedentes. Poco se conoce sobre los ocupantes de estos espacios y sus prácticas pasadas. Con el in de conocer más sobre éstos, en estas páginas se aborda el estudio y el análisis sistemático del repertorio plástico-temático-compositivo de los sitios con arte rupestre de Los Algarrobales (Catamarca) y su distribución espacial y temporal. De este modo, es posible acercarnos a la comprensión de las modalidades de apropiación de las personas de la zona habitada, la relación que las mismas habrían mantenido con el entorno, así como la distinción de diversos eventos y usos de distintos de los lugares y, de este modo, aportar al conocimiento del desarrollo histórico, social y cultural del área. A lo largo de la lectura, nos acercamos a vislumbrar los paisajes arqueológicos relacionados con el arte rupestre para este sector del área meridional andina.

Sobre el Autor
Doctora en Arqueología por la Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Ha participado en investigaciones en el área Surandina (en el Noroeste argentino y en Bolivia) y en Sinaí y Luxor (Egipto) y ha colaborado con múltiples proyectos de investigación nacionales e internacionales. Se ha desempañado en docencia en dicha universidad, ha publicado artículos y libros sobre sus temas de investigación ha y dictado ponencias y conferencias en Argentina y otros países. En el noreste de la provincia de Catamarca ha desarrollado su investigación doctoral sobre los paisajes arqueológicos rupestres de Los Algarrobales y actualmente desarrolla su investigación posdoctoral sobre el análisis de los small finds, en el del sitio Tell el-Ghaba (Norte de Sinaí, Egipto).
NEW: Redonner vie à une collection: les terres cuites communes du fort La Tour by Julie Toupin. Paperback; xviii+248 pages; 19 tables, 1 graph, 13 figures, fully illustrated catalogue (colour throughout). French text. (Print RRP £54.00). 101 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693836. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693843. Book contents pageDownload

Research on common earthenware from the first half of the 17th century is very elementary, when it exists at all. This study seeks to bring back to life the ceramics, the inhabitants and the site where the objects were used. The collection includes 1602 fragments from 277 common earthenware objects coming from the period of occupation of Fort La Tour (1631-1645) in Portland Point, New Brunswick. These pieces were mostly made in France, but some are probably of English origin.

Mostly through the visual identification of the features included in the ceramic body, a classification system was developed with four main groups, 28 types, and 10 variations. With this classification system, earthenware objects were able to be grouped based on the activities for which they were used and related to their uses and functions. This process enabled links to be established with the daily use of the earthenware objects on a French site in the first half of the 17th century.

French description
Les recherches portant sur les terres cuites communes datant de la première demie du XVIIe siècle sont pratiquement inexistantes ou sont très élémentaires. Cette recherche se veut une étude qui permettra de redonner vie aux objets cérames ainsi qu’aux habitants et au site sur lequel ces objets furent utilisés. Notre collection comprend un ensemble de 1 602 tessons regroupés en 277 objets de terres cuites communes provenant de la phase d'occupation du fort La Tour (1631-1645) à Portland Point au Nouveau-Brunswick (BhDm-7). Ces pièces sont majoritairement de facture françaises, mais quelques objets sont probablement anglais.

Nous avons élaboré, principalement par l’identification visuelle des inclusions comprises dans la pâte, une typologie céramique comprenant quatre grandes familles, 28 types et 10 variantes. À partir de cette classification, les objets en terre cuite commune furent regroupés à l'intérieur d’activités fonctionnelles qui ont été reliées aux usages et aux fonctions de ces céramiques. Cette démarche a permis d’établir des liens avec l’utilisation quotidienne des terres cuites communes sur un site français de la première demie du XVIIe siècle.
NEW: Invisible Archaeologies: Hidden aspects of daily life in ancient Egypt and Nubia edited by Loretta Kilroe. Paperback; 203x276mm; ii+128 pages. 100 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693751. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693768. Book contents pageDownload

Invisible Archaeologies: hidden aspects of daily life in ancient Egypt and Nubia brings together eight of the papers presented at a conference held in Oxford in 2017. The theme aimed to bring together international early-career researchers applying novel archaeological and anthropological methods to the ‘overlooked’ in ancient Egypt and Nubia – and included diverse topics such as women, prisoners, entangled communities and funerary displays.

The papers use a range of archaeological and textual material and span from the Predynastic period to the Late Period. By applying methodology used so successfully within the discipline of archaeology over the past 20 years, they offer a different perspective on Egyptological research, and demonstrate how such theoretical models can broaden scholarly understanding of the Nile Valley.

About the Editor
Loretta Kilroe is an Egyptologist who completed her PhD from the University of Oxford in 2019. She specialises in ancient Egyptian and Nubian ceramics and has participated in several excavations in Sudan with the Sudan Archaeological Research Society. She now works as Project Curator: Sudan and Nubia at the British Museum.
NEW: Public Archaeology: Arts of Engagement edited by Howard Williams, Caroline Pudney and Afnan Ezzeldin. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+270 pages; 82 figures, 5 tables (101 pages in colour). 99 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693737. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693744. Book contents pageDownload

How should communities be engaged with archaeological research and how are new projects targeting distinctive groups and deploying innovative methods and media? In particular, how are art/archaeological interactions key to public archaeology today?

This collection provides original perspectives on public archaeology’s current practices and future potentials focusing on art/archaeological media, strategies and subjects. It stems from the 2nd University of Chester Archaeology Student Conference, held on 5 April 2017 at the Grosvenor Museum, Chester: Archaeo-Engage: Engaging Communities in Archaeology.

About the Editors
Howard Williams is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester and researches mortuary archaeology, archaeology and memory, the history of archaeology and public archaeology. He regularly writes an academic blog: Archaeodeath.

Caroline Pudney is a Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Chester with research interests in Iron Age and Roman Britain, material culture, public archaeology and applied archaeology.

Afnan Ezzeldin graduated with a BA (Hons) Archaeology degree in 2017 from the University of Chester. Subsequently, in 2018, she completed the MA Archaeology of Death and Memory from the University of Chester, with a thesis focused on manga mortuary archaeology.
NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 4 2019 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Paperback; vi+532 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 4 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693775. £60.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693782. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The fourth volume of the Journal of Greek Archaeology (JGA) is unusually rich and varied in content. Geographically the articles range from Sicily via Greece to Anatolia and the Near East, while chronologically they extend from the Bronze Age to the Ottoman era. Thematically there is a set of papers in landscape studies which include agricultural history, settlement geography, regional comparisons; articles on material culture which encompass metallurgy, ceramics, the links between language and artefacts, and production and trade; papers on aspects of human social science such as palaeopathology and deformity, gender studies and the representation of the supernatural; historical perspectives are finally represented by articles on fortifications and Islamisation. Of particular note is a lengthy presentation of the survey and excavation at the recently discovered Mycenaean palace in the Sparta Valley.

The review section is even broader, running from the Palaeolithic through to aspects of present-day heritage studies, and covering an equally wide field of topics.

NEW: Early Medieval Settlement in Upland Perthshire: Excavations at Lair, Glen Shee 2012-17 by David Strachan, David Sneddon and Richard Tipping. Hardback; 205x290mm; 202 pages; 85 figures; 18 tables (63 pages in colour). (RRP £29.00). 579 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693157. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693164. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological evidence for settlement and land use in early medieval Scottish upland landscapes remains largely undiscovered. This study records only the second excavation of one important and distinctive house form, the Pitcarmicktype building, in the hills of north-east Perth and Kinross. Excavation of seven turf buildings at Lair in Glen Shee has confirmed the introduction of Pitcarmick buildings in the early 7th century AD. Clusters of these at Lair, and elsewhere in the hills, are interpreted as integrated, spatially organised farm complexes comprising byre-houses and outbuildings. Their form has more to do with contemporary traditions across the North Sea than with local styles.

There is a close link between 7th-century climatic amelioration and their spread across the hills, and it is argued that this was a purposeful re-occupation of a neglected landscape. Pitcarmick buildings were constructed and lived in by precocious, knowledgeable, and prosperous farming communities. Pollen analysis has shown the upland economy to have been arable as well as pastoral, and comparable contemporary economic ‘recovery’ is suggested from similar analyses across Scotland. The farms at Lair were stable and productive until the 11th century when changes, poorly understood, saw their demise.
About the Authors
David Strachan has worked in curatorial field archaeology in Wales, England and Scotland, at both national and local level, over the last 30 years. Having established the Historic Environment Record and planning archaeology service for Perth and Kinross in 2000, as Director of Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust he maintains interests in the Scottish ‘long’ Iron Age, intertidal and upland archaeology, and aerial photography.

David Sneddon has 20 years professional experience in archaeology, the last eight years of which were with Northlight Heritage where he was Project Manager. He recently co-founded Clyde Archaeology who provide archaeological and heritage services across the UK.

Richard Tipping has worked on problems of interpreting northern British landscapes since 1984 as a palaeo-ecologist, historical geomorphologist, geo-archaeologist and environmental historian. He has authored, co-authored and edited twelve books and more than 250 peer-reviewed and other contributions.
NEW: Les restes humains badegouliens de la Grotte du Placard Cannibalisme et guerre il y a 20,000 ans by Bruno Boulestin and Dominique Henry-Gambier. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+138 pages; 47 figures, 14 tables (56 pages of colour). 579 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693690. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693706. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Placard is a major Upper Palaeolithic site in France, known from as early as the middle of the nineteenth century. Paradoxically, owing to the antiquity of the poorly-documented early excavations, dozens of thousands of remains that were uncovered then are either unpublished to this day, or have only been the subjects of limited and often obsolete studies. This is the case in particular for the human remains, for which, until recently, the cultural attribution was moreover still under debate. Dating makes it clear they belong to various periods, yet most of them form a homogeneous group remarkable by traces of a specific treatment. Thanks to radiocarbon dating and to data from further excavations carried out some thirty years ago, this group can be dated from the Badegoulian period.

The writers present in this book a detailed study of the Badegoulian human remains. On the basis of quantification and bone modification analyses, they describe and identify the treatments of the dead. Whereas the general treatment pertains to the practice of cannibalism, more specific ones, focused on the head, can be explained by the crafting of trophies. On the whole, these treatments can be interpreted in a consistent manner by one or several episodes of armed conflicts, begging the question of the possible existence of warfare during the Upper Palaeolithic. Thus, despite the antiquity of the discovery, the Badegoulian human bones from le Placard still constitute a unique assemblage that contributes greatly to our knowledge of the behaviours of hunter-gatherer populations in European prehistory.

About the Authors
Bruno Boulestin and Dominique Henry-Gambier are anthropologists at the University of Bordeaux (France), members of the research unit ‘De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie’ (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). They are working on practices surrounding death in ancient societies, from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data. B. Boulestin’s work deals more specifically with bone modifications and the treatments of corpses. D. Henry-Gambier is a former Research Director at France's National Scientific Research Centre (CNRS) and is a specialist of Upper Palaeolithic populations.

French Description:
Connu depuis le milieu du 19e siècle, le site du Placard est un site majeur du Paléolithique supérieur français. Paradoxalement, en raison de l’ancienneté des premières fouilles, mal documentées, les dizaines de milliers de vestiges qui y ont été découverts sont pour la plupart inédits ou n’ont fait l’objet que d’études ponctuelles et souvent obsolètes. C’est le cas en particulier des restes humains, dont l’attribution culturelle était par ailleurs jusqu’à récemment discutée. Leur datation montre qu’ils appartiennent à plusieurs époques, mais la plus grande partie d’entre eux constitue un lot homogène qui se distingue par les traces d’un traitement spécifique. Grâce au radiocarbone et aux données provenant de nouvelles fouilles menées il y a une trentaine d’années, ce lot peut être daté du Badegoulien.

Les auteurs livrent ici l’étude détaillée de ces restes humains badegouliens. À partir de l’analyse quantitative et de celle des modifications osseuses, ils décrivent et identifient les traitements des morts. L’un, général, renvoie à la pratique du cannibalisme, tandis que d’autres, particuliers à la tête, peuvent s’expliquer par la fabrication de trophées. Globalement, ces traitements peuvent être interprétés de façon cohérente par un ou plusieurs épisodes de conflits armés, ce qui conduit à s’interroger sur la possible existence de la guerre au Paléolithique supérieur. Ainsi, malgré l’ancienneté de leur découverte, les restes humains badegouliens du Placard forment un ensemble exceptionnel qui apporte une contribution importante à notre connaissance des comportements des populations de chasseurs-cueilleurs de la Préhistoire europé
NEW: The Beau Street, Bath Hoard by Verity Anthony, Richard Abdy and Stephen Clews. Hardback; 205x290mm; 338 pages; 36 figures; 57 plates containing images of 1524 coins (75 pages in colour). 578 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 59. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915940. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915957. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Beau Street Hoard is one of the most remarkable archaeological discoveries ever to be made in Bath: the Roman town of Aquae Sulis. The discovery captured the public imagination and it became the focus for a major scientific investigation and a significant learning and public engagement programme. Carefully excavated by professional archaeologists the hoard was recovered intact and removed to the British Museum for more detailed examination and study. It was found to have been deposited in a cist in at least eight bags. Micro-investigation of the hoard in a conservation laboratory and further scientific analysis revealed more fascinating details and information reported on here. The Beau Street, Bath Hoard provides a thorough and complete publication and analysis of the hoard, which is one of the largest yet found in a Roman town in Britain. The high quality of the recovery and investigation process means that it makes a significant contribution to both archaeological and numismatic studies.

About the Authors
Verity Anthony is Visitor Experience and Collections Manager at Cornwall’s Regimental Museum. Prior to that she has worked in collections roles at the Museum of London and at The Roman Baths, where she played a major part in the Beau Street Hoard project.

Richard Abdy has been curator of Roman coins at the British Museum for many years, with particular interest in the middle and later imperial periods of the Roman Empire. He is in the process of publishing RIC II.3 on the coinage of Hadrian and has had long experience of recording Roman coin hoards through work on Treasure cases in England.

Stephen Clews is the Manager of the Roman Baths and Pump Room in Bath, where he has worked on the re-development and re-display of the site and its collections for more than thirty years. He also enjoys an occasional glass of spa water.
NEW: Dating Urban Classical Deposits: Approaches and Problems in Using Finds to Date Strata by Guido Furlan. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+288 pages; 153 figures, 6 tables (71 pages in colour). 576 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692525. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692532. Book contents pageDownload

Dating Urban Classical Deposits: Approaches and problems in using finds to date strata considers the issues surrounding the dating of archaeological strata on the basis of the assemblages recovered from them. This process is one of the most common processes in archaeology, yet it is still poorly structured theoretically, methodologically and operatively. No manuals specifically tackle the issue as a whole and consideration of useful theoretical and methodological tools is fragmentary. This book has been developed to try to correct this failing; it is based on the idea that for dating a given layer through the materials recovered from it, the embedding process of the materials must be modelled.

The book reviews the present state of archaeological practice and follows this with a theoretical discussion of the key concepts involved in the issue of dating deposits; the main methodological tools which can be employed (quantitative, qualitative and comparative) are then discussed in detail. The text presents a problem-oriented taxonomy of deposits, with depositional models for assessing how different assemblages can be analysed for dating; each type of deposit is accompanied by case studies where the methodological tools used are explained. Finally, a structured working method is proposed.

The topic of dating deposits crosses the chronological and spatial borders of many archaeologies, but the book focusses on Classical cities (particularly Roman), as they present specific traits (continuous occupation, high rates of residuality, high impact architecture, waste management etc.) making them unique fields for study.

About the Author
Guido Furlan is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Padova, where he achieved his doctorate in 2015. His current research focuses on Roman archaeology and post-excavation methodologies. He was involved, among others, in the investigation of the forum of Nora (Sardinia) until 2008, and in the excavation of the House of Titus Macer, Aquileia, from 2009 to 2013. He is currently working on the theatre of the ancient city.
NEW: Pottery from Roman Malta by Maxine Anastasi with contributions by David Cardona and Nathaniel Cutajar. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+176 pages; 87 figures, 7 tables. 574 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693294. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693300. Book contents pageDownload

Much of what is known about Malta’s ancient material culture has come to light as a result of antiquarian research or early archaeological work—a time where little attention was paid to stratigraphic context. This situation has in part contributed to the problem of reliably sourcing and dating Maltese Roman-period pottery, particularly locally produced forms common on nearly all ancient Maltese sites. This book presents a comprehensive study of Maltese pottery forms from key stratified deposits spanning the first century BC to mid-fourth century AD. Ceramic material from three Maltese sites was analysed and quantified in a bid to understand Maltese pottery production during the Roman period, and trace the type and volume of ceramic-borne goods that were circulating the central Mediterranean during the period. A short review of the islands’ recent literature on Roman pottery is discussed, followed by a detailed contextual summary of the archaeological contexts presented in this study. The work is supplemented by a detailed illustrated catalogue of all the forms identified within the assemblages, presenting the wide range of locally produced and imported pottery types typical of the Maltese Roman period.

About the Author
Maxine Anastasi is a Lecturer at the Department of Classics and Archaeology, University of Malta. She was awarded a D.Phil. in Archaeology from the University of Oxford for her thesis on small-island economies in the Central Mediterranean. Her research primarily focuses on Roman pottery in the central Mediterranean, with a particular emphasis on Maltese assemblages.
NEW: From Hispalis to Ishbiliyya: The Ancient Port of Seville, from the Roman Empire to the End of the Islamic Period (45 BC – AD 1248) by Carlos Cabrera Tejedor. Paperback; 205x290mm; xx+216 pages; 170 figures, 5 tables (92 plates in colour). (Print RRP £45.00). 534 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690583. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690590. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From Hispalis to Ishbiliyya: The ancient port of Seville, from the Roman Empire to the end of the Islamic period (45 BC - AD 1248) focuses on the history and development of the ancient port of Seville, which is located in the lower Guadalquivir River Basin, Spain. This unique study is important because, despite its commercial importance, little has been known about the port, and so the purpose was to examine the topography, layout, and facilities of the ancient port of Seville, their history and development from approximately the 1st c. BC to about the 13th c. AD. This longue durée study was conducted adopting a holistic and interdisciplinary approach by examining a diverse range of information (historical, archaeological and scientific), a maritime archaeological perspective as well as a diachronic study of three different historical periods (Roman, Late Antique, Islamic). As a result, it has been possible to offer a description of the construction, development, and demise of the port. The study was one of the first comprehensive studies of an ancient port in Spain and one of the first to be conducted in a combined holistic and diachronic manner in Europe. This methodology has produced significant results not obtained with other simpler approaches, thus serving as a model for studies of other archaeological sites, especially those in relation with maritime or riverine culture.

About the Author
Carlos Cabrera Tejedor is a maritime archaeologist with a diverse and multi-disciplinary background and an interest in shipbuilding and ports. He started as a conservator, completing two bachelor’s degrees, one in Fine Arts Restoration and the other in Archaeological Conservation. He also completed a Master of Arts degree in Nautical Archaeology from Texas A&M University, worked as a project director and research associate at the Institute of Nautical Archaeology (INA), and a received a DPhil in Archaeology at the University of Oxford.

Regarding the study of ancient ships, Dr Cabrera conducted the study of the Mazarrón 1 shipwreck, a 7th century BC Phoenician boat excavated in Spain that constitutes the only known example of hull-remains from that century. He also completed a post-doctoral research study, at the University of Oxford, on the hull of Ship 11, a 5th – 4th century BC ritual vessel excavated in the Grand Canal of Thonis-Heracleion (Egypt) associated with the Mysteries of Osiris and his Temple. Included among Dr Cabrera’s on-going international collaborations is a project with the Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arte e Paesaggio per le Province di Pisa, where he is responsible for studying and publishing the naval architecture of a number of Roman vessels excavated at the Pisa-San Rossore train station, Pisa (Italy).
NEW: Architectures of Fire: Processes, Space and Agency in Pyrotechnologies edited by Dragoş Gheorghiu. 98 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693676. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693683. Book contents pageDownload

Architectures of Fire attempts to present the entanglement between the physical phenomenon of fire, the pyro-technological instrument that it is, its material supports, and the human being. In this perspective, the physical process of combustion, material culture, as well as the development of human action in space, are addressed together.

Fire is located at the centre of all pre-modern architecture. It creates the living or technological space. Fire creates architectures since it imposes geometry, from the simple circles of stone or clay, which control its spread (and which are the geometrical figures of its optimal efficiency), to cone trunks, cylinders, half-spheres, half-cylinders or parallelepipeds, circular geometric figures that efficiently control the air-draught process required for combustion. All these forms involving the circle are determined by the control and conservation of thermal energy.

We should not imagine that the term ‘architecture’ evokes only constructed objects that delimit human action. Architecture means not only the built space, but also the experienced space, in the present case around the pyro-instruments. Pyro-instruments involve an ergonomic, kinesthetic and visual relationship, as well as the rhythmic actions of feeding or maintaining fire at a certain technological tempo. The technological agency is structured both by the physics of the combustion phenomenon, and by the type of operation to be performed.

About the Author
Dragoş Gheorghiu is an historical anthropologist/archaeologist and experimentalist whose studies focus on the process of cognition, material culture and ancient technologies.

He has edited books on fire in archaeology, fire as material culture, fire as an instrument, also on ceramics, figurines and stamps. He has contributed articles on ceramic technology, kilns and burned houses in the Chalcolithic, and during the last two decades has carried out experiments with the building and burning of wattle and daub houses, with kilns and with other structures involved with combustion.

Professor Gheorghiu is the Secretary of the UISPP Commission ‘Neolithic Civilizations of the Mediterranean and Europe’, and is a member of the European Association of Archaeologists. He is a Paul Mellon Fellow at the Centre of Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
NEW: Arab Settlements: Tribal structures and spatial organizations in the Middle East between Hellenistic and Early Islamic periods by Nicolò Pini. Paperback; xii+252 pages; 88 figures, 13 plates. 97 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693614. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693621. Book contents pageDownload

How can the built environment help in the understanding of social and economic changes involving ancient local communities? Arab Settlements aims to shed light on the degree to which economic and political changes affected social and identity patterns in the regional context from the Nabatean through to the Umayyad and Abbasid periods. Settlement analysis is understood to be a crucial tool for accessing the local material culture and characterising the specific identities of the concerned societies. For this purpose, the author compares eight case studies across the Middle East, considering their spatial organisation over a long period (2nd – 9th centuries AD). For the interpretation of the remains, the anthropological concepts of ‘segmented societies’ and ‘pastoralism’ are fundamental, providing possible explanations of some spatial patterns attested in the case-studies. The idea of ‘Oriental’ settlements underscores the marked continuity in the organisation of the buildings and the use of space revealed on different levels between the Byzantine and Early Islamic periods. Furthermore, the label of ‘Arab settlements’ is proposed in this context, highlighting the direct connection between social identities and built environment, with a direct reference to the development of an ‘Arab’ identity.

About the Author
Nicolò Pini PhD (Cologne, 2017) is external Research associate with the Islamic Archaeology Unit at the University of Bonn and collaborates on several projects in the Near East (among which Tall Hisban in Jordan and Khirbet beit Mazmil near Jerusalem).
NEW: Imágenes, lengua y creencias en Lusitania romana edited by Jorge Tomás García and Vanessa Del Prete. Paperback; 203x276mm; illustrated throughout (51 pages in colour). 94 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692945. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692952. Book contents pageDownload

This publication considers the visual, linguistic and religious culture of the Roman province of Lusitania. Roman influence was especially notable in religion and artistic manifestations. It was in the cities where the Lusitanians acquired Roman civilization: they learned Latin, the Frankish language of the peninsula; they were introduced to the Roman administration and religion; and in the third century, when Rome converted to Christianity, so did the Lusitanians. The Latin language was imposed as the official language, functioning as a binding factor and communication between different peoples. Being a fairly large area and lacking a unified state that promoted a particular language in administration or education, different languages coexisted simultaneously in Hispania. The subjects continued to use their native languages, although official business was conducted in Latin or Greek. Indigenous religions persisted, although sacrifices were offered everywhere for the emperor and the gods of the Roman pantheon. Visual culture also reflected the hybrid character of provincial civilization. Images of a Roman style and subject matter circulated widely, and yet the craftsmen and consumers of the provinces maintained their own traditions, adopting Roman techniques and tastes as they pleased. The papers in this volume establish a broad and generous view of the relationship between images, languages and religious culture within Lusitanian society.

La presente publicación pretende suponer un acercamiento transversal y generoso a la cultura visual, lingüística y religiosa de la provincia romana de Lusitania. La influencia romana fue especialmente notable en la religión y en las manifestaciones artísticas. Las ciudades fueron una de las instituciones más importantes impuestas a Lusitania durante la ocupación romana. Fue en las ciudades donde los lusitanos adquirieron la civilización romana: aprendieron latín, la lengua franca de la península; fueron introducidos a la administración y religión romanas; y en el siglo III, cuando Roma se convirtió al cristianismo, también lo hicieron los lusitanos. La lengua latina se impuso como la lengua oficial, funcionando como factor vinculante y comunicación entre los diferentes pueblos. Al ser un área bastante grande, y al carecer de un estado unificado que promoviera un idioma determinado en la administración o la educación, en Hispania convivieron diferentes lenguas simultáneamente. Los sujetos siguieron usando sus idiomas nativos, aunque los negocios oficiales se realizaron en latín o griego. Las religiones indígenas persistieron, aunque los sacrificios se ofrecían en todas partes para el emperador y los dioses del panteón romano. La cultura visual también reflejó el carácter híbrido de la civilización provincial. Las imágenes del estilo y el mensaje romanos circulaban ampliamente y, sin embargo, los artesanos y los consumidores de las provincias mantenían sus propias tradiciones, adoptando las técnicas y los gustos romanos como les convenía. Este y otros problemas están recogidos en los capítulos de esta obra, que permite establecer una mirada amplia y generosa sobre la relación entre las imágenes, la lengua y la visión religiosa y cultural de la sociedad lusitana. Los autores de este volumen tratan así de entender este panorama tan complejo, utilizando con gran énfasis las imágenes y el lenguaje, fuentes de relevancia para acometer una visión transversal de la cultura y religión de Lusitania.

About the Editors
Jorge Tomás García PhD (Murcia, 2010) is Professor of Ancient Art at the Autonomous University of Madrid (Art History Department).

Vanessa Del Prete Mainer PhD (Madrid, 2016), is Chief Editor of the academic journal Gods and Men (interdisciplinary studies regarding the sciences of religions), launched in 2018.
NEW: KOINON: The International Journal of Classical Numismatic Studies Volume II, 2019 edited by Nicholas J. Molinari (General Editor). 2 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693553. £35.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693560. £25.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

As the name indicates, KOINON is a journal that encourages contributions to the study of classical numismatics from a wide variety of perspectives. The journal includes papers concerning iconography, die studies, provenance research, forgery analysis, translations of excerpts from antiquarian works, specialized bibliographies, corpora of rare varieties and types, ethical questions on laws and collecting, book reviews, and more. The editorial advisory board is made up of members from all over the world, with a broad range of expertise covering virtually all the major categories of classical numismatics from archaic Greek coinage to late Medieval coinage.

Table of Contents
An Introductory Note from the General Editor, with Recourse to Plato and Eukleidas

GREEK NUMISMATICS
Numismatic evidence (or not) for the aphippodroma horse race at Larisa – Rosanagh Mack
A Bacchid at Apollonia: a late survival of an ancient family – David Macdonald
An unusual depiction of Ba‘al Arwad and a hippocampus on coins of Arados during the Persian Period – Martin Rowe
The Macedonian Mint at Susa (319/8-312/1 BC) – Lloyd W. H. Taylor
The Susa wreath group Alexanders: The first step in the transformation of an anchor seal to a dynastic emblem – Lloyd W. H. Taylor
A discussion on provenance research with some early provenances uncovered – John Voukelatos

ROMAN NUMISMATICS
The Youthful God revisited: Veiovis on Roman Republican denarii – Tyler Holman
An enigmatic denarius of M. Herennius – Phillip Davis
Some further ideas on a double-obverse bronze of the Constantinian period from the Antioch excavations – Shawn Caza
Back in the saddle again: a re-examination of the FEL TEMP REPARATIO Falling horseman type – Shawn Caza

BYZANTINE AND RELATED COINAGES
The ‘Sirmium Group’ – an overview – Dirk Faltin

MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN COINAGE
Numismatic letterforms of ‘A’ in medieval Europe: A classification system – David B. Spenciner and Marina V. Spenciner
Did Louis X of France mint deniers tournois? (Notes on a few deniers tournois à la croisette) – Andrei Bontas

A CATALOG OF NEW VARIETIES
FORTHCOMING: Great Cloister: A Lost Canterbury Tale A History of the Canterbury Cloister, Constructed 1408-14, with Some Account of the Donors and their Coats of Arms by Paul A. Fox. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+694 pages; 759 illustrations, full colour throughout. (Print RRP: £65.00). 595 2019. ISBN 9781789693317. Book contents pageBuy Now

Great Cloister: A Lost Canterbury Tale presents a new study of the heraldry, genealogy and history of the Canterbury Cathedral cloister. It is the first comprehensive and complete study of this monument ever undertaken, and it provides a detailed chronology as well as many new insights into the families who were donors. The monument is revealed to have been the personal project of Archbishop Thomas Arundel (d.1414), an individual closely connected with the overthrow of King Richard II. The work as a whole provides considerable insights into the revolution of 1399 and the troubled reign of Henry IV as seen through the lens of individual families.

The cloister, as originally conceived, contained 856 heraldic shields, badges and devices of which 576 were unique. Some 365 families, principalities, religious foundations and other individuals both real and imagined were represented, some with more than one shield or device. More precisely, there were 252 families, 51 peerage families, 3 English royal families (Lancaster, York and Beaufort), 20 principalities, 12 religious foundations, 9 bishops, 7 saints, 3 heroes, 4 cities or towns, 2 priests, 1 monk and 1 for God himself (in the form of the Holy Trinity). The origins and evolution of each shield represented are considered in detail.

About the Author
Dr Paul A. Fox, FHS, FSA is a retired consultant physician, medical researcher and university lecturer. He is the honorary editor of Coat of Arms: Journal of the Heraldry Society, a former Chairman of the Heraldry Society, and an Academician of the Académie Internationale d’Héraldique.
FORTHCOMING: The Cultures of Ancient Xinjiang, Western China: Crossroads of the Silk Roads. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+206 pages; 214 figures (67 colour pages). (Print RRP £38.00). 594 2019. ISBN 9781789694062. Book contents pageBuy Now

The Cultures of Ancient Xinjiang, Western China: Crossroads of the Silk Roads unveils the ancient secrets of Xinjiang, western China, one of the least known but culturally rich and complex regions located at the heart of Asia. Historically, Xinjiang has been the geographic hub of the Silk Roads, serving international links between cultures to the west, east, north and south. Trade, artefacts, foods, technologies, ideas, beliefs, animals and people have traversed the glacier covered mountain and desert boundaries. Perhaps best known for the Taklamakan desert, whose name translates in the Uyghur language as ‘You can go in, you will never come out’, here the region is portrayed as the centre of an ancient Bronze Age culture, revealed in the form of the famous Tarim Mummies and their grave goods. Three authoritative chapters by Chinese archaeologists appear here for the first time in English, giving international audiences direct access to the latest research ranging from the central-eastern Xiaohe region to the western valleys of the Bortala and Yili Rivers. Other contributions by European, Australian and Chinese archaeologists address the many complexities of the cultural exchanges that ranged from Mongolia, through to Kashgar, South Asia, Central Asia and finally Europe in pre-modern times.

About the Editor
Alison Betts, Professor of Silk Road Studies, University of Sydney, has worked on the archaeology of Central Asia for more than two decades and more recently on Xinjiang.

Marika Vicziany, Professor Emerita in Arts, Monash University, has specialised during the last four decades in Indian and Chinese culture and socioeconomic change.

Peter Weiming Jia, Research Fellow, University of Sydney, has for more than a decade studied the Bronze Age sites of Xinjiang.

Angelo Andrea Di Castro, Research Adjunct in Arts, Monash University, has been working on archaeological sites in Italy, Nepal, Australia and China for some three decades.
FORTHCOMING: ̕Eν Σοφίᾳ μαθητεύσαντες: Essays in Byzantine Material Culture and Society in Honour of Sophia Kalopissi-Verti edited by Charikleia Diamanti and Anastasia Vassiliou. Paperback;205x290mm; 454pp; illustrated throughout (116 pages in colour). 593 2019. ISBN 9781789692624. Book contents pageBuy Now

En Sofía mathitéfsantes. Essays in Byzantine Material Culture and Society in Honour of Sophia Kalopissi-Verti contains a collection of thirty studies dedicated to Sophia Kalopissi-Verti by her students which celebrate the multifaceted academic and teaching career of Professor Kalopissi-Verti, Emerita of Byzantine Archaeology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. The contributions cover a large variety of topics presenting unpublished archaeological material, suggesting new approaches to various aspects of Byzantine archaeology, material culture and art history. Geographically topics span a vast area from Constantinople to South Sinai and from Cyprus and Antiocheia to the Aegean Islands, continental Greece and Italy. Covering the period from the Early Byzantine to the Post-Byzantine period, they are organised in seven thematic sections: Urbanism and Architecture; Painting and Iconography; Stone Carving and Sculpture; Ceramics; Bone, Metal and Textiles; Coinage and Sigillography; Inscriptions, Portraits and Patronage. The broad thematic, chronological and geographic scope of the volume’s essays reflects the wide range of Kalopissi-Verti’s pioneering research and her own interests, to which she introduced her students and with which she inspired them.

About the Editor Charikleia Diamanti obtained a PhD from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. She is curator of Byzantine Antiquities at the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Cyclades, Hellenic Ministry of Culture, specialising in pottery, settlements and economy of the Late Roman/Early Byzantine period.

Anastasia Vassiliou obtained a PhD from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. She is curator of Byzantine Antiquities at the Ephorate of Antiquities of Argolis, Hellenic Ministry of Culture, specialising in medieval pottery and aspects of everyday life.
FORTHCOMING: Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit II: Coin Finds 2012–2016 / Late Roman and Early Islamic Pottery from Kom al-Ahmer by Michele Asolati, Cristina Crisafulli and Cristina Mondin with contributions by Maria Lucia Patanè and Mohamed Kenawi. Hardback; 205x290mm; xii+340 pages; 41 figures; 22 tables; 127 plates (88 colour pages). (Print RRP £65.00). 592 2019. ISBN 9781789693966. Book contents pageBuy Now

Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit were ideally placed to take advantage of the Mediterranean trade given their close proximity to the Egyptian ports of Thonis-Heracleion, Alexandria, and Rosetta during the Hellenistic, Roman, Late Roman, and early Islamic period. The social and economic vitality of the sites has been revealed during investigations undertaken by the Italian archaeological mission between 2012 and 2016 and published in Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt ca. 700 BC – AD 100.

This volume presents over 1070 coins (ca. 310 BC–AD 641) and 1320 examples of Late Roman and Early Islamic pottery, testimony to the considerable commercial activity in the region during the Late Antique period. Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit emerge as centers of an exchange network involving large-scale trade of raw materials to and from the central and eastern Mediterranean.

About the Authors
Michele Asolati is Associate Professor of Numismatics at the University of Padua. His research focuses on Late Roman and Early Medieval coinage and on the coin finds of the Mediterranean area, having published extensively on the subject.

Cristina Crisafulli is Curator of the Numismatic Collections of the Correr Museum in Venice. Her research focuses on the Roman coins of the third century AD and on coin finds of the Mediterranean area, especially North Africa.

Cristina Mondin is the coordinator of the Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit Archaeological Project and Manager of the Asolo Museum. She authored many articles on Roman and Late Roman pottery from contexts in Italy, Egypt, Turkey, and Croatia. Her research focuses on the economy and the trade in the Mediterranean.
FORTHCOMING: Sources of Han Décor: Foreign Influence on the Han Dynasty Chinese Iconography of Paradise (206 BC-AD 220) by Sophia-Karin Psarras. Paperback; 175x245mm; x+138 pages; 4 maps, 69 figures. (Print RRP: £30.00). 591 2019. ISBN 9781789693256. Book contents pageBuy Now

Sources of Han Décor: Foreign Influence on the Han Dynasty Chinese Iconography of Paradise (206 BC-AD 220) uses archaeological data to examine the development of Han dynasty Chinese art (206 BC-AD 220), focussing on three major iconographies (the animal master, the tree of life, and animal predation), together with a series of minor motifs (particularly the griffin and several vegetal forms). All of these are combined in what may be considered the most important iconographic creation of the Han: images of paradise. While influence from the Chinese Bronze Age (especially, c. the 14th-3rd centuries BC) on Han art is expected, a surprisingly profound debt to Greece, the Near East, and the steppe is evident not only in the art of the Han era, but in that of the preceding Eastern Zhou (c. 771-221 BC). Initial Eastern Zhou incorporation of this largely-Western influence appears concentrated in chronological parallel to the Orientalization of Greek art (c. the 7th century BC) and the eastern spread of Hellenism (c. the 4th century BC), followed by repeated introduction of foreign motifs during the Han, when these influences were fully integrated into Chinese art.

About the Author
Sophia-Karin Psarras is a specialist of the archaeology and political history of China and the non-Chinese during the Han dynasty (206 BC-AD 220). Much of her work focuses on retracing intercultural exchange through material culture, together with an exploration of how that culture reflects the past. Her work has appeared in journals such as Monumenta Serica, Early China, and Central Asiatic Journal; her research on Han dynasty Chinese archaeology was published in Han Material Culture: An Archaeological Analysis and Vessel Typology (Cambridge University Press, 2015).
FORTHCOMING: What Difference Does Time Make? Papers from the Ancient and Islamic Middle East and China in Honor of the 100th Anniversary of the Midwest Branch of the American Oriental Society edited by JoAnn Scurlock and Richard H. Beal. Paperback; 176x250mm; 186pp; 10 figures (Print RRP: £38.00). 589 2019 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 6. ISBN 9781789693171. Buy Now

A wide-ranging exploration of Time as experienced and contemplated. Included are offerings on ancient Mesopotamian archaeology, literature and religion, Biblical texts and archaeology, Chinese literature and philosophy, and Islamic law. In addition, the majority of the papers specifically address issues of differences and similarities between cultures, with or without actual cultural contact.

This volume is the publication of a conference designed to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Midwest branch of the American Oriental Society, held at St. Mary’s University in Notre Dame, Indiana, in February 2017.

About the Editors
JoAnn Scurlock, president of the Midwest Branch of the American Oriental Society, received her BA and PhD in Assyriology from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. She is the author of around one hundred articles in scholarly journals on ancient medicine, magic, mythology, religion, and political history.

Richard H. Beal received his BA in the Oriental Studies department at the University of Pennsylvania and his PhD from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago in Hittitology. He has worked for the Chicago Hittite Dictionary Project since its inception in 1976 and is now a senior research associate.
FORTHCOMING: Les pratiques funéraires en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle by András Márton. Paperback; 205x290mm; 556pp; 322 figures, 382 maps. French text. (Print RRP: £70.00). 588 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 62. ISBN 9781789693355. Buy Now

Les pratiques funéraires en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle aims to give an overview of Roman burial practices in Pannonia during the Early Roman period. Among the different approaches proposed by R. Reece for the study of Roman cemeteries, this work focuses on the grave treatment and grave furnishing. The funerary practices are thus apprehended through the study of tomb structure, the selection and treatment of grave goods and human remains.

The book proposes a synthesis of the published finds to serve as a base for future research. The analysis consists of a documentary review (presented in the catalogue and numerous tables) as complete as possible from the published data, accompanied by a detailed analysis of the information available today to highlight the trends regarding the entire province but also the peculiarities that can be distinguished at the regional level. The analysis is supported by many graphics and maps. Many general trends, common to the western provinces of the Roman Empire, were detected but also many particularities linked to the economic and social situation of the communities, the different components of the population of Pannonia and the political and military history of the province.

About the Author
András Márton was born in Budapest. He holds masters degrees in History, and Archaeology (specializing in Roman provincial and Classical archaeology) from the Eötvös Lorand University, Budapest and a PhD from the Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest. He currently lives in France and is involved with research programmes at the Louvre and the Museum of Fine Arts, Lyon. His research interests are pottery studies and ancient funerary practices.

French Description:
Cette étude vise à donner une présentation des pratiques funéraires romaines en Pannonie durant le Haut-Empire. Parmi les différentes approches pour l’étude des cimetières romains, ce travail porte sur le traitement des tombes et leur mobilier. Les pratiques funéraires sont ainsi appréhendées à travers l'étude de la structure des tombeaux, la sélection et le traitement des mobiliers funéraires et des restes humains. L'objectif principal est de proposer une synthèse des découvertes publiées pouvant servir de base aux recherches à venir. L’analyse consiste en une revue documentaire (présentée dans le catalogue et détaillée au sein des tableaux) aussi complète que possible des données publiées, accompagnée d’une analyse détaillée des informations aujourd’hui disponibles, afin de mettre en évidence les tendances concernant toute la province, mais aussi les particularités régionales et locales. L'analyse est accompagnée par de nombreux graphiques et des cartes. Bien sûr, des tendances générales, communes aux provinces occidentales de l'Empire romain, ont pu être détectées, mais également de nombreuses particularités liées à la situation économique et sociale des communautés, aux différents groupes de population en Pannonie et à l'histoire politique et militaire de la province.

András Márton a étudié à l'Université Eötvös Lóránd à Budapest où il a obtenu deux diplômes de Master, l'un en Histoire et l'autre en Archéologie (spécialisé en Archéologie des provinces romaines et en Archéologie classique). Après avoir obtenu son diplôme, il a travaillé au Musée national hongrois puis au Musée des Beaux-Arts de Budapest. Il a soutenu sa thèse intitulée « Le rituel funéraire en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle en comparaison avec les provinces occidentales » summa cum laude à l'Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest. Il vit actuellement en France et participe aux programmes de recherche du musée du Louvre et du musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon. Il a réalisé de nombreux articles scientifiques et a contribué en tant que co-auteur à plusieurs ouvrages. Ses recherches portent sur la production de la céramique et des
FORTHCOMING: La naissance des cités-royaumes cypriotes by Thierry Petit. Paperback; 175x245mm; 168pp (Print RRP: £30.00). 587 2019. ISBN 9781789693478. Book contents pageBuy Now

Three theories vie to explain the causes, characteristics and chronology behind the emergence of Iron Age Cypriot city-kingdoms: Achaean, Phoenician and autochthonous. Privileged by scholars until as recently as the 1980s, the first linked the emergence of the Cypriot city-state to the great Achaean migrations at the end of the second millennium. Epic foundation myths, telling of cities founded by Achaean heroes returning from Troy, were seen as fabled versions of events unfolding ostensibly at the outset of the Iron Age. The writings of D.W. Rupp cast doubt on the Achaean theory, by placing these developments at a much later date (8th c. BCE) and tracing their origins to the growing influence of the Phoenicians. This hypothesis was hotly contested, giving rise to a third theory, according to which the Cypriot Iron Age was essentially a continuation of the island’s Bronze Age civilisation. The latter theory now holds sway and is scarcely ever contested. The Cypriot city-kingdoms that we observe in the historical period (7th-4th c. BCE) are said to have arisen, after a few decades of instability, as early as the 11th century. Their political and administrative structures would have undergone little more than consolidation in the 8th century, before enjoying their floruit during the Archaic and Classical periods and finally disappearing amid the Wars of the Diadochi at the start of the Hellenistic period.

By recasting these developments within the broader context of the re-emergence of state structures in the eastern Mediterranean, La naissance des cités-royaumes cypriotes reassesses the arguments advanced by champions of the received theory. It likewise situates the phenomenon within a firmer theoretical (i.e. anthropological) framework, intended to establish well-defined distinctions. Furthermore, it proposes a shared typology that can accommodate other political entities, traces of which are found throughout the Geometric period (11th-8th c. BCE). Not only does the archaeological evidence compel us to question whether events unfolded as suggested, it reinforces a more nuanced variant of the Phoenician theory. Various state markers, though abundant in the 8th century (Cypro-Geometric III), seem indeed conspicuously absent during Cypro-Geometric I and II. Excavations at one such city-state, the palace of Amathus, have yielded compelling indications as to when a lasting dynasty originally arose. From them, we can surmise that the Kingdom of Amathus was the first of its kind. While the process no doubt took several decades, under no circumstances did it occur before the 9th century BCE. This coincides, moreover, with the wave of resurgent state-building that swept the eastern Mediterranean and engulfed even more westerly regions like the Aegean.

À propos de l'origine des cités-royaumes cypriotes connues aux époques archaïque et classique (VIIe-IVe s. av.), trois théories s'affrontent, que l'on peut respectivement appeler la « théorie achéenne », la « théorie phénicienne » et la « théorie autochtone ». C'est cette dernière qui actuellement fait consensus. Selon ses défenseurs, les poleis de l'île auraient été constituées en royaumes dès le XIe s. en prenant pour base une organisation politique et socio-économique héritée de l'Âge du Bronze. Dans cet ouvrage, l'auteur entend démontrer que cette vision des choses est erronée et ne se fonde sur aucune évidence archéologique ou textuelle. En dépit d'une certaine hiérarchisation sociale visible dans les ensevelissements, les polities cypriotes du début de l'Âge du Fer (I-II) ne constituent pas des États, mais des entités moins centralisées que l'on peut désigner du terme de « chefferies ». Les différents corrélats anthropologiques de l'État ne sont pas visibles avant la fin du IXe s. C'est surtout au VIIIe s. (Cypro-Géométrique III/ Cypro-Archaïque I) que des changements profonds ont lieu, à la suite des contacts croissants avec les Phéniciens et de leur i
FORTHCOMING: The Busy Periphery: Urban Systems of the Balkan and Danube Provinces (2nd – 3rd c. AD) by Damjan Donev. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+380 pages; 106 figures, 21 tables, 123 maps (99 colour pages). (Print RRP: £54.00). 582 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 61. ISBN 9781789693492. Book contents pageBuy Now

The Busy Periphery: Urban Systems of the Balkan and Danube Provinces (2nd – 3rd c. AD) considers the reconstruction of the urban geography of the Balkan and Danube provinces at the time of the Severan dynasty. Four basic parameters governed the focus of research: the origin and socio-economic character of the settlements, their size, micro-location, and the size of their administrative territories. The principal goal was to map the variable developments of the urban network, both between and within the sub-regions that constituted this part of the Roman Empire. This line of inquiry helped in bridging the gap between the regional and the general. In the process of explaining the apparent gaps in the urban map of the study-region or the differential growth of the individual towns and settlements, we were inevitably faced with the question of the role of towns in Roman provincial society and in the economy in general, and with the interpretation of the basic prerequisites for their emergence and prosperity.

About the Author
Damjan Donev completed his Master’s degree at the department of Archaeology and Art History at Bilkent University, Ankara, and earned his doctoral degree in September 2014, at Leiden University, the Netherlands. Between 2013 and 2017, he worked on the ERC-funded project ‘An Empire of 2000 cities’, hosted by Leiden University. Over the past couple of decades, Damjan has participated in and directed a number of archaeological field projects. His geographic focus is the Balkan Peninsula, while his research interest include regional studies, with a special emphasis on settlement patterns, hierarchies, and territoriality, methods of field survey and remote sensing.
FORTHCOMING: Bridge of Civilizations: The Near East and Europe c. 1100–1300 edited by Peter Edbury, Denys Pringle and Balázs Major. Hardback; 176x250mm; xx+344 pages; 171 figures, 10 maps. (Print RRP £65.00). 576 2019. ISBN 9781789693270. Buy Now

This volume brings together 23 of the papers presented at a conference held in Esztergom, Hungary, in May 2018 to coincide with the 800th anniversary of the crusade of King Andrew II of Hungary to the Holy Land in 1217–18. The theme, Bridge of Civilizations, was chosen to highlight aspects of the links and contrasts between Europe and the areas around the eastern Mediterranean that were visited and occupied by western crusaders and settlers in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, giving special attention to the evidence provided by archaeology and material culture, as well as historical sources.

The results of the joint Syrian-Hungarian Archaeological Mission (SHAM) to the Hospitaller castle of Margat (al-Marqab) highlighted in this volume include an up-to-date overview of the structural development of the site from 1187 to 1285, as well as particular studies of the wall paintings, cooking installations and pottery. SHAM’s recent rescue work at Crac des Chevaliers also provides the basis for studies of the water-management system and medieval burials revealed in its courtyard, while other papers examine the masonry marks and surviving evidence of medieval trebuchet damage at both castles. Other papers focus on the medieval castles of Karak (Jordan) and Jubayl (Lebanon), the medieval buildings of Latakia (Syria), the impact of the Crusades on buildings in Cairo, historic bridges in Lebanon, the medieval chapels of Yanouh-Mghayreh and Edde-Jbeil (Lebanon), piscinas in Crusader churches in the East, the images of donors found in medieval Lebanese churches, and the activity of late thirteenth-century Western metalworkers in Cyprus.

Papers focusing more particularly on historical sources include a new edition of a late eleventh- to twelfth century pilgrimage itinerary from Hungary to the Holy Land, a discussion of two minor military orders in Hungary, a reassessment of the conceptualization of Holy War in the run-up to the First Crusade, and the portrayal of Sultan al-Kāmil in a contemporary western account of the Fifth Crusade.

About the Editors
Peter Edbury is Emeritus Professor of Medieval History in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. He has published widely on the history and institutions of the kingdoms founded by the crusaders in the Near East and has re-edited the legal treatises by John of Ibelin (2003) and Philip of Novara (2009).

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013).

Balázs Major is an archaeologist, Arabist and historian by training and holds a PhD from Cardiff University. He is the director of the Institute of Archaeology at Pázmány Péter Catholic University and a lecturer in the Department of Arabic Studies.
FORTHCOMING: Settlements and Necropoleis of the Black Sea and its Hinterland in Antiquity Select Papers from the Third International Conference ‘The Black Sea in Antiquity and Tekkeköy: An Ancient Settlement on the Southern Black Sea Coast’, 27-29 October 2017, Tekkeköy, Samsun edited by Gocha R. Tsetskhladze and Sümer Atasoy. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+302 pages; 299 figures, 13 tables. 573 2019. ISBN 9781789692068. Book contents pageBuy Now

Settlements and Necropoleis of the Black Sea and its Hinterland in Antiquity contains a selection of some two dozen of the papers from an international conference held in October 2017 at Tekkeköy in Samsun, ancient Amisos, on the Turkish Black Sea coast. The archaeology sessions included presentations not only on the Tekkeköy/Samsun region but also on other parts of the Black Sea. They were presented by participants from Bulgaria, France, Georgia, Romania, Russia, Turkey and the United Kingdom. The selection offered here includes almost all of the contributions on archaeology and ancient history. The papers cover all shores of the Black Sea, studying (once again), the establishment dates of some Greek colonies, East Greek transport amphorae, the Black Sea on the Tabula Peutingeriana, the history of Tekkeköy, a Sinopean from Tomis, imports at Açic Suat (Caraburun), arrowhead and dolphin-shaped monetary signs from Berezan, the pre-Roman economy of Myrmekion, the necropolis of Porthmion, Artyushchenko-1 settlement on the Taman Peninsula, South Pontic imports at Classical sites in Ajara, recent excavations in Gonio-Apsarus, the Alaca Höyük Chalcolithic culture in coastal settlements, the Baruthan Tumuli at Amisos, iron finds from the Fatsa Cıngırt Kayası excavations, new excavations at Amastris, ancient Sebastopolis, politics and diplomacy in Paphlagonia, the Great Göztepe tumulus in Paphlagonia, Amasya-Oluz Höyük, the Iron Age sites of Zile district, Byzantine finds at Komana, glass bracelets from Samsun Museum, and dating the Kavak Bekdemir Mosque in Samsun.

About the Editors
Gocha Tsetskhladze (PhD Moscow, DPhil Oxford) is a classical archaeologist who specialises in ancient Greek colonisation and the archaeology of the Mediterranean, the Black Sea, Caucasia, Anatolia, and Central and Eastern Europe in the 1st millennium BC. For more than 20 years he has excavated several Greek colonial sites around the Black Sea (in Georgia, Russia, and the Ukraine). In 2009 he became director of the excavation at Pessinus in central Anatolia. From 2004 to 2015 he taught Mediterranean, Anatolian, and Black Sea archaeology at Melbourne University, Australia. Prior to moving there he had resided in England for 14 years, four of them in Oxford as a pupil of Prof. Sir John Boardman, then ten teaching classical archaeology at the University of London, where he was also director of the University of London excavations in Phanagoria, a Greek colony in South Russia. He has now returned to Britain. Professor Tsetskhladze is the author of more than 250 books, edited volumes, chapters, articles, etc.; founder and series editor of the publication series Colloquia Pontica, now Colloquia Antiqua; and founder and editor-in-chief of the journal Ancient West and East. He has organised many international conferences, congresses, etc., notably the International Congress on Black Sea Antiquities that he established in 1995. He was awarded the Gold Medal of Charles University, Prague, in May 2015, in recognition of his academic achievements, and was made Professor of the University of Bucharest, honoris causa, in November 2015. He has lectured extensively at universities in Europe and North America.

Gocha Tsetskhladze (PhD Moscow, DPhil Oxford) is a classical archaeologist who specialises in ancient Greek colonisation and the archaeology of the Mediterranean, the Black Sea, Caucasia, Anatolia, and Central and Eastern Europe in the 1st millennium BC. For more than 20 years he has excavated several Greek colonial sites around the Black Sea (in Georgia, Russia, and the Ukraine). In 2009 he became director of the excavation at Pessinus in central Anatolia. From 2004 to 2015 he taught Mediterranean, Anatolian, and Black Sea archaeology at Melbourne University, Australia. Prior to moving there he had resided in England for 14 years, four of them in Oxford as a
FORTHCOMING: Farmsteads and Funerary Sites: The M1 Junction 12 Improvements and the A5–M1 Link Road, Central Bedfordshire Archaeological investigations prior to construction, 2011 & 2015–16 by Jim Brown. Hardback; 205x290mm; 566pp; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £120.00). 556 2019. ISBN 9781789692600. Buy Now

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook extensive excavations during the construction of two separate, but adjacent road schemes, some 4.5km apart near Houghton Regis and Toddington, in south Central Bedfordshire. Taken as a whole, the excavations provide a detailed multi-period dataset for regional and national comparison.

The first evidence for occupation occurred in the middle/late Bronze Age comprising pits and clusters of postholes, including four-post and six-post structures. Two pit alignments, more than 2km apart, also indicate that land divisions were being established, and in the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a significant new settlement emerged in the valley bottom. Parts of a further contemporary earlier-middle Iron Age settlement lay at the top of the valley but neither settlement extended into the Roman period. In the late Iron Age or early Roman period three or four new settlements emerged with occupation continuing into the late Roman period in at least one of these. Of particular interest was the recovery of two significant Aylesford-Swarling type cemeteries as well as a third cemetery which largely comprised unurned burials, including some busta, but with few accompanying grave goods.

In the late 7th-century a small probable Christian conversion open-ground inhumation cemetery was established with burials accompanied by a range of objects, including a rare work box, knives, brooches, chatelaine keys and a spearhead. Parts of three medieval settlements were uncovered including one with a potters' working area.