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NEW: A Latin Lexicon: An Illustrated Compendium of Latin Words and English Derivatives by Caroline K. Mackenzie. Illustrations by Amanda Short. Hardback; 156x234mm; 142 pages; colour design throughout, 20 full-colour illustrations. 677 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697629. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697636. £19.99 (Exc. VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A charming compendium of Latin words and English derivatives, encompassing over 365 words required for Latin GCSE, one for each day of the year. Each Latin entry is accompanied by key notes on grammar, translations and some playful and memorable derivatives. A concise introduction and a glossary of Latin in common usage combine to make this a vade-mecum (essential companion) for all learners of Latin as well as cruciverbalists. The text is imaginatively punctuated by 20 full-colour illustrations by Amanda Short.

About the Author
Caroline K. Mackenzie read classics at Pembroke College, Cambridge. After a legal career in London, she became Head of Classics at a school in Sevenoaks. In 2018 Caroline was awarded distinction in an MA in Classical Art and Archaeology at King’s College London. Caroline offers online private tutoring in Latin and Greek and runs online Classical reading groups for all ages and abilities. Caroline’s first book, Culture and Society at Lullingstone Roman Villa was published by Archaeopress in 2019.

Praise for This Volume:
Carpe verba! (Grasp the words!) A hugely fun and useful tool for Latin learners. I wish I’d had this book when I was learning Latin.’ – Caroline Lawrence, author of The Roman Mysteries. ;

‘The narrator of a recent French historical novel muses: 'My whole life I owe to Greek. If I hadn't known how to conjugate the aorist, where to put the stresses, how to recite -mi verbs, I would never have been able to escape my menial little existence. Declensions proved to be the instrument of my ascent'. Pari passu and mutatis mutandis, that surely is what every reader will say after reading, marking and inwardly digesting Caroline Mackenzie's brilliant Latin Compendium.’ – Professor Paul Cartledge, University of Cambridge. ;

‘A handsome and lively introduction to Latin through its core vocabulary and derivatives. Everyone should have a copy.’ – Dr Daisy Dunn, author of In the Shadow of Vesuvius. ;

‘This delightful, illustrated book will serve two purposes: the straightforward English derivatives will help students remember their Latin vocabulary, and the recondite ones will give a head start for the Scrabble board or cryptic crossword.’ – Dr John Taylor, author of Essential GCSE Latin. ;

‘Latin can be fun, who knew? A real must for anyone learning Latin or interested in language. I genuinely LOVE this book. It is a fantastic idea and looks absolutely beautiful.’ – Celia Rees, author and former English teacher. ;

‘Elegantly presented, entertaining, and educational.’ – Ruth Downie, author. ;

'The perfect book for anyone who, like me, wishes they had understood Latin at school. Why did our teachers tell us it is a "dead language", and not how useful it would be in real life?’ – Janie Hampton, author. ;

‘A thoroughly helpful volume, great for both reference and pleasure, ideal for both the crossword and the classroom.’ – Michelle Lovric, author.
NEW: The Global Connections of Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the Third International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 18th-19th March, 2019 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696950; Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout. 669 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696950. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696967. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Gandhāran art is often regarded as the epitome of cultural exchange in antiquity. The ancient region of Gandhāra, centred on what is now the northern tip of Pakistan, has been called the ‘crossroads of Asia’. The Buddhist art produced in and around this area in the first few centuries AD exhibits extraordinary connections with other traditions across Asia and as far as the Mediterranean. Since the nineteenth century, the Graeco-Roman associations of Gandhāran art have attracted particular attention. Classically educated soldiers and administrators of that era were astonished by the uncanny resemblance of many works of Gandhāran sculpture to Greek and Roman art made thousands of miles to the west. More than a century later we can recognize that the Gandhāran artists’ appropriation of classical iconography and styles was diverse and extensive, but the explanation of this ‘influence’ remains puzzling and elusive. The Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre was initiated principally to cast new light on this old problem.

This volume is the third set of proceedings of the project’s annual workshop, and the first to address directly the question of cross-cultural influence on and by Gandhāran art. The contributors wrestle with old controversies, particularly the notion that Gandhāran art is a legacy of Hellenistic Greek rule in Central Asia and the growing consensus around the important role of the Roman Empire in shaping it. But they also seek to present a more complex and expansive view of the networks in which Gandhāra was embedded. Adopting a global perspective on the subject, they examine aspects of Gandhāra’s connections both within and beyond South Asia and Central Asia, including the profound influence which Gandhāran art itself had on the development of Buddhist art in China and India.

About the Editors
Wannaporn Rienjang obtained her doctorate in Archaeology from University of Cambridge. She is now Lecturer in Archaeology, Museum and Heritage Studies at the Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University and a project consultant for the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. Her research focuses on the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Indian Ocean Trade and ancient working technologies of stone beads and vessels. ;

Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran a
NEW: The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland The British School at Rome’s Tiber Valley Project by Helen Patterson, Robert Witcher and Helga Di Giuseppe. Paperback; 205x290mm; 372 pages; 131 figures, 21 tables (colour throughout). 665 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 70. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696158. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696165. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland presents a new regional history of the middle Tiber valley as a lens through which to view the emergence and transformation of the city of Rome from 1000 BC to AD 1000. Setting the ancient city within the context of its immediate territory, the authors reveal the diverse and enduring links between the metropolis and its hinterland. At the heart of the volume is a detailed consideration of the results of a complete restudy of the pioneering South Etruria Survey (c. 1955–1970), one of the earliest and most influential Mediterranean landscape projects. Between 1998 and 2002, an international team based at the British School at Rome conducted a comprehensive restudy of the material and documentary archive generated by the South Etruria Survey. The results were supplemented with a number of other published and unpublished sources of archaeological evidence to create a database of around 5000 sites across southern Etruria and the Sabina Tiberina, extending in date from the Bronze Age, through the Etruscan/Sabine, Republican and imperial periods, to the middle ages. Analysis and discussion of these data have appeared in a series of interim articles published over the past two decades; the present volume offers a final synthesis of the project results.

The chapters include the first detailed assessment of the field methods of the South Etruria Survey, an extended discussion of the use of archaeological legacy data, and new insights into the social and economic connectivities between Rome and the communities of its northern hinterland across two millennia. The volume as a whole demonstrates how the archaeological evidence generated by landscape surveys can be used to rewrite narrative histories, even those based on cities as familiar as ancient Rome.

Includes contributions by Martin Millett, Simon Keay and Christopher Smith, and a preface by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill.

About the Authors
Helen Patterson is the former Assistant Director (Archaeology) of the British School at Rome and director of the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project (1998–2002). She is a specialist in the archaeology of the late antique and early medieval periods, with particular interests in ceramic production and distribution. She has published a series of edited volumes including Bridging the Tiber (2004), Mercator Placidissimus (with F. Coarelli, 2008) and Veii: the historical topography of the ancient city (with R. Cascino & H. Di Giuseppe, 2012).

Robert Witcher is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University, UK. From 1999 to 2002, he was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. His research interests include landscape archaeology with a particular focus on the pre-Roman and Roman periods in Italy and the wider Mediterranean. He has published on aspects of ancient rural settlement, agriculture, demography and globalization. He is the editor of the world archaeology journal, Antiquity.

Helga Di Giuseppe specialises in Italian archaeology with particular interests in the classical and late antique periods. She has published widely on ancient landscape, Roman villas, and ceramic and textile production, and has edited several major excavation and conference volumes. From 1998 to 2002, she was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. She is currently project manager for Fasti Online with the International Association of Classical Archaeology and editorial manager with the publisher Scienze e Lettere.
NEW: A Catalogue of the Sculpture Collection at Wilton House by Peter Stewart with new photography by Guido Petruccioli. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 229x305mm; 438 pages; 14 figures and 154 plates in full colour throughout. 661 2020. ISBN 9781789696554. £90.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Wilton House sculptures constituted one of the largest and most celebrated collections of ancient art in Europe. Originally comprising some 340 works, the collection was formed around the late 1710s and 1720s by Thomas Herbert, the eccentric 8th Earl of Pembroke, who stubbornly ‘re-baptized’ his busts and statues with names of his own choosing. His sources included the famous collection of Cardinal Mazarin, assembled in Paris in the 1640s and 1650s, and recent discoveries on the Via Appia outside Rome. Earl Thomas regarded the sculptures as ancient – some of them among the oldest works of art in existence – but in fact much of the collection is modern and represents the neglected talents of sixteenth-and seventeenth-century artists, restorers and copyists who were inspired by Greek and Roman sculpture.

About half of the original collection remains intact today, adorning the Gothic Cloisters that were built for it two centuries ago. After a long decline, accelerated by the impact of the Second World War, the sculptures have been rehabilitated in recent years. They include masterpieces of Roman and early modern art, which cast fresh light on Graeco-Roman antiquity, the classical tradition, and the history of collecting.

Illustrated with specially commissioned photographs, this catalogue offers the first comprehensive publication of the 8th Earl’s collection, including an inventory of works dispersed from Wilton. It re-presents his personal vision of the collection recorded in contemporary manuscripts. At the same time, it dismantles some of the myths about it which originated with the earl himself, and provides an authoritative archaeological and art-historical analysis of the artefacts.

About the Author
Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. His research ranges across many aspects of Greek and Roman sculpture and the relationships between different artistic traditions. His previous publications include, Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008).

Guido Petruccioli is an Oxford University-trained classical archaeologist and professional photographer with specialist interests in Roman imperial portraiture and the documentation of ancient sculpture.
NEW: The Development of an Iron Age and Roman Settlement Complex at The Park and Bowsings, near Guiting Power, Gloucestershire: Farmstead and Stronghold by Alistair Marshall. Paperback; 205x290mm; 204 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. (RRP: £32.00). 657 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693638. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693645. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This report outlines excavation of a small complex of iron age and Roman settlement near Guiting Power in the Cotswolds. A relatively undefended farmstead of middle iron age date was abandoned, to be followed by an adjacent, more substantial, ditched enclosure of the mid to later iron age, which appears to have been a stronghold of higher status, with less directly agrarian associations. This latter site became dilapidated, or was perhaps slighted, during the latest iron age or early Roman period, with a Romanised farmstead developing over the traditional habitation area, this providing evidence for occupation until the late 4th century AD. The sequence of settlement indicates social, economic, and environmental changes occurring in the area from the ‘proto-Dobunnic’ to late Roman periods.

Excavation of pits at the site has provided the basis for experimental investigation of grain storage.

Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general but not exclusive interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects, which include the following: -application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments, with related experimental work; -structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; -investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and NW’n Europe.

About the Author
Alistair Marshall has a formal background in archaeology and the natural sciences, general interests in European prehistory, and is currently developing various projects including: application of remote sensing, from broader study of landscapes to detailed interpretation of ritual monuments with related experimental work; structural analysis of megalithic sites, with especial reference to interpretation of axial alignment; investigation of broader aspects of tribal economies during the later Iron Age in Britain and Northwestern Europe.
NEW: Excavations at Chester. The Northern and Eastern Roman Extramural Settlements Excavations 1990-2019 and other investigations by Leigh Dodd. Paperback; 205x290mm; 142 pages; illustrated throughout. 668 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 71. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696271. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696288. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations at Chester: the northern and eastern Roman extramural settlements presents the results of fifteen archaeological investigations carried out within the canabae to the north and east of the Roman legionary fortress at Chester between 1990 and 2019. The results demonstrate that there was sparse development of the canabae to the north of the fortress during the 1st and 2nd centuries; instead, this area was predominantly used for the extraction of building materials⁠ – sandstone and clay. By the 3rd century, the final phase of usage took the form of a small cemetery, the first to be examined in this area. Subject to more constraints, the sites investigated within the eastern canabae close to the fortress produced limited evidence for urban plot divisions, whilst those further east provided evidence for the division and management of agricultural land forming the prata legionis.

About the Author
Leigh Dodd has worked in the commercial sector of archaeology since the early 1990s. During this time he has excavated a wide range of sites including many of the Roman and post-medieval periods, several of which have been published in regional and international journals. Additionally, he has written many finds reports for a wide-range of clients. He is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.
FORTHCOMING: The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire A Juridical and Functional Approach to Town Life in Roman Gaul, Germania Inferior and Britain by Frida Pellegrino. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 164 figures (83 pages in colour). Print RRP: £48.00. 685 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 72. ISBN 9781789697742. Buy Now

The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire investigates the development of urbanism in the north-western provinces of the Roman empire. Key themes include the continuities and discontinuities between pre-Roman and Roman ‘urban’ systems, the relationships between cities’ juridical statuses and their levels of monumentality, levels of connectivity and economic integration as illuminated by the geographical distribution of cities and town-like settlements belonging to various size brackets, and the shapes and nature of regional urban hierarchies, as reconstructed on the basis of not only the administrative centres but - crucially - all places that fulfilled urban ‘functions’.

About the Author
Frida Pellegrino graduated with honours in 2008, after completing a BA course in Archaeology at the University of Padua. She then enrolled in the MA course at the University of Padua and spent a year abroad, studying at Southampton University (UK), with the Erasmus project. She graduated summa cum laude in 2011, specialising in Roman archaeology. She completed her PhD at the University of Leiden in 2018.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Acknowledgements ;
Introduction . The study of the urbanisation of the North-Western provinces ;
Chapter 1: Object and Aims ;
Chapter 2: The Dawn of Urbanism ;
Chapter 3: The Integration of the North-Western Provinces into the Roman Empire ;
Chapter 4: The Self-Governing Cities: Elements and Rhythms of Urbanisation ;
Chapter 5: The Secondary Agglomerations of Gaul ;
Chapter 6: The Secondary Agglomerations of Germania Inferior and Britannia ;
Conclusions ;
Summary ;
Appendix A: List of Civitates in the North-western Provinces and Their Juridical Status and Dating (either Date or Reign) ;
Appendix B: Assured Magistrates of the North-Western Provinces ;
Appendix C: The Settlements of the North-Western Provinces ;
Bibliography
FORTHCOMING: Carving a Professional Identity: The Occupational Epigraphy of the Roman Latin West by Rada Varga. Paperback; 156x234mm; 126 pages; 13 graphs. 684 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 73. ISBN 9781789694642. Book contents pageBuy Now

Carving a Professional Identity: The occupational epigraphy of the Roman Latin West presents the results of long-term research into the occupational epigraphy from the Latin-language provinces of the Roman Empire. It catalogues stone epigraphs of independent professionals (thus excluding state workers, imperial slaves, freedmen and military personnel), comprising some 690 people, providing quantitative as well as qualitative analyses of the raw data. A glossary translating the occupational titles is also included. The book reveals a very lively work market, where specialisation responded to demand and brought social and economic status to the worker. The coherence of epigraphic habits and manifestations within a professional group, along with all the other existing clues for a rather unitary use of symbols, endorse once more the existence of a Roman provincial, commercial, middle class.

About the Author
Rada Varga is a researcher at Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania) specialising in Latin epigraphy, digital classics, prosopography and provincial archaeology (co-directing the excavations at the fortress of ala I milliaria Batavorum from Dacia). Her main project is Romans1by1, a prosopographical database for people attested in ancient epigraphy. Currently, Dr Varga is a member of the executive committee of EADH (The European Association for Digital Humanities).
FORTHCOMING: Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest edited by Federica Boschi, Enrico Giorgi, Frank Vermeulen. Paperback; 203x276mm, 230 pages; 96 figures (colour throughout). Print RRP: £42.00. 121 2020. ISBN 9781789696998. Book contents pageBuy Now

Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest: Landscape Archaeology and Material Culture is a coherent collection of papers presented at an International Workshop held in Ravenna (Italy) on 13-14 May 2019. The event, organized by the Universities of Bologna and Ghent and Arcadria, focussed on the transition between Italic culture and Romanised society in the central Adriatic area – the regions ager Gallicus and Picenum under Roman dominance – from the fourth to the second centuries BCE.

By bringing together the experience of international research on this topic, the volume highlights a period that marks a profound transformation in the whole of central Italy by analysing the relationships between the central settlements and their territories and, more generally, by measuring the impact of early Romanization on the territorial structure, social organization and cultural substrata of populations living here. The volume also discusses methodological aspects regarding best practices in fieldwork, landscape investigation and study of material culture, identifying research lines and perspectives for the future deepening of knowledge in this crucial period of central Adriatic archaeology.

About the Editors
Federica Boschi is senior researcher in Methods of Archaeological Research at the University of Bologna. She specialises in non-destructive methods of investigation, in particular geophysics and aerial photography for archaeology. She directs field projects in central Adriatic Italy and is a member of several teams conducting research of international significance. ;

Enrico Giorgi is Associate Professor of Methodology and Landscape Archaeology at the University of Bologna. He is the director of the journal ‘Groma: Documenting Archaeology’ and directs research on Adriatic archaeology. He conducts archaeological missions in Croatia, Albania and Egypt which are already the subject of publications. ;

Frank Vermeulen has been Professor of Roman Archaeology and Archaeological Methodology at Ghent University since 1999 and directed its Department of Archaeology from 2015-2018. He is particularly interested in Roman settlement archaeology and geo-archaeological approaches to ancient Mediterranean landscapes; he has a keen interest in IT applications in archaeology.
L’Egitto dei Flavi: Sintesi e prospettive d’indagine alla luce della documentazione papirologica ed epigrafica egiziana by Nikola D. Bellucci and Brunella L. Longo. Paperback; 156x234mm; 184 pages. Italian text.. 654 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 69. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696738. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696745. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

L’Egitto dei Flavi, providing synthesis and new prospects of investigation, offers an overall review of the various information obtainable from sources from the Roman province of Egypt in the moment of transition from the Julio-Claudian dynasty to the new Flavian dynasty. Within the investigations, an attempt was made to focus on the province of Egypt during the period of Flavian domination with the aim of providing a compendium and a more balanced examination of the technical and economic organization of the country in a historical period that still would seem complex to want to define in its entirety. This operation made it necessary to start from the various documentary sources (papyrus, ostraka, epigraphs and wooden tablets) which bore testimony of the aspects that were intended to be emphasized. The texts examined were therefore carefully selected in the context of the substantial material available.

About the Authors
Nikola D. Bellucci, master's degree in Classical Philology (Th. Papyrology) and master's degree in Archaeology and Cultures of the Ancient World (Th. Egyptology) at the Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, is today PhD f. and department member of the University of Bern.

Brunella L. Longo, master's degree in Classical Philology (Th. Papyrology) at Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna, currently teaches classical literature at the Filzi State High School in Rovereto (Italy). She has dealt with scientific popularization (with particular reference to Classical Philology and Ancient History).

Italian Description
L’Egitto dei Flavi, fornendo sintesi e nuove prospettive d’indagine, vuole ritenersi un pratico strumento riguardante le molteplici informazioni ricavabili dalle fonti provenienti dalla provincia romana d’Egitto nel momento di passaggio dalla dinastia giulio-claudia alla nuova dinastia flavia proponendo una revisione d’insieme specie di queste ultime. Nel corso delle indagini si è tentato di mettere a fuoco la provincia d’Egitto durante il periodo di dominazione flavia con l’intento di fornire un compendio e un esame più calibrato dell’organizzazione tecnica ed economica del paese in un periodo storico che ancora parrebbe complesso voler definire nella sua completezza. Tale operazione ha reso necessario partire dalle varie fonti documentarie (papiri, ostraka, epigrafi e tavolette lignee) che portavano testimonianza degli aspetti che si intendeva maggiormente porre in rilievo. I testi esaminati sono pertanto stati attentamente selezionati nel contesto del consistente materiale disponibile.

Nikola D. Bellucci, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) e dottore magistrale in Archeologia e Culture del Mondo Antico (Th. Egittologia) presso l’Alma Mater Studiorum – Università di Bologna, è oggi PhD f. presso l’Università di Berna. Autore di numerosi articoli scientifici, è anche membro di alcuni tra i maggiori istituti scientifici internazionali d’antichità.

Brunella L. Longo, dottore magistrale in Filologia classica (Th. Papirologia) presso l’Alma Mater Studiorum – Università di Bologna, insegna attualmente Letteratura classica presso il Liceo Filzi di Rovereto. Si occupa inoltre di divulgazione scientifica (specie negli ambiti della Filologia Classica e della Storia Antica).
A Biography of Power: Research and Excavations at the Iron Age 'oppidum' of Bagendon, Gloucestershire (1979-2017) by Tom Moore. Paperback; 205x290mm; 626 pages, illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 621 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695342. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695359. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume explores the changing nature of power and identity from the Iron Age to Roman period in Britain. Presenting detailed excavation results and integrating a range of comprehensive specialist studies, A Biography of Power provides fresh insights into the origins and nature of one of the lesser-known, but perhaps most significant, Late Iron Age oppida in Britain: Bagendon in Gloucestershire.

Combining the results of a large-scale geophysical survey, with analysis of both historic and new excavations, this volume reassesses Iron Age occupation at Bagendon, revealing evidence for diverse artisanal activities and complex regional exchange networks that saw livestock, and people, travelling to Bagendon from west of the Severn. The results of excavation of two morphologically unusual, banjo-like enclosures, and of one of the previously unexamined dykes, has revealed that the Bagendon oppidum had earlier origins and more complex roles than previously envisaged. The volume also provides new insights into the nature of the Iron Age and Roman landscape in which Bagendon was situated. Detailing the discovery of two, previously unknown, Roman villas at Bagendon, this research also demonstrates the continued significance of this landscape in the early Roman province.

This volume redefines Bagendon as a landscape of power, which offers important insights into the changing nature of societies from the Middle Iron Age to Roman period. It calls for a radical reassessment of how we define oppida complexes and their socio-political importance at the turn of the 1st millennium BC.

Contains contributions from Sophia Adams, Michael J. Allen, Sam Bithell, Loïc Boscher, Cameron Clegg, G.B. Dannell, Lorne Elliott, Elizabeth Foulds, Freddie Foulds, Christopher Green, Derek Hamilton, Colin Haselgrove, Yvonne Inall, Tina Jakob, Mandy Jay, Sally Kellett, Robert Kenyon, Mark Landon, Marcos Martinón-Torres, Edward McSloy, Janet Montgomery, J.A. Morley-Stone, Geoff Nowell, Charlotte O’Brien, Chris Ottley, Cynthia Poole, Richard Reece, Harry Robson, Ruth Shaffrey, John Shepherd, Jane Timby, Dirk Visser, D.F. Williams, Steven Willis.

About the Editor
Tom Moore is an Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University. His research focuses on the western European Iron Age and approaches to cultural landscape management. He has published widely on Iron Age social organisation and conducted major field projects at Late Iron Age oppida in Britain and France, including at Bibracte, Burgundy. He is co-author of the textbook: Archaeology: an introduction.

Table of Contents:
Summary ;
Acknowledgements ;
Chapter 1: Research at Bagendon ;
Chapter 2: The wider Bagendon complex: remote sensing surveys 2008-2016 ;
Chapter 3: Before the ‘oppidum’: Excavations at Scrubditch and Cutham enclosures ;
Chapter 4: Revisiting Late Iron Age Bagendon ;
Chapter 5: After the ‘oppidum’. Excavations at Black Grove ;
Chapter 6: Iron Age and Roman ceramics ;
Chapter 7: Brooches ;
Chapter 8: Metalwork ;
Chapter 9: An analytical study of the Iron Age bloomery slag ;
Chapter 10: Coinage ;
Chapter 11: Coin moulds ;
Chapter 12: Miscellaneous material ;
Chapter 13: Radiocarbon dates and Bayesian analysis ;
Chapter 14: Dating the Roman fort at Cirencester ;
Chapter 15: Human Remains ;
Chapter 16: Faunal Remains ;
Chapter 17: Isotopic analysis of human and animal remains ;
Chapter 18: The plant and invertebrate remains (1979-2017) ;
Chapter 19: Putting the Bagendon complex into its landscape setting: the geoarchaeological and land snail evidence ;
Chapter 20: Viewsheds and Least Cost analysis of the Bagendon complex and its environs ;
Chapter 21: Geophysical survey at Hailey Wood Camp, Sapperton, Gloucester
‘Blood Is Thicker Than Water’ – Non-Royal Consanguineous Marriage in Ancient Egypt An Exploration of Economic and Biological Outcomes by Joanne-Marie Robinson. Paperback; 175x245mm; 246 pages; 21 figures, 14 tables (11 colour pages). 646 2020 Archaeopress Egyptology 29. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695434. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695441. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Discussions on consanguineous marriage within Egyptology usually focus on brother-sister marriages recorded in census returns from Roman Egypt, or royal sibling marriages amongst the ruling Ptolemies. However, no wide-ranging review exists of non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt despite the economic and biological implications of such relationships. This is the first time that evidence for nonroyal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt has been collated from select sources spanning the Middle Kingdom to the Roman Period and a method created to investigate the potential economic and biological outcomes of these unions, particularly beyond the level of sibling and half-sibling unions. The working definition of consanguineous marriage used throughout this study is that used by clinical geneticists: unions contracted between cousins biologically related as second cousins or closer biological kin. This research argues that for some families, and under certain conditions, consanguineous marriage was a preferred economic strategy in terms of gifts given at marriage and in inheritance, and that families who married consanguineously may have received greater levels of intra-familial support without the expectation of reciprocity. Although there may have been adverse biological outcomes arising from congenital anomalies and genetic disorders in the offspring of consanguineous marriages, the research suggests that it is unlikely that these physical or cognitive disorders were distinguished from other medical disorders in the general health environment of ancient Egypt. The investigation focuses primarily on ancient Egyptian documentary and archaeological sources, including human remains, and is informed by research on consanguinity from a range of disciplines including anthropology, demography, economics and pathology.

About the Author
Joanne-Marie Robinson is a Visiting Scholar at the KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology at the University of Manchester. She has a research interest in non-royal consanguineous marriage in ancient Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean, and the socio-cultural and religious factors that influence this choice of marriage partner. Her work also considers the potential biological outcomes of consanguineous marriage and investigates the reception to congenital physical and cognitive anomalies in ancient Egypt. This book presents the outcomes of a research project. The author holds a PhD in Egyptology and has worked as a lecturer, writer and advisor for television and radio programmes focusing on religion and history.
Domi militiaeque: Militär- und andere Altertümer Festschrift für Hannsjörg Ubl zum 85. Geburtstag edited by Günther E. Thüry. 150 figures; 4 tables; 4 plates (86 colour pages). Papers in German (3 in English). 644 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 68. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695328. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695335. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is in honour of the Austrian scholar Prof. Dr Hannsjörg Ubl. It contains a tabula gratulatoria, a bibliography and 24 contributions covering a wide range of topics. The focus being Greek and Roman, the volume includes papers about the Langobards, renaissance replicas of classical sculpture, and the archaeology of World War I. The 'classical' papers deal with Greek and Roman art and art looting; dogs in Greek and Roman warfare; Roman looking-glasses; erotic inscriptions of Gaulish spindle whorls; military equipment and dress accessories; Roman military history and the non-military archaeology of Raetia, Noricum and Pannonia.

Günther E. Thüry is a lecturer at the Department of Classical Studies at Salzburg University, specialising in Roman cultural history, archaeobiology, epigraphy and numismatics. His bibliography includes some 300 publications, including books on ancient coinage, Greek and Roman environmental history, Roman diet and Roman eroticism.

German Description
Dem österreichischen Archäologen Prof. Dr. Hannsjörg Ubl ist diese Festschrift gewidmet. Sie umfasst eine tabula gratulatoria, die Bibliographie des Jubilars und 24 Beiträge, die sich mit einem weiten Spektrum von Themen beschäftigen. Während ihr Schwerpunkt auf der griechischrömischen Antike liegt, widmen sich Aufsätze von Michael P. Speidel auch den Langobarden, von Kurt Gschwantler renaissancezeitlichen Nachbildungen griechisch-römischer Skulpturfunde und von Rupert Gietl und Reinfrid Vergeiner der Archäologie des Ersten Weltkriegs. Die Arbeiten zur klassischen Antike behandeln Themen der griechischen und römischen Kunst (Claudia Lang- Auinger, Erwin Pochmarski); den Kunstraub im Altertum (Ernst Künzl); den Einsatz von Hunden im Krieg (Heidelinde Autengruber-Thüry); römische Spiegel (Lawrence Okamura); erotische Inschriften auf gallischen Spinnwirteln (Günther E. Thüry); militärische Ausrüstungs- und Bekleidungsgegenstände (Thomas Fischer, Christian Koepfer, José Remesal Rodríguez, Bernd Steidl, Paula Zsidi); die römische Militärgeschichte (Martin Mosser, Bernhard Palme, Michael A. Speidel, Zsolt Visy, Ekkehard Weber); und die zivile Kultur der Provinzen Rätien, Noricum und Pannonien (Gerald Grabherr, Renate Miglbauer, Beatrix Petznek, Peter Scherrer, Gerhard Waldherr und Magdalena Waser).

Günther E. Thüry ist Lehrbeauftragter am Fachbereich Altertumswissenschaften der Universität Salzburg. Er arbeitet vor allem über Themen der römischen Kulturgeschichte, Archäobiologie, Epigraphik und Numismatik. Zu seinen ca. 300 Veröffentlichungen zählen Bücher über antike Münzkunde, griechische und römische Umweltgeschichte, römische Ernährung und römische Erotik.
Barbaric Splendour: The Use of Image Before and After Rome edited by Toby F. Martin with Wendy Morrison. Paperback; 203x276mm; 152 pages; 38 figures (30 colour pages). 119 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696592. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696608. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Barbaric Splendour: the use of image before and after Rome comprises a collection of essays comparing late Iron Age and Early Medieval art. Though this is an unconventional approach, there are obvious grounds for comparison. Images from both periods revel in complex compositions in which it is hard to distinguish figural elements from geometric patterns. Moreover, in both periods, images rarely stood alone and for their own sake. Instead, they decorated other forms of material culture, particularly items of personal adornment and weaponry. The key comparison, however, is the relationship of these images to those of Rome. Fundamentally, the book asks what making images meant on the fringe of an expanding or contracting empire, particularly as the art from both periods drew heavily from – but radically transformed – imperial imagery.

About the Editors
Toby Martin currently works as a lecturer at Oxford University’s Department for Continuing Education, where he specialises in adult and online education. His research concentrates on theoretical and interpretative aspects of material culture in Early Medieval Europe. Toby has also worked as a field archaeologist and project officer in the commercial archaeological sector and continues to work as a small finds specialist.

Wendy Morrison currently works for the Chilterns Conservation Board managing the NLHF funded Beacons of the Past Hillforts project, the UK’s largest high-res archaeological LiDAR survey. She also is Senior Associate Tutor for Archaeology at the Oxford University Department for Continuing Education. Wendy’s research areas are Prehistoric European Archaeology and Landscape Archaeology. She has over a decade’s excavation experience in Southern Britain, the Channel Islands, and India.
Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the Archaeology and History of Interaction in European Protohistory edited by Roxana-Gabriela Curcă, Alexander Rubel, Robin P. Symonds and Hans-Ulrich Voß. Paperback; 175x245mm; 164 pages; 60 figures (29 colour pages). Print RRP: £32.00. 641 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 67. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691030. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691047. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rome and Barbaricum: Contributions to the archaeology and history of interaction in European protohistory asks the following questions: How did the ‘Barbarians’ influence Roman culture? What did ‘Roman-ness’ mean in the context of Empire? What did it mean to be Roman and/or ‘Barbarian’ in different contexts? The papers presented here explore the concepts of Romanisation and of Barbaricum from a multi-disciplinary and comparative standpoint, covering Germania, Dacia, Moesia Inferior, Hispania, and other regions of the Roman Empire. They deal with issues such as conceptual analysis of the term ‘barbarian’, military and administrative organization, inter-cultural and linguistic relations, numismatics, religion, economy, prosopographic investigations, constructing identities; and they present reflections on the theoretical framework for a new model of Romanisation.

About the Editors
Alexander Rubel served at the Goethe Institute and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) in Romania before being appointed Senior Research Fellow at the Archaeological Institute of the Romanian Academy and Associate Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi. Since 2011 he has been the Director of the Institute of Archaeology in Iasi. His academic writings include cultural history and literary studies but focus mainly on ancient history and religion as well as on Roman archaeology. These are geographically centered on the fringes of the Empire and the ‘barbarian’ people who lived there.

Roxana-Gabriela Curcă is Assistant Professor at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania and Director of the Department for Long Distance Learning at the Faculty of History. Her academic papers focus on ancient bilingualism, the language of Greek and Latin inscriptions and onomastics. She has been a visiting professor at a number of universities: State University of New York at Buffalo, UCLA, University of West Alabama (USA); National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Flinders University, Adelaide (Australia).

Hans-Ulrich Voß (Voss) is Scientific Assistant at the Romano-Germanic Commission (RGK) of the German Archaeological Institut (DAI) at Frankfurt am Main. He is responsible for the Iron Age, Roman and Migration Periods, and for editorial work. He is project coordinator of the ‘Corpus of Roman Finds in the European Barbaricum (CRFB)’. From 1985 to 1991 he was Scientific Assistant, at the Central Institute of Ancient History and Archaeology of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR, in the department of Pre- and Protohistory, at Berlin. He conducts research into the proto-history of Central Europe, and is a collaborator of the CRFB project.

Robin P. Symonds is a specialist in Roman ceramics and author of Rhenish Wares: Fine Dark Coloured Pottery from Gaul and Germany (1992). He was employed as a Roman pottery specialist for the Colchester Archaeological Trust (1981–1990), then for the Museum of London Archaeology Service (1991–2004) and thereafter in France at the Institut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (INRAP), based at Dijon. He retired from Inrap in 2015 and moved with his family to eastern Romania in 2017. He has reported on the ceramics from many different international sites, and has published numerous papers and reviews on aspects of Roman pottery research.
Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus by Paweł Gołyźniak. Hardback; 618 pages; fully illustrated catalogue containing 1,015 figures (in colour). 627 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 65. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695397. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695403. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus deals with small, but highly captivating and stimulating artwork – engraved gemstones. Although in antiquity intaglios and cameos had multiple applications (seals, jewellery or amulets), the images engraved upon them are snapshots of people's beliefs, ideologies, and everyday occupations. They cast light on the self-advertising and propaganda actions performed by Roman political leaders, especially Octavian/Augustus, their factions and other people engaged in the politics and social life of the past.

Gems can show both general trends (the specific showpieces like State Cameos) as well as the individual and private acts of being involved in politics and social affairs, mainly through a subtle display of political allegiances, since they were objects of strictly personal use. They enable us to analyse and learn about Roman propaganda and various social behaviours from a completely different angle than coins, sculpture or literature.

The miniaturism of ancient gems is in inverse proportion to their cultural significance. This book presents an evolutionary model of the use of engraved gems from self-presentation (3rd-2nd century BC) to personal branding and propaganda purposes in the Roman Republic and under Augustus (until 14 AD). The specific characteristics of engraved gems, their strictly private character and the whole array of devices appearing on them are examined in respect to their potential propagandistic value and usefulness in social life.

The wide scope of this analysis provides a comprehensive picture covering many aspects of Roman propaganda and a critical survey of the overinterpretations of this term in regard to the glyptic art. The aim is the incorporation of this class of archaeological artefacts into the well-established studies of Roman propaganda, as well as the Roman society in general, brought about by discussion of the interconnections with ancient literary sources as well as other categories of Roman art and craftsmanship, notably coins but also sculpture and relief.

About the Author
Paweł Gołyźniak works as a Research Fellow in the Institute of Archaeology, Jagiellonian University in Krakow. His research interests include engraved gems (ancient and neo-classical), Roman Republican and Augustan numismatics, history of antiquarianism, collecting and scholarship as well as 18th century drawings of intaglios and cameos and the legacy of antiquary and connoisseur Philipp von Stosch (1691-1757).

Reviews
'... this volume—splendidly produced at an extraordinarily low price for what it contains (and actually free to download in PDF format)—is a book of enduring worth. Gołyźniak deserves our gratitude for writing one of the best books on Roman gems to have been published for a very long time.'—Dr Martin Henig, The Journal of Gemmology, Volume 37, No. 3, 2020
Before/After: Transformation, Change, and Abandonment in the Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean edited by Paolo Cimadomo, Rocco Palermo, Raffaella Pappalardo and Raffaella Pierobon Benoit. Paperback; 203x276mm; 126 pages; 39 figures (8 plates in colour). Print RRP: £30.00. 112 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695991. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696004. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Before/After explores various aspects related to transformation and change in the Roman and Late Antique world through the archaeological and historical evidence. The seven chapters of the volume range from the evolution of settlement patterns to spatial re-configuration after abandonment processes. Geographically the volume aims to cover – through case studies – the enlarged Roman world from Spain, to Cyprus, from the Rhine area borderland to the Red Sea. The book is the result of a workshop organized as part of the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference, held in Rome during March 2016.

About the Editors
Paolo Cimadomo is a Post-Doc Research Fellow at the University of Naples ‘Federico II’ (Italy). His main research interests are the Hellenistic and Roman Near East. He has worked in different areas of the Eastern Mediterranean (Israel, Jordan, Syria, Turkey) and is the author of The Southern Levant during the first centuries of the Roman rule (64 BCE-135 CE) (Oxbow Books, 2019) ;

Rocco Palermo is a Researcher and Lecturer at the University of Groningen (Netherlands), and Associate Director of the Erbil Plain Archaeological Survey (Iraqi Kurdistan, Harvard University). He has carried out extensive fieldwork in the Middle East (Syria, Jordan, Iraq), where he explores the formation and development of imperial landscapes through the archaeological record. He is the author of On the Edge of Empires. North Mesopotamia during the Roman Period (Routledge, 2019). ;

Raffaella Pappalardo obtained her PhD in Ancient History from University of Naples ‘Federico II’ (Italy). As a pottery specialist she has taken part in many archaeological projects in Syria, Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon, where she was in charge of the ceramic assemblages. Her publication record reflects her interest in the socio-cultural role of pottery in the ancient world, and specifically in the period between the Late Antique and the Islamic world. ;

Raffaella Pierobon Benoit is associate member of Arts and Sciences Academy of Naples (Italy), and was Professor of Archaeology of the Roman Provinces at the University of Naples ‘Federico II’ until 2015. She has carried out extensive fieldwork in Italy and directed archaeological projects in France (Anderitum/Javols) and Turkey (Mandalya Gulf Survey). She was Associate Director of the Italian Archaeological Expedition at Tell Barry (Syria) from 1989 to 2004, and Project Director since 2005.
The Urban Landscape of Bakchias: A Town of the Fayyūm from the Ptolemaic-Roman Period to Late Antiquity by Paola Buzi and Enrico Giorgi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 120 pages; 76 figures, 6 plates. 624 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 66. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695670. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695687. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £29.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Urban Landscape of Bakchias: A Town of the Fayyūm from the Ptolemaic-Roman Period to Late Antiquity summarises the results of field research conducted on the archaeological site of Bakchias, located in the north-eastern part of the Fayyūm region. Historical, historico-religious and papyrological studies are also presented. The book provides a clear and comprehensive overview of the rise and fall of the kome of Bakchias. The settlement was a thriving centre from at least the 26th dynasty up until the ninth or tenth centuries CE, although with differing levels of economic prosperity and urban development. Equal weight is given not only to the archaeological and topographical aspects but also to the historical and the religious, whilst never forgetting the relationship between the urban settlement and other villages of the Arsinoite nomos, which is famously a peculiar exception in Egyptian geography.

About the Author
Paola Buzi is Full Professor of Egyptology and Coptic Studies at the Sapienza University of Rome and Honorary Professor of the same disciplines at Hamburg University. She is President-Elect of the International Association for Coptic Studies. Since 2002, she has been a member of the Archaeological Mission in Bakchias (Fayyūm ) and co-director of the same mission since 2008.

Enrico Giorgi is Associate Professor in Archaeological Research Methodologies at the University of Bologna. Since 1997, he has been a member of the Archaeological Mission in Bakchias (Fayyūm ) and co-director of the same mission since 2008. He is Director of archaeological projects of his university in Agrigento, Butrint, Burnum, Pompei, Paestum, Suasa and Monte Rinaldo.
Middle Bronze Age and Roman Settlement at Manor Pit, Baston, Lincolnshire: Excavations 2002-2014 by Rob Atkins, Jim Burke, Leon Field and Adam Yates. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300 pages; 104 figures, 89 tables (82 plates in colour). 619 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695830. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695847. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Between 2002 and 2014 MOLA Northampton carried out evaluation and excavation work over an area of approximately 49.65ha ahead of mineral extraction for the quarry at the Manor Pit, Baston, Lincolnshire.

The earliest activity dated to the Neolithic with the first occupation dating to the early Bronze Age, but it was within the middle Bronze Age that significant occupation took place within the site. Part of a large co-axial field system was recorded over an area approximately c800m long and up to 310m wide. Cropmarks and the results from other archaeological excavations suggest the field system continued beyond Manor Pit for c4km and was up to 1km wide. The field system was a well-planned pastoral farming landscape at a scale suggesting that cattle and other animals were being farmed for mass trade.

The site was reoccupied in the early 2nd century AD when two adjacent Roman settlements were established. One of the settlements was arranged along a routeway which led from the Car Dyke whilst the other settlement connected to this routeway by a long straight boundary. In both settlements there were a series of fields/enclosures situated in a largely open environment, with some evidence for cultivation, areas of wet ground and stands of trees. Well/watering holes lay within these enclosures and fields indicating that stock management was a key component of the local economy.

In the later medieval period a trackway ran across the site, associated with which was a small enclosure, which perhaps contained fowl. During the early post-medieval period the land was subject to a final period of enclosure, with a series of small rectilinear fields established aligned with Baston Outgang Road, forming the basis of the current landscape.
The Hippodrome of Gerasa A Provincial Roman Circus by Antoni A. Ostrasz with Ina Kehrberg-Ostrasz. Paperback; 205x290mm; 504 pages; 261 figures (77 plates in colour). 616 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918132. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918149. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hippodrome of Gerasa: A Provincial Roman Circus publishes the unique draft manuscript by the late architect and restorer Antoni Ostrasz, the study of Roman circuses and the complex fieldwork for the restoration of the Jarash Hippodrome, a work in progress abruptly ended both in writing and in the field by his untimely death in October 1996. The manuscript is presented as it is in order to retain the authenticity of his work. It is, therefore, an unusual publication providing the researcher as well as restorer of ancient monuments with unparalleled insights of architectural studies for anastyloses. Compendia A and B have been added to supplement the incomplete segments of the manuscript with regard to his studies as well as archaeological data. This concerns the excavation and preparation for the restorations and the archaeological history or stratigraphic history of the site from the foundations to primary use as a circus to subsequent occupancies of the circus complex. The study of the architectural and archaeological remains at the hippodrome encapsulates the sequence of the urban history of the town from its early beginnings to Roman Gerasa and Byzantine and Islamic Jarash, including vestiges of the seventh century plague and still visible earthquake destructions, as well as Ottoman settlements.

About the Authors
Antoni Adam Ostrasz M.Eng PhD (Warsaw 1958, 1967) began his overseas work as research architect with the Polish Archaeological Centre in Cairo from 1961-1966 before joining expeditions to Alexandria, Palmyra and Nea Paphos. He was commissioned by the Syrian Authorities at Palmyra to prepare the restorations of several monuments, recently destroyed. He continued his architectural studies at Fustat and later joined the ‘Jarash Archaeological Project’ where he studied and restored the Umayyad House and the Church of Bishop Marianos. In 1984, the Dept of Antiquities appointed him as permanent director for the restoration project of the Hippodrome at Jarash. ;

Ina Kehrberg-Ostrasz graduated in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Sydney where she completed her postgraduate thesis on Cypriot ceramics. She began excavating in Jordan with the University of Sydney in 1975, followed by several international and long-term archaeological projects at Jarash and other Decapolis cities in Jordan. She became Hon. Research Fellow at the University of Sydney, and was made Hon. Lecturer at ANU/Canberra in 2019 where she offers Masterclasses in the study of ceramics and other artefacts.
The Antonine Wall: Papers in Honour of Professor Lawrence Keppie edited by David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson. Paperback; 206x255mm; 494 pages; 166 figures; 15 tables (exp. RRP £30.00). 613 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 64. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694505. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694512. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The Antonine Wall, the Roman frontier in Scotland, was the most northerly frontier of the Roman Empire for a generation from AD 142. It is a World Heritage Site and Scotland’s largest ancient monument. Today, it cuts across the densely populated central belt between Forth and Clyde.

In this volume, nearly 40 archaeologists, historians and heritage managers present their researches on the Antonine Wall in recognition of the work of Lawrence Keppie, formerly Professor of Roman History and Archaeology at the Hunterian Museum, Glasgow University, who spent much of his academic career recording and studying the Wall. The 32 papers cover a wide variety of aspects, embracing the environmental and prehistoric background to the Wall, its structure, planning and construction, military deployment on its line, associated artefacts and inscriptions, the logistics of its supply, as well as new insights into the study of its history. Due attention is paid to the people of the Wall, not just the officers and soldiers, but their womenfolk and children.

Important aspects of the book are new developments in the recording, interpretation and presentation of the Antonine Wall to today's visitors. Considerable use is also made of modern scientific techniques, from pollen, soil and spectrographic analysis to geophysical survey and airborne laser scanning. In short, the papers embody present-day cutting edge research on, and summarise the most up-to-date understanding of, Rome's shortest-lived frontier.

The editors, Professors Bill Hanson and David Breeze, who themselves contribute several papers to the volume, have both excavated sites on, and written books about, the Antonine Wall.

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
List of Tables ;
List of Contributors ;
Abbreviations ;
1. Lawrence Keppie: an appreciation – David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson ;
2. The Antonine Wall: the current state of knowledge – William S. Hanson and David J. Breeze ;
3. The Landscape at the time of construction of the Antonine Wall – Mairi H. Davies ;
4. The Impact of the Antonine Wall on Iron Age Society – Lesley Macinnes ;
5. Pre-Antonine coins from the Antonine Wall – Richard J Brickstock ;
6. Planning the Antonine wall: an archaeometric reassesment of installation spacing – Nick Hannon, Lyn Wilson, Darrell J Rohl ;
7. The curious incident of the structure at Bar Hill and its implications – Rebecca H Jones ;
8. Monuments on the margins of Empire: the Antonine Wall sculptures – Louisa Campbell ;
9. Building an image: soldiers’ labour and the Antonine Wall Distance Slabs – Iain M. Ferris ;
10. New perspectives on the structure of the Antonine Wall – Tanja Romankiewicz, Karen Milek, Chris Beckett, Ben Russell and J. Riley Snyder ;
11. Wing-walls and waterworks. On the planning and purpose of the Antonine Wall – Erik Graafstal ;
12. The importance of fieldwalking: the discovery of three fortlets on the Antonine Wall – James J. Walker ;
13. The Roman temporary camp and fortlet at Summerston, Strathclyde – Gordon S. Maxwell and William S. Hanson ;
14. Thinking small: fortlet evolution on the Upper German Limes, Hadrian’s Wall, the Antonine Wall and Raetian Limes – Matthew Symonds ;
15. The Roman fort and fortlet at Castlehill on the Antonine Wall: the geophysical, LiDAR and early map evidence – William S. Hanson and Richard E. Jones ;
16. ‘... one of the most remarkable traces of Roman art ... in the vicinity of the Antonine Wall.’ A forgotten funerary urn of Egyptian travertine from Camelon, and related stone vessels from Castlecary – Fraser Hunter ;
17. The Kirkintilloch hoard revisited – J.D. Bateson ;
18. The external supply of pottery and cereals to Antoni
El instrumental de pesca en el Fretum Gaditanum Catalogación, análisis tipo-cronológico y comparativa regional edited by José Manuel Vargas Girón. Paperback; 205x290mm; 188 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Online catalogue. Papers in Spanish and English. 598 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693850. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693867. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

El instrumental de pesca en el Fretum Gaditanum : Catalogación, análisis tipo-cronológico y comparativa region analyses fishing tackle in the region known as Fretum Gaditanum (Straits of Gibraltar), where over a thousand pieces of fishing tackle have been identified. The book offers a typo-chronological classification of the material, which follows a diachronic discourse spanning from the Phoenician-Punic period to Late Antiquity. Special emphasis is given to the morphological-typological changes undergone by these artefacts and technological changes over time. In this way, a comprehensive picture of the fishing arts practised in the environment of Gades during Antiquity is drawn. The corpus is compared to assemblages found in other Atlantic and Mediterranean regions.

About the Editor
José Manuel Vargas Girón holds a BA degree in History (2008)—including an Extraordinary Graduation Prize—an MA in Archaeological-Historical Heritage (2010) and a PhD in Maritime History and Archaeology (2017), all awarded by the University of Cádiz. His research has focused on recording and studying fishing tackle in antiquity and has resulted in the elaboration of a corpus of reference, which includes over a thousand items of fishing tackle. He has participated in numerous research projects, both nationally and internationally (Italy and Morocco), and he has published his results in book chapters, articles, conference proceedings and catalogue entries.

Spanish Description
El estudio de los instrumentos de pesca constituye una reciente línea de investigación que está deparando interesantes resultados para el conocimiento de una de las actividades económicas de mayor arraigo en las sociedades marítimas del pasado: la pesca. Este libro constituye una primera aproximación a la problemática de este tipo de material arqueológico en la región conocida como Fretum Gaditanum, habiéndose elaborado un corpus documental donde se han inventariado casi mil evidencias de instrumental pesquero. En estas páginas el lector encontrará un análisis tipo-cronológico de los materiales catalogados, para lo cual seguiremos un discurso diacrónico, desde época fenicio-púnica hasta la Antigüedad Tardía, incidiendo en la evolución morfo-tipológica que han sufrido estos artefactos y valorándose los cambios tecnológicos que han ido produciéndose a lo largo de la historia. De esta manera, se ha conseguido obtener una visión de conjunto de las artes de pesca practicadas en el entorno gaditano durante la Antigüedad, habiéndose podido comparar el instrumental pesquero del Fretum Gaditanum con el de otras regiones atlánticas y mediterráneas.

José Manuel Vargas Girón es licenciado en Historia por la Universidad de Cádiz (2003-2008), obteniendo el Premio Extraordinario de Fin de Carrera. Realizó un máster en Patrimonio Histórico-Arqueológico en la Universidad de Cádiz (2009-2010). Obtuvo el grado de Doctor en Historia y Arqueológía Marítimas en la Universidad de Cádiz (2017). Su línea de investigación ha girado en torno a la documentación y estudio de los instrumentos de pesca en la Antigüedad, elaborando un corpus de referencia donde se han recopilado casi mil evidencias de instrumental pesquero. Su labor científica puede resumirse en los siguientes puntos: participación en numerosos proyectos de investigación tanto nacionales como internacionales (Italia y Marruecos); publicaciones científicas (libros, capítulos de libros, artículos científicos, actas de congresos, fichas de catálogo de exposiciones y recensiones); participación en reuniones científicas nacionales e internacionales; organización de actividades científicas; estancias internacionales de investigación en centros de excelencia.
FORTHCOMING: Urbanisation in the Time of Claudius in the Western Provinces of the Empire by Erika Cappelletto. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £50.00). 487 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690507. Buy Now

This volume analyses Claudius’ activities in the provinces of the western Empire in order to get an idea of his political attitude in a broader context and see how his interests in the provinces influenced the urban works.

The first aim of the project was to find structures, urban development and changes in the cities which were directly connected to Claudius; the second was to reflect on planning issues and strategies adopted by the emperor. A comprehensive examination of new buildings, or additions to prior ones (with statues, for example), was conducted in order to understand the underlying intentions, as well as how, and in which way, the prototypes in Italy influenced construction in the provinces. The final aim was connected to Venturi’s work, who deals with Claudius’ activities in Italy and in particular at Rome and Ravenna. The question was whether the trends found by Venturi can also be applied to the provinces. As a result of these investigations, the author has been able to propose new trends which might explain the emperor’s political actions.

About the Author
ERIKA CAPPELLETTO received a degree from the University of Venice with a thesis about the representation of spinning implements on gravestones. She gained her Masters from the same university with a study of the black glazed pottery from Pompeii. During this period, she participated in different projects in Italy and studied for six months at Ankara with the Erasmus project. Later, she moved to Heidelberg where she completed her PhD. She has participated in international projects and conferences, frequented workshops and undertaken an internship in digital archaeology (3d reconstruction and modelling). She currently works in cultural heritage in Germany.
Ceramics and Atlantic Connections: Late Roman and Early Medieval Imported Pottery on the Atlantic Seaboard Proceedings of an International Symposium at Newcastle University, March 2014 edited by Maria Duggan, Mark Jackson and Sam Turner. Paperback; 210x297mm;vi+150; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (Print RRP: £30.00). 583 2019 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 15. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693379. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693386. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Atlantic Seaboard has attracted increasing interest as a zone of economic complexity and social connection during Late Antiquity and the early medieval period. A surge in archaeological and, in particular, ceramic research emerging from this region over the last decade has demonstrated the need for new models of exchange between the Mediterranean and Atlantic, and for new understandings of links between sites along the Western littoral of Europe. Ceramics and Atlantic Connections: Late Roman and Early Medieval Imported Pottery on the Atlantic Seaboard stems from the Ceramics and Atlantic Connections symposium, hosted by the School of History, Classics and Archaeology, Newcastle University, in March 2014. This represents the first international workshop to consider late Roman to early medieval pottery from across the Atlantic Seaboard. Reflecting the wide geographical scope of the original presentations by the invited speakers, these nine articles from ceramic specialists and archaeologists working across the Atlantic region, cover western Britain, Ireland, western France, north-west Spain and Portugal.

The principal focus is the pottery of Mediterranean origin which was imported into the Atlantic, particularly East Mediterranean and North African amphorae and red-slipped finewares (African Red Slip and Late Roman C and D), as well as ceramics of Atlantic production which had widespread distributions, including Gaulish Dérivées-de-Sigillées Paléochrétiennes Atlantique/DSPA, céramique à l’éponge’ and ‘E-ware’. Following the aims of the Newcastle symposium, the papers examine the chronologies and relative distributions of these wares and associated products, and consider the compositions of key Atlantic assemblages, revealing new insights into the networks of exchange linking these regions between c. 400-700 AD. This broad-scale exploration of ceramic patterns, together with an examination of associated artefactual, archaeological and textual evidence for maritime exchange, provides a window into the political, economic, cultural and ecclesiastical ties that linked the disparate regions of the Late Antique and early medieval Atlantic. In this way, this volume presents a benchmark for current understandings of ceramic exchange in the Atlantic Seaboard and provides a foundation for future research on connectivity in this zone.

About the Editors


Maria Duggan works on European Late Antique and early medieval archaeology, particularly focusing on late Roman and Byzantine pottery and long-distance exchange and contact. She is currently a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at Newcastle University and the British School at Athens, conducting research on the imported ceramic assemblage from Tintagel, Cornwall.

Mark Jackson is Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at Newcastle University. He teaches and researches Late Antique, Byzantine and early Islamic archaeology in the Mediterranean and has a particular research interest in ceramics.

Sam Turner works on medieval archaeology and the cultural heritage of landscapes, with particular interests in Britain, Europe and the Mediterranean. He has worked at Newcastle University since 2004, where he is now Professor of Archaeology and Director of the interdisciplinary McCord Centre for Landscape.
Mortuary Variability and Social Diversity in Ancient Greece Studies on Ancient Greek Death and Burial edited by Nikolas Dimakis and Tamara M. Dijkstra. Paperback; 205x290mm; ii+196 pages; illustrated throughout (includes 60 colour pages). 603 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694420. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694437. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Even though, at death, identity and social status may undergo major changes, by studying funerary customs we can greatly gain in the understanding of a community’s social structure, distribution of wealth and property, and the degree of flexibility or divisiveness in the apportionment of power. With its great regional diversity and variety of community forms and networks, ancient Greece offers a unique context for exploring, through the burial evidence, how communities developed. Mortuary Variability and Social Diversity in Ancient Greece brings together early career scholars working on funerary customs in Greece from the Early Iron Age to the Roman period. Papers present various thematic and interdisciplinary analysis in which funerary contexts provide insights on individuals, social groups and communities. Themes discussed include issues of territoriality, the reconstruction of social roles of particular groups of people, and the impact that major historical events may have had on the way individuals or specific groups of individuals treated their dead.

About the Editors
Nikolas Dimakis is a postdoctoral research fellow in Classical Archaeology at the University of Athens. He specialises in the funerary archaeology of Classical to Roman Greece and examines the interplay of emotions, ritual and identity in the burial context. His research interests also include childhood and gender archaeology, the archaeology of religion and ritual, and terracotta lamps. Nikolas has coordinated and participated in international meetings and in many archaeological projects in Attica, the Peloponnese, Thrace and the Dodecanese.

Tamara M. Dijkstra is a researcher at the Department of Greek Archaeology at the University of Groningen. She specialises in the funerary archaeology and epigraphy of Classical to Roman Greece and examines the relation between mortuary practices, social structure, and social identities. She also studies Hellenistic domestic archaeology within the Halos Archaeological Project.
Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean A Comparative Archaeological Study at Antiochia ad Cragum (Turkey) and Delos (Greece) by Emlyn K. Dodd. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+208 pages; 30 figures, 42 plates. 597 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 63. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694024. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694031. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £36.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Wine was an ever-present commodity that permeated the Mediterranean throughout antiquity; in particular, settlements in the eastern Mediterranean produced substantial quantities of wine for a variety of uses in the Roman and Late Antique eras.

Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean devotes itself to the viticulture of two such settlements, Antiochia ad Cragum and Delos, using results stemming from surface survey and excavation to assess their potential integration within the now well-known agricultural boom of the 5th-7th centuries AD. Interdisciplinary and ethnographic data supplements the main archaeological catalogue and provides a rounded understanding of production and use. The publication of an excavated vinicultural vat in Rough Cilicia for the first time, along with the first complete discussion of the viticultural industry on Delos in Late Antiquity, underscores the significance of this study.

The combined catalogue, analysis and discussion reinforce the noteworthy position viticulture held in Late Antiquity as an agricultural endeavour, socio-cultural and economic factor engrained within eastern Mediterranean settlements.

About the Author
Emlyn K. Dodd is an Honorary Postdoctoral Associate at Macquarie University and Greece Fellow at the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens. He was recently the Macquarie-Gale British School at Rome Scholar.

Reviews
'The volume is beautifully illustrated, with numerous high-quality photographs and other images... [It] also provides a comprehensive survey of ancient evidence and modern scholarship through exhaustive research and meticulous referencing in more than 1000 footnotes. The monograph makes an invaluable contribution to an important topic for late antiquity.' - Tamara Lewit, European Journal of Post-Classical Archaeologies, May 2020
Les pratiques funéraires en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle by András Márton. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+528 pages; 322 figures, 382 maps. French text. 588 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 62. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693355. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693362. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £70.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Les pratiques funéraires en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle aims to give an overview of Roman burial practices in Pannonia during the Early Roman period. Among the different approaches proposed by R. Reece for the study of Roman cemeteries, this work focuses on the grave treatment and grave furnishing. The funerary practices are thus apprehended through the study of tomb structure, the selection and treatment of grave goods and human remains.

The book proposes a synthesis of the published finds to serve as a base for future research. The analysis consists of a documentary review (presented in the catalogue and numerous tables) as complete as possible from the published data, accompanied by a detailed analysis of the information available today to highlight the trends regarding the entire province but also the peculiarities that can be distinguished at the regional level. The analysis is supported by many graphics and maps. Many general trends, common to the western provinces of the Roman Empire, were detected but also many particularities linked to the economic and social situation of the communities, the different components of the population of Pannonia and the political and military history of the province.

About the Author
András Márton was born in Budapest. He holds masters degrees in History, and Archaeology (specializing in Roman provincial and Classical archaeology) from the Eötvös Lorand University, Budapest and a PhD from the Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest. He currently lives in France and is involved with research programmes at the Louvre and the Museum of Fine Arts, Lyon. His research interests are pottery studies and ancient funerary practices.

French Description:
Cette étude vise à donner une présentation des pratiques funéraires romaines en Pannonie durant le Haut-Empire. Parmi les différentes approches pour l’étude des cimetières romains, ce travail porte sur le traitement des tombes et leur mobilier. Les pratiques funéraires sont ainsi appréhendées à travers l'étude de la structure des tombeaux, la sélection et le traitement des mobiliers funéraires et des restes humains. L'objectif principal est de proposer une synthèse des découvertes publiées pouvant servir de base aux recherches à venir. L’analyse consiste en une revue documentaire (présentée dans le catalogue et détaillée au sein des tableaux) aussi complète que possible des données publiées, accompagnée d’une analyse détaillée des informations aujourd’hui disponibles, afin de mettre en évidence les tendances concernant toute la province, mais aussi les particularités régionales et locales. L'analyse est accompagnée par de nombreux graphiques et des cartes. Bien sûr, des tendances générales, communes aux provinces occidentales de l'Empire romain, ont pu être détectées, mais également de nombreuses particularités liées à la situation économique et sociale des communautés, aux différents groupes de population en Pannonie et à l'histoire politique et militaire de la province.

András Márton a étudié à l'Université Eötvös Lóránd à Budapest où il a obtenu deux diplômes de Master, l'un en Histoire et l'autre en Archéologie (spécialisé en Archéologie des provinces romaines et en Archéologie classique). Après avoir obtenu son diplôme, il a travaillé au Musée national hongrois puis au Musée des Beaux-Arts de Budapest. Il a soutenu sa thèse intitulée « Le rituel funéraire en Pannonie de l’époque augustéenne à la fin du 3e siècle en comparaison avec les provinces occidentales » summa cum laude à l'Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest. Il vit actuellement en France et participe aux programmes de recherche du musée du Louvre et du musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon. Il a réalisé de nombreux articles scientifiques et a contribué en tant que co-auteur à plusieurs ouvrages. Ses recherches portent sur la production de la céramique et des
Scambi e commerci in area vesuviana I dati delle anfore dai saggi stratigrafici I.E. (Impianto Elettrico) 1980-81 nel Foro di Pompei edited by Darío Bernal-Casasola and Daniela Cottica. Paperback; 210x297mm; x+344 pages; 79 figures, 71 plates (90 pages in colour). 590 2019 Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean Pottery 14. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693232. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693249. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Transport amphorae are one of the best archaeological indicators for evaluating the economy and trade of societies in the ancient world. Scambi e commerci in area vesuviana: i dati delle anfore dai saggi stratigrafici I.E. (Impianto Elettrico) 1980-81 nel Foro di Pompei, produced by researchers from the University of Cadiz and the Ca' Foscari University of Venice, includes the study of nearly five hundred of these commercial containers, recovered during the pioneering stratigraphic excavations carried out in 1980-1981 at the Forum of Pompeii, called conventionally "Impianto Elettrico".

The work represents the first Pompeian monograph dedicated exclusively to the analysis of the amphoric evidence brought to light by archaeological excavation activities in the city buried by the eruption of Vesuvius and analyses in diachronic perspective the main productions in circulation between the VI / V BC and the year 79 AD. The chapters of the volume offer the reader data relating to archaic amphorae, Greek amphorae and Italic wine amphorae from the Republican era, which draw a commercial panorama of great vitality. The African amphorae, following Punic traditions, are then reviewed; then follow the Punic-Gaditan garum amphorae, identified for the first time in the Vesuvian area in this study; le Dressel 21-22, containers for the Italic fish-salting trade and, finally, the productions of the late Republican and Julio-Claudian period. The volume is completed by a series of complementary archaeometric studies carried out on some of the amphorae (paleocontent organic residue analysis and petrographic characterization of the fabrics).

All this material, analyzed with an integrated and interdisciplinary approach, allows us to draw multiple conclusions, fundamental to understanding the rich and articulated daily history of Pompeii, its merchants and its inhabitants (the consumers to whom the amphorae were intended) but also useful to better define the Economic History of some of the circum-Mediterranean regions (from Gades to the Aegean) with which Pompeii had strong trade ties in Antiquity, as evidenced by the amphorae presented here.

About the Editors
Darío Bernal-Casasola is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Cádiz.

Daniela Cottica is currently Senior Lecturer in Classical Archeology at the Ca 'Foscari University of Venice.

Italian Description:
Scambi e commerci in area vesuviana: i dati delle anfore dai saggi stratigrafici I.E. (Impianto Elettrico) 1980-81 nel Foro di Pompei rappresenta la prima monografia pompeiana dedicata esclusivamente all’analisi delle testimonianze anforiche portate alla luce da attività di scavo archeologico nella città sepolta dall’eruzione del Vesuvio, ed analizza in prospettiva diacronica tutte le produzioni in circolazione tra il VI/V secolo a.C. e l’anno 79 d.C. I quattordici capitoli del volume offrono al lettore i dati relativi alle anfore arcaiche, non abbondanti ma molto significative per le fasi più antiche dell’insediamento, e alle anfore greche, specialmente rodie di epoca ellenistica, che si distinguono per l’abbondanza di esemplari bollati. Sono poi presentate le anfore vinarie italiche di epoca repubblicana, che disegnano un panorama commerciale di grande vitalità, nel quale la Campania gioca un ruolo preminente, intrecciando le sue produzioni con quelle di altre aree della penisola. Si passano quindi in rassegna le anfore africane, o di tradizione punica, caratterizzate da una complessa seriazione tipologica che ben illustra gli intensi rapporti commerciali con il nordafrica e l’isola di Ibiza; seguono poi le anfore punico-gaditane da garum, identificate per la prima volta in area vesuviana proprio in questo studio, e le Dressel 21-22, contenitori per il commercio italico di salagione di recente caratterizzazione e, infine, le produzioni del periodo tardo-repubblicano e giulio-claudio.
The Busy Periphery: Urban Systems of the Balkan and Danube Provinces (2nd – 3rd c. AD) by Damjan Donev. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+380 pages; 106 figures, 21 tables, 123 maps (99 colour pages). (Print RRP: £54.00). 582 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 61. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693492. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693508. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £54.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Busy Periphery: Urban Systems of the Balkan and Danube Provinces (2nd – 3rd c. AD) considers the reconstruction of the urban geography of the Balkan and Danube provinces at the time of the Severan dynasty. Four basic parameters governed the focus of research: the origin and socio-economic character of the settlements, their size, micro-location, and the size of their administrative territories. The principal goal was to map the variable developments of the urban network, both between and within the sub-regions that constituted this part of the Roman Empire. This line of inquiry helped in bridging the gap between the regional and the general. In the process of explaining the apparent gaps in the urban map of the study-region or the differential growth of the individual towns and settlements, we were inevitably faced with the question of the role of towns in Roman provincial society and in the economy in general, and with the interpretation of the basic prerequisites for their emergence and prosperity.

About the Author
Damjan Donev completed his Master’s degree at the department of Archaeology and Art History at Bilkent University, Ankara, and earned his doctoral degree in September 2014, at Leiden University, the Netherlands. Between 2013 and 2017, he worked on the ERC-funded project ‘An Empire of 2000 cities’, hosted by Leiden University. Over the past couple of decades, Damjan has participated in and directed a number of archaeological field projects. His geographic focus is the Balkan Peninsula, while his research interest include regional studies, with a special emphasis on settlement patterns, hierarchies, and territoriality, methods of field survey and remote sensing.
Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt ca. 700 BC – AD 1000 edited by Mohamed Kenawi. Hardback; xxviii+350 pages; 358 figures, 52 tables. (Print RRP £65.00). 575 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692983. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692990. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Cristina Mondin, Michele Asolati Louise Bertini, Audrey Eller, Urška Furlan, Ole Herslund, Israel Hinojosa Baliño, Marie-Caroline Livaditis, Giorgia Marchiori, Marcus Müller, Benjamin T. Pennington and Amy Wilson.

In 2012, fieldwork began at two large sites in the Beheira Province in the western Nile Delta: Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit (ancient Metelis). Being close to the important ports of Thonis-Heracleion, Alexandria, and Rosetta meant that they had been ideally placed to take advantage of the trade between the Mediterranean and Egypt. The sites are being thoroughly investigated to reveal their archaeological significance.

Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt presents the results of the Italian archaeological mission between 2012 and 2016. It provides details of the survey and excavation results from different occupation phases. A complete town beneath the Nile silt was revealed using a combination of modern scientific techniques. Hellenistic houses and a temple enclosure wall were investigated at Kom Wasit; while at Kom al-Ahmer, a Late Roman house, an amphora storage building, a cistern and an early Islamic cemetery were revealed.

Dating from the Late Dynastic to the Early Islamic period, the remains found at Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit demonstrate for the first time the rich archaeological heritage of this region.

About the Editor
Mohamed Kenawi is a Researcher and Training Manager at the School of Archaeology, University of Oxford, for the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa project. He was Head Researcher (2011–16), followed by Acting Director (2016–17), of the Hellenistic Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria. He taught at the American University in Cairo and at Catania University. He has participated in various archaeological missions in Libya, Italy, and Egypt, among them those at Kom al-Ahmer/Kom Wasit, Athribis, Dionysias, and Manqbad. He currently collaborates on projects with Padua University and Tübingen University. He has published various articles about his research, in addition to his monograph, Alexandria’s Hinterland: Archaeology of the Western Nile Delta, Egypt (2014). He published a co-authored book with G. Marchiori entitled Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology: the Italian Contribution (2018). He is Egypt Coordinator for the Manar al-Athar open access photo-archive.