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NEW: Worlds Apart Trading Together: The organisation of long-distance trade between Rome and India in Antiquity by Kasper Grønlund Evers. viii+214 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 9 plates in colour. 385 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 32. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917425. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917432. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Worlds Apart Trading Together sets out to replace the outdated notion of ‘Indo-Roman trade’ with a more informed perspective integrating the new findings of the last 30 years. In order to accomplish this, a perspective focusing on concrete demand from the ground up is adopted, also shedding light on the role of the market in long-distance exchange. Accordingly, the analysis conducted demonstrates that an economically highly substantial trade took place between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean in the 1st–6th cen. CE, altering patterns of consumption and modes of production in both India, South Arabia and the Roman Empire. Significantly, it can be documented that this trade was organised at the centres of demand and supply, in Rome and India, respectively, by comparable urban associations, the transport in-between being handled by equally well-organised private networks and diasporas of seagoing merchants. Consequently, this study concludes that the institution of the market in Antiquity was able to facilitate trade over very long distances, acting on a scale which had a characteristic impact on the economies of the societies involved, their economic structures converging by adapting to trade and the market.

About the Author
Kasper Grønlund Evers holds master’s degrees in History from Lancaster (UK) and Copenhagen, as well as a PhD from the latter. He has previously published a monograph on the Vindolanda Tablets and the ancient economy.
NEW: Immagini del tempo degli dei, immagini del tempo degli uomini Un’analisi delle iconografie dei mesi nei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e del loro contest storico-culturale by Ciro Parodo. viii+338 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English summary. 376 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 30. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917340. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917357. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A characteristic shared by the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars is that they represent the twelve months of the year, referable to an iconographic repertoire which is divided into three themes: the astrological-astronomical, the festive-ritual and the rural-seasonal. With regard to the first type, the months are depicted through images of the signs of the zodiac, often associated with images of the guardian deities of the months; the second category includes depictions of the months that refer to some important religious festivals; finally, the third theme includes images of the months that allude to the most important work activities performed in the countryside. The figurative calendars, which in most cases are made on mosaics, are characterized by a wide distribution in terms of time, concentrated between the 3rd and 6th century, and geography, with the areas of greatest attestation consisting of Italy, Africa Proconsularis, Greece and Arabia. With regard to the architectural context, the calendars from the West are prevalently documented in the domus, while those from the East are particularly attested in ecclesiastical buildings. The aim of research presented in this volume is the in-depth study of the connections between the meaning of the iconography of the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars and their historical and cultural context.

About the Author:
Ciro Parodo (1978) received a Degree and a Post-Graduate Degree in Archaeology at the University of Cagliari (Italy), and a PhD in Classical Archaeology at the Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen (Germany). He focuses his research on two principal domains: the study of Greek and Roman Iconography as a means of understanding the social and cultural issues of the Classical World, and the reception of Classical Antiquity in the Modern and Contemporary Age. Italian Description: La caratteristica comune dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini consiste nella rappresentazione dei dodici mesi dell’anno, riferibile a un repertorio iconografico articolato in tre temi: quelli di tipo astrologico-astronomico, festivo-rituale e rurale-stagionale. Per quanto riguarda la prima tipologia, i mesi sono raffigurati mediante le immagini dei segni zodiacali, spesso associate a quelle delle divinità tutelari mensili; la seconda categoria include quelle raffigurazioni dei mesi che si riferiscono ad alcune importanti festività religiose; la terza tematica, infine, comprende quelle immagini dei mesi che alludono alle più rilevanti attività lavorative svolte in ambito campestre. I calendari figurati, realizzati nella maggioranza dei casi su mosaico, si contraddistinguono per un’ampia distribuzione in senso temporale, con una concentrazione cronologica fra il III e il VI secolo d.C., e geografico, con le aree di maggior attestazione costituite dall’Italia, l’Africa Proconsularis, la Grecia e l’Arabia. In merito invece al contesto architettonico, i calendari di provenienza occidentale sono documentati in prevalenza presso le domus, mentre per quanto concerne quelli orientali, sono attestati in particolare negli edifici ecclesiastici. L’obiettivo della ricerca presentata in questo volume si focalizza sull’approfondimento delle connessioni esistenti tra il significato dell’iconografia dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e il loro contesto storico- culturale.

Ciro Parodo (1978) ha conseguito la Laurea e la Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia presso l’Università di Cagliari (Italia) e il Dottorato di Ricerca in Archeologia Classica presso l’Eberhard- Karls-Universität di Tübingen (Germania). Focalizza la sua ricerca su due ambiti principali: lo studio dell’iconografia greca e romana come strumento per analizzare le problematiche socio- culturali del mondo classico e l’indagine delle dinamiche di ricezione dell’antichità classica nell’età moderna e contemporanea.
NEW: La ceca de Ilduro by Alejandro G. Sinner. 189 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English summary. 375 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 29. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917234. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917241. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The minting of coinage in a territory without previous monetary history or tradition reflects a series of political, social and cultural changes that took place in order to make it possible. Such changes can be traced in the archaeological record thanks to elements apparently as different as coins, ceramics, epigraphy, funerary rites or architecture; these changes thus emerge as some of the most significant points in the colonization process that took place throughout the second century B.C. and at the beginning of the next century in the valley of Cabrera de Mar (ancient Ilduro) and the Laietani territory.

This book is exclusively devoted to the mint of Ilduro, its main goal being to study not only the issues produced by the workshop in detail, but also the role that this coinage had in the monetarization of a changing society, that of the Laietani, which had never previously needed to use coinage. To do so, the author of this study endeavours to answer the following questions in as much depth as possible: Who minted the coins? Why? What for? How? Where? When? How many?

With the aim of answering the aforementioned questions, this volume has been organized into ten chapters divided in three broader sections dedicated to studying, specifically, each one of the aspects involved in the production of this mint. The chapters considering the location of the workshop and the legends used are fundamental to answer the questions of who minted the coins and where. On the other hand, aspects such as metrology, typology and the technique (metallographic analysis) used by the mint are essential to understand how the coins were minted, and also to put forward a hypothesis as regards the use given to the coin issues discussed in the present study. Finally, the chapters dedicated to the production, classification and chronology of the issues should answer such important questions as when and how much money was put into circulation.

This is a book that, in addition to increasing our knowledge of Iberian numismatics, brings us closer to the evolution and production of the coin issues minted in present-day northeastern Spain in general and to the Ilduro workshop in particular.

About the author:
Prof. Alejandro G. Sinner holds a B.A. degree in History, and M.A. degree in Archaeology and a Ph.D. in Society and Culture (2014) from the University of Barcelona. He is currently an Assistant Professor in Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria.

Prof. Sinner’s research focuses on the social and cultural history of Roman Spain and the western provinces. His main research lines include Iberian Numismatics and epigraphy, identity construction, cultural change, and pre-Roman languages in the Iberian Peninsula. Despite being at an early stage in his academic career, Prof. Sinner’s publication record includes two books and over a dozen articles in national and international journals. Since 2006 he has been involved in the excavations of the ancient site of Ilduro in Cabrera de Mar (Catalonia) where he is currently directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.


Spanish description: La acuñación de moneda en un territorio sin historia ni tradición monetaria previa supone que se ha producido una serie de cambios políticos, sociales y culturales para hacerla posible. Tales cambios pueden detectarse en el registro arqueológico gracias a elementos aparentemente tan distintos como dicha moneda, la cerámica, la epigrafía, los ritos funerarios o la arquitectura, y se perfilan como algunos de los puntos más relevantes para entender el proceso de colonización que tuvo lugar a lo largo del siglo II a. C. e inicios de la centuria siguiente en el valle de Cabrera de Mar, así como en el territorio layetano.

Este libro, dedicado exclusivamente a estudiar la ceca de Ilduro, tiene c
FORTHCOMING: Latrina: Roman Toilets in the Northwestern Provinces of the Roman Empire by Stefanie Hoss. ii+152 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). 378 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 31. ISBN 9781784917258. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents a selection of papers and case studies first presented at a conference designed to focus on the toilets of the Northwestern provinces of the Roman Empire, taking place at Radboud University on the 1st and 2nd of May 2009. Papers demonstrate the value of scientific analysis of waste to understand the food habits and diseases of the Roman users of the toilet, while elsewhere questions on how to find the necessary expertise and financing for such investigations were raised.

It is impossible at this time to write a definitive history of toilets and toilet-use in Roman times. Much more research is needed to get a clear view of all aspects surrounding human waste removal during the Roman period. While the basics of the architectural aspects of Roman toilets are better known by now, other aspects have been only touched upon briefly. It is hoped that this conference and its proceedings volume will not be the last on this subject in the Northwestern provinces, but just a start for this interesting research topic.
NEW: Palmyrena: Palmyra and the Surrounding Territory from the Roman to the Early Islamic period by Jørgen Christian Meyer. x+220 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (143 plates in colour). 377 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917074. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917081. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is the first investigation of the relationship between Palmyra and its surrounding territory from the Roman to the early Islamic period since D. Schlumberger’s pioneer campaigns in the mountains northwest of Palmyra in the late 1930s. It discusses the agricultural potential of the hinterland, its role in the food supply of the city, and the interaction with the nomadic networks on the Syrian dry steppe. The investigation is based on an extensive joint Syrian-Norwegian surface survey north of Palmyra in 2008, 2010 and 2011 and on studies of satellite imagery. It contains a gazetteer of 70 new sites, which include numerous villages, estates, forts, stations and water management systems.

About the Author:
Dr Phil. Jørgen Christian Meyer is professor in Ancient History at the Department of Archaeology, History, Cultural Studies and Religion, University of Bergen, Norway. From 2008 to 2013 he was head of the project entitled Palmyrena: City, Hinterland and Caravan Trade between Orient and Occident.
NEW: Elements of Continuity: Stone Cult in the Maltese Islands by George Azzopardi. x+94 pages; 41 figs. In black & white. 370 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916954. £18.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916961. £9.60 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stones can serve an infinite array of functions both when they are worked and when they are left in a ‘raw’ state. Depending on their function, stones can also be meaningful objects especially when they act as vehicles of ideas or instruments of representation. And it is, therefore, in their functional context, that the meaning of stones can be best grasped.

The stones dealt with in this study are non-figural (or aniconic) or, sometimes, semi-figural. They come from ritual contexts and, as such, act as a material representation of divine presence in their role as betyls. But it is not mainly the representational aspect of these stones that this study seeks to highlight. As material representations of divine presence that are also worshipped, these particular stones form part of a phenomenon that seems to know no geographical or temporal boundaries. They are of a universal character.

It is this universal character of theirs that seems to qualify these stones as elements forming part of the phenomenon of continuity: continuity across different cultures and in different places along several centuries. It is this phenomenon which this study seeks to highlight through a study of these stones. The Maltese islands are presented as a case study to demonstrate the phenomenon of continuity through a study of these stones. Worship of stones in representation of divine presence is found on the Maltese islands since prehistoric times. But the practice survived several centuries under different cultures represented by unknown communities during the islands’ prehistory and the Phoenicians / Carthaginians and the Romans in early historic times.
NEW: Die Ausrüstung der römischen Armee auf der Siegessäule des Marcus Aurelius in Rom Ein Vergleich zwischen der skulpturalen Darstellung und den archäologischen Bodenfunden by Boris Alexander Nikolaus Burandt. iv+412 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. German text. 369 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 28. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916930. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916947. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The reliefs of the column of Marcus Aurelius in Rome are used extensively for the illustration of Roman soldiers. However, despite the fact that in the last decades a number of sites at the Danube Limes have been analyzed, where numerous militaria from the Markomannic Wars have emerged, there is no comparison between this work of official Roman art and the archaeological finds. This book aims to address this lacuna. Each piece of equipment of the Roman soldier is analyzed in its sculptural representation and compared with the existing finds as well as supplementary comparisons with secondary sources. The result is a broad picture of the Roman army under Marcus Aurelius and of Rome's depiction of their forces in state propaganda. In addition, the present work comprehensively separates the antique parts of the frieze from the additions made during the late Renaissance for the first time and thus provides a solid basis for future archaeological and art historical evaluations.

About the Author
Boris A. N. Burandt studied Archeology of the Roman Provinces, Classical Archeology, History of Art and Ancient History at the University of Cologne, and specialized early in Roman military equipment. After completing his studies he was research assistant at the Morphomata International Center for Advanced Studies and in three projects of the German Archaeological Institute as well as a trainee of the State Office for National Heritage Conservation in the Rhineland. He also participated in various excavations and campaigns in Germany, Italy and North Africa. Since 2017 he has undertaken research at the Goethe-University in Frankfurt on the Main about Roman memorabilia in the context of gladiator fights and chariot races. This book is based on his PhD thesis, which was written between 2012 and 2015 at the University of Cologne.

German Description:
Die Reliefs der Marcussäule in Rom bilden seit Langem vielfach verwendete Vorlagen zur Illustration römischer Soldaten. Doch obwohl in den letzten Dekaden mehrere Fundplätze am Donaulimes aufgearbeitet wurden, an denen zahlreiche Militaria aus den Markomannenkriegen zutage gekommen sind, fehlt bislang ein Vergleich zwischen den Arbeiten der offiziellen römischen Staatskunst und den archäologischen Bodenfunden. Diesen Mangel soll nun das vorliegende Werk beheben. Jeder Ausrüstungsgegenstand des römischen Soldaten wird in seiner skulpturalen Darstellung analysiert und mit den vorliegenden Funden sowie ergänzenden Sekundärquellen verglichen. Es entsteht somit ein umfangreiches Bild der römischen Armee unter Marcus Aurelius und von Roms Umgang mit dem Militär in der staatlichen Propaganda. Außerdem separiert das vorliegende Werk erstmals umfassend die antiken Partien des Friesbandes von den Ergänzungen der Spätrenaissance und legt somit eine solide Basis für künftige archäologische und kunsthistorische Auswertungen.

Boris A. N. Burandt studierte Archäologie der römischen Provinzen, Klassische Archäologie, Kunstgeschichte und Alte Geschichte an der Universität zu Köln und spezialisierte sich früh auf die Erforschung römischer Militärausrüstung. Nach seinem Studium war B. Burandt Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Internationalen Kolleg Morphomata und in drei Projekten des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts sowie Volontär des Rheinischen Amtes für Bodendenkmalpflege. Außerdem nahm er an diversen Ausgrabungen und Kampagnen in Deutschland, Italien und Nordafrika teil. Seit 2017 forscht B. Burandt an der Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt am Main zu römischen Memorabilien im Kontext von Gladiatorenkämpfen und Wagenrennen. Das vorliegende Buch basiert auf seiner Dissertation, die zwischen 2012 und 2015 an der Universität zu Köln entstanden ist.
NEW: Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla by Mario Ramírez Galán. 434 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (145 colour plates). Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access. 39 2017. ISBN 9781784917098. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla is a project that aims to encompass all aspects of battlefield archaeology, in order to be a reference work in this study area. Therefore, a detailed historiographical study about this branch of archaeology has been made, from early origins until the present day, allowing us to gain a deeper understanding of the evolution of battlefield archaeology. Two methodologies, archaeological and museographical, are proposed for the treatment of this particular type of archaeological site. In order to prove the viability of both methodologies, a theoretical application has been carried out in two research examples from different periods, demonstrating both the project’s methodological validity and reinforcing our theories.

Two registers were made regarding battlefields ¬- one historical and another archaeological. The purpose of this was to catalogue all possible existing sites in the interior of the Iberian Peninsula from Roman times through to the Spanish Civil War, which will hopefully serve as a point of reference for future researchers. Through this book, people will be able to understand the great potential of Spanish battlefields and their heritage. Furthermore, Spain could be regarded as a very important country regarding battlefield archaeology.

Spanish Description:
Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla es un trabajo que recoge todos los aspectos referentes a la arqueología de campos de batalla, con el objetivo de ser una obra de referencia en esta área de estudio. En ella se ha llevado a cabo un estudio historiográfico pormenorizado de esta rama de la arqueología, remontándose hasta los orígenes de la misma, permitiendo comprender su evolución hasta nuestros días. Se han planteado dos propuestas metodológicas, arqueológica y museográfica, para el tratamiento de esta tipología de yacimiento. Para comprobar la viabilidad de ambas metodologías se realizó una aplicación teórica en dos casos de estudio de distinta época, lo que nos permitió ver su validez y reforzar nuestras teorías.

Para esta obra elaboramos dos registros de campos de batalla, uno de tipo histórico y otro de tipo arqueológico, con el objetivo de catalogar todos los posibles yacimientos existentes en interior peninsular desde la época romana hasta la Guerra Civil, sirviendo así de punto de partida para futuros investigadores. A través de este libro se puede comprobar el gran potencial que posee España en campos de batalla y que podría situarse entre los países más destacados.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Glassware and Glassworking in Thessaloniki 1st Century BC – 6th Century AD by Anastassios Ch. Antonaras. viii+384 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (70 colour plates). 360 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 27. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916794. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916800. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Glassware and Glassworking in Thessaloniki: 1st Century BC – 6th Century AD is a detailed examination of the production of glass and glass vessels in the eastern Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Age to the Early Christian period, analysing production techniques and decoration. The volume establishes the socio-economic framework of glassmaking and glassmakers’ social status in the Roman world generally and in Thessaloniki specifically, while identifying probable local products. Presented are all the excavation glass finds from Thessaloniki and its environs found between 1912 and 2002. A typological classification was created for almost 800 objects – which encompass the overwhelming majority of common excavation finds in the Balkans – as well as for the decorative themes that appear on the more valuable pieces. Comparative material from the entire Mediterranean was studied, verified in its entirety through primary publications. A summary of the excavation history of these vessels’ find-spots is provided, with details for each excavation, in many cases unpublished and identified through research in the archives of the relevant museums and Ephorates of Antiquities. The uses of glass vessels are presented, and there is discussion and interpretation of the reasons that permitted, or imposed, the choice of glass for their production. The finds are statistically analysed, and a chronological overview examining them century by century on the basis of use and place of production is given. Finally, there is an effort to interpret the data from the study in historical terms, and to incorporate the results into the political-economic evolution of the region’s political history. Relatively unfamiliar glassmaking terms are explained in a glossary of glassworking technology and typology terms. The material is fully documented in drawings and photographs, and every object in the catalogue is illustrated. A detailed index of the 602 geographical terms in the work, many unknown, concludes the book.

About the Author:
Anastassios C. Antonaras, a specialist in the history of glass, jewellery and textiles, is an archaeologist and curator at the Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki. His books include: Glassworking, Ancient and Medieval: Terminology, Technology and Typology; A Greek- English-English-Greek Dictionary; Roman and Early Christian Glassworking: Vessels from Thessaloniki and its Region (which received a prize from the Academy of Athens in 2010); Fire and Sand: Ancient Glass in the Princeton University Art Museum; and Artisanal Production in Ancient and Byzantine Thessaloniki: Archaeological, Literary and Epigraphic Evidence. Antonaras has organized numerous exhibitions and symposia, and has published numerous articles on objects from Thessaloniki. He currently serves on the board of the Christian Archaeological Association and is the secretary general of the International Association for the History of Glass.

L’artisanat dans les cites antiques de l’Algérie (Ier siècle avant notre ère –VIIe siècle après notre ère) by Touatia Amraoui. xx+426 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with one plate in colour. French text with English summary. 357 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 26. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916671. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916688. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Normally dealt with in a rather limited way, through the examination of a particular activity or geographical zone, the artisans of ancient North Africa are here, for the first time, the subject of an entire book. Focusing on urban production in Algeria during Antiquity, this critical study brings together new documentation drawn up on the basis of field data and the consultation of archives from a long history of survey in Algeria and France. This synthesis reviews the archaeological sites with workshops by defining their activities, at the same time as analyzing how they operated and looking at them typologically. Based on a comparison with documented workshops in the Western Roman world, the study of the techniques highlights the very strong similarities between the Roman regions but also the specific local variations of the methods used in Africa at this time. Maghreb ethnography shows the permanence of certain practices over time while attempting to reconstruct the "chaîne opératoire". Although it is still difficult to obtain an overall picture both from a spatial and a chronological point of view of the artisanal topography, the data reveals the existence of varied artisanal and commercial activities in urban areas throughout Antiquity.

French description: Abordé généralement de façon ponctuelle à travers une activité particulière ou une zone géographique donnée, l’artisanat en Afrique du nord antique fait ici pour la première fois l’objet d’un ouvrage. Centrée sur la production urbaine en Algérie durant l’Antiquité, cette étude critique rassemble une nouvelle documentation élaborée à partir des données de terrain et de la consultation des archives à partir d’un long travail d’enquête en Algérie et en France. La synthèse fait le point sur les sites archéologiques présentant des ateliers en définissant leur activité tout en analysant leur fonctionnement et leur typologie. En s’appuyant sur une comparaison avec les découvertes d’ateliers dans le monde romain occidental, l’étude des techniques met en évidence les similitudes très fortes entre les régions romaines mais aussi les spécificités locales des méthodes employées en Afrique durant cette période. L’ethnographie maghrébine montre quant à elle la permanence de certaines pratiques à travers le temps tout en complétant l’essai de restitution de la « chaîne opératoire ». S’il est encore difficile d’avoir une vision d’ensemble tant d’un point de vue spatial que chronologique de la topographie artisanale, les données recensées révèlent l’existence d’activités artisanales et commerciales variées incluses dans l’ensemble du domaine urbain tout au long de l’Antiquité.

Biographie: Actuellement membre de l’École des Hautes Études Hispaniques et Ibériques de la Casa de Velázquez à Madrid et à partir d’octobre 2017, chercheur au Centre Camille Jullian (CNRS, Aix-en-Provence), Touatia Amraoui est docteur en Histoire et Archéologie de l’Université Lumière Lyon 2. Elle est l’auteur d’articles sur l’artisanat et l’économie dans le Maghreb antique. Elle a collaboré à plusieurs projets de recherche internationaux en Algérie, au Maroc, en France, en Espagne et en Angleterre.
Ras il-Wardija Sanctuary Revisited A re-assessment of the evidence and newly informed interpretations of a Punic-Roman sanctuary in Gozo (Malta) by George Azzopardi. vi+82 pages; black & white illustrations throughout. 354 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916695. £19.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916701. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The secluded sanctuary on the coastal promontory of Ras il-Wardija on the central Mediterranean island of Gozo (near Malta) constitutes another landmark on the religious map of the ancient Mediterranean. Ritual activity at the sanctuary seems to be evidenced from around the 3rd century BC to the 2nd century AD and, possibly, even as late as the 4th century AD. This ritual activity was focused in a small built temple and in a rock-cut cave that seems to have incorporated a built extension in a later stage. But the practised cult or cults were aniconic and remained so largely throughout. This may explain why the sanctuary’s excavators did not report any findings of statuettes or any figural images. Contemporaneously, figural images were also venerated on other sites showing that, for a long while, iconism and aniconism co-existed on the Maltese islands. There might have been more than one deity venerated in this sanctuary. Dionysos could have been one of them. But whoever they were, they are likely to have been somehow connected with the sea and / or with a maritime community or communities as the sanctuary itself evidently was.

About the Author
George Azzopardi is a practising archaeologist hailing from the island of Gozo and is quite familiar with the site. His main research interests focus on the Classical period with the phenomenon of continuity as a marked backdrop. In line with this view, he directed his recent research on religious activity in Classical times as being often in continuity from earlier – sometimes, even prehistoric – traditions or inspired from earlier sources. To this effect, human history is seen as a continuum with hardly any identifiable beginnings or intervals.
Roman Frontier Studies 2009 Proceedings of the XXI International Congress of Roman Frontier Studies (Limes Congress) held at Newcastle upon Tyne in August 2009 edited by Nick Hodgson, Paul Bidwell and Judith Schachtmann. Paperback edition; xxii+726 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 336 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 25. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915902. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915919. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The XXI International Congress of Roman Frontier studies was hosted by Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums in Newcastle upon Tyne (Great Britain) in 2009, 60 years after the first Limeskongress organised in that city by Eric Birley in 1949.

Sixty years on, delegates could reflect on how the Congress has grown and changed over six decades and could be heartened at the presence of so many young scholars and a variety of topics and avenues of research into the army and frontiers of the Roman empire that would not have been considered in 1949.

Papers are organised into the same thematic sessions as in the actual conference: Women and Families in the Roman Army; Roman Roads; The Roman Frontier in Wales; The Eastern and North African Frontiers; Smaller Structures: towers and fortlets; Recognising Differences in Lifestyles through Material Culture; Barbaricum; Britain; Roman Frontiers in a Globalised World; Civil Settlements; Death and Commemoration; Danubian and Balkan Provinces; Camps; Logistics and Supply; The Germanies and Augustan and Tiberian Germany; Spain; Frontier Fleets.

This wide-ranging collection of papers enriches the study of Roman frontiers in all their aspects.

About the Editors:
Nick Hodgson is Archaeological Projects Manager for Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums and has excavated for many years at South Shields, Wallsend and other sites on the northern frontier of Roman Britain. He has published widely on Iron Age and Roman archaeology and is the author of Hadrian’s Wall: Archaeology and History at the limit of Rome’s empire (2017).

Paul Bidwell was Head of Archaeology at Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums for almost three decades until his retirement in 2013. He has published numerous monographs, excavation reports and articles and is the author of Roman Forts in Britain (1997 and 2007). He is now an independent researcher and archaeological and heritage consultant.

Judith Schachtmann obtained an MA at Humboldt University, Berlin, with a comparison of German, British and Irish archaeological world heritage sites. For two years she was a researcher in the DFG (German Research Foundation) and is currently working on a PhD thesis on archaeological museums and exhibitions in Saxony during the national socialist era.


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SOMA 2014. Proceedings of the 18th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology Wrocław – Poland, 24-26 April 2014 edited by Blazej Stanislawski and Hakan Öniz. viii+192 pages; illustrated throughout with 35 plates in colour. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784914943. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The 18th annual meeting of the Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology (SOMA) was held in Wrocław-Poland, 24th to 26th April 2014.

Since prehistoric times the Mediterranean has acted as a stage for intense interactions between groups inhabiting regions that are now studied mainly within various sub-fields of ancient studies. In recent years, however, the development of research techniques and analytical models of archaeological evidence have identified similar historical paths that are similar, if not, in some cases, common to these disparate areas of the ancient world from West (Iberian peninsula) to East (Anatolia and Levant), from North (Europe, Black Sea Coast) to South (Maghreb and Egypt).

The 18th SOMA provided a forum for presentations related to the above-mentioned topics, as well as general themes such as the role of the sea, trade, colonization, even piracy, using archaeological data collected within contexts associated with the Mediterranean Basin and the area referred to as the Ancient Near East, ranging chronologically from the Prehistoric to Medieval periods. This current volume contains 22 papers selected from the 90 presented.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Bronze Age Monuments and Bronze Age, Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon Landscapes at Cambridge Road, Bedford by Andy Chapman and Pat Chapman. x+146 pages; illustrated throughout with 55 plates in colour. 337 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916046. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916053. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Open area excavation on 14.45ha of land at Cambridge Road, Bedford was carried out in 2004-5 in advance of development. A background scatter of Early Neolithic flint, including a Langdale stone axe, may be related to the nearby presence of the Cardington causewayed enclosure.

Two Early Bronze Age ring ditches sat on a low lying gravel ridge between the River Great Ouse and the Elstow Brook. A causewayed ring ditch, 30m in diameter, had a broad entrance to the southwest, where a shallow length of ditch either silted or had been filled in. Adjacent to the shallow ditch was a pit containing three crouched burials, probably in an oak-lined chamber, radiocarbon dated to the early Middle Bronze Age. A nearby small round barrow enclosed a deep central grave containing the crouched burial of a woman, probably within an oak-lined chamber. An L-shaped ditch to the east, radiocarbon dated to the Middle to Late Bronze transition, may have been the final feature of the monument group. It parallels the addition of L-shaped ditches/pit alignments at other contemporary ring ditch monuments.

Shallow linear ditches formed a land boundary extending north and south from the Bronze Age ring ditch, and other contemporary ditches were remnants of a rectilinear field system, contemporary with a scatter of irregular pits and a waterhole. This phase came to an end at the Late Bronze Age/ Early Iron Age transition, when a large assemblage of decorated pottery was dumped in the final fills of the waterhole.

By the Middle Iron Age there was a new linear boundary, comprising three near parallel ditches, aligned north-south; a rectangular enclosure and a complex of intercut pits. The pottery assemblage was sparse, but the upper fills of both the deepest linear boundary ditch and the pit complex contained some Roman pottery. To the south-east an extensive Romano-British ladder settlement is dated to the 1st to 4th centuries AD. Only the northern fringe lay within the excavated area, comprising successive boundary ditches, along with pits, a stone-lined well, an inhumation burial and animal burials.

In the early Anglo-Saxon period (5th-6th centuries AD), there was a loose cluster of three sunken featured buildings with another to the south. In the middle Saxon period (8th-9th centuries AD) a small rectangular mausoleum contained a single inhumation burial, with a second inhumation to the immediate west. Subsequent land use comprised truncated furrows of the medieval ridge and furrow field cultivation and post-medieval quarry pits.
Romano-Celtic Mask Puzzle Padlocks A study in their Design, Technology and Security by Jerry Slocum and Dic Sonneveld. Hardback; 144 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 325 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915643. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915650. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents a little-known and ingenious artefact of the Roman world: a small puzzle padlock whose font plate bears a face or ‘mask’ of ‘Celtic’ style. The padlocks were designed to secure small bags or pouches and their distribution extended across Europe with the majority found in the Danubian region and in the vicinity of Aquileia.

The authors examine the cultural context, the origins and uses of the padlocks, and provide detailed solutions to the puzzle mechanisms. The publication provides a fully-illustrated catalog of the known 156 examples, categorises their types according to construction and style, and explores the technicalities of the subject by the process of constructing replica mask puzzle padlocks.

About the authors:
Jerry Slocum, a retired Aerospace executive, is an historian, collector and author specialising in the field of mechanical puzzles. His personal collection of over 40,000 mechanical puzzles is believed to be the world’s largest. It includes hundreds of puzzle padlocks including 34 Roman mask puzzle padlocks. He is the author of 16 earlier books on puzzles and their history including Puzzles Old and New in 1986, The 15 Puzzle, The Cube (about Rubik’s Cube), and The Tangram Book. In 2006, Slocum donated his entire puzzle collection and library of over 5,000 puzzle books to the Lilly Library at Indiana University, marking the first time a major collection of mechanical puzzles was made available to the public in an academic setting. He also founded The International Puzzle Collectors’ Party in 1978 that organises annual gatherings in Asia, Europe and the USA of as many as 450 serious puzzle collectors from all over the world.

Until his retirement in 2011, Dic Sonneveld was an Information and Computer Technology (ICT) professional at Leiden University. Jerry knew him as designer of a type of mechanical puzzles, using partly self-written software. In 1997 Jerry asked him to contribute to the research for the history of the Chinese Puzzle, better known as Tangram (which was an international puzzle rage in the early 19th century). From that time on he assisted Jerry with literature research, library research and Internet research, which resulted in The 15 Puzzle book (about the worldwide puzzle craze in 1880) and several others. All these experiences and knowledge now have culminated in the research for this book about Roman-Celtic mask puzzle padlocks. It all started in January 2013, as always, with a simple inquiry from Jerry; he wanted to know more about these “ancient trick locks”.

Birds, Beasts and Burials: A study of the human-animal relationship in Romano-British St. Albans by Brittany Elayne Hill. vi+204 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 35 colour plates. 333 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 24. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915964. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915971. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The human-animal relationship is one that has been pondered by scholars for ages. It has been used to define both what it means to be human and what it means to be animal. Birds, Beasts and Burials examines human-animal relationships as found in the mortuary record within the area of Verulamium that is now situated in the modern town of St. Albans. Once considered a major centre, the mortuary rites given to its people suggest high variabilities in the approach to the personhood of certain classes of both people and animals. While 480 human individuals were examined, only a small percentage was found to have been afforded the rite of a human-animal co-burial. It is this small percentage that is examined in greater detail. Of major concern are the treatments to both the human and animal pre- and post- burial and the point at which the animal enters into the funerary practice.

About the Author:
Dr Brittany Elayne Hill is an American archaeologist who completed her undergraduate studies at University of Kansas in 2009 before coming to the University of Southampton in 2010 to pursue her master’s degree, which was then followed up by her acceptance to a PhD course in 2011. An ongoing fascination with Romano-British culture and osteology inspired her to engage in research covered in this book. She is particularly pleased by the combined representation of human osteology and zooarchaeology demonstrated in this monograph, as both play roles in the formation of the Romano-British burials found in St. Albans. This is her first monograph and she is excited to release the results of her PhD work to the public sphere for the first time. She is hopeful that the content of this monograph inspires others to consider the influence human-animal relationships have on the formation of ancient and modern cultures alike.
Catalogue of Artefacts from Malta in the British Museum by Josef Mario Briffa SJ and Claudia Sagona. viii+326 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 332 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915889. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915896. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The archaeology of the Maltese archipelago is remarkable. Lying at the heart of the central Mediterranean, ancient lives were, at times, moulded by isolation and harsh elements and the landscape is shaped by millennia of intensive land use. Ancient finds from the islands are rare, and those held in the British Museum form an important collection. Represented is a wide cultural range, spanning the Early and Late Neolithic, the Bronze Age, Roman and more recent historic periods. From the early 1880s, Malta attracted a fascinating array of historians, collectors and travellers and, on one level, the British Museum’s holdings represent their activities, but on another, the collections reflect the complex path antiquarianism has played out in Malta as it moved steadily toward fledgling archaeological investigations. Significantly, artefacts excavated by notable Maltese archaeologist, Sir Themistocles Zammit, at the key Neolithic site of Tarxien, and those uncovered by Margaret Murray at Borġ in-Nadur form a crucial part of the collection.

About the Authors:
Josef Mario Briffa SJ is Lecturer at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome, and a Roman Catholic priest. He has recently completed his PhD at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London on The Figural World of the Southern Levant during the Late Iron Age. He also holds a Licentiate in Sacred Scripture from the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome. His research has included the history of Maltese archaeology, with a focus on the work of Fr Emmanuel Magri SJ (1851-1907), pioneer in Maltese archaeology and folklore studies. He has excavated in Malta and Israel, and is currently a staff member of The Lautenschläger Azekah Expedition.

Claudia Sagona is Honorary Principal Fellow in the Centre for Classics and Archaeology at The University of Melbourne. Her research has taken her from the islands of the Maltese Archipelago, to the highlands of north-eastern Anatolia and the Caucasus. She has written a number of books concerning Malta’s ancient past, including a comprehensive volume for Cambridge University Press, The Archaeology of Malta: From the Neolithic through the Roman Period (2015), another on the Phoenician-Punic evidence, The Archaeology of Punic Malta (2002), and has delved into the Mithraic mystery cult, Looking for Mithra in Malta (2009). In 2007, she was made an honorary member of the National Order of Merit of Malta (M.O.M.).

‘Poedicvlorvm oppida’ Spazi urbani della Puglia centrale in età romana by Custode Silvio Fioriello. 248 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English summary. 331 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 23. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915926. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915933. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The indigenous persistence, texture, articulation, shape and functionality of the urban definition of the municipia in central Apulia demonstrate the nature of the complex history and settlement of this area in the long period between the age of Romanization and the third century AD. The comprehensive collection and examination of the material evidence make it possible to reconstruct – for the first time, in an organic manner and in a global framework – the profile of the urban space of ‘Poediculorum oppida’. This has been carried out according to a dynamic perspective that reveals signs of restructuring and approval, of novelty and vibrancy, of strength and interaction, to make possible the reconsideration of that stubborn idea, prevalent until recently, of an ineluctable ‘crisis’, and to draw a picture of urban geography calibrated according to an intense and morphogenetic tension in terms of the assimilation of Roman culture and adaptation to local conditions.

Italian description: Persistenza indigena, consistenza, articolazione, forma e funzionalità urbanistiche dei municipia della Puglia centrale consentono di leggere la complessa vicenda storica e insediativa di questo comparto nel lungo periodo esteso fra l’età della romanizzazione e il III sec. d.C. La raccolta e disamina complessive del patrimonio documentario permettono così di ricostruire – per la prima volta, in maniera organica e in un disegno globale – il profilo dello spazio urbano dei ‘Poediculorum oppida’ secondo una prospettiva dinamica che lascia cogliere segni di ristrutturazione e di omologazione, di novità e di vivacità, di rottura e di interazione, per provare a riconsiderare quell’idea pervicace di ineluttabile ‘crisi’ tradita fino a tempi recenti e a tracciare un quadro poleografico calibrato su una intensa e morfogenetica tensione fra metabolismo e simbiosi.
Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times Η ΜΕΓΑΛΗ ΡΟΔΙΑΚΗ ΠΛΑΣΤΙΚΗ ΤΩΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΣΤΙΚΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΡΩΜΑΪΚΩΝ ΧΡΟΝΩΝ by Kalliope Bairami. xviii+864 pages; 222 plates, 23 in colour. Greek text with 19 page English summary. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784915766. £80.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hellenistic society of the Rhodian metropolis, a naval aristocracy (Gabrielsen), dedicated bronze statues of their members in the sanctuaries and public buildings and used marble and -occasionally-lartios lithos to carve portrait-statues originally for funerary use and in a later period also for honorific purposes, figures of deities and decorative sculpture for the houses and the parks. The artists, local and itinerant, from Athens, the islands and the Asia Minor, established artistic workshops on Rhodes, some of them active for three centuries and for more than one generation. The impact of Rhodian art is evident on the islands of the Aegean and the cities of Asia Minor, due to the expansion of the Rhodian Peraia. Together with Pergamon, Rhodes emerges as a productive artistic centre of the Hellenistic era, creating statuary types and combining them with landscape elements. The radiance of its art is evident in the late Hellenistic period in Rome, the new capital of the world, where the Rhodian artists create mythological statuary groups set in grottoes.

This volume presents the large-scale Rhodian sculpture of the Hellenistic and Roman period through the publication of sixty unpublished sculptures of life size or larger than life size, together with forty-five sculptures already published. The sculptures are grouped according to their statuary type (gods, mortals and portraits), while those unable to be firmly identified due to their fragmentary condition are grouped under the category ‘uncertain identification’. The presentation of the sculptures is further supplemented by a technical description and an analysis of stylistic characteristics according to chronological development. Excavation data, wherever available, are also provided.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Saxa loquuntur: Roman Epitaphs from North-Western Croatia/Rimski epitafi iz sjeverozapadne Hrvatske by Branka Migotti. vi+126 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Full text presented in English and Croatian. 320 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915667. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915674. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book examines Roman funerary material from three Roman cities of the south-western regions of the Roman province of Pannonia (modern-day north-western Croatia): Andautonia (Ščitarjevo near Zagreb), Siscia (Sisak), and Aquae Balissae (Daruvar).

The material chosen reflects the potential of Roman funerary monuments and gravestones for gaining an insight into the historical, social and psychological aspects of Roman provincial society. It enables a perception of the gradual development of the Romano-Pannonian milieu from the 1st to the 4th centuries in its various social aspects: civilian, military, and religious. Within this frame, the focus is on the interaction between the individual and the community as reflected in monologues or even dialogues between the deceased and the living, conveyed through epitaphs and depictions. The deceased more often than not strove to represent themselves on their monuments in a ‘wished-for’ rather than a realistic manner. All of the examples illustrated here reflect in one way or another the Roman obsession with the eternal preservation of the deceased’s memory.

This volume is one of the ‘deliverables’ (dissemination of the results prevalently among the non-professional readers) of the project entitled: Roman funerary monuments of south-western Pannonia in their material, social, and religious context (IP-2014-09-4632), headed by B. Migotti. Its publication was partly supported by the Croatian Science Foundation.

Branca Migotti was born in Zagreb in 1954 and took the following degrees from the Faculty of Philosophy of the Zagreb University: BA in Archaeology and the English Language in 1978, MA in 1985 and PhD in 1992, both in the field of the early Christian archaeology of Dalmatia. She is currently employed at the Division of Archaeology of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Zagreb as a scholarly consultant and Head of the Division, and she is a regular collaborator in the postgraduate study programme ‘Roman and Early Christian Archaeology’ at the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb. Her main fields of scholarly interests are early Christianity and the funerary archaeology of Pannonia, with a stress on funerary monuments as evidence for social, material and religious aspects of life in the Roman province.
Late Roman to Late Byzantine/Early Islamic Period Lamps in the Holy Land The Collection of the Israel Antiquities Authority by Varda Sussman. iv+635 pages; highly illustrated throughout in black and white with 10 colour plates. 321 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915704. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915711. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume illustrates lamps from the Byzantine period excavated in the Holy Land and demonstrates the extent of their development since the first enclosing/capturing of light (fire) within a portable man-made vessel. Lamps, which held important material and religious functions during daily life and the afterlife, played a large role in conveying art and cultural and political messages through the patterns chosen to decorate them. These cultural, or even more their religious affinities, were chosen to be delivered on lamps (not on other vessels) more than ever during the Byzantine period; these small portable objects were used to ‘promote’ beliefs like the ‘press’ of today. Each cultural group marked the artifacts / lamps with its symbols, proverbs from the Old and New Testaments, and this process throws light on the deep rivalry between them in this corner of the ancient world.

The great variety of lamps dealt with in this volume, arranged according to their various regions of origin, emphasizes their diversity, and probably local workshop manufacture, and stands in contrast to such a small country without any physical geographic barriers to cross, only mental ones (and where one basket of lamps could satisfy the full needs of the local population). The lamps of the Byzantine period reflect the era and the struggle in the cradle of the formation of the four leading faiths and cultures: Judaism (the oldest), Samaritanism (derived from the Jewish faith), newly-born Christianity – all three successors to the existing former pagan culture – and the last, Islam, standing on a new threshold.

Unlike during the former Greek and Roman periods of rule, the land of Israel during the Byzantine period did not really have a central government or authority. The variety of the oil lamps, their order and place of appearance during the Byzantine period can be described as a ‘symphony played by a self-conducted orchestra, where new soloists rise and add a different motet, creating stormy music that expresses the rhythm of the era’.

This volume, like the author’s earlier books on this subject, is intended to create a basis for further study and evaluation of the endless aspects that lamps bring to light and which are beyond the capacity of any single scholar.

About the Author:
Varda Sussman was born in Palestine (now Israel) and graduated from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (BA and MA) in the faculties of Prehistory and Archaeology. She majored in prehistory with Professor M. Stekelis, in Classical archaeology with Professor M. Avi Yonah, and in ancient history with Professor B. Mazar. She studied for one year in the Oriental Institute in Chicago (USA). From 1950, while studying and working at the Department of Antiquity (now the Israel Antiquities Authority), she participated in various archaeological excavations. In 1964 she became curator / keeper of all treasures (finds) discovered since 1948 and developed the system of storage which enabled students and scholars to obtain, examine and study the material which she had catalogued. Among the catalogued finds were many oil lamps which were objects of artistic and historical significance. Two exhibitions were held of the material: the first on Decorated Jewish Oil Lamps (with catalogue) in 1972 in The Israel Museum, the second illustrating the regional lamps of the northern part of the country in the University of Haifa Museum. These established the recognition of typical workshops which had fashioned special lamps for the use of the Jewish and Samaritan populations. The author’s Ornamented Jewish Oil Lamps from the Fall of the Second Temple through the Revolt of Bar Kochba was published in Hebrew by Mosad Bialik and the Israel Exploration Society in 1972; it was translated into English and published by Aris & Phillips Ltd in 1982. She has also published other articles concerning various aspect of art derived from oil lamps, and a num
Ländliche Siedlungsstrukturen im römischen Spanien Das Becken von Vera und das Camp de Tarragona –zwei Mikroregionen im Vergleich by Jan Schneider. vi+214 pages; illustrated throughout with 35 plates in colour. German text; concluding chapter in German and English. 317 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 22. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915544. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915551. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The present study deals with the comparison of rural settlements, aiming to compare developments in various settlements of the Iberian Peninsula during the Roman era. This is to show to what extent structures in the hinterland show parallels or are different from one another and to explore the causes of these similarities and differences. Aspects of the Roman economy must be taken into account as well as the micro-regional influences of pre-Roman settlement or topographical conditions. To achieve this goal, various aspects of rural settlements such as the dating, size or status of a place and its location and environmental conditions are analyzed and related. Archaeological, geographic and statistical methods of investigation are used. These methods, along with the complete resulting data, are fully disclosed in order to allow the comparison to be extended to other regions. The Vera basin and the Camp de Tarragona were chosen as study areas. The former is located in the south-east of the Iberian Peninsula on the Spanish Mediterranean coast, and was seen in the Roman period as the hinterland of the city of Baria, today's Villaricos. Also on the Mediterranean coast of Spain, but in the north, is Camp de Tarragona. The name refers to the surrounding area of the Roman city of Tarraco, capital of the Hispania Tarraconensis province of the same name.

German Description: Die vorliegende Untersuchung beschäftigt sich mit dem Vergleich ländlicher Siedlungsstrukturen. Ziel der Arbeit ist es, die Entwicklungen in verschiedenen Siedlungskammern der Iberischen Halbinsel während der römischen Epoche einander gegenüberzustellen. Dies soll zeigen, inwieweit Strukturen im Hinterland Parallelen aufweisen oder voneinander abweichen und worin die diese Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede begründet sind. Dabei sind Aspekte des römischen Wirtschaftswesens ebenso zu berücksichtigen, wie mikroregionale Einflüsse der vorrömischen Besiedlung oder topographische Gegebenheiten. Um dieses Ziel zu erreichen, werden verschiedene Aspekte ländlicher Siedlungsstrukturen wie Datierung, Größe oder Status eines Platzes und dessen Standort- und Umgebungsbedingungen analysiert und in Beziehung zueinander gesetzt. Dabei kommen archäologische, geographische und statistische Untersuchungsmethoden zum Einsatz. Diese werden ebenso wie sämtliche Daten und Ergebnisse innerhalb der Arbeit vollständig offengelegt, um eine Ausweitung des Vergleichs auf weitere Regionen zu ermöglichen. Als Untersuchungsgebiete wurden das Becken von Vera und das Camp de Tarragona ausgewählt. Ersteres liegt im Südosten der Iberischen Halbinsel an der spanischen Mittelmeerküste und war in römischer Zeit als Hinterland der Stadt Baria, dem heutigen Villaricos, anzusehen. Ebenfalls an der Mittelmeerküste Spaniens, jedoch in dessen Norden, liegt das Camp de Tarragona. Der Name bezeichnet das Umland der römischen Stadt Tarraco, Hauptstadt der gleichnamigen Provinz Hispania Tarraconensis.
Jan Schneider studierte Klassische Archäologie und Alte Geschichte an der Justus-Liebig-Universität in Gießen. Bereits in seiner Magisterarbeit 2010, die in Kooperation zwischen der Universität Gießen und dem Deutschen Archäologischen Institut Madrid betreut wurde, beschäftigte er sich mit dem römischen Spanien. Darauf aufbauend folgte seine Dissertation Ländliche Siedlungsstrukturen im römischen Spanien. Untersuchungen im Becken von Vera und dem Camp de Tarragona die 2015 an der Universität Gießen eingereicht wurde. Er ist seit seinem Studium aktives Mitglied im Netzwerk zur Erforschung der Iberischen Halbinsel (TOLETUM) und arbeitet derzeit als Archäologe in Deutschland.

La Cerámica Común romana en la Bahía Gaditana en Época romana Alfarería y centros de producción by Lourdes Girón Anguiozar. xxii+424 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English introduction. 315 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 21. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915360. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915377. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volumes examines Roman pottery and production centers in modern-day Cádiz.

The innovative aspects of this research are several but we will limit them to three: the typological classification from a closer perspective to the mentality of the old potter; the concept of ‘social measure’, which connects the dimensions of the containers with the type of consumer and social group; and, the ethnoarchaeological aspects applied to the construction of a furnace, which have enabled to better specify various aspects relating to the manufacture of common Roman ceramics.

From a methodological point of view, it is proposed a debate about the concept of ‘common pottery’, which is defined as ceramics intended for a common and multipurpose use, more practical than aesthetic. Likewise, it is exposed the great problem of the typologies, seeking not only a logical classification into types and variants, but also a reference to the artisan work. The theme of the ancient name of Roman ceramic forms is faced in order to call by the old names to the Roman pottery forms found today. The concept of ‘social measure’, unprecedented in this type of analysis, pretends to reach a social accepted measure, obtained with a statistical study. This measure is that one around which the values are concentrated.
Amphorae from the Kops Plateau (Nijmegen) Trade and supply to the Lower-Rhineland from the Augustan period to AD 69/70 edited by C. Carreras and J. van den Berg. x+404 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 314 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 20. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915421. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915438. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the year 19 BC, Roman legions arrived in Nijmegen with the aim of conquering the Rhenish territories from the local populations. In addition to the legionaries themselves, the Roman army required a regular provision of staple supplies in order to keep such a war machine in top condition. The archaeological evidence for this provision is a myriad of organic remains (i.e. seeds, bones, pollen) as well as ceramic containers such as amphorae.

One of the first military camps at Nijmegen, together with that on the Hunerberg, was Kops Plateau. This timber fortress – the most northerly military site of the Julio-Claudian period – dating from 12 BC to AD 69, has provided an extraordinary amphora assemblage. At a time when most Roman roads were still only projects, this distant military outpost received amphora products from all over the Mediterranean basin – from Palestine to Greece in the east to Baetica and northern Africa in the west as well as from the Italian core. In addition to amphorae, Kops Plateau also provided a wide repertory of regional vessels whose contents are unknown.

The amphorae from Kops Plateau represent a singular example of Roman military supply in northern Europe at a very early date. Their analysis sheds light on trading routes in the Atlantic regions, and from Gaul to Germany; indeed also on the Claudian invasion of Britain.
Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon Settlement along the Empingham to Hannington Pipeline in Northamptonshire and Rutland by Simon Carlyle, Jason Clarke and Andy Chapman. xii+132 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 308 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915346. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915353. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Between January 2008 and July 2009, Northamptonshire Archaeology, now part of MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology), carried out a series of excavations along the route of a new water pipeline being constructed by Anglian Water Services as part of a major project to increase the supply of water to new homes and businesses in the south-east Midlands region. Nineteen sites were investigated, dating primarily to the Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods.

The earliest remains were a late Bronze Age/early Iron Age pit alignment near Seaton, Rutland. The Iron Age and Roman sites were small rural settlements comprising ditched enclosures, the remains of roundhouses and pits. Settlements were located near Seaton and Caldecott in Rutland and in Northamptonshire at Swinawe Barn near Corby, Thorpe Malsor, White Hill Lodge, Great Cransley and Willows Nursery. A Roman site near Rushton, Northamptonshire may be associated with a villa estate. Other sites included part of a Roman field system at Violet Lane, near Corby, and Roman cremation burials near Gretton, Northamptonshire. The settlements mainly date from the late middle Iron Age, 2nd century BC, through to the 4th century AD, although there was little evidence for direct continuity of settlement between the Iron Age and Roman periods.

An Anglo-Saxon cremation cemetery dated to the late 5th century to mid-7th century AD, at Glaston, Rutland, contained 16 cremation burials deposited in decorated and plain urns along with small assemblages of grave goods, often also burnt on the pyre, and including a brooch, glass beads, and fragments of a bone comb and mount.

Later features generally comprised medieval and post-medieval furrows from ridge and furrow field systems and field boundary ditches.
The Nature and Origin of the Cult of Silvanus in the Roman Provinces of Dalmatia and Pannonia by Ljubica Perinić. vi+126 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 306 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 19. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915124. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915131. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Nature and Origin of the Cult of Silvanus in the Roman Provinces of Dalmatia and Pannonia deals with the cult of Silvanus and presents the evidence and current state of research of the cult in Dalmatia and Pannonia to the wider scholarly community. New perceptions on the subject are proposed and a fresh standpoint from which certain problems may be (re)addressed is presented.

About the Author:
Ljubica Perinić studied Archaeology at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Archaeology, where she defended her PhD thesis in 2008. She works at the Division of Archaeology at the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts. She is particularly interested in Roman religion, Roman army, and epigraphy. She lives and works in Zagreb.
Croatia at the Crossroads: A consideration of archaeological and historical connectivity Proceedings of conference held at Europe House, Smith Square, London, 24–25 June 2013 to mark the accession of Croatia to the European Union edited by David Davison, Vince Gaffney, Preston Miracle and Jo Sofaer. iv+264 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 2016 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915308. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915315. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Croatia has a unique geographical and historical position within Europe, bridging central and south-east Europe. From the Pannonian Plain to the southern Adriatic maritime landscape, interconnectedness flows through Croatia’s history. This dynamic past is increasingly being reflected upon by a new and exciting generation of Croatian scholars who are firmly embedded within a strong national tradition of archaeology but who also look outward to draw insights into the nature of material culture they encounter in Croatia and Croatian identity itself.

Croatia at the Crossroads (24-25 June, Europe House, London) provided the opportunity to reflect upon such interconnectedness and Croatia’s historic place within Europe. This event typified the desire of Croatian archaeologists to engage with such matters on an international level and to situate their scholarship within broader regional dynamics. Following the foundation of the new Croatian state, the opportunities for new forms of engagement have grown. This has stimulated thinking regarding both approaches to archaeology and the potential cultural cross-fertilisation that has resulted in Croatia’s rich archaeological and historical record. This has led to in new, exciting understandings of archaeological material, and this was revealed in contributions to the Croatia at the Crossroads conference.

The papers published here arise from the exceptionally interesting presentations and discussions held in London at the conference. Each of them takes Croatia’s particular interconnectedness in terms of social and cultural relationships with the wider region as the starting point for exploring issues across a broad chronological range, from human origins to modernity. Within this, contributors pick up on a variety of different fields of interconnectedness and forms of interaction including biological, cultural, religious, military, trade, craft and maritime relationships. In many ways, these papers represent opening conversations that explore ways of thinking about new and established data sets that are entering Croatian scholarship for the first time. They also act as a set of complementary discussions that transcend traditional period and national boundaries. We hope that by bringing them together the volume will provide an insight into current trends in Croatian archaeology and stimulate fruitful discussions regarding future directions.
Brochs and the Empire: The impact of Rome on Iron Age Scotland as seen in the Leckie broch excavations by Euan W. MacKie. +122 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 274 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914400. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914417. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The excavation of the Leckie Iron Age broch in Stirlingshire, Scotland, took place during the 1970’s after the author had been asked to organise the work by a local archaeological society. At that stage the author did not consider – despite its location – that the site might vividly reflect the expansion of the Roman Empire into southern Scotland in the late first century AD. For various reasons the final report was not written until about thirty years after the fieldwork finished and by then the quality and significance of the Roman finds was much better understood, thanks to the analysis of them by experts. Many of them seemed like gifts to the broch chief, despite the clear evidence of the violent destruction of the broch at a later date. The Roman author Tacitus gave a detailed account of Governor Agricola’s campaigns in southern Scotland and pointed out that he sometimes tried to make friends with local chiefs before invading their territories, to avoid un-necessary casualties. This also applied to the first Roman naval excursion up the west coast and explains the evidence from Dun Ardtreck, Skye, excavated in the 1960’s. This site was also destroyed later and this could reflect the later hostile voyage of the navy after the battle of Mons Graupius which occurred after a few years of campaigning. Thus Rome’s accounts can allow one to understand the history of some native sites much more vividly.
The Black Sea in the Light of New Archaeological Data and Theoretical Approaches Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on the Black Sea in Antiquity held in Thessaloniki, 18-20 September 2015 edited by Manolis Manoledakis. viii+290 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 301 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915100. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915117. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Black Sea in the Light of New Archaeological Data and Theoretical Approaches contains 19 papers on the archaeology and ancient history of the Black Sea region, covering a vast period of time, from the Early Iron Age until the Late Roman – Early Byzantine Periods. The majority of papers present archaeological material that has come to light during the last few years, in excavations that have been taking place in several parts of Pontus. Additionally, there are papers that present theoretical approaches to historical issues concerning the Black Sea, its local peoples, cultural aspects or specific sites, while at the end there is as well as a section on the connections between the Black Sea and northern Greece. Thus, the reader of this volume will have the opportunity to be informed about new archaeological results from excavators of some very important Black Sea sites, focus on specific categories of excavation finds or constructions, but also encounter new theories and ideas about social aspects of life in the Black Sea in ancient times. All these indicate once again the impressive acceleration of the archaeological and historical research that is being conducted in the last few decades in the Black Sea littoral, which continues to attract the unfailing interest of scholars from around the world.

About the author: Manolis Manoledakis is Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology at the International Hellenic University in Thessaloniki. He has also taught at the University of Ioannina, the Democritus University of Thrace and the Hellenic Open University. He has participated in various research programmes and is the director of the International Hellenic University’s excavation in Neo Rysio, Thessaloniki. His research work concentrates on the archaeology and ancient history of the Black Sea as well as central Macedonia, ancient topography and geography of these areas, ancient Greek religion, Greek mythology in its historical context, and ancient Greek painting and vase-painting. He is the director of the two post-graduate programmes of the International Hellenic University’s School of Humanities, the MA in Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies and the MA in the Classical Archaeology and the Ancient History of Macedonia, funded by the Alexander S. Onassis Public Benefit Foundation. Every three years he organizes the International Workshop on the Black Sea in Antiquity at the International Hellenic University.
Bearsden: The Story of a Roman Fort by David Breeze. vi+124 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 296 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914905. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914912. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman fort at Bearsden and its annexe, together with areas beyond its defences, were extensively excavated from 1973 to 1982. The report on these excavations was published in 2016. This ‘popular’ account of the discoveries looks at the material recovered from the site in a different way, examining the process of archaeological excavation, the life of the soldiers at the fort based on the results of the excavation as well as material from elsewhere in the Roman Empire, the presentation and interpretation of the bath-house and latrine, and a discussion of possible future work arising out of the excavation. The excavation report was well illustrated with reconstruction drawings and the process of creating these is also discussed.

About the author:
David Breeze excavated Bearsden while working as an inspector of ancient monuments; he later served as Chief Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Scotland. He also led the team which successfully nominated the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site in 2008. David Breeze has excavated on both Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall and written several books on these frontiers, on frontiers elsewhere in the Roman Empire and on the Roman army. He has served as Chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier and President of several archaeological societies.