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NEW: The Geography of Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the Second International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 22nd-23rd March, 2018 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789691863. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 plates in colour). (Print RRP £38.00). 533 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691863. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691870. Book contents pageDownload

Gandhāran art is usually regarded as a single phenomenon – a unified regional artistic tradition or ‘school’. Indeed it has distinctive visual characteristics, materials, and functions, and is characterized by its extensive borrowings from the Graeco-Roman world. Yet this tradition is also highly varied. Even the superficial homogeneity of Gandhāran sculpture, which constitutes the bulk of documented artistic material from this region in the early centuries AD, belies a considerable range of styles, technical approaches, iconographic choices, and levels of artistic skill.

The geographical variations in Gandhāran art have received less attention than they deserve. Many surviving Gandhāran artefacts are unprovenanced and the difficulty of tracing substantial assemblages of sculpture to particular sites has obscured the fine-grained picture of its artistic geography. Well documented modern excavations at particular sites and areas, such as the projects of the Italian Archaeological Mission in the Swat Valley, have demonstrated the value of looking at sculptures in context and considering distinctive aspects of their production, use, and reuse within a specific locality. However, insights of this kind have been harder to gain for other areas, including the Gandhāran heartland of the Peshawar basin. Even where large collections of artworks can be related to individual sites, the exercise of comparing material within and between these places is still at an early stage. The relationship between the Gandhāran artists or ‘workshops’, particular stone sources, and specific sites is still unclear.

Addressing these and other questions, this second volume of the Gandhāra Connections project at Oxford University’s Classical Art Research Centre presents the proceedings of a workshop held in March 2018. Its aim is to pick apart the regional geography of Gandhāran art, presenting new discoveries at particular sites, textual evidence, and the challenges and opportunities of exploring Gandhāra’s artistic geography.

About the Editors
WANNAPORN RIENJANG is Project Assistant of the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. She completed her doctoral degree in Archaeology at the University of Cambridge on Buddhist relic cult in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Before starting her PhD, she worked as a research assistant for the Masson Project at the Department of Coins and Medals, the British Museum. Her research interests include the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Buddhist studies, and working technologies of stone containers and beads.

PETER STEWART is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran art and Roman sculpture.
Human Mobility in Archaeology: Practices, Representations and Meanings Ex Novo: Journal of Archaeology, Volume 3, 2018 edited by Maja Gori, Martina Revello Lami and Alessandro Pintucci. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691214. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload

It has been abundantly demonstrated that theories and paradigms in the humanities are influenced by historical, economic and socio-cultural conditions, which have profoundly influenced archaeology’s representation of migration. This was mostly conceived as the study of the movement of large and homogenous population groups, whose identity was often represented as ethnically characterized. The present-day shift of attention from collective to individual agency and the countless facets of migration goes hand in hand with new socio-political and cultural scenarios such as the extraordinary migratory flows into Europe, shifting boundaries, alternative forms of citizenship and identity, and the emergence of emotive reactionism.

The third issue of Ex Novo gathers multidisciplinary contributions addressing mobility to understand patterns of change and continuity in past worlds; reconsider the movement of people, objects, and ideas alongside mobile epistemologies, such as intellectual, scholarly or educative traditions, rituals, practices, religions and theologies; and provide insights into the multifaceted relationship between mobile practices and their shared meanings and how they are represented socially and politically.

Table of Contents
Maja GORI, Martina REVELLO LAMI & Alessandro PINTUCCI
Editorial: Practices, Representations and Meanings of Human Mobility in Archaeology

Paraskevi ELEFANTI & Gilbert MARSHALL
Mobility during the Upper Palaeolithic Greece: Some Suggestions for the Argolid Peninsula

Maurizio CRUDO
Greek Migrations along the Ionian Coast (Southern Italy)

Anna RAUDINO
Variation in Material Culture: Adoption of Greek Ceramics in an Indigenous Sicilian Site (8th century BC)

Maria ÁLVAREZ-FOLGADO
The Jewish Diaspora in the Roman Empire. Diaspora, Social Agents and Social Networks: Towards the Creation of a New Analytical Toolkit

Domiziana ROSSI
A Road to Fīrūzābād

Marijn STOLK
Exploring Immigrant Identities: The Link between Portuguese Ceramics and Sephardic Immigrants in 17th Century Amsterdam

Jesùs GARCÍA SANCHEZ
From War Material Culture to Popular Heritage, and Beyond. The PSP “Cancelli di Venosa” as paradigms of Object Biography Theory.

Reviews
A. Falcone & A. D’Eredità (eds.) ARCHEOSOCIAL L’Archeologia Riscrive il Web: Esperienze, Strategie e Buone Pratiche, Rende (CS): Dielle Editore, 2018, 195 pp. Reviewed by Paola DI GIUSEPPANTONIO DI FRANCO
The Roman Pottery Manufacturing Site in Highgate Wood: Excavations 1966-78 by A E Brown and H L Sheldon. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+392 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (70 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 456 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 43. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919788. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919795. Book contents pageDownload

Excavations over a period of eight years uncovered at least ten pottery kilns, waster heaps, ditches and pits, but only a few definite structures. The pottery from the site indicates a period of operation extending from the first half of the 1st century AD to the later 2nd century. The pottery made at the site included initially a vegetable tempered handmade ware, but subsequently the bulk of it consisted of a grog tempered ware and then pottery in a sandy fabric which is well known from assemblages in London. The type of kiln varied with the pottery fabric; there was possible evidence for a pre-Roman pit firing, and later kilns set in ditches were of the twin flued type, eventually replaced by the more familiar above ground kilns with raised floors. Changes in pottery fabric were reflected in different methods of clay preparation, which led to changes in the function of the various ditches, the stratigraphy of which, along with the variation in the fabrics, was significant in enabling the four broad phases into which the site has been divided, to be proposed.

The report includes a very detailed analysis of the forms and fabrics of the pottery made at Highgate. Finds of prehistoric flintwork and pottery during the excavation, and of material of later date, together with the observation of earthworks and historical research, have been used to show the place of the pottery kilns as an element in the exploitation of the woodland of northern London over the last eight thousand years.

In addition to the full eBook being available as a free download in Open Access (click 'Download (pdf)' further down this page), these web pages take the published pottery illustrations, but rearrange them by their typological category rather than their archaeological context. This allows the full spectrum of Highgate pottery forms across all phases of the site to be compared, and parallels for vessels of possible Highgate origin from domestic sites can be identified.


About the Authors
TONY BROWN was a member of the academic staff of the University of Leicester for over thirty years, moving there in 1964 as an Assistant Staff Tutor (Organising Tutor for Leicestershire). In 1966 he became Organising Tutor for Northamptonshire and in 1968 Staff Tutor in Archaeology. From 1990 he held a joint appointment with the School of Archaeological Studies, retiring in 2001 as an Emeritus Reader.
SOMA 2015: Time, Space and People Proceedings of the 19th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology edited by Murat Arslan. iv+190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (69 colour plates). 49 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918514. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918521. Book contents pageDownload

The 19th annual meeting of the Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology (SOMA) was held in Kemer/Antalya (Turkey) from the 12th to the 14th of November, 2015. As has been the case in the past, this symposium continues to provide an important opportunity for scholars and researchers to come together and discuss their academic studies in a friendly and supportive atmosphere. The proceedings of SOMA 2015 contain eighteen interdisciplinary articles on themes from underwater archaeology to history, archaeometry and art history, and chronologically, the subjects of these articles range from the Bronze Age to the 20th century.

About the Editor
Murat Arslan is the editor of SOMA 2015. He is professor of Ancient History at Akdeniz University in Antalya (Turkey). He is interested in Ancient Greek and Ancient History, especially the Classical and Hellenistic periods, and historiography. In addition to his monographs (Galatians, Mithradates VI Eupator, Classical and Hellenistic History of Byzantion), his translations and commentaries on periplus (Arrianus, Ps. Scylax), and Memnon of Heracleia Pontica, he is the current editor in chief of several international journals (Cedrus, MJH, Phaselis, Libri).
Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla by Mario Ramírez Galán. 434 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (145 colour plates). Spanish text. 39 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917098. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917104. Book contents pageDownload

Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla is a project that aims to encompass all aspects of battlefield archaeology, in order to be a reference work in this study area. Therefore, a detailed historiographical study about this branch of archaeology has been made, from early origins until the present day, allowing us to gain a deeper understanding of the evolution of battlefield archaeology. Two methodologies, archaeological and museographical, are proposed for the treatment of this particular type of archaeological site. In order to prove the viability of both methodologies, a theoretical application has been carried out in two research examples from different periods, demonstrating both the project’s methodological validity and reinforcing our theories.

Two registers were made regarding battlefields - one historical and another archaeological. The purpose of this was to catalogue all possible existing sites in the interior of the Iberian Peninsula from Roman times through to the Spanish Civil War, which will hopefully serve as a point of reference for future researchers. Through this book, people will be able to understand the great potential of Spanish battlefields and their heritage. Furthermore, Spain could be regarded as a very important country regarding battlefield archaeology.

Spanish Description:
Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla es un trabajo que recoge todos los aspectos referentes a la arqueología de campos de batalla, con el objetivo de ser una obra de referencia en esta área de estudio. En ella se ha llevado a cabo un estudio historiográfico pormenorizado de esta rama de la arqueología, remontándose hasta los orígenes de la misma, permitiendo comprender su evolución hasta nuestros días. Se han planteado dos propuestas metodológicas, arqueológica y museográfica, para el tratamiento de esta tipología de yacimiento. Para comprobar la viabilidad de ambas metodologías se realizó una aplicación teórica en dos casos de estudio de distinta época, lo que nos permitió ver su validez y reforzar nuestras teorías.

Para esta obra elaboramos dos registros de campos de batalla, uno de tipo histórico y otro de tipo arqueológico, con el objetivo de catalogar todos los posibles yacimientos existentes en interior peninsular desde la época romana hasta la Guerra Civil, sirviendo así de punto de partida para futuros investigadores. A través de este libro se puede comprobar el gran potencial que posee España en campos de batalla y que podría situarse entre los países más destacados.
SOMA 2014. Proceedings of the 18th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology Wrocław – Poland, 24-26 April 2014 edited by Blazej Stanislawski and Hakan Öniz. viii+192 pages; illustrated throughout with 35 plates in colour. 31 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784914943. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914950. Book contents pageDownload

The 18th annual meeting of the Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology (SOMA) was held in Wrocław-Poland, 24th to 26th April 2014.

Since prehistoric times the Mediterranean has acted as a stage for intense interactions between groups inhabiting regions that are now studied mainly within various sub-fields of ancient studies. In recent years, however, the development of research techniques and analytical models of archaeological evidence have identified similar historical paths that are similar, if not, in some cases, common to these disparate areas of the ancient world from West (Iberian peninsula) to East (Anatolia and Levant), from North (Europe, Black Sea Coast) to South (Maghreb and Egypt).

The 18th SOMA provided a forum for presentations related to the above-mentioned topics, as well as general themes such as the role of the sea, trade, colonization, even piracy, using archaeological data collected within contexts associated with the Mediterranean Basin and the area referred to as the Ancient Near East, ranging chronologically from the Prehistoric to Medieval periods. This current volume contains 22 papers selected from the 90 presented.

Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times Η ΜΕΓΑΛΗ ΡΟΔΙΑΚΗ ΠΛΑΣΤΙΚΗ ΤΩΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΣΤΙΚΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΡΩΜΑΪΚΩΝ ΧΡΟΝΩΝ by Kalliope Bairami. xviii+864 pages; 222 plates, 23 in colour. Greek text with 19 page English summary. 25 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915766. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915773. Book contents pageDownload

The Hellenistic society of the Rhodian metropolis, a naval aristocracy (Gabrielsen), dedicated bronze statues of their members in the sanctuaries and public buildings and used marble and -occasionally-lartios lithos to carve portrait-statues originally for funerary use and in a later period also for honorific purposes, figures of deities and decorative sculpture for the houses and the parks. The artists, local and itinerant, from Athens, the islands and the Asia Minor, established artistic workshops on Rhodes, some of them active for three centuries and for more than one generation. The impact of Rhodian art is evident on the islands of the Aegean and the cities of Asia Minor, due to the expansion of the Rhodian Peraia. Together with Pergamon, Rhodes emerges as a productive artistic centre of the Hellenistic era, creating statuary types and combining them with landscape elements. The radiance of its art is evident in the late Hellenistic period in Rome, the new capital of the world, where the Rhodian artists create mythological statuary groups set in grottoes.

This volume presents the large-scale Rhodian sculpture of the Hellenistic and Roman period through the publication of sixty unpublished sculptures of life size or larger than life size, together with forty-five sculptures already published. The sculptures are grouped according to their statuary type (gods, mortals and portraits), while those unable to be firmly identified due to their fragmentary condition are grouped under the category ‘uncertain identification’. The presentation of the sculptures is further supplemented by a technical description and an analysis of stylistic characteristics according to chronological development. Excavation data, wherever available, are also provided.

This book is also available to buy in paperback priced £80.00.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Note for downloading: PDF displays best in Chrome. For best results right-click 'Download (pdf)' below and use the option 'Save link as...' to save a local copy to your computer/device. Please ensure file has finished downloading before opening and be sure to use desktop PDF reading software rather than browser-based software, otherwise file may appear corrupted.
Statio amoena Sostare e vivere lungo le strade romane edited by Patrizia Basso and Enrico Zanini. viii+264 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. All papers in Italian with English abstracts. 295 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784914981. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914998. Book contents pageDownload

The Roman road system was the main service infrastructure for administrative management, economic operation and defense of the empire.

Along with roads, a key element of this infrastructure were the resting places more or less directly linked with vehiculatio / cursus publicus, or with a system run or controlled by the state to ensure essential services (safe stop, supplies, maintenance of horses and other animals) to those traveling on behalf of the public administration.

New archaeological research and new studies on a rich and diverse body of extra-archaeological sources have recently reported the attention of the international scientific community on the subject of parking places, within the more general theme of the smaller settlements in the Roman world and their evolution in late antiquity and early medieval times.

This volume brings together contributions from scholars from three different generations, starting from different sources and methodological approaches, converging towards the construction of an area of common reflection on a theme still relatively underdeveloped. The goal is to lay the foundation for a deepening of the interdisciplinary debate and to develop new research projects.

Italian description:
Il sistema stradale romano rappresentava la principale infrastruttura di servizio per la gestione amministrativa, il funzionamento economico e la difesa dell’impero.

Insieme con le strade, elemento fondamentale di questa infrastruttura erano i luoghi di sosta più o meno direttamente legati con la vehiculatio/cursus publicus, ovvero con il sistema gestito o controllato dallo stato per assicurare i servizi indispensabili (sosta sicura, rifornimenti, cambio dei cavalli, manutenzione di animali e mezzi) a chi viaggiava per conto della pubblica amministrazione.

Nuove ricerche archeologiche e nuovi studi su un ricco e variegato corpus di fonti extra-archeologiche hanno recentemente riportato l’attenzione della comunità scientifica internazionale sul tema dei luoghi di sosta, all’interno della tematica più generale degli insediamenti minori nel mondo romano e della loro evoluzione in epoca tardoantica e altomedievale.

Questo volume raccoglie contributi di studiosi di tre diverse generazioni che, partendo da sistemi di fonti e da approcci metodologici differenti, convergono verso la costruzione di un terreno di riflessione comune su un tema ancora relativamente poco frequentato. L’obiettivo è quello di gettare le basi per un approfondimento del dibattito interdisciplinare e per lo sviluppo di nuovi progetti di ricerca, più organici e specificamente mirati.
Archeologia dell’acqua a Gortina di Creta in età protobizantina by Elisabetta Giorgi. x+288 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English abstracts for each chapter. 21 2016 Limina/Limites: Archaeologies, histories, islands and borders in the Mediterranean (365-1556) 5. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784914448. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914455. Book contents pageDownload

Ancient aqueducts have long commanded the attention of archaeologists, both for their intrinsic, monumental importance and for their significance as infrastructures closely related to the concept of civilisation. An aqueduct, in fact, is an artefact that has a great potential for providing information concerning at least two major aspects of ancient society: those relating to structural, technical, and engineering matters, and those relating to building and construction technology. These topics have enjoyed considerable attention in past studies, and in recent years they have also been integrated with a multi-disciplinary and contextual approach. They have further increased the potential of the analysis of ancient hydraulic systems, turning them into historical subjects capable of expanding our knowledge of the urban and social transformation of ancient cities and their territories.

The current study of the early Byzantine aqueduct of Gortyn (Crete) follows this tradition, but starts from a viewpoint related not so much to the aqueduct itself, as to a series of questions about the city: what was the appearance of Gortyn in the early Byzantine era? How did the inhabitants live? Where did they live and what did they do for living?

The aqueduct was born with the Roman city and accompanied it for its entire lifetime, constituting the backbone around which the various forms of urban settlement were redrawn at each major historical stage. Its vital link with everyday life makes the aqueduct a key witness for the study of the transformations of the city over the long term.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Palmyra, 30 Years of Syro-German/Austrian Archaeological Research (Homs) Taken from A History of Syria in One Hundred Sites by Andreas Schmidt-Colinet, Khaled al-As‘ad and Waleed al-As‘ad. Pages 339-348.Download

The temple- or house-like tomb no. 36 is situated in the centre of so-called ‘Valley of the Tombs’. With about 18m length from edge to edge and about 300 graves (loculi), it is the largest representative of this palace-like type of tombs at Palmyra. The architectural decoration of the building allows a dating to about 210 to 230 AD. Furthermore the tomb can be attributed probably to the family of the famous Iulius Septimius Aurelius Vorodes. The documentation of the more than 700 fallen blocks of the ruin enables us to draw an exact reconstruction of the building. The architecture documents a fusion of different traditions as well as the grandiose will of the buildings commissioner: The palace-like facade of the entrance contrasts with the square, two-storey and uncovered peristyle courtyard in the centre of the structure. Design and metrology of the building reveal at every point Roman principles of design, brought into line with oriental taste. The themes and the stylistic evidence of the architectural sculpture prove close relations with foreign sarcophagi workshops on the Syrian coast and their connections to Roman art: Dionysos-Baalshamin sitting in the vineyards, nereids and erotes riding on dolphins, seamonsters holding a shell between them, victories,winged Medusas, tragic masks. On the other hand, the exceptionally rich architectural decoration of highest quality was worked out by local workshops and enables us to reconstruct pattern books which partly can be traced back to native textile patterns. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Off the Beaten Track. Epigraphy at the Borders Proceedings of 6th EAGLE International Event (24-25 September 2015, Bari, Italy) edited by Antonio E. Felle and Anita Rocco. vi+154 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 222 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913229. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913236. Book contents pageDownload

This volume contains the papers presented during the Meeting ‘Off the Beaten Track – Epigraphy at the Borders’, the sixth in a series of international events planned by the EAGLE, Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy international consortium.

The Meeting was held on 24–25 September 2015, with the support of the Department of Classics and Late Antiquity Studies at the University of Bari Aldo Moro (Italy).

During the event, the EAGLE Portal (http://www.eagle-network.eu) was officially launched and presented to the public for the first time. The event was intended to address the issues which arise in digitizing inscriptions characterised by ‘unusual’ features in comparison with the epigraphic norm. Here are collected contributions from several ongoing digital projects raising questions and proposing solutions regarding encoding inscriptions – from the Archaic period to the Middle Ages and beyond, even in languages other than Greek and Latin – which do not fall within those labelled as standard.

The projects involved are the following: ILA – Iscrizioni Latine Arcaiche; The Ancient Graffiti Project; DASI – Digital Archive for the Study of pre-Islamic Arabian Inscriptions; EDB – Epigraphic Database Bari; EDV – Epigraphic Database Vernacular Inscriptions; AshLi – Ashmolean Latin Inscriptions Project.

Reviews:

'...the projects presented in the volume, though very diverse in terms of chronology, geography and focus, share numerous challenges. Some of them are still works in progress and have not yet been launched, others already have a long web presence but nonetheless need to overcome new encoding hurdles. Precisely because of this, the volume will be of interest to digital epigraphists everywhere, also outside the beaten tracks of the Graeco Latin world.' – Ortal-Paz Saar, Utrecht University (Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 2016 View online.)
The discovery of the fountain of Anna Perenna and its influence on the study of ancient magic Taken from The Wisdom of Thoth (ed. Bąkowska-Czerner/Roccati/Świerzowska) by Marina Piranomonte. Pages 71-85.Download

Anna Perenna was an ancient Roman goddess who had a festival ‘via Flaminia ad lapidem primum’, on the Ides of March, the primitive Roman New Year’s Eve, according to the Vatican, Antiates and Farnese Fasti (Fasti Vat., CIL XII, 342; Fasti Ant., Fasti Farn., CIL XII, 311). She was widely mentioned by Ovid and Silius Italicus and, as Macrobius recalls in the Satires, on the 15th of March ‘et publice et privatim ad Annam Perennam sacrificatum itur, ut annare perennareque commode liceat’ (Ov., Fasti, 3, 523–696; Sil. It., Pun., 8, 49–201; Macr., Satyr., 1, 12). Plinius Senior and Martial mention Anna but only Ovid in his Fasti describes the festival of the Idus of March (Plin., Nat. Hist, 35, 94; Mart., 4, 64, 17). The feast had a licentious nature and was held in an area not far from the Tiber banks. During the celebrations abundant wine libations were poured and the couples lay down on the grass making love. There were songs, mime performances and women dancing with their hair loose during all the festival.

More than two thousand years later in 1999 CE, the myth of the goddess became truth, with the discovery of the fountain of Anna Perenna in Rome in the modern quarter of Parioli. It can definitely be considered one of the most important new findings of religion of the ancient world for the concentration of materials related to the cult of the goddess and to magic for the presence of some professional sorcerers working at the fountain during the late Roman Empire. The recent studies about these materials, especially the deciphering of more than 24 defixiones and magical texts, the presence of different gods on the boxes and the voodoo dolls found inside the containers, made this finding the most important magical excavation of recent time and help the scholars to better analyse old and most famous findings.

This paper was originally published in The Wisdom of Thoth: Magical Texts in Ancient Mediterranean Civilisations edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner, Alessandro Roccati and Agata Świerzowska (Archaeopress, 2016) available in paperback and e-PDF here.
The Roman Necropolis of Algarve (Portugal) About the Spaces of Death in the South of Lusitania by Carlos Pereira. iv+21 pages; 8 plates, 6 in colour.ISBN 9781784912277. Download

We intend to disclose some of the results of the analysis of the spaces of death from Roman times that were excavated in Algarve for over a century. The conclusions obtained do not fit, as it is understandable, in a summary article on the topic. However, it is important to disclose some that denounce the status and religion of the people who inhabited the South of the Roman province of Lusitania.

We have particularly emphasised the problems related to the transition from the cremation rite to the rite of inhumation of the corpse and the possible visibility of the first signs of Christianity in the tombs of these necropoleis. Arguments that favour and refute either situation were weighed, which cannot be fully expressed here, but are better exposed in the doctoral thesis of the author.
The Barracks of the Roman Army from the 1st to 3rd Centuries A.D. A comparative study of the barracks from fortresses, forts and fortlets with an analysis of building types and construction, stabling and garrisons by David P. Davison. 940 pages.ISBN 9781784912246. Download

A comparative study of the barracks from fortresses, forts and fortlets with an analysis of building types and construction, stabling and garrisons. Originally published in 1989.
Roman Barrows by Velika Gorica, Croatia, and Pannonian Glazed and Samian Pottery Production by Rajka Makjanić and Remza Koščević. Download

Description of Roman Barrows from the first and second centuries AD excavated in the 1980s in the forest of Turopoljski Lug near Velika Gorica (Zagreb), Croatia. Special attention is given to a luxurious lead-glazed relief bowl found on the funeral pyre of Barrow V, probably from a local Pannonian workshop, with decoration inspired by western Samian ware.
Terra Sigillata / Samian Ware found in Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) now at the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb by Rajka Makjanić. Download

Publication of Samian ware from the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb, found in Roman Siscia. The assemblage includes Italian, Gaulish, African, Pannonian, Moesian and other pottery. It also incorporates a study on some types of North Italian Sigillata and their distribution in Pannonia. First published in 1995.
A note on the development of Cypriot Late Roman D forms 2 and 9 Taken from LRFW 1. Late Roman Fine Wares. Solving problems of typology and chronology. A review of the evidence, debate and new contexts by Paul Reynolds. 57-65.Download

The development and evolution of LRD 2 into LRD 9 through the 5th to 7th centuries is traced and illustrated through a revision of the evidence presented in Late Roman Pottery (Hayes 1972) and finds from new contexts excavated in Beirut.

This paper is taken from LRFW 1. Late Roman Fine Wares. Solving problems of typology and chronology. A review of the evidence, debate and new contexts edited by Miguel Ángel Cau, Paul Reynolds and Michel Bonifay, Archaeopress 2012. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
An initiative for the revision of late Roman fine wares in the Mediterranean (c. AD 200-700): The Barcelona ICREA/ESF Workshop Taken from LRFW 1. Late Roman Fine Wares. Solving problems of typology and chronology. A review of the evidence, debate and new contexts by Miguel Ángel Cau, Paul Reynolds and Michel Bonifay. 1-13.Download

This paper summarises both the evolution and the results of the Barcelona ICREA/ESF workshop on late Roman fine wares. A brief guide to what we agreed were the principal Mediterranean contexts for the dating of fine wares, as well as a summary of the principal conclusions on the dating and sources of ARS, LRC and LRD forms are presented. Plans for the publication of the workshop and its results, as well as future collaborative projects are outlined.

This paper is taken from LRFW 1. Late Roman Fine Wares. Solving problems of typology and chronology. A review of the evidence, debate and new contexts edited by Miguel Ángel Cau, Paul Reynolds and Michel Bonifay, Archaeopress 2012. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Sigillatas africanas y orientales de mediados del VI d. C. procedentes de los rellenos de colmatación de una cisterna de Hispalis (Sevilla) Los contextos de la Plaza de la Pescadería Taken from LRFW 1. Late Roman Fine Wares. Solving problems of typology and chronology. A review of the evidence, debate and new contexts by Jacobo Vázquez Paz and Enrique García Vargas. Download

The public works carried out on the road network of Seville (Spain) uncovered a structural complex of Roman date for the storage and redistribution of water. According to some authors, this complex can be identified with the city’s castellum aquae. The pottery contained in the fill of the eastern vault of the cistern, the only one excavated so far, provides a guide to the range of fine wares in the city of Hispalis during the first half of the 6th century.

This paper is taken from LRFW 1. Late Roman Fine Wares. Solving problems of typology and chronology. A review of the evidence, debate and new contexts edited by Miguel Ángel Cau, Paul Reynolds and Michel Bonifay, Archaeopress 2012. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Iron Age and Roman Italy Chapter 16 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Zena Kamash, Lucy Shipley, Yannis Galanakis and Stella Skaltsa. 336-357.Download

The Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM) holds c. 346 artefacts from Italy that are recorded as Iron Age or Roman in date. A further c. 302 artefacts are listed as ‘Roman’, but with no country of provenance. This chapter therefore presents a characterization of c. 648 artefacts, complementing the discussions of Iron Age and Roman material in the chapters on Egypt (Chapter 7), Europe (Chapter 11), the Aegean and Cyprus (Chapter 15), the Levant (Chapter 22) and South-West Asia (Chapter 23). After setting this collection in its geographic and temporal context (16.2), this chapter presents an overview of the collectors represented by the Iron Age and Roman Italian collections (16.3), with reference to the PRM founding collection (16.3.1), and the material collected by John Wickham Flower (16.3.2), Henry Balfour (16.3.3), Robert William Theodore Gunther (16.3.4), Anthony John Arkell (16.3.5), Walter Leo Hildburgh (16.3.6), and other collectors (16.3.7). The collections from Iron Age Italy are considered in section 16.4 by Lucy Shipley, Yannis Galanakis and Stella Skaltsa, with reference to the Etruscan collections (16.4.1) and the other Iron Age material from Italy (16.4.2). Collections from Roman Italy and unprovenanced Roman objects are considered by Zena Kamash in section 16.5, and brief conclusions are drawn in section 16.6.
Later Prehistoric and Roman Europe Chapter 11 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Joshua Pollard and Dan Hicks. 240-261.Download

This chapter considers the collections of European later prehistoric and Romano-British material held by the Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM). The term ‘later prehistoric’ is used here to refer to the Mesolithic, Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age: c. 10,000 BCE–c. 500 CE. The term ‘Roman’ is used to refer to those areas of Europe which fell within the Roman Empire between the 1st century BCE and the 5th century CE – i.e. from 43 CE for Romano-British period – while the ‘Iron Age’ is understood to have continued into the 5th century CE beyond the limits of the Roman Empire, for example in Scotland, Wales and Ireland. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
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