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Archaeopress: Publishers of Academic Archaeology
Communicating the research of thousands of archaeologists worldwide since 1991

Archaeopress is an Oxford-based publisher specialising in academic archaeology.
 
 
NEW: The Life and Works of W.G. Collingwood A wayward compass in Lakeland by Malcolm Craig. Paperback; 148x210mm; xii+254 pages; 38 figures, 13 plates in colour. 466 2018 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918712. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918729. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The son of a watercolour artist, William Gershom Collingwood (1854-1932) studied at University College, Oxford where he met John Ruskin, whose secretary he later became and with whom he shared a wide range of interests. Collingwood travelled extensively, sketching as he went, and after studying at the Slade School of Art, moved to the Lake District where he wrote extensively about the Lakes, Icelandic sagas and Norse mythology, as well as publishing a biography on Ruskin in 1893. He was an accomplished artist, founding the Lake Artists Society in 1904 and serving as Professor of Fine Art at the University of Reading from 1905-11. His interest in art and Scandinavia prompted his research into the Pre-Norman Crosses of Cumbria and the North of England. In 1927 he published ‘Northumbrian Crosses of the Pre-Norman Age’, illustrated with his own drawings. He was also an accomplished musician, climber, swimmer and walker. His son was the noted archaeologist (a leading authority on Roman Britain), philosopher and historian R. G. Collingwood. This well researched biography provides a comprehensive account of the life and works of a nineteenth century polymath whose story should be better known.

About the Author
Malcolm Craig PhD lives with his wife Margaret in Histon, Cambridgeshire; they have a daughter, Alison and son, Andrew. He began working life as a marine engineer in the Merchant Navy, his voyages taking him to the far east and twice around the world. A keen mountaineer, between voyages he worked in the Alps of Switzerland, Italy and Austria. He became Chief Instructor at Outward Bound schools in Wales and Malaysia before moving back to engineering as a Training Manager in shipbuilding. He joined the Industrial Training Research Unit in Cambridge and completed a PhD in engineering at Cranfield Institute of Technology (now University), where he subsequently lectured, and worked as a Tutor for the Open University in Britain and Russia. He has written seven books, most with mountains as a theme, and became interested in the work of W.G. Collingwood while rock climbing as a young man in the English Lake District.
NEW: Softstone: Approaches to the study of chlorite and calcite vessels in the Middle East and Central Asia from prehistory to the present edited by Carl S. Phillips and St John Simpson. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 461 2018 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919924. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919931. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stone containers have been made and used in the Middle East for over eleven millennia where they pre-dated the invention of pottery and were widely traded. The appearance or properties of the stone helped govern how stone vessels were valued or used and many classes were strictly utilitarian, being used for storage, cooking or lighting. Others were decorated and at times they were considered valuable exotica, particularly in regions far removed from their source areas. The subject of stone vessels is attracting growing attention but this is the first attempt to bring together different approaches to the study of softstone vessels, particularly but not exclusively those carved from varieties of chlorite, and covering all periods from prehistory to the present.

About the Editors
CARL S. PHILLIPS works in the Université Paris Ouest, specialises in Arabian archaeology and has excavated extensively in Oman, Yemen and the United Arab Emirates.

ST JOHN SIMPSON is a senior curator in the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum, specialises in the archaeology of the Sasanian and early medieval periods and has excavated extensively in the Middle East and Central Asia.
NEW: How Did the Persian King of Kings Get his Wine? The upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) by Anthony Comfort and Michał Marciak. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+148 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (46 plates in colour). (Print RRP £32.00). 457 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919566. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919573. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

How did the Persian King of Kings Get His Wine? the upper Tigris in antiquity (c.700 BCE to 636 CE) explores the upper valley of the Tigris during antiquity. The area is little known to scholarship, and study is currently handicapped by the security situation in southeast Turkey and by the completion during 2018 of the Ilısu dam. The reservoir being created will drown a large part of the valley and will destroy many archaeological sites, some of which have not been investigated. The course of the upper Tigris discussed here is the section from Mosul up to its source north of Diyarbakır; the monograph describes the history of the river valley from the end of the Late Assyrian empire through to the Arab conquests, thus including the conflicts between Rome and Persia. It considers the transport network by river and road and provides an assessment of the damage to cultural heritage caused both by the Saddam dam (also known as the Eski Mosul dam) in Iraq and by the Ilısu dam in south-east Turkey. A catalogue describes the sites important during the long period under review in and around the valley. During the period reviewed this area was strategically important for Assyria’s relations with its northern neighbours, for the Hellenistic world’s relations with Persia and for Roman relations with first the kingdom of Parthia and then with Sassanian Persia.

About the Authors
ANTHONY COMFORT is an independent scholar associated with the Centre for the Study of Greek and Roman Antiquity at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. After a career in the secretariat of the European Parliament, he completed a doctoral dissertation dealing with the roads on the frontier between Rome and Persia at Exeter University under the supervision of Stephen Mitchell. He is a specialist in the use of satellite imagery for archaeology in the Middle East but is now responsible for a project concerning the Roman roads of south-west France, where he lives.

MICHAL MARCIAK, PhD (2012), Leiden University, is an Assistant Professor at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków (Poland). He has published extensively on Northern Mesopotamia, including two monographs Izates, Helena, and Monobazos of Adiabene (Harrassowitz, 2014) and Sophene, Gordyene, and Adiabene: Three Regna Minora of Northern Mesopotamia Between East and West (Brill, 2017). He is currently also the Principal Investigator of the Gaugamela Project (in cooperation with the Land of Nineveh Archaeological Project of the University of Udine, Italy) which is dedicated to the identification of the site of the Battle of Gaugamela (331 BCE).
NEW: The Roman Pottery Manufacturing Site in Highgate Wood: Excavations 1966-78 by A E Brown and H L Sheldon. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+392 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (70 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 456 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 43. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919788. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919795. Book contents pageDownload

Excavations over a period of eight years uncovered at least ten pottery kilns, waster heaps, ditches and pits, but only a few definite structures. The pottery from the site indicates a period of operation extending from the first half of the 1st century AD to the later 2nd century. The pottery made at the site included initially a vegetable tempered handmade ware, but subsequently the bulk of it consisted of a grog tempered ware and then pottery in a sandy fabric which is well known from assemblages in London. The type of kiln varied with the pottery fabric; there was possible evidence for a pre-Roman pit firing, and later kilns set in ditches were of the twin flued type, eventually replaced by the more familiar above ground kilns with raised floors. Changes in pottery fabric were reflected in different methods of clay preparation, which led to changes in the function of the various ditches, the stratigraphy of which, along with the variation in the fabrics, was significant in enabling the four broad phases into which the site has been divided, to be proposed.

The report includes a very detailed analysis of the forms and fabrics of the pottery made at Highgate. Finds of prehistoric flintwork and pottery during the excavation, and of material of later date, together with the observation of earthworks and historical research, have been used to show the place of the pottery kilns as an element in the exploitation of the woodland of northern London over the last eight thousand years.

About the Authors
TONY BROWN was a member of the academic staff of the University of Leicester for over thirty years, moving there in 1964 as an Assistant Staff Tutor (Organising Tutor for Leicestershire). In 1966 he became Organising Tutor for Northamptonshire and in 1968 Staff Tutor in Archaeology. From 1990 he held a joint appointment with the School of Archaeological Studies, retiring in 2001 as an Emeritus Reader. During the earlier part of this period he engaged in rescue excavations for the Department of the Environment (Roman pottery kilns at Harrold in Bedfordshire and the Roman small town of Towcester in Northamptonshire), thereafter co
NEW: Walking with the Unicorn: Social Organization and Material Culture in Ancient South Asia Jonathan Mark Kenoyer Felicitation Volume edited by Dennys Frenez, Gregg M. Jamison, Randall W. Law, Massimo Vidale and Richard H. Meadow. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+300 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (96 plates in colour). (Print RRP £110.00). 455 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919177. £110.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919184. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £110.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Walking with the Unicorn – Jonathan Mark Kenoyer Felicitation Volume is an important contribution highlighting recent developments in the archaeological research of ancient South Asia, with specific reference to the Indus Civilization.

As suggested by the title, it is a compilation of original papers written to celebrate the outstanding contributions of Jonathan Mark Kenoyer to the archaeology of South Asia over the past forty years. Many interpretations now commonly accepted in the study of the Indus Civilization are the results of Kenoyer’s original insights, which combine his instinctive knowledge of the indigenous culture with the groundbreaking application of ethnoarchaeology, experimental studies and instrumental analyses.

The numerous contributions from international specialists cover central aspects of the archaeological research on Bronze Age South Asia, as well as of the neighboring regions. They include socio-economic implications of craft productions, the still undeciphered Indus script and related administrative technologies and procedures. The inter-regional exchanges that allowed the rooting of the Indus culture over a vaste territory, as well as the subtle regional variations in this ‘Harappan veneer’ are also studied.

About the Honorand
Jonathan Mark Kenoyer (born May 28th 1952 in Shillong, India) is one of the world’s leading experts on the ancient Indus Civilisation of Pakistan and India. Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, he has been excavating with the Harappa Archaeological Research Project (HARP) at the ancient Indus city of Harappa since 1986 and is currently involved in ongoing research in South Asia as well as in adjacent regions including the Oman Peninsula, Afghanistan and China. His particular interests include the origins and development of urbanism, writing and technologies. He has worked with craftspeople in Pakistan, India, China and the Sultanate of Oman, to replicate ancient pottery, jewellery, copper smelting and other manufacturing processes. He speaks fluently Urdu, Hindi and Bengali.
NEW: Dosariyah: An Arabian Neolithic Coastal Community in the Central Gulf by Philipp Drechsler. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+498 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (110 plates in colour). (Print RRP £80.00).. 454 2018 British Foundation for the Study of Arabia Monographs (formerly Society for Arabian Studies Monographs) 19. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919627. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919634. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £80.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dosariyah: Reinvestigating a Neolithic coastal community in eastern Arabia describes the work carried out at Dosariyah, located in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, which took place between 2010 and 2014. It was conducted by the joint German-Saudi Dosariyah Archaeological Research Project (DARP). A wealth of material remains was found during excavations within almost three metres of anthropogenic deposits. Radiocarbon dates and comparative studies of artefacts securely date the occupation of the site into the first centuries of the fifth millennium BC.

The co-occurrence of locally produced artefacts that are technologically and typologically rooted in the local Arabian Middle Neolithic, and imports from southern Mesopotamia is characteristic of Dosariyah. However, the mechanisms behind this distribution of foreign materials along the Arabian Gulf coast, in particular, are still poorly understood. It is the central proposition of this book that the local societies living along the shores of the Arabian Gulf coast played an active role in the acquisition of Ubaid pottery and other objects originating in southern Mesopotamia.

A predominance of imported objects, considered as ‘exotic items’, are understood as integral components of rituals that were part of temporary gatherings of larger groups of people at Dosariyah. Based on the material evidence from the site, such collective social events were embedded in everyday life during the fifth millennium BC.

About the Author
Philipp Drechsler is a research fellow at the University of Tübingen, Germany, where he received his PhD in 2008. Trained in prehistoric archaeology, geology and geography, he has a particular interest in the emergence and the development of food producing – Neolithic – societies on the Arabian Peninsula. His fields of expertise include lithic studies, the analysis of spatial patterns of human behaviour and human action against the background of changing environmental conditions. He is head of the joint German-Saudi Dosariyah Archaeological Research Project (DARP), and has also been invited to participate in research projects in Qatar, V.A.E and Syria.
NEW: Études Mésopotamiennes – Mesopotamian Studies: N°1 – 2018 edited by Vincent Déroche, Maria Grazia Masetti-Rouault and Christophe Nicolle. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+330 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French, abstracts in Arabic and Kurdish. (Print RRP £52.00). 449 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919412. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919429. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £52.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The first volume of the series EMMS, Études Mésopotamiennes – Mesopotamian Studies presents a collection of articles, communications and preliminary reports representing the advancement, in recent years, of human sciences - archaeological, historical, philological and cultural researches –concerning ancient Mesopotamia area studies. It contains the first results of some excavation and survey programs carried out by different European teams namely in the Kurdistan region of Iraq, developed since the reopening of this large territory to international research after the long pause due to war. The volume includes also studies, debates, reflections preparing and illustrating the new trends of the research launched now in Mesopotamia. Marked by the continuity of the scientific traditions, they show the changes induced by the evolution of mentalities and by new methods, techniques and instruments of work. The proceedings of an international congress held in Paris in 2013, show also the orientation of Iraqi archaeologists’ researches, and their perceptions of the new, possible collaboration starting now in the region. In the same spirit, to allow a better circulation and sharing of their contents, the texts are accompanied by large summaries translated into Arabic and Kurdish.

About the Editors
VINCENT DÉROCHE is a former alumnus of the École Normale Supérieure, former member of the École française d’Archéologie d’Athènes, researcher at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), currently Directeur de recherche, Directeur adjoint or the UMR 8167, « Orient & Méditerranée », for the part « Monde byzantin ». Elected to the chair of « Littérature byzantine » at Sorbonne Université, and to the chair « Christianisme byzantin » at the École pratique des Hautes Études (Paris).

MARIA GRAZIA MASETTI-ROUAULT, a specialist of Late Bronze - Iron Age Mesopotamian cultures, is Directeur d’études (Professor) in the École Pratique des Hautes Études PSL, Sorbonne University in Paris, where she helds the Chair of « Religions of the Syro- Mesopotamian societies: Archaeology and History ». Since 2005, she is co-director of the Syro-French Archaeological Mission in Tell Masaikh and its region (Syrian Lower Middle Euphrates area) and, since 2015, she is also Director of the French Archaeological Mission in Qasr Shemamok (Iraqi Kurdistan).

CHRISTOPHE NICOLLE is an archaeologist specialist of pre-classical Middle East archaeology, working in different regions (Northern Mesopotamia, Northern Levant, South Levant), participating or directing several excavations or surveys over periods ranging mainly from the Chalcolithic to the Late Bronze Age. Former member of the French Institute of the Near East (IFPO), researcher at the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), he works actually in a team of the Collège de France (Paris).
NEW: A Kerma Ancien Cemetery in the Northern Dongola Reach Excavations at site H29 by Derek A. Welsby. Hardback; 210x297mm; xviii+226 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (103 colour plates). English text with Arabic summary. (Print RRP £58.00). 443 2018 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 22. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919313. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919320. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £58.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is the final report on the excavations of a Kerma Ancien cemetery discovered by the Sudan Archaeological Research Society during its Northern Dongola Reach Survey conducted between 1993 and 1997. It is one of the very few cemeteries of this date to have been fully excavated and provides interesting data on funerary culture as practised in a rural environment, to be compared with the extensive information available from investigations of the cemetery associated with the metropolis of Kerma 100km to the north. It includes a range of specialist reports on all categories of artefacts recovered as well as on the physical anthropology, archaeobotany and archaeozoology.

About the Author
DEREK A. WELSBY has directed excavations and surveys in Sudan since 1982. These have included all-period surveys in the Northern Dongola Reach and at the Fourth Cataract as a component of the Merowe Dam Archaeological Salvage Project. Major excavations have been undertaken within the capital of the medieval kingdom of Alwa at Soba East and in the Kushite town and cemetery at Kawa. Surveys have also been undertaken along Sudan’s first railway between Wadi Halfa and Kerma dating to the late 19th century.
NEW: Indonesian Megaliths: A Forgotten Cultural Heritage by Tara Steimer-Herbet. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+104 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (94 plates in colour). (Print RRP £30.00). 413 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918439. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918446. Book contents pageDownload

Indonesian Megaliths: A forgotten cultural heritage highlights aspects of Indonesian culture which are currently misunderstood and sometimes threatened by destruction. Although they are relatively recent in origin, the Indonesian megaliths offer similarities to their counterparts in the Middle East and Arabia: they reflect the rise to prominence of local chiefs in a context of acculturation which prompted the need to build megalithic monuments to bury the dead, and to honour, commemorate and communicate with ancestors. In societies of oral tradition, these stones punctuate the landscape to transmit the memory of men and social structure from one generation to the next.

Based on scientific documents (articles, archaeological reports) and field visits, this new exploration clarifies various elements of the Indonesian megaliths, including their function in the daily life of the tribes and the use of certain stones for musical purposes (lithophony). In Nias, Sumba and Toraya, the megalith tradition is still alive and ethno-anthropological studies of these three regions provide a unique chance to complement the archaeological perspectives on megalithic monuments abandoned for several centuries in the rest of the Archipelago. The book includes numerous photographs documenting the monuments which were taken during the author’s stay in Indonesia (2010-2013).

About the Author
TARA STEIMER-HERBET is a graduate of Paris 1 - Panthéon La Sorbonne where she carried out her doctoral research on developing a methodological approach to Middle Eastern archaeology. Her research led her to become particularly interested in megalithism, and the way this phenomenon is expressed in the cultural and funerary practices of the Levant and western Arabia during the 4th and 3rd millennia BC. In 2005 she excavated a sanctuary in Hadramawt (Yemen) and since 2010 has focussed on the megalithic phenomenon in Indonesia. Her research efforts currently concentrate on the preservation of megalithic monuments in the Akkar region of Lebanon as well as on characterising the megalithic phenomenon of the 3rd and 2d millennium BC in the Kuwait region of al-Subiya, Dr Steimer currently teaches ‘archaeological methodology’ and ‘megalithism in the world’ at the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology of the University of Geneva, Switzerland.
NEW: Giving the Past a Future: Essays in Archaeology and Rock Art Studies in Honour of Dr. Phil. h.c. Gerhard Milstreu edited by James Dodd and Ellen Meijer. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+300 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (96 plates in colour). 61 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919702. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919719. Book contents pageDownload

This volume celebrates the work of Dr. Phil. h.c. Gerhard Milstreu in his 40th year as director of Tanum Museum of Rock Carving and Rock Art Research Centre, Underslös, Sweden. Here, a feast of scholarly contributions from across Europe, at all levels of study have been collected. Each and every one of the chapters addresses aspects connected to the work Gerhard has done over the last 40 years. Through their words and images, these pay respect to and acknowledge Gerhard’s achievements in the fields of rock art documentation, research, international collaboration and outreach. Gerhard has striven from the outset to: promote the importance of the image within archaeology, increase public interest and involvement with prehistoric art, and to encourage the next generation to continue the work. Thus, many authors think very deeply about the images, how we interpret them and how we record them, particularly in light of recent advances in technology. Others explore how Gerhard has fostered dissemination and public involvement. The range of countries and subjects represented; France, Italy, Holland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and the UK; reflects the success of Gerhard’s focus on international collaboration and dialogue. Given Gerhard’s emphasis on giving the past a future, it is appropriate that leading up and coming scholars, from all levels of higher education, are also present and have the opportunity to present their latest research.

About the Editors
JAMES DODD is currently a PhD scholar at the Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies, Aarhus University, Denmark. Originally educated at Durham University, James is a specialist in the study, analysis and documentation of the prehistoric rock art of Scandinavia. During the past few years, he has worked extensively in the field, becoming versed in the archaeology of the areas with various museums and institutions in the Scandinavian countries, in particular Bornholms Museum, Denmark. His current PhD project investigates the extent of homogeneity or diversity within Southern Tradition rock art. In addition to high-level statistical analyses and GIS, James is undertaking the largest programme of surface-based rock art documentation ever conducted in Denmark, on the island of Bornholm. Advances in technology are brought into the field with processing of image-based models occurring on site using remote access to cluster processing on the Danish e-Infrastructure Collaboration’s High Performance Computer: Abacus 2.0.

ELLEN MEIJER has been working with the documentation of rock carvings for the past 22 years. She has learned the ins and outs of documentation at Tanums Hällristningsmuseum Underslös. Since 2011, she has worked for projects on rock art documentation at the Swedish Rock Art Research Archives and the University of Gothenburg, as a research assistant, as well as a field supervisor teaching courses in rock art documentation organized by University of Gothenburg in collaboration with Swedish Rock Art Research Archives and The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art. She has been jointly responsible for the development and implementation of digital documentation of rock art through Structure from Motion and optical laser scanning within the Tanum World Heritage Area and published in Adoranten, the peer reviewed Rock Art Magazine of The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art.

Both James and Ellen are members of the Board of The Scandinavian Society for Prehistoric Art.
NEW: Treinta años de Arqueología Medieval en España edited by Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+418 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English preface and introduction (Print RRP £64.00). 58 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919238. £64.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919245. Book contents pageDownload

This book presents, in sixteen papers, recent developments and some of the main topics seen in academic Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain. The papers explore some of the emergent and consolidated topics of the discipline, such as landscapes, cities, rural spaces, bio-archaeological records, archaeology of architectures, agrarian archaeology, post-Roman archaeology, colonial archaeology in the Canary Islands and the archaeology of religious minorities, opening new lines of enquiries and providing new theoretical and methodological approaches. An overview of Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain is offered, proposing a wide range of topics for discussion. Finally, the book explores the connections between Spanish Medieval Archaeology and other European traditions, specifically, English, Italian and Portuguese Medieval Archaeology.

About the Editor
Juan Antonio Quirós is a Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country, Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology (University College London), and Visiting Fellow at All Souls College (University of Oxford). He is the director of the ‘Heritage and Cultural Landscapes Research Group’ of the University of the Basque Country and the 'Rural Medieval Research Group', CSIC-UPV/EHU. His principal interests lie in the study of the archaeology of landscapes, the archaeology of rural communities, Mediterranean Archaeology, Archaeology of Architectures, and the study of Social Complexity. Besides, he is very interested in a multi-proxy and multidisciplinary approach to cultural resources. Some of his recent works include ‘Arqueología de una comunidad campesina medieval: Zornoztegi’ (Bilbao, 2018); ‘Longhouses, house biography and social complexity in Early Medieval Northwestern Iberia’ (Arqueología de la Arquitectura 2017); ‘Local identities and desertions in Late Medieval period’ (Reti Medievali, 2017); ‘Social complexity in Early Medieval rural communities’ (Oxford, 2016); and ‘Agrarian Archaeology in Early Medieval Europe’ (Quaternary International 346, 2014). Currently, he is preparing a book about the Archaeology of Medieval Peasantry.
NEW: Rockshelter Excavations in the East Hamersley Range, Pilbara Region, Western Australia edited by Dawn Cropper and W. Boone Law, foreword by Maitland Parker and Slim Parker, Martidja Banyjima Elders. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+454 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £90.00). 458 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919764. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919771. Book contents pageDownload

Rockshelter Excavations in the East Hamersley Range offers a detailed study of six exceptional rockshelter sites from the inland Pilbara Region of Western Australia. It provides highly descriptive, chapter-length accounts of archaeological investigations at Jundaru, Djadjiling, HS-A1, HD073APAD13, PAD 3, and HD073A03 rockshelters, which were excavated as part of a mitigative salvage program conducted at the Hope Downs 1 mine between 2007 and 2010. The research findings show that early Aboriginal peoples initially occupied the area ca. 45,000 years ago, demonstrating that the east Hamersley Range contains some of the oldest known Aboriginal archaeological sites in the Australian arid zone. The story of the Pleistocene and Holocene Aboriginal occupation at Hope Downs 1 is long and complex. Using an extensive radiocarbon and OSL chronology that spans from >47,000 years ago to the recent past, the story of the Aboriginal archaeological record is explored via prominent changes in lithic technology, artefact use-wear/residues, combustion features, faunal remains, rockshelter geomorphology, archaeomagnetism, and pollen/phytolith analysis. The work investigates the early occupation of the region and examines the archaeological evidence for occupation during the last glacial maximum. It chronicles significant changes in Aboriginal stone artefact technology over time with its analysis of more than 35,000 chipped stone artefacts.

Consisting of 18 chapters, the volume is rich with colour photographs, illustrations, and figures, including high-resolution images of the rockshelter sites, excavations, stratigraphic sections, cultural features, and artefacts. It includes a foreword by the Martidja Banyjima elders, who contextualise the cultural importance of this work to Banyjima Peoples and Traditional Owners of the region. The monograph also includes comprehensive synthesis of the regional archaeological record by the editors and a chapter on Banyjima culture and traditions by consulting anthropologists Dr Nadia Butler, Dr Neale Draper, and Fiona Sutherland. Many specialist studies were commissioned for the Hope Downs work, including an archaeomagnetism report by Dr Andy Herries (LaTrobe University), a faunal analysis study by Dr. Matthew McDowell (University of Tasmania), a phytolith analysis by Dr Lynley Wallis (University of Notre Dame Australia), a palynological study by Dr Simon Haberle, Feli Hopf, and Dr Phil Roberts (Australian National University), artefact usewear/residue analysis by Dr Richard Fullagar (University of Wollongong), optically stimulated luminescence dating by Frances Williams (University of Adelaide), and a rockshelter geomorphological study by Prof Martin Williams (University of Adelaide).

About the Editors
DAWN CROPPER is the Director of Archaeology at leading consulting company, New Zealand Heritage Properties, which has branches in Dunedin, Christchurch, and Invercargill. As Director, Dawn’s responsibilities include the management of all archaeology teams across the branches, development of process and training, as well as the development of proprietary methodology for archaeological risk management across large areas. She also specialises in heritage impact assessments and is a leading expert in the management of large-scale archaeological projects throughout New Zealand. Dawn holds a PhD in Archaeology from the University of Sydney (Australia) and a Master’s in Archaeology from the University of Saskatchewan (Canada), with a focus on technological analysis of flaked stone tools. From 2007 to 2013 she worked as a senior archaeologist and lithic specialist for Australian Cultural Heritage Management Pty Ltd, co-managing and supervising the Hope Downs 1 rockshelter excavations with W. Boone Law.

W. BOONE LAW is a scientist and heritage professional that specialises in the Aboriginal archaeology of the Australian Arid Zone. His qualifications include a BA in Anthr
NEW: Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011 Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 edited by Jeanine Abdul Massih and Shinichi Nishiyama in collaboration with Hanan Charaf and Ahmad Deb. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+452 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (124 colour plates). (Print RRP £65.00). 452 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919474. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919481. Book contents pageDownload

Syria has been a major crossroads of civilizations in the ancient Near East since the dawn of human kind. Until the current crisis began in 2011, Syria was one of the foremost pioneers in the investigation of past human knowledge, diversity, and identity. However, due to the ongoing war, archaeological excavations came to an abrupt halt. Since then, there have been countless alarming reports of damage or destruction inflicted on archaeological, historical, and museum sites.

The International Syrian Congress on Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (ISCACH), held December 3-5, 2015 in Beirut, Lebanon, was designed to bring together international scholars who have directed or participated in archaeological expeditions in Syria, and colleagues from Syria. By doing so, not only could the results of years of archaeological investigations and cultural heritage management in Syria be shared and discussed, but also a spirit of friendship and collaboration could be fostered and strengthened during this turbulent period.

The Congress focussed on the scientific aspects of each explored site and region allowing researchers to examine in detail each heritage site, its characteristics and identity. Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011: Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 consists of two parts. The first part presents the results of archaeological investigations conducted between 2000 and 2010. The second part comprises abstracts of papers and posters presented during the Congress. It is hoped that this book will represent an important contribution to the scientific dialogue between international and Syrian scholars, and will appeal to the general public interested in the culture and history of Syria.

About the Editors
JEANINE ABDUL MASSIH is professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Hellenistic and Roman settlements, town planning, and architecture. She co-directed the excavations of Cyrrhus (Aleppo, Syria) on behalf of the Lebanese University and the DGAMS and coordinated many field and research projects in Syria and Lebanon. Since 2014, she has been in charge of the excavations and management of the Quarries of Baalbek (Lebanon) and of a survey project on the Southern Beqaa (Lebanon).

SHINICHI NISHIYAMA is associate professor at Chubu University, Japan. He specializes in the Iron Age culture of the ancient Near East, especially in the northern Levant. He has participated in various archaeological projects in the Near East and Central Asia including Syria, Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. He was also involved in the UNESCO-led cultural heritage projects in Afghanistan and Tajikistan. He currently co-directs archaeological projects in Iraqi Kurdistan (Yasin Tepe) and in Lebanon (Southern Beqaa).

HANAN CHARAF is assistant professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Near Eastern history and archaeology during the Bronze and Iron Ages in the central Levant. Her research interests include Bronze Age ceramic production and distribution, Bronze Age Cypriot pottery imported to Lebanon, supra and intraregional trade (exchange commodities and routes) in the Levant during the Bronze Age, and cultural characteristics of the transitional period Late Bronze Age-Iron Age in the central Levant.

AHMAD DEB holds a PhD in archaeology and is currently Head of the Department of the Historical Buildings and Archaeological Documentation at the Directorate General of Antiquities of Syria. He directed the Syrian excavations of Tell Nahr El-Arab (Tell Al-Shamiyeh) between 2011 and 2018. He specializes in Bronze Age settlements and burials in the Near East. Today, he dedicates his time to saving and documenting Syrian endangered cultural heritage.
NEW: Metal Sewing-Thimbles Found in Britain by Brian Read; principal illustrator: Mike Trevarthen. Paperback; 203x273mm; viii+88 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (26 colour plates). (Print £25.00). 450 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919450. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919467. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This is the first reference book that deals specifically with all types of sewing-thimble made from copper-alloy or silver, or either of these metals combined with iron or steel, and found in Britain: also included is a seemingly rare gold specimen. Domed, ring-type and open-top (here the latter classed as a new type) sewing-thimbles are described, among them unusual examples and others previously absent from the known record. From Britain the earliest reliable dating for these humble yet fascinating tools is between c.1270 – c.1350, and continues through the medieval and early post-medieval periods and into the 18th and 19th centuries.

Dating from at least the 17th century, subjected to detailed attention is the largely neglected sailmakers’ and sailors’ palm-iron, a heavy-duty tool made from either iron, steel or copper alloy. Also described are the two known types of silver or copper-alloy finger guard, an 18th – 19th century tool used in conjunction with finer sewing-thimbles.

The majority of sewing-thimbles and other sewing-tools catalogued here are credited to metal-detectorists or members of The Society of Thames Mudlarks, who also use metal-detectors. To show constructional detail, each object is archaeologically drawn. This information is essential for metal-detectorists, archaeologists, museum curators, sewing-tool collectors and dealers, or anyone with an interest, seeking to gauge the type or age of any particular sewing-thimble or palm-iron.

About the Author
BRIAN READ was born in 1939 in Essex and raised in East and South-East London. With no formal educational qualifications, in 1954 he left Secondary Modern School and became a trainee millwright and then a trainee groundsman before joining the Merchant Navy in 1955 where he travelled widely. In 1961 he embarked on a fire service career, first with the Devon County Fire Service, then the City of Plymouth Fire Brigade, and finally the newly formed Devon Fire Brigade. While on duty in 1983, in the rank of assistant divisional officer, he sustained an injury that, in 1986, resulted in his medical discharge.

Since leaving the fire service he has worked as a freelance writer. His first book History Beneath Our Feet, published in 1988, was a bestseller and after extensive revision underwent re-publication in 1995 and again proved successful. Between 1999 – 2015 he self-published, under the imprint Portcullis Publishing.

From 1978, metal detecting and its associated study of small metal artefacture, has been his primary leisure interest.
NEW: When Archaeology Meets Communities: Impacting Interactions in Sicily over Two Eras (Messina, 1861-1918) by Antonino Crisà. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+416 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £55.00). 446 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917913. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917920. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

When Archaeology Meets Communities examines the history of nineteenth-century Sicilian archaeology through the archival documentation for the excavations – official and casual – at Tindari, Lipari and nearby minor sites in the Messina province from Italy’s Unification to the end of the First World War (1861-1918). The area and historical period have been fully neglected by past scholars and need in-depth investigation. The substantial evidence includes sets of approximately six hundred new records and black and white images from Italian and UK archives.

The historical reconstruction, based on analysis of these records, lays the foundations for the entire volume and forms the basis from which the book develops innovative outlines on Sicilian archaeology. The structure follows this central concept. Furthermore, the volume seeks: a) to clarify relationships between the Italian Ministry of Public Education, the Museum of Palermo and local government authorities (‘3-level’ structure of interaction) and to pinpoint contacts with the contemporary social context; b) to compare archaeological research during the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies and the post-Unification period in northern Sicily in terms of methods, history of collecting, antiquities safeguarding and legislation; and c) to contextualise this work in terms of the evolution of archaeology and social change in the wider Italian and European contexts.

About the Author
ANTONINO CRISÀ is an archaeologist, ancient historian and numismatist, and currently research fellow at the University of Warwick, Department of Classics and Ancient History. He studied at the University of Milan (BA 2004, MA 2008) and worked as a ‘Classics Teaching Assistant’ at the University of Leicester (2012-16), where he obtained his PhD in Archaeology (2015). As a field archaeologist, he has excavated in Sicily (Tindari), Sardinia (Nora), northern Italy (Milano, Calvatone, Bagnolo San Vito, Adria, Bergamo, Casale sul Sile) and Syria (Palmyra). His research explores numismatics and the history of archaeology in Sicily between the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (antiquarianism, coin collectors, nineteenth-century archaeological excavations, archives and museum collection). Dr Crisà has been honoured by the publication of his best numismatic papers within the Italian National Competition for Young Numismatists (Cronaca Numismatica) (2006) and Premio M. Cagiati – XV International Numismatic Congress of Taormina (Accademia Italiana di Studi Numismatici) (2015).
20% OFF: Travellers in Ottoman Lands The Botanical Legacy edited by Ines Aščerić-Todd, Sabina Knees, Janet Starkey and Paul Starkey. Paperback; 160x230mm; xxii+358 pages; 2 maps, 7 tables, 167 figures (139 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 438 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919153. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919160. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Spotlight Promotion - Summer Reading. RRP £60.00, OFFER PRICE £48.00 (offer ends 31/08/2018): This collection of around twenty papers has its origins in a two-day seminar organised by the Association for the Study of Travel in Egypt and the Near East (ASTENE) in conjunction with the Centre for Middle Eastern Plants at the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh (RBGE), with additional support from Cornucopia magazine and the Turkish Consulate General, Edinburgh. This multi-disciplinary event formed part of the Ottoman Horizons festival held in Edinburgh in 2017 and attracted a wide range of participants from around the world, including several from Turkey and other parts of the Middle East.

This splendidly illustrated book focuses on the botanical legacy of many parts of the former Ottoman Empire — including present-day Turkey, the Levant, Egypt, the Balkans, and the Arabian Peninsula — as seen and described by travellers both from within and from outside the region. The papers cover a wide variety of subjects, including Ottoman garden design and architecture; the flora of the region, especially bulbs and their cultural significance; literary, pictorial and photographic depictions of the botany and horticulture of the Ottoman lands; floral and related motifs in Ottoman art; culinary and medicinal aspects of the botanical heritage; and efforts related to conservation.

About the Editors
DR INES AŠČERIĆ-TODD is a Teaching Fellow in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her research interests include social and cultural history of the Middle East and the Ottoman Empire, Sufism and dervish orders. She is the author of Dervishes and Islam in Bosnia: Sufi Dimensions to the Formation of Bosnian Muslim Society, in the Brill series ‘The Ottoman Empire and its Heritage’ (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2015).

DR SABINA KNEES has edited the Flora of the Arabian Peninsula and Socotra, since 2005. Before joining The Centre for Middle Eastern Plants (CMEP) at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE) in 2005, Sabina was a principal editor on the European Garden Flora, and a Stanley Smith Research Fellow based at the RBGE. Sabina is a member of the Horticultural Taxonomy Group (Hortax), the IUCN SSC Arabian Plant Specialist Group and the Executive Committee of the Friends of Socotra.

DR JANET STARKEY has edited the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies since 2007. A former lecturer at Durham University, she has published extensively on travellers in the Middle East. Her most recent book, The Scottish Enlightenment Abroad: the Russells of Braidshaw in Aleppo and on the Coast of Coromandel (Leiden & Boston: Brill), was published in March 2018.

PROFESSOR PAUL STARKEY, a specialist in Arabic literature and culture, is Emeritus Professor at Durham University and is currently Vice-President of the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies (BRISMES) and Chairman of the Banipal Trust for Arab Literature. His translation of The Book of the Sultan’s Seal by Youssef Rakha won the 2015 Saif Ghobash Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation, and his translation of The Shell by Mustafa Khalifa won a Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding in 2017.
NEW: Reindeer hunters at Howburn Farm, South Lanarkshire A Late Hamburgian settlement in southern Scotland – its lithic artefacts and natural environment by Torben Bjarke Ballin with contributions by Alan Saville, Richard Tipping, Tam Ward, Rupert Housley, Lucy Verrill, Matthew Bradley, Clare Wilson, Paul Lincoln and Alison MacLeod. Hardback; 205x290mm; xx+124 pages; 47 illustrations, 25 tables (13 plates in colour). 433 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919016. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919023. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents the lithic assemblage from Howburn in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, which at present is the oldest prehistoric settlement in Scotland (12,700-12,000 BC), and the only Hamburgian settlement in Britain. The site also included a scatter from the Late Upper Palaeolithic Federmesser- Gruppen period (12,000-10,800 BC), as well as lithics from the Mesolithic, Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. The book focuses on the Hamburgian finds, which are mainly based on the exploitation of flint from Doggerland, the then dry bed of the North Sea. The Hamburgian tools include tanged arrowheads, scrapers, piercers, burins, and other implement forms which show similarities with tools of the same age on the European continent. The shape of one scatter suggests that the Palaeolithic settlers lived in tent-like structures. The Palaeolithic finds from Howburn shed light on several important general trends, such as the ‘acclimatization’ of pioneer settlers, as well as the development of regional differences following the initial Late Glacial recolonization of Scotland. Palaeo-environmental work focused on whether there was a small lake (‘Loch Howburn’) in front of the terrace on which the camp was situated, and it was concluded that there was indeed a lake there, but it was neither contemporary with the Hamburgian, nor the Federmesser-Gruppen settlement. Most likely, ‘Loch Howburn’ dates to the Loch Lomond stadial.

About the Author
After having worked as a specialist and Project Manager in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Norway, Torben Ballin relocated to Scotland in 1998. Since that year, he has worked as an independent lithics specialist in Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland, and he is an Honorary Fellow at the University of Bradford. Torben’s special interests have been lithic terminology and typology, lithic technology, chronological frameworks, raw material studies, intra-site spatial analyses, prehistoric territories and exchange networks, and – not least – Scotland’s Late Upper Palaeolithic (LUP) and Early Mesolithic industries. While still active in Denmark, he briefly worked with Jørgen Holm at the Hamburgian/Federmesser-Gruppen site of Slotseng in Southern Jutland, and one of his academic theses was on the refitting and spatial analysis of the LUP Brommian settlement of Højgård on Zealand. While in Norway, he led the Farsund Project and the Oslofjord Crossing Project, where he analysed a large number of Norwegian Early, Middle and Late Mesolithic sites and assemblages. Since 1998, Torben has dealt with numerous Mesolithic sites and assemblages from all parts of Scotland, and lately he has focused on the discovery of Scottish LUP sites, assemblages, and individual finds and, with the late Alan Saville of National Museums Scotland he published the Federmesser-Gruppen site of Kilmelfort Cave, Argyll; with Hein Bjerck, University of Trondheim, the unique LUP Fosna-Hensbacka point from Brodgar on Orkney; and with Headland Archaeology Ltd. the LUP site of Milltimber, Aberdeenshire. Torben has recently published a number of papers in which he discussed how to recognize individual LUP finds and assemblages on the basis of their technological attributes, when no diagnostic types are present.

The following co-authors took part in the production of the Howburn monograph: The late Alan Saville, National Museums Scotland; Richard Tipping, University of Stirling; Tam Ward, Biggar Archaeology Group; Rupert Housley, Royal Holloway, University of London; Lucy Verrill, University of Stirling; Matthew Bradley, University of Stirling; Clare Wilson, University of Stirling; Paul Lincoln, University of Portsmouth; and Alison MacLeod, University of Reading.
NEW: Egyptian and Imported Pottery from the Red Sea port of Mersa Gawsis, Egypt by Sally Wallace-Jones with contributions from Andrea Manzo, Mary Ownby and Karin Kopetzky. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (43 colour plates). (Print RRP £32.00). 432 2018 Archaeopress Egyptology 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919030. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919047. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The unique site of Mersa Gawasis was a base for seaborne trade along the Red Sea coast during the Middle Kingdom. The Egyptians’ purpose was to trade with Punt for incense and other exotic materials. There is little evidence of any permanent structures at the site apart from man-made caves in which shipping equipment was stored between expeditions. The pottery is, therefore, amongst the most significant evidence for human activity here. Vessel types include many marl C jars, but other kinds of vessels including significant foreign material also occur, some in large quantities. This variety of vessels and the careful reuse of potsherds is central to an understanding of specific and day to day domestic activities and of how the site operated. Mersa Gawasis has many vessel forms of the 12th and Early 13th dynasties. Epigraphic evidence closely dates the site, helping to confirm and underpin an understanding of vessel types and technologies within the ceramic chronology of the period. This volume presents the site’s wide variety of ceramic material, offering also an interpretation of what pottery reveals about activities at the site. The author and excavation photographer have worked together to enhance details of the text with specific photographs.

About the Author
SALLY WALLACE-JONES was born in Norwich, and her interest in archaeology was sparked in childhood by parents who had worked in Egypt and by the Egyptian collection at Norwich Castle Museum where she assisted with the redisplay of the collection. She studied Archaeology and Classics at Manchester University and completed her PhD in the ceramics of Predynastic Egypt. Sally has excavated in many places including Hadrian’s Wall and the Frankish port of Quentovic. She studied with Janine Bourriau and worked for several seasons on the pottery from the Egypt Exploration Society’s Survey of Memphis. She has also worked on the Predynastic pottery at Diospolis Parva for Kathryn Bard’s Boston University excavations, before being asked to take on the ceramic analysis at Mersa Gawasis. She worked as a teacher until 2015 when she began to study for ordination in the Anglican Church, being awarded a BTh degree from Cambridge in 2017. Sally is now part of the clergy team at Hingham in Norfolk. In her spare time, she enjoys continued study of Ancient Egyptian culture as well as travelling, collecting pottery from her travels and playing in a woodwind chamber group. She also speaks on Egyptology to local organisations.
NEW: The Luwians of Western Anatolia Their Neighbours and Predecessors by Fred Woudhuizen. Paperback; 175x245mm; iv+162 pages; 35 illustrations, 11 tables (3 colour plates). 405 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918279. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918286. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In scholarly literature, there is much attention given to the Hittites and the Mycenaean Greeks, but the Luwians of Western Anatolia are notoriously neglected. Therefore, a study focussing on the latter is desirable. In this book, the presently available information on the western Luwians is assembled. This entails, primarily, the epigraphic evidence in the form of Luwian hieroglyphic inscriptions from the region and the historical information which can be deduced from it, as well as historical Hittite sources. As a prerequisite for the reconstruction of the history of the western Luwians during the Middle and Late Bronze Ages, the thorny question of the geography of their habitat needs to be tackled. This can now be done in an adequate manner owing to the most recent discoveries. Apart from Luwian hieroglyphic, the Luwians of Western Anatolia also used cuneiform script. Based on the linguistic data from both categories of evidence, a sketch of their language is presented. It must be realized, though, that not all inhabitants of Western Anatolia were speakers of the Luwian language. Thus, it will be argued that their northern neighbours in the Troad spoke a different language, of Thraco-Phrygian type. Finally, the Luwians were not autochthonous in the region, but preceded by speakers of a different Indo-European tongue, most adequately defined as Old Indo-European in Hans Krahe’s terms.

About the Author
FRED WOUDHUIZEN, born in 1959, graduated in Mediterranean Pre- and Protohistory at the University of Amsterdam (1985). He earned his PhD in 2006 at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, with a dissertation on ‘The Ethnicity of the Sea Peoples’. As an expert Luwologist, he is well-known for his books and articles on the Luwian dialects of Anatolia and the wider Aegean. Among his books, mention should be made of ‘Luwian Hieroglyphic Monumental Rock and Stone Inscriptions from the Hittite Empire Period’ (2004) and ‘Selected Luwian Hieroglyphic Texts: The Extended Version’ (2011).

Table of Contents
Preface; 1. The Homeland of the Luwians; 2. Geography of Western Anatolia; 3. Origin of the Luwian Hieroglyphic Script; 4. Luwian Hieroglyphic Evidence on the Great Kingdom of Assuwa; 5. Western Anatolia under Hittite Rule; 6. Western Anatolia in the Final Stage of the Bronze Age; 7. Amenhotep III: Historical Background to his Aegean Policy; 8. The Arzawan Language; 9. The Language of the Trojans; 10. Evidence for an Old Indo-European Substrate in Western Anatolia; Bibliography
NEW: Verres incolores de L’antiquité romaine en Gaule et aux marges de la Gaule by Danièle Foy, Françoise Labaune-Jean, Caroline Leblond, Chantal Martin Pruvot, Marie-Thérèse Marty, Claire Massart, Claudine Munier, Laudine Robin and Janick Roussel-Ode. Two volume set; Paperback; 205x290mm; xliv+738 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 118 colour plates. French text with English abstract. (Print RRP £130.00). 348 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 42. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918972. £130.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918989. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £130.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Colourless glass became prominent between the middle of the 1st century AD and the beginning of the 4th century. This book reflects the diversity of glass and is designed as a practical manual divided into three parts: Assemblages, Typological Catalogue, Chemical Analyses.

The first presents contexts in which colourless glass has been found; the second, in the form of index cards, is a typological catalogue which gives an overall picture of the colourless glassware found throughout Gaul; glass is highly useful as a dating tool but also tells us much about the economic, social and cultural aspects of its time. Chemical analyses form the third component.

The volume of material gathered in this book makes it an indispensable working tool for researchers and students interested in the glassware of Roman antiquity.

A collective work by multiple scholars, this book results from an investigation initiated and mainly supported by the French Association for Glass Archaeology (Association française pour l’Archéologie du Verre) to which most of the authors belong as well as being attached to various research institutions.

Le verre incolore, volontairement décoloré au manganèse ou à l’antimoine, est celui qui est le plus souvent utilisé entre le milieu du Ier s. apr. J.-C. et le début du IVe s. Verres incolores de L’antiquité romaine en Gaule et aux marges de la Gaule rend compte de la diversité de ce mobilier (vaisselle, contenants et petits objets) est conçu comme un manuel pratique divisé en trois parties. La première présente des contextes renfermant du verre incolore ; la seconde, sous forme de fiches, est un catalogue typologique qui livre une image globale de la verrerie incolore découverte dans l’ensemble de la Gaule. Outil de datation, le verre nous informe aussi sur les aspects économiques, sociaux et culturels de son époque. Les analyses chimiques forment le troisième volet.

La masse documentaire réunie dans cet ouvrage en fait un instrument de travail indispensable aux chercheurs et étudiants qui s’intéressent au verre de l’Antiquité romaine.

Fruit d’un travail collectif, cet ouvrage résulte d’une enquête initiée et principalement supportée par l’Association française pour l’Archéologie du Verre (AFAV) à laquelle appartiennent la plupart des auteurs qui, par ailleurs, sont rattachés à divers organismes de recherche. L’AFAV qui publie régulièrement dans un bulletin les travaux de ses rencontres annuelles est également organisatrice de colloques internationaux et éditrice scientifique.
NEW: La ocupación cazadora-recolectora durante la transición Pleistoceno-Holoceno en el oeste de Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil: geoarqueología de los sitios en la formación sedimentaria Touro Passo by Viviane Pouey Vidal. Paperback; 203x276mm; xviii+238 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text (Print RRP £55.00). 57 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919139. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919146. Book contents pageDownload

This book presents the results obtained during geoarchaeological studies carried out in the locality of Touro Passo, municipality of Uruguaiana, Brazil. There, the Paleoindian sites studied by the team of the PRONAPA-National Archaeological Research Program in the 1960s and 1970s were relocated and others with excellent study potential have been recognized. The archaeological sites are located in the alluvial plains of the Uruguay River and the Touro Passo Stream and correspond to the late Pleistocene-early Holocene transition.

The geoarchaeological approach allowed the understanding of the stratigraphic sequence and the processes of formation and post-depositional disturbance of the archaeological sites in a fluvial environment. Archaeological excavations, soundings, stratigraphic profile surveys, sequence correlations and numerical dates were carried out. The dispersion of artifacts on the surface and cave erosion was recorded, and a lithic taphonomy study was carried out. Four Paleoindian sites located in the Touro Passo Formation were analyzed: Barranca Grande, RS-I-66: Milton Almeida, RS-I-69: Laranjito and Casualidade. The new chronologies obtained for the initial period of human occupation in the region represent a scientific advance for the study of hunter-gatherer occupations during the Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene in the triple border of Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay.

About the Author
Viviane Pouey Vidal has a PhD in Archaeology (Faculty of Social Sciences, UNICEN-National University of the Center of the Province of Buenos Aires-Olavarría). She is a researcher at the GEGAL - Group of Geoarchaeological Studies of Latin America. She was a PhD Fellow abroad by the CAPES - Coordination of Improvement of Higher Level Personnel. She acted as University teacher in the Interdisciplinary Degree Course in Human Sciences at UNIPAMPA - Federal University of Pampa, São Borja Campus / Rio Grande do Sul (2015/2017). She is a member of the Frontier Relations Research Group: History, Politics and Culture in the Triple Frontier Brazil and Uruguay (CNPq-Federal University of Pampa). She is the author of the PPC- Pedagogical Project of the Bachelor's Degree Course in Archaeology that aims to be implemented in the UNIPAMPA. She acts as a consultant in archaeological and patrimonial research in environmental licensing, with experience in Precolonial research and Patrimonial Education.

Spanish Description: Este libro presenta los resultados obtenidos durante los estudios geoarqueológicos realizados en la localidad Touro Passo, municipio de Uruguaiana, Brasil. Alli se reubicaron los sitios paleoindios estudiados por el equipo del PRONAPA-Programa Nacional de Investigaciones Arqueológicas en las décadas de 1960 y 1970 y han sido reconocidos otros con excelente potencial de estudio. Los sitios arqueológicos están situados en las planicies aluviales del Río Uruguay y del Arroyo Touro Passo y corresponden a la transición Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno temprano.

El enfoque geoarqueológico permitió la comprensión de la secuencia estratigráfica y los procesos de formación y perturbación postdepositacional de los sitios arqueológicos en ambiente fluvial. Fueron realizadas excavaciones arqueológicas, sondeos, relevamiento de perfiles-estratigráficos, correlaciones de secuencias y fechados numéricos. Se registró la dispersión de los artefactos en superficie y en las cárvavas de erosión, y se realizó, un estudio de tafonomía lítica. Se analizaron 4 sitios paleoindios situados en la Formación Touro Passo: Barranca Grande, RS-I-66:Milton Almeida, RS-I-69: Laranjito y Casualidade. Las nuevas cronologías obtenidas para el período inicial de ocupación humana en la región, representan un avance científico para el estudio de las ocupaciones cazadoras-recolectoras durante el Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno temprano en la triple frontera Brasil, Argentina y Uruguay.

Biografía da autora: Viviane P
NEW: La industria lítica bifacial del sitio en cantera Chipana-1 Conocimiento y técnica de los grupos humanos del Desierto de Atacama, norte de Chile al final del Pleistoceno by Katherine A. Herrera. Paperback; 203x276mm; viii+106 pages; 60 illustrations; 8 tables (55 colour plates). Spanish text with English Abstract (Print RRP £34.00). 55 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 51. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919115. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919122. Book contents pageDownload

The site of Chipana-1 is located in the middle of the Atacama Desert, in the Pampa del Tamarugal (PdT), 1200 m asl. The site is a good example of past societies adaptation to hyper-arid environments, and provides new insights into the early human occupations of South America. The well-preserved stratigraphic record, together with 13 radiocarbon dates, show that the site was occupied around 11,480 cal BP. Chipana-1 is a lithic raw-material extraction and workshop site, of a silicified rock of good quality, mainly related to the production of bifacial tools (façonnage), and to a lesser extent, of flakes (débitage) on surface. This is the first site in northern Chile that provides information on the first stages of lithic production, such as raw-material selection and reduction (dégrossissage). In addition, flakes resulting from façonnage (shaping method) suggest the local elaboration of large bifacial pieces that have not been recovered on site, indicating that part of the production was probably exported elsewhere, within and outside the borders of the PdT. Some smaller flakes also suggest a local production of “Tuina” type projectile points, a morphotype well-known in the regions south of the Atacama Desert. One can highlight the presence of flakes of allochthonous raw-materials, imported from other areas, which have been flaked at Chipana-1 in order to produce bifacial tools. Chipana-1 was an important location for Late Pleistocene hunter-gatherer groups, poorly known until now, for the gathering of raw-materials and lithic production in the Atacama Desert. The site was integrated within a broader network of mobility that we are just starting to discover.

Spanish description: El sitio Chipana-1, situado en pleno corazón del Desierto de Atacama en la Pampa del Tamarugal (PdT) a 1200 msnm, refleja la adaptación de antiguas sociedades humanas a un ambiente hiper-árido, y aporta nuevos datos al debate sobre las primeras ocupaciones humanas en América del Sur. La buena conservación estratigráfica y 13 dataciones 14C muestran que el sitio fué frecuentado alrededor de los 11.480 cal BP. Chipana-1 es un sitio de producción lítica esencialmente de façonnage (modelado) bifacial, con un mínimo de débitage (desbaste) de lascas, observables en la superficie de esta gran cantera-taller de roca sílicificada de buena calidad. Este tipo de sitio es inédito dentro del norte de Chile, debido a que permite observar las etapas iniciales de elaboración como la selección cualitativa de la materia prima y su preparación (dégrossissage). Además, lascas del façonnage indican la elaboración de grandes piezas bifaciales no encontradas en el sitio, probablemente fueron exportadas a otras áreas dentro y fuera de la PdT. Algunas lascas más pequeñas señalan la producción de una punta de proyectil tipo “Tuina”, conocida en tierras altas hacia el sur del Atacama. Destacamos también la presencia de lascas de façonnage bifacial de materias primas alóctonas, que fueron importadas a la cantera como productos ya trabajados en otros sitios. Así Chipana-1 fue, para grupos de cazadores recolectores aún desconocidos al final del Pleistoceno, un punto importante de adquisición de roca tallable y de producción lítica en el Desierto de Atacama, insertado en un circuito de movilidad que recién comenzamos a develar.
NEW: Navigation et installations lacustres dans les hautes terres du Mexique les cas mexica et tarasque by Alexandra Biar. Paperback; 203x276mm; xvi+292 pages; 217 illustrations; 33 tables (119 colour plates). French text with English summary and foreword (Print RRP £60.00). 54 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 50. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919092. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919108. Book contents pageDownload

In a cultural area where geography conspires against ease of exchange, Mesoamerican societies discovered technical answers adapted to their needs. At a time when the exchange of merchandise and goods relied mainly on human transport, some civilizations turned to a mystical aquatic environment: lakes. This research focuses on the practice of lake navigation and specific facilities that are associated with it. Due to the need for a wholistic approach, this research is situated in a multidisciplinary framework that combines archaeology, ethnology and ethnohistory. Its primary objective is to elaborate the framework of a new research field from the analytical and systematic study of a corpus of eclectic data, about the exploitation of water as a means of transport.

In Mesoamerica, the greatest concentration of lake systems lies in the Mexican highlands. However, only the Mexico and Pátzcuaro Basin were converted into real political economic and cultural centres, with the emergence of the Mexica Empire and Tarascan State in the Late Postclassic period (1350-1521). Why then do archaeologists, ethnologists and historians persist in ignoring the true importance of navigation in their study of the formation and organization of these two civilizations? To what extent can we extract, from the study of boats and lake installations, data that can open new research perspectives?

French description: Dans une aire culturelle où la géographie conspire contre la fluidité des échanges, les sociétés mésoaméricaines ont su trouver des réponses techniques adaptées à leurs besoins. À une époque où l’acheminement de marchandises et de biens s’effectue principalement à dos d’homme, certaines civilisations vont se tourner vers un milieu aquatique mythique : les lacs. Ce travail de recherche s’intéresse donc à la pratique de la navigation lacustre et aux installations spécifiques qui lui sont associées. De par la nécessité d’une approche transversale, ce sujet se positionne dans un cadre pluridisciplinaire, entremêlant archéologie, ethnohistoire et ethnologie. Son objectif premier est de délimiter le cadre d’un nouveau champ de recherche à partir d’une étude analytique et systématique d’un corpus de données éclectiques, autour de l’exploitation d’un mode de transport aquatique.

En Mésoamérique, c’est dans les hautes terres mexicaines que seuls les lacs des Bassins de Mexico et de Pátzcuaro ont été convertis en de véritables centres politiques, économiques et culturels à l’origine de l’émergence de l’Empire mexica et du Royaume tarasque à la période Postclassique (1350-1521). Pourquoi archéologues, historiens et ethnologues continuent donc d’ignorer la véritable importance de la navigation dans l’étude de la formation et de l’organisation de ces deux civilisations ? Dans quelle mesure les données que nous pourrons extraire de l’étude des embarcations et des installations lacustres peuvent-elles ouvrir de nouvelles perspectives de recherches ?
NEW: The Population of Tikal: Implications for Maya Demography by David Webster. Paperback; 203x276mm; vi+152 pages; 22 illustrations, 13 tables (Print edition RRP £34.00). 48 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 49. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918453. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918460. Book contents pageDownload

The Classic Maya (AD 250-900) of central and southern Yucatan were long seen as exceptional in many ways. We now know that they did not invent Mesoamerican writing or calendars, that they were just as warlike as other ancient peoples, that many innovations in art and architecture attributed to them had diverse origins, and that their celebrated “collapse” is not what it seems. One exceptionalist claim stubbornly persists: the Maya were canny tropical ecologists who managed their fragile tropical environments in ways that supported extremely large and dense populations and still guaranteed resilience and sustainability. Archaeologists commonly assert that Maya populations far exceeded those of other ancient civilizations in the Old and New Worlds. The great center of Tikal, Guatemala, has been central to our conceptions of Maya demography since the 1960s. Re-evaluation of Tikal’s original settlement data and its implications, supplemented by much new research there and elsewhere, allows a more modest and realistic demographic evaluation. The peak Classic population probably was on the order of 1,000,000 people. This population scale helps resolve debates about how the Maya made a living, the nature of their sociopolitical systems, how they created an impressive built environment, and places them in plausible comparative context with what we know about other ancient complex societies.

About the Author
DAVID WEBSTER received his doctoral degree in anthropology from the University of Minnesota in 1972. He originally intended to become a Near Eastern archaeologist, but he was deflected into Mesoamerican archaeology by the opportunity to work at the fortified site of Becan, Campeche, Mexico. This experience stimulated a long interest in warfare among the Classic Maya and other complex societies. His field work and research included projects in Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala, and heavily focused on settlement survey, household archaeology, demographic reconstruction, and human ecology. Webster joined the faculty of the Anthropology Department at Penn State University in 1972 and spent his career there until his retirement in 2014. He is now emeritus professor at Penn State, where he continues an active program of writing and research.

Table of Contents
Introduction; A Short History of Maya Demographic Estimates and their Implications; Comparative Demographic Estimates for Other Civilizations; University of Pennsylvania Tikal Project Population Estimates; The “Managed Forest” Model for the Lowland Maya: Implications for Tikal; Biases and Limitations of the Tikal Research and some Comparisons with Copan; How Many Maya Lived in the Central and Southern Lowlands during Late and Terminal Classic Times? ; Discussion and Conclusions; Appendix A: Population Density Calculations; Appendix B: The Big Stuff; Appendix C: Agricultural Intensification; Appendix D: Maya Food Shortfalls and Their Consequences; Appendix E: Agrarian Capital, Land Tenure, Inheritance, Entitlements, and Agency; Appendix F: Classic Maya Political Organization and Institutions; Appendix G: Malthus, Boserup, and the Maya References cited
NEW: Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 48 2018 Papers from the fifty-first meeting of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held at the British Museum, London, 4th to 6th August 2017 edited by Julian Jansen van Rensburg, Harry Munt, Tim Power, and Janet Starkey. ISSN 0308-8421. Paperback; 206x255mm; vi+374 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. PSAS48 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918774. £69.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918781. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £69.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies has come a long way since 1968 when it was first convened, yet it remains the principal international academic forum for research on the Arabian Peninsula. This is clearly reflected in the ever-increasing number of researchers from all over the world who come each year to the three-day Seminar to present and discuss their latest research and fieldwork.

The Seminar has covered, and continues to cover, an extensive range of diverse subjects that include anthropology, archaeology, architecture, art, epigraphy, ethnography, history, language, linguistics, literature, numismatics, theology, and more, from the earliest times to the present day or, in the fields of political and social history, to around the end of the Ottoman Empire (1922/1923).

Papers presented at the Seminar have all been subjected to an intensive review process before they are accepted for publication in the Proceedings. The rigorous nature of the reviews undertaken by a range of specialists ensures that the highest academic standards are maintained.

A supplementary volume, ‘Languages, scripts and their uses in ancient North Arabia’ edited by M.C.A. Macdonald (ISBN 9781784918996, Archaeopress, 2018), is also available containing the proceedings from the special session held during the seminar on 5 August 2017.
NEW: Languages, scripts and their uses in ancient North Arabia Papers from the Special Session of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held on 5 August 2017: Supplement to the Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 48 2018 edited by M.C.A. Macdonald. Paperback; 206x255mm; vi+122 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. PSAS. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918996. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919009. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seminar for Arabian Studies has come a long way since 1968 when it was first convened, yet it remains the principal international academic forum for research on the Arabian Peninsula. This is clearly reflected in the ever-increasing number of researchers from all over the world who come each year to the three-day Seminar to present and discuss their latest research and fieldwork.

Most of the papers published in this volume were presented at a Special Session of the fifty-first Seminar for Arabian Studies, held at the British Museum on 5 August 2017. Its subject was ‘Languages, scripts, and their uses in ancient North Arabia’ and it was held to celebrate the completion in the previous March of Phase 2 of the ‘Online Corpus of the Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia’ (OCIANA).
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NEW: ARAMAZD Subscriptions and Back-Issues Armenian Journal of Near Eastern Studies (AJNES) edited by Aram Kosyan (Editor–in–Chief). One volume published annually in 1-2 issues. 11 2017. ISBN 1829-1376-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

Established in 2006 by the Association for Near Eastern and Caucasian Studies in corporation with Institute of Oriental Studies and Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (National Academy of Sciences of Armenia) AJNES is the only periodical in the Republic of Armenia devoted exclusively to the investigation of ancient and medieval cultures of the Near East and the Caucasus. Articles appearing in its pages are contributions of scholars of international reputation in history, archaeology, philology, art, religion and science.

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NEW: Ash-Sharq Subscriptions and Back-Issues Bulletin of the Ancient Near East: Archaeological, Historical and Societal Studies edited by Laura Battini (editor-in-chief). One volume published annually in 2 issues.ISBN 2513-8529-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

Ash-sharq is a journal devoted to short articles on the archaeology, history and society of the Ancient Near East. It is published twice a year. The editorial board is headed by Laura Battini (Paris, UMR 7192-Collège de France, France).

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NEW: EX NOVO: Journal of Archaeology: Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually edited by Maja Gori and Paolo Fallai (editors-in-chief). ISBN 2531-8810-HOME. Book contents pageBuy Now

Ex Novo is a fully peer reviewed open access international journal that promotes interdisciplinary research focusing on the multiple relations between archaeology and society. It engages with contemporary perspectives on antiquity linking past and present, and encourages archaeology’s engagement with theoretical developments from other related disciplines such as history, anthropology, political sciences, philosophy, social sciences and colonial studies. Ex Novo encompasses prehistory to modern period, and by exploring interconnections between archaeological practice and the importance of the past in current society it encourages an exploration of current theoretical, political and heritage issues connected to the discipline. Areas and topics of interest include: politics and archaeology, public archaeology, the legacies of colonialism and nationalism within the discipline, the articulation between local and global archaeological traditions, the discipline’s involvement in memory and identity, museum studies and restitution issues. Ex Novo encourages dialogue between disciplines concerned with the past and its relevance, uses and interpretations in the present. the Editors in Chief are Maja Gori (University of Heidelberg) and Paolo Fallai (Corriere della Sera). For further information including submission guideance please visit the Ex Novo homepage.

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Ex Novo Volume 1, 2016: The Impact of the Fall of Communism on European Heritage Proceedings of the 20th EAA Meeting held in Istanbul 10–14 September 2014
Ex Novo Volume 2, 2017: Who Owns the Past? Archaeological Heritage between Idealism and Destruction