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NEW: Historic Landscapes and Mental Well-being edited by Timothy Darvill, Kerry Barrass, Laura Drysdale, Vanessa Heaslip and Yvette Staelens. Paperback; xx+282 pages; 70 figures, 7 tables (75 pages in colour). 569 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692686. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692693. Book contents pageDownload

Using archaeological sites and historic landscapes to promote mental health well-being represents one of the most significant advances in archaeological resource management for many years. Its potential contribution to health-care and wellness initiatives is boundless. Prompted by the Human Henge project working within the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site, this volume provides an overview of work going on across Britain and the near Continent at many different scales. Contributors share experiences, and discuss the outcomes, implications, and theoretical underpinnings of heritage-based well-being projects.

About the Editors
Timothy Darvill is Head of the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Bournemouth University and leads the research on the Human Henge project; Kerry Barrass is a researcher on the project; Laura Drysdale is the Director of the Restoration Trust and project manager of Human Henge; Vanessa Heaslip is a Principal Academic in the Department of Nursing and Social Sciences at Bournemouth University and leads the participant monitoring programme on Human Henge; and Yvette Staelens is a visiting research fellow at Bournemouth University and was the programme facilitator for Human Henge.
NEW: The First Peoples of Oman: Palaeolithic Archaeology of the Nejd Plateau by Jeffrey I. Rose, Yamandú H. Hilbert, Anthony E. Marks and Vitaly I. Usik. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+198 pages; 142 figures; 27 tables (90 colour pages). 558 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 5. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692846. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692853. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In Dhofar, the southern Governorate of the Sultanate of Oman, the deep canyons cutting the Nejd plateau once flowed with perennial rivers, feeding wetland environments, forests, and grasslands across the now desiccated interior. The first peoples of Oman flourished along these waterways, drawn to the freshwater springs and abundant game, as well as the myriad chert outcrops with which to fashion their hunting implements and other tools. The landscapes of the Nejd Plateau are a natural museum of human prehistory, covered in carpets of chipped stone debris. The archaeological evidence presented in this work encompasses the cultural remains of over a million years of successive human occupations, from the Lower Palaeolithic to the Late Palaeolithic. Once considered an evolutionary backwater or merely a migratory way station, the archaeology of Dhofar requires a fundamental reconsideration of the role of Southern Arabia in the origin and dispersal of our species.

About the Authors
Jeffrey I. Rose, Research Scholar at the Ronin Institute, is specialized in the prehistory of North Africa and Southwest Asia. His research interests include modern human origins, stone tool technology and archaeogenetics. In recognition of his team’s discoveries in Oman, in 2012 Dr. Rose was named National Geographic’s Emerging Explorer.

Yemandù H. Hilbert, Associated Researcher at the Archeorient laboratory of French CNRS, has worked on the field across Eurasia and North Africa since 2005 and is specialized on the Late Paleolithic of Dhofar. His research interests include ethnography, prehistoric archaeology and physical paleoanthropology.

Anthony E. Marks, Conducted pioneering prehistoric research in the Nile Valley and southern Levant, producing seminal works on the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic periods in these regions. Since 2003, Prof. Marks has focused his research activities in the United Arab Emirates and Oman.

Vitaly I. Usik, Senior Researcher in the Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, is specialized in lithic technology, refitting and site survey and excavations. With more than four decades of fieldwork experience, he has carried out technological studies on a wide range of lithic assemblages from Northeast Africa, the Levant, Arabia and western Eurasia.
NEW: Taming the Great Desert: Adam in the Prehistory of Oman by Guillaume Gernez and Jessica Giraud. Paperback; xiv+128 pages; 106 figures (colour throughout). (Print RRP £30.00). 538 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691801. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691818. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Located at the margins of the Rub Al-Khali desert, a place of interactions between settled and nomadic populations, the Adam oasis occupies a pivotal role in the history of Oman. However, almost nothing was known about its foundation and early developments. In 2006, the French Archaeological Mission in Central Oman began the exploration of the area. After ten years of field research using innovative methods and technologies, much is now revealed about the importance of Adam in the prehistory and early history of Oman. This is the first monograph about the research carried out at Adam and it includes seven chapters written by specialists directly involved in the field activities. Each major period is described in detail, including evidence of Palaeolithic occupation, Neolithic settlements, Early and Middle Bronze Age necropolises, Iron Age ritual sites and also an ethnographic study of the traditional water sharing within the oasis.

About the Authors
GUILLAUME GERNEZ is associate professor of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne and Director of the French Archaeological Mission in Central Oman. A former researcher at the French Institute for the Near East in Beirut, he specializes in protohistoric periods, material culture and funerary customs. For more than fifteen years, he has participated in archaeological excavations, surveys and material studies in Syria, Lebanon, Iraq and Oman. He has published books on the prehistory and antiquity of Lebanon (2010) and the history and early developments of weapons in the ancient Near and Middle East (2017).

JESSICA GIRAUD is associated researcher at the Laboratory Archaeology and Sciences of Antiquity (CNRS / University Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne) and is CEO and founder of the company ArCHaios — Archaeology, Culture & Heritage. She has been working on the archaeology of Oman for fifteen years, researching mainly on landscape archaeology in the Ja’alan province and in the Adam oasis, where she conducted the very first surveys and excavations. Since 2012, she has worked in Kurdistan as Director of the French Archaeological Mission to the Governorate of Sulaimaniyah (Iraq), and she continues to work in Oman at Adam and Quriyat.
NEW: El Mesolítico en Cantabria centro-oriental by Mercedes Pérez Bartolomé. Paperback; 203x276mm; Tomo I: 402 pages; Tomo II (online): 770 pages; full colour throughout. Spanish text. 90 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692464. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692471. Book contents pageDownload

This book explores the Mesolithic period in the central-eastern area of Cantabria (Spain) as a manifestation of sociocultural evolution and change of the societies that lived in the area between the ninth and sixth millennia cal BC, until the introduction of farming. It analyses the subsistence and sociocultural transformations made by hunter-gatherer societies in their adaptation to the environment that emerged from the climate change seen during the Holocene. It also considers the evolutionary processes undergone by social groups based on their experiences and cognitive processes.

Mercedes Pérez Bartolomé holds a degree in Geography and History and a PhD in Archeology and Prehistory from the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED) Madrid (Spain).

Spanish Description
En esta libro se aborda el estudio del Mesolítico en la zona centro-oriental de Cantabria como una manifestación de evolución y cambio sociocultural de las sociedades que habitaron la región entre el IX y VI milenios cal BC, hasta la instauración de la economía productiva. Se analizan las trasformaciones económicas y socioculturales que efectuaron las sociedades de cazadores-recolectores, en su adaptación al medioambiente surgido del cambio climático del Holoceno, sin olvidar los procesos evolutivos que experimentan los grupos sociales basados en sus experiencias y procesos cognitivos.

Desde el descubrimiento de yacimientos de conchero en la región cantábrica, la investigación se ha centrado en el oriente de Asturias, donde se definió una cultura local, el Asturiense, que se extendió como ámbito cultural a toda la región cantábrica. De tal modo que, la investigación en Cantabria ha consistido en un reducido número de excavaciones de yacimientos, que en parte se encuentran en proceso de estudio.

Este vacío en la investigación del Mesolítico en Cantabria, es por lo que nos planteamos abordar el estudio de este poblamiento en un marco geográfico que se extiende desde la ría de Suances por el oeste, que planteamos como límite geográfico del Mesolítico Asturiense, y la de Ontón por el este, límite geográfico con el País Vasco Atlántico.

La investigación se ha basado en la realización de Proyectos de arqueología espacial con los objetivos de localizar nuevos yacimientos, verificar el estado de conservación y, la recopilación de datos arqueológicos de cada uno de los yacimientos reconocidos, que se recoge en el registro arqueológico, que debido a su mala conservación y exposición a procesos erosivos, están en peligro de desaparecer. Proyectos de excavaciones arqueológicas en yacimientos situados en diferentes contextos (costa, llanura litoral y montaña), en los que se han realizado estudios multidisciplinares que aportan información sobre paleoambiente, el patrón económico, las industrias, el pensamiento simbólico y el patrón de asentamiento. Se han obtenido fechas de radiocarbono en cada uno de los valles que forman el territorio y en diferentes entornos geográficos. Se aportan 18 nuevas dataciones para el Mesolítico en la región cantábrica.

Mercedes Pérez Bartolomé es licenciada en Geografía e Historia y doctora en Arqueología y Prehistoria por la Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED) Madrid (España).
NEW: El sol, símbolo de continuidad y permanencia: un estudio multidisciplinar sobre la figura soliforme en el arte esquemático de la Provincia de Cádiz by Mercedes Versaci. Paperback; 203x276mm; xiv+208 pages; 156 figures, 38 tables (151 colour pages); Spanish text. 89 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691948. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691955. Book contents pageDownload

The purpose of this study is to analyze the soliform figures in schematic cave paintings. The author presents research on all the global factors relevant to the study of these figures (technological, typological, stylistic, semiotic, astronomical, anthropological and landscape) and their relationship with the whole of schematic rock paintings and the societies that produced them. The geographical scope of the study is the area of Laguna de la Janda and Campo de Gibraltar (Cadiz).

One of the arguments the author maintains in this research is the shortage of studies conducted in the territory of Cadiz in relation to these figures – and to rock art in general, which has been a central motif in almost all primitive religions or mythologies since the birth of agricultural societies. The recurrence of abstract motifs within the rock art of this area, and its durability over time, could be an indication of common cultural patterns among the different populations that inhabited the province. But these same signs are also repeated in different parts of the world – could it therefore suggest universal aspects of our species?

The interpretation of these symbols has been – and continues to be – subject to intangible or subjective issues; therefore, it is not exempt from possible projections of our own culture. We think that we are able to approach, in a scientific way, the ritual and symbolic aspects of those who elaborated these paintings. In this book, the author proposes an alternative according to the theoretical framework of disciplines such as ethnography, anthropology, landscape archaeology, archaeoastronomy and semiotics.

La finalidad de este estudio es el análisis de la figura soliforme en el arte rupestre esquemático. Presentamos una investigación global atendiendo a todos los factores susceptibles de estudio (tecnológicos, tipológicos, estilísticos, semióticos, astronómicos, antropológicos y paisajísticos) de esta figura y de su relación con el conjunto del arte rupestre esquemático y con las sociedades autoras del mismo. El ámbito geográfico de nuestro estudio será el entorno de la Laguna de la Janda y el Campo de Gibraltar (Cádiz).

Uno de los argumentos que esgrimimos para la realización de esta investigación es la escasa producción de estudios realizados en el territorio gaditano en relación a esta figura- y al arte rupestre en general- que ha sido motivo central en casi todas las religiones o mitologías primitivas desde el nacimiento de las sociedades agropecuarias. La recurrencia de los motivos abstractos dentro del arte rupestre de la zona que nos ocupa, y su perduración en el tiempo, podría ser indicio de patrones culturales comunes entre las diferentes poblaciones que habitaron nuestra provincia. Pero estos mismos signos también se repiten en diferentes partes del mundo. ¿Podríamos estar hablando de aspectos universales de nuestra especie? Somos conscientes que la interpretación de este símbolo ha estado y está sujeta a cuestiones subjetivas o intangibles, por consiguiente, no exenta de posibles proyecciones de nuestra propia cultura. Creemos que estamos en condiciones de aproximarnos de una manera científica a los aspectos rituales y simbólicos de aquellos que elaboraron estas pinturas, proponiendo una alternativa desde los marcos teóricos de disciplinas como la Etnografía, la Antropología, la Arqueología del Paisaje, la Arqueoastronomía y la Semiótica.

About the Author
MERCEDES VERSACI received her Ph.D. from the University of Cádiz in 2018 and she is an active member of the research group HUM 812: Studies in Prehistory, Archeology, Ethnoarchaeology, Anthropology and Cultural Landscape (PAEAPC) at the same institution. Her studies on the rock art of the Province of Cádiz go back to the year 2007, and she has published (in specialist magazines) several researches concerning paintings and funeral customs in recent prehistory. She has participated in vari
NEW: The Middle Stone Age of Nigeria in its West African Context by Philip Allsworth-Jones. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+240 pages; 317 figures, 27 tables (83 colour pages). 529 2019. ISBN 9781789691382. £44.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This book provides a full up to date account of the evidence relating to the Middle Stone Age in Nigeria and the other countries of West Africa. It relies upon the author’s own fieldwork and extensive personal knowledge of the region and its archaeology. It is abundantly illustrated with maps, photographs, and drawings. The emphasis is on stratigraphy, chronology, site situation, and artefact characteristics, with such general background information about the countries concerned as is required. A summary account is also provided of the current situation in relation to this topic (covering climate, archaeology, and human evolution) in the African continent as a whole, so that a judgement can made as to how the West African evidence fits in with the rest. In general accounts of the African palaeolithic record up to now, West Africa tends to be neglected, so this book goes a long way to fill a gap in the available literature.

About the Author
PHILIP ALLSWORTH-JONES completed his PhD on the European Palaeolithic in Cambridge, before serving as a staff member of the Department of Archaeology in Ibadan for a number of years, during which time much of the fieldwork described in this work was carried out. He subsequently held an analogous appointment at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica, but he has continued to take an interest in West Africa up to this day. He is currently an Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology of the University of Sheffield, and while holding this appointment he has in recent years published a number of works on Nigeria, including the results of his excavations at the rock shelter sites of Itaakpa and Kariya Wuro. This is however his first attempt to tell the story of the Middle Stone Age in West Africa as a whole in book form.
NEW: Understanding Lithic Recycling at the Late Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave, Israel A functional and chemical investigation of small flakes by Flavia Venditti. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+188 pages; 11 tables, 113 figures (86 plates in colour). 509 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691016. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691023. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Flakes, and small flakes in particular, are usually seen as by-products or debris of the knapping process, rather than as desired end-products with a specific potential use. In recent years, this particular category of small tools has attracted increasing interest among researchers, especially when focusing on technological aspects in Lower Palaeolithic contexts, while the functional role of these tools is still poorly investigated.

Understanding Lithic Recycling at the Late Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave, Israel: A functional and chemical investigation of small flakes examines Late Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave, Israel, where a particular lithic trajectory directed towards the production of small flakes by means of recycling and exploiting old discarded flakes as cores has been recognised. The high density of this production throughout the stratigraphic sequence of the cave demonstrates that this was a conscious and planned technological choice aimed at providing small and sharp items to meet specific functional behaviours, and that this lithic behaviour persisted for some 200 kyr of human use of the cave. The exceptional conservation of use-wear signs and residues has made it possible to reconstruct the functional role of this specific production system, highlighting its specialised nature mostly related to the processing of the animal carcasses through accurate and careful actions and in a very specific way. The application of functional analysis based on the determination of wear on artefacts by means of optical light microscope, scanning electron microscopy and chemical analysis (FTIR and EDX), provides a useful and effective approach for understanding the adaptive strategies of the Qesem Cave hominins while facing various situations and solving different needs.

About the Author
FLAVIA VENDITTI is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Tel Aviv, Israel. She specialises in the functional analysis of quartz and flint lithic tool production and has a particular interest in Palaeolithic assemblages. During her MA studies, she started working in the field of use-wear analysis under the supervision of Professor Cristina Lemorini at University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’. She focused her research on the use-wear study of a quartz assemblage form the Middle Palaeolithic site of Coudouolous in Quercy (France). Subsequently, she attended a two-years Masters class in Archaeological Heritage at University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’ and completed her dissertation on the effects of the mechanical postdepositional alteration on quartz artifacts coming from Neolithic sites of the Sai Island (Sudan). Flavia completed her doctorate in 2017 with a research project on the functional analysis of the products of recycling from the Lower Palaeolithic Qesem Cave site in the Levant. She is a member of the Qesem Cave team project taking part in the annual archaeological excavations on the site.
NEW: Aesthetics, Applications, Artistry and Anarchy: Essays in Prehistoric and Contemporary Art A Festschrift in honour of John Kay Clegg, 11 January 1935 – 11 March 2015 edited by Jillian Huntley and George Nash. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+170 pages; 100 figures, 5 tables (42 plates in colour). 496 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919986. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919993. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Scholar and artist John Clegg made a pioneering contribution to the study of rock art. He was the first in the Australian academy to teach rock art research as a dedicated subject (Sydney University 1965-2000), supervising the first graduate students with such specialty, subsequently supporting their careers. He is honoured here for much more than his novelty and the contributions in this monograph pay homage to the late John Kay Clegg’s diverse influence. Rock art researchers from around the globe traverses topics such as aesthetics, the application of statistical analyses, frontier conflict and layered symbolic meanings, the deliberate use of optical illusion, and the contemporary significance of ancient and street art. They cover rock art assemblages from Columbia, South Africa, Europe and across Clegg’s beloved Australia. They interrogate descriptive and analytic concepts such as repainting, memorialisation and graffiti, as well as questioning the ethical impactions of research practices touching rock art as a part of its study.

The tributes in this book are necessarily as individual as the man they honour, and John Clegg was certainly an individual. The longevity of ideas and perspectives Clegg brought to the pursuit of rock art research is demonstrated in this collection of works. Clegg’s continued relevance is testament to the value and magnitude of his contribution. He is a deserving subject for a Festschrift.

About the Editors
Dr JILLIAN HUNTLEY is a Research Fellow at the Place Evolution Rock Art Heritage Unit in the Centre for Social and Cultural Research at Griffith University, Australia. She specialises in the physiochemical characterization of rock art and other archaeological pigments and has been privileged in recent years to work on high-profile Australasian finds. A field archaeologist by trade, Jillian has 15 years experience in public archaeology and has worked with Aboriginal peoples across Australia since 2001 recording rock art as part of both research and commercial projects. Best known as an archaeological scientist, Jillian has published on diverse topics relating to rock art from the complex impacts of mining to pseudoarchaeology.

Dr GEORGE NASH is an Associate Professor at the Museum of Prehistoric Art, Quaternary and Prehistory Geosciences Centre, Maçao, Portugal. George has been a professional archaeologist for the past 25 years and has undertaken extensive fieldwork on prehistoric rock-art and mobility art in Chile, Denmark, Indonesia, Malaysia, Norway, Sardinia, Spain and Sweden. Between 1994 and 1997 he directed excavations at the La Hougue Bie passage grave on Jersey, one of Europe’s largest Neolithic monuments and has also directed preliminary excavations at Westminster Hall, London. He has also written, edited and co-edited many books on prehistoric art and monumentality including the most recent book entitled Archaeologies of Rock Art: South American Perspectives (2018). In the past George has been involved in a number of major rock-art recording and interpretation projects, the most recent being in the Central Negev region of southern Israel and in central Andean Chile. In his native Wales, he is convener for the Welsh Rock art Organisation (WRAO). In addition to fieldwork, he has also written and presented programmes on European rock-art and contemporary graffiti for the BBC.
Art of the Ancestors: Spatial and temporal patterning in the ceiling rock art of Nawarla Gabarnmang, Arnhem Land, Australia by Robert G. Gunn. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+902 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. 492 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690705. £150.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690712. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents a new systematic approach to the archaeological recording and documentation of rock art developed to analyse the spatial and temporal structure of complex rock art panels. Focusing on the ceiling art at Nawarla Gabarnmang, one of the richest rock art sites in Arnhem Land the approach utilised DStretch-enhanced photographs to record 1391 motifs from 42 separate art panels across the ceiling. Harris Matrices were then built to show the sequence of superimpositions for each art panel. Using common attributes, including features identified by Morellian Method (a Fine Art method not previously employed in archaeological rock art studies), contemporaneous motifs within panels were then aggregated into individual layers. The art layers of the various panels were then inter-related using the relative and absolute chronological evidence to produce a full relative sequence for the site as a whole. This provided a story of the art that began some 13,000 years ago and concluded around 60 years ago, with a major change identified in the art some 450 years ago. The method was shown to be invaluable to the resolution of many difficult issues associated with the identification of motifs, their superimpositions and the development of art sequences.

About the Author
Dr Robert Gunn is a consultant archaeologist with over 35 years’ experience and who specialises in the recording and management of Australian Aboriginal rock art. He has published over 50 papers and monographs, mostly on areas of rock art research. He has worked throughout Australia with research interests in Arnhem Land, Central Australia, Western Victoria, south-western regions of Western Australia, and Far Western NSW. This work has involved the collection of both archaeological and ethnographic information and, consequently, he has worked closely with senior Aboriginal custodians and traditional owners. Robert completed his PhD at Monash University, Australia, in 2007. He is currently a Research Fellow affiliated with Monash Indigenous Study Centre, Monash University, and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage.
The Grotte du Placard at 150: New Considerations on an Exceptional Prehistoric Site edited by Christophe Delage. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+198 pages; 98 illustrations, 10 tables (62 plates in colour). 467 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919603. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919610. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The prehistoric site of Le Placard, located in Southwest France, was discovered and first explored 150 years ago at a time when prehistory was just emerging as a scientific discipline. Through this century and a half of explorations this site has been involved in numerous debates of prehistoric research; it has also yielded an extraordinary amount and diverse range of archaeological materials (i.e. lithics, fauna, osseous industry, body adornments, pigments, human remains, mobiliary and parietal art, hearths, etc.). Yet this site appears now poorly valued due to the devastating 19th-century excavation techniques that almost completely emptied the cavity. Subsequently it is surprisingly ill-known. This 150-year milestone gives us an opportunity to look back at this exceptional site and its associated materials in order to demonstrate that it still holds a unique potential in the debates about these Late Pleistocene hunting and gathering societies. The various chapters cover multiple aspects of the history of research and of the collections, present detailed studies on the material culture (osseous industry, spearthrowers, musical instruments), and address speci¬fic issues related to parietal art, social networks and the political nature of these prehistoric communities. The best hypothesis and explanation to account for this exceptional diversity of remains would argue that Le Placard has been a village occupied by various groups of complex (transegalitarian) hunter-gatherers.

About the Editor
Christophe Delage (Ph.D., 2001, University of Paris 1-Sorbonne) is a specialist of lithic raw material sourcing and chipped stone industries. He has been working in the Southern Levant (Israel and Jordan) for 25 years and in Southwest France (Charente and Vienne) on the Magdalenian for about 10 years. He has published various articles and edited books related to these topics. He is currently affiliated with the Department of Prehistory, National Museum of Natural History (Paris).
Early Mesolithic Technical Systems of Southern France and Northern Italy by Davide Visentin. Paperback; xxiv+330 pages; 96 illustrations, 167 tables. 59 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919276. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919283. Book contents pageDownload

The Sauveterrian represents one of the main cultural aspects of the European Early Mesolithic. In this work, its presumed uniformity—mostly based on typological grounds—is questioned with the purpose of assessing and verifying the relationships existing between the two central areas of diffusion of this complex: southern France and northern Italy. A broad technological approach, combining complementary analytical techniques, was applied to the study of a series of French and Italian lithic assemblages. More specifically, these were investigated with the aim of reconstructing the entire reduction sequences, from the procurement of lithic raw materials to the use and discard of tools.

Results indicate that the two regions responded to the same conceptual scheme and their respective lithic technical systems shared the same rationale: an extremely optimized technology, not opportunistic in the least, but issued from a careful strategic planning. Nonetheless, in the context of this generalized behaviour, a consistent variability can be found, marked by differences of both ‘stylistic’ and technical nature especially regarding the processes for producing microlithic armatures. At a general level, in the context of the important environmental changes that characterized the Late Glacial to Early Holocene transition, the emergence of Sauveterrian technology was fundamental in allowing the development of a complex settlement structure, characterized by a mobility system based on relatively short distances and with a strong logistic component.

About the Author DAVIDE VISENTIN did his PhD at the University of Ferrara and at the University of Toulouse Jean Jaurès (co-directed thesis). His research and publication interests are focused on Late Palaeolithic and Mesolithic hunter-gatherers’ technology and settlement systems as well as mountain archaeology. He currently collaborates with the University of Ferrara on multiple research projects, directs the excavations at the Epigravettian site of Landro on the Cansiglio plateau and works as a field archaeologist in north-eastern Italy.
Rockshelter Excavations in the East Hamersley Range, Pilbara Region, Western Australia edited by Dawn Cropper and W. Boone Law, foreword by Maitland Parker and Slim Parker, Martidja Banyjima Elders. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+454 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £90.00). 458 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919764. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919771. Book contents pageDownload

Rockshelter Excavations in the East Hamersley Range offers a detailed study of six exceptional rockshelter sites from the inland Pilbara Region of Western Australia. It provides highly descriptive, chapter-length accounts of archaeological investigations at Jundaru, Djadjiling, HS-A1, HD073APAD13, PAD 3, and HD073A03 rockshelters, which were excavated as part of a mitigative salvage program conducted at the Hope Downs 1 mine between 2007 and 2010. The research findings show that early Aboriginal peoples initially occupied the area ca. 45,000 years ago, demonstrating that the east Hamersley Range contains some of the oldest known Aboriginal archaeological sites in the Australian arid zone. The story of the Pleistocene and Holocene Aboriginal occupation at Hope Downs 1 is long and complex. Using an extensive radiocarbon and OSL chronology that spans from >47,000 years ago to the recent past, the story of the Aboriginal archaeological record is explored via prominent changes in lithic technology, artefact use-wear/residues, combustion features, faunal remains, rockshelter geomorphology, archaeomagnetism, and pollen/phytolith analysis. The work investigates the early occupation of the region and examines the archaeological evidence for occupation during the last glacial maximum. It chronicles significant changes in Aboriginal stone artefact technology over time with its analysis of more than 35,000 chipped stone artefacts.

Consisting of 18 chapters, the volume is rich with colour photographs, illustrations, and figures, including high-resolution images of the rockshelter sites, excavations, stratigraphic sections, cultural features, and artefacts. It includes a foreword by the Martidja Banyjima elders, who contextualise the cultural importance of this work to Banyjima Peoples and Traditional Owners of the region. The monograph also includes comprehensive synthesis of the regional archaeological record by the editors and a chapter on Banyjima culture and traditions by consulting anthropologists Dr Nadia Butler, Dr Neale Draper, and Fiona Sutherland. Many specialist studies were commissioned for the Hope Downs work, including an archaeomagnetism report by Dr Andy Herries (LaTrobe University), a faunal analysis study by Dr. Matthew McDowell (University of Tasmania), a phytolith analysis by Dr Lynley Wallis (University of Notre Dame Australia), a palynological study by Dr Simon Haberle, Feli Hopf, and Dr Phil Roberts (Australian National University), artefact usewear/residue analysis by Dr Richard Fullagar (University of Wollongong), optically stimulated luminescence dating by Frances Williams (University of Adelaide), and a rockshelter geomorphological study by Prof Martin Williams (University of Adelaide).

About the Editors
DAWN CROPPER is the Director of Archaeology at leading consulting company, New Zealand Heritage Properties, which has branches in Dunedin, Christchurch, and Invercargill. As Director, Dawn’s responsibilities include the management of all archaeology teams across the branches, development of process and training, as well as the development of proprietary methodology for archaeological risk management across large areas. She also specialises in heritage impact assessments and is a leading expert in the management of large-scale archaeological projects throughout New Zealand. Dawn holds a PhD in Archaeology from the University of Sydney (Australia) and a Master’s in Archaeology from the University of Saskatchewan (Canada), with a focus on technological analysis of flaked stone tools. From 2007 to 2013 she worked as a senior archaeologist and lithic specialist for Australian Cultural Heritage Management Pty Ltd, co-managing and supervising the Hope Downs 1 rockshelter excavations with W. Boone Law.

W. BOONE LAW is a scientist and heritage professional that specialises in the Aboriginal archaeology of the Australian Arid Zone. His qualifications include a BA in Anthr
Reindeer hunters at Howburn Farm, South Lanarkshire A Late Hamburgian settlement in southern Scotland – its lithic artefacts and natural environment by Torben Bjarke Ballin with contributions by Alan Saville, Richard Tipping, Tam Ward, Rupert Housley, Lucy Verrill, Matthew Bradley, Clare Wilson, Paul Lincoln and Alison MacLeod. Hardback; 205x290mm; xx+124 pages; 47 illustrations, 25 tables (13 plates in colour). 433 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919016. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919023. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents the lithic assemblage from Howburn in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, which at present is the oldest prehistoric settlement in Scotland (12,700-12,000 BC), and the only Hamburgian settlement in Britain. The site also included a scatter from the Late Upper Palaeolithic Federmesser- Gruppen period (12,000-10,800 BC), as well as lithics from the Mesolithic, Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. The book focuses on the Hamburgian finds, which are mainly based on the exploitation of flint from Doggerland, the then dry bed of the North Sea. The Hamburgian tools include tanged arrowheads, scrapers, piercers, burins, and other implement forms which show similarities with tools of the same age on the European continent. The shape of one scatter suggests that the Palaeolithic settlers lived in tent-like structures. The Palaeolithic finds from Howburn shed light on several important general trends, such as the ‘acclimatization’ of pioneer settlers, as well as the development of regional differences following the initial Late Glacial recolonization of Scotland. Palaeo-environmental work focused on whether there was a small lake (‘Loch Howburn’) in front of the terrace on which the camp was situated, and it was concluded that there was indeed a lake there, but it was neither contemporary with the Hamburgian, nor the Federmesser-Gruppen settlement. Most likely, ‘Loch Howburn’ dates to the Loch Lomond stadial.

About the Author
After having worked as a specialist and Project Manager in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Norway, Torben Ballin relocated to Scotland in 1998. Since that year, he has worked as an independent lithics specialist in Scotland, England, Northern Ireland and Ireland, and he is an Honorary Fellow at the University of Bradford. Torben’s special interests have been lithic terminology and typology, lithic technology, chronological frameworks, raw material studies, intra-site spatial analyses, prehistoric territories and exchange networks, and – not least – Scotland’s Late Upper Palaeolithic (LUP) and Early Mesolithic industries. While still active in Denmark, he briefly worked with Jørgen Holm at the Hamburgian/Federmesser-Gruppen site of Slotseng in Southern Jutland, and one of his academic theses was on the refitting and spatial analysis of the LUP Brommian settlement of Højgård on Zealand. While in Norway, he led the Farsund Project and the Oslofjord Crossing Project, where he analysed a large number of Norwegian Early, Middle and Late Mesolithic sites and assemblages. Since 1998, Torben has dealt with numerous Mesolithic sites and assemblages from all parts of Scotland, and lately he has focused on the discovery of Scottish LUP sites, assemblages, and individual finds and, with the late Alan Saville of National Museums Scotland he published the Federmesser-Gruppen site of Kilmelfort Cave, Argyll; with Hein Bjerck, University of Trondheim, the unique LUP Fosna-Hensbacka point from Brodgar on Orkney; and with Headland Archaeology Ltd. the LUP site of Milltimber, Aberdeenshire. Torben has recently published a number of papers in which he discussed how to recognize individual LUP finds and assemblages on the basis of their technological attributes, when no diagnostic types are present.

The following co-authors took part in the production of the Howburn monograph: The late Alan Saville, National Museums Scotland; Richard Tipping, University of Stirling; Tam Ward, Biggar Archaeology Group; Rupert Housley, Royal Holloway, University of London; Lucy Verrill, University of Stirling; Matthew Bradley, University of Stirling; Clare Wilson, University of Stirling; Paul Lincoln, University of Portsmouth; and Alison MacLeod, University of Reading.

Reviews
‘This fascinating volume focuses on a Scottish settlement site that has its origins in the Late Upper Palaeolithic (LUP), inhabited at a time when the glaciers in northern Europe were in retreat. The book presents the r
La ocupación cazadora-recolectora durante la transición Pleistoceno-Holoceno en el oeste de Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil: geoarqueología de los sitios en la formación sedimentaria Touro Passo by Viviane Pouey Vidal. Paperback; 203x276mm; xviii+238 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text (Print RRP £55.00). 57 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919139. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919146. Book contents pageDownload

This book presents the results obtained during geoarchaeological studies carried out in the locality of Touro Passo, municipality of Uruguaiana, Brazil. There, the Paleoindian sites studied by the team of the PRONAPA-National Archaeological Research Program in the 1960s and 1970s were relocated and others with excellent study potential have been recognized. The archaeological sites are located in the alluvial plains of the Uruguay River and the Touro Passo Stream and correspond to the late Pleistocene-early Holocene transition.

The geoarchaeological approach allowed the understanding of the stratigraphic sequence and the processes of formation and post-depositional disturbance of the archaeological sites in a fluvial environment. Archaeological excavations, soundings, stratigraphic profile surveys, sequence correlations and numerical dates were carried out. The dispersion of artifacts on the surface and cave erosion was recorded, and a lithic taphonomy study was carried out. Four Paleoindian sites located in the Touro Passo Formation were analyzed: Barranca Grande, RS-I-66: Milton Almeida, RS-I-69: Laranjito and Casualidade. The new chronologies obtained for the initial period of human occupation in the region represent a scientific advance for the study of hunter-gatherer occupations during the Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene in the triple border of Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay.

About the Author
Viviane Pouey Vidal has a PhD in Archaeology (Faculty of Social Sciences, UNICEN-National University of the Center of the Province of Buenos Aires-Olavarría). She is a researcher at the GEGAL - Group of Geoarchaeological Studies of Latin America. She was a PhD Fellow abroad by the CAPES - Coordination of Improvement of Higher Level Personnel. She acted as University teacher in the Interdisciplinary Degree Course in Human Sciences at UNIPAMPA - Federal University of Pampa, São Borja Campus / Rio Grande do Sul (2015/2017). She is a member of the Frontier Relations Research Group: History, Politics and Culture in the Triple Frontier Brazil and Uruguay (CNPq-Federal University of Pampa). She is the author of the PPC- Pedagogical Project of the Bachelor's Degree Course in Archaeology that aims to be implemented in the UNIPAMPA. She acts as a consultant in archaeological and patrimonial research in environmental licensing, with experience in Precolonial research and Patrimonial Education.

Spanish Description: Este libro presenta los resultados obtenidos durante los estudios geoarqueológicos realizados en la localidad Touro Passo, municipio de Uruguaiana, Brasil. Alli se reubicaron los sitios paleoindios estudiados por el equipo del PRONAPA-Programa Nacional de Investigaciones Arqueológicas en las décadas de 1960 y 1970 y han sido reconocidos otros con excelente potencial de estudio. Los sitios arqueológicos están situados en las planicies aluviales del Río Uruguay y del Arroyo Touro Passo y corresponden a la transición Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno temprano.

El enfoque geoarqueológico permitió la comprensión de la secuencia estratigráfica y los procesos de formación y perturbación postdepositacional de los sitios arqueológicos en ambiente fluvial. Fueron realizadas excavaciones arqueológicas, sondeos, relevamiento de perfiles-estratigráficos, correlaciones de secuencias y fechados numéricos. Se registró la dispersión de los artefactos en superficie y en las cárvavas de erosión, y se realizó, un estudio de tafonomía lítica. Se analizaron 4 sitios paleoindios situados en la Formación Touro Passo: Barranca Grande, RS-I-66:Milton Almeida, RS-I-69: Laranjito y Casualidade. Las nuevas cronologías obtenidas para el período inicial de ocupación humana en la región, representan un avance científico para el estudio de las ocupaciones cazadoras-recolectoras durante el Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno temprano en la triple frontera Brasil, Argentina y Uruguay.

Biografía da autora: Viviane P
Les Néandertaliens du talon Technologie lithique et mobilité au Paléolithique moyen dans le Salento (Pouilles, Italie méridionale) by Enza E. Spinapolice. xii+224 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout with 14 plates in colour. French text.. 409 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918217. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918224. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Salento is a peninsula in Southern Italy, the heel of the Italian boot, characterised both by an abundance of Middle Palaeolithic sites and a scarcity of raw material suitable for knapping. The research question at the basis of this book concerns the managing of raw materials by Neanderthals, through both the procurement and use of the locally available raw materials and the exploitation of possibly more distant sources.

Le Salento est une péninsule du sud de l’Italie, le talon de la botte italienne, caractérisée à la fois par l’abondance des sites du Paléolithique moyen et par une pénurie des matières premières propres à la taille. La question de recherche à la base de ce livre concerne la gestion des matières premières par les Néandertaliens, à travers l’approvisionnement et l’utilisation des matières premières disponibles localement et l’exploitation éventuelle de sources plus éloignées.

About the Author ENZA E. SPINAPOLICE is a researcher at Sapienza University of Rome. She is a Palaeolithic archaeologist, broadly interested in what makes us human. Her main research focus is on the origins and spread of modern humans and the Neanderthal extinction. She is currently studying MSA lithic industries from North Africa, Ethiopia and Kenya and Mousterian/Uluzzian record from Italy. She is particularly interested in the interactions between culture and biological evolution, as well as in the cultural, social and demographic processes of prehistoric hunter-gatherers from both a synchronic and diachronic perspective.

ENZA E. SPINAPOLICE est chercheur à l’Université La Sapienza, Rome (Italie). Elle est une archéologue du paléolithique, intéressée à la question de «ce qui nous rend humains». Ses principaux intérêts de recherche portent sur les origines et la diffusion des humains modernes et sur l’extinction des Néandertaliens. Elle étudie actuellement les industries lithiques MSA d’Afrique du Nord, d’Éthiopie et du Kenya et la Transition Moustérien/ Uluzzien en Italie. Elle s’intéresse particulièrement aux interactions entre la culture et l’évolution biologique, ainsi qu’aux processus culturels, sociaux et démographiques des chasseurs-cueilleurs préhistoriques, d’un point de vue synchronique et diachronique.
Marcadores gráficos y territorios megalíticos en la Cuenca interior del Tajo: Toledo, Madrid y Guadalajara by Mª Ángeles Lancharro Gutiérrez. 346 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (222 plates in colour). 46 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917975. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917982. Book contents pageDownload

The aim of this work is to analyze Late Prehistoric graphical markers, comprising paintings, engravings, Megalithic elements, and other portable objects. All of them can be described as post-paleolithic or Schematic Art over various surfaces. The chosen area, the inland region of the Tajo inner basin (Spain), was especially appealing for several reasons, such as the lack of scholarship on the subject, the lack of information on the geographical location of the archaeological sites, and the extended ignorance about the sites’ materials and relationships.

The methodology is based on systematic registration of all archaeological sites. This is studied from an Archaeology Landscape perspective through Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis. It tests geographical markers according to their strategic location (pre-eminence and visibility) and their relationship with other funerary, habitable and resources sites. This has allowed parietal surfaces (megaliths, caves, shelters) and mobile pieces to be given coordinate position for the first time in the region, which has demonstrated abundant and complex prehistoric graphical markers. The results achieved allow the extrapolation of settlement models, explained in chapter VI. Generally, shelters divide the territory by geographical units where the settlers have access to a variety of economic resources and transit networks.

About the Author
Dr. María Ángeles Lancharro has a BA in History from the University of Alcalá (Spain) and received her PhD in Prehistory from the same university. Her research interests include landscape archaeology, megalithic territories and their symbolism, Prehistoric Rock Art in the Iberian Peninsula and Late Prehistory in the inner basin of the Tajo river. Additionally, she specialises in databases, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis. Her work is focused on territorial analysis from rock shelters, habitats, necropoli, areas of exploitation and resources. Dr. Lancharro has an extensive teaching experience and has participated in several excavations in Spain and southern France aimed at the compared study of Megalithic and Schematic Art. Her findings have been published in different peer-reviewed journals and books, and she has participated in a number of archaeological conferences.

Spanish description:
El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio de los marcadores gráficos de la Prehistoria Reciente, entre los que se incluyen pinturas, grabados, elementos megalíticos y elementos mobiliares que responden a la descripción de Arte Esquemático o Postpaleolítico sobre diferentes soportes. Se eligió como zona de estudio la cuenca interior del Tajo a su paso por las provincias interiores (España), de especial interés por su carencia de valoraciones conjuntas y desde luego, por la escasa información acerca del posicionamiento geográfico de estos yacimientos y el desconocimiento bastante generalizado de sus contenidos y relaciones contextuales. El método de trabajo se ha fundamentado en la recogida sistemática de todos los yacimientos registrados. El estudio se ha llevado a cabo con nuevas tecnologías como los Sistemas de Información Geográfica (SIG), desde una perspectiva de la Arqueología del Paisaje. Se han efectuado diversos análisis establecidos sobre su posición estratégica (preeminencia y visibilidad) y su relación con otros yacimientos de carácter funerario, habitacional y recursos de explotación. Esto ha permitido que los soportes parietales (abrigos, cuevas y megalitos), así como piezas mobiliares, se hayan georreferenciado por primera vez en la región, dando muestras de la abundancia y complejidad de estas grafías prehistóricas.

Los resultados nos han permitido extrapolar modelos de implantación en el territorio, expuestos en el capítulo VI. En general, existe una tendencia a delimitar el territorio en unidades geográficas caracterizadas, en las que las sociedade
Sites of Prehistoric Life in Northern Ireland by Harry and June Welsh. iv+236 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (47 colour plates). 398 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917937. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917944. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Much has been written about the history of Northern Ireland, but less well-known is its wealth of prehistoric sites, from which most of our knowledge of the early inhabitants of this country has been obtained. Until recently, the greatest sources for this information were prehistoric burial sites, which have been visible in our landscape for thousands of years and have attracted the attention of inquisitive people throughout this time, often removing items, or adding others and in doing so, making it difficult for later generations to sift through the evidence. Fortunately, sketches, notes and artefacts have been gathered by Ordnance Survey surveyors, antiquarians and archaeological and historical societies and these continue to be interrogated by modern archaeologists in their search for understanding.

A further problem has been the dependence on information about prehistoric societies from their burial sites. Very few sites where these people lived and worked were visible above ground and as a consequence, little was known about them. However, during the last few decades, large-scale infrastructure projects and associated archaeological investigation has revealed a wealth of information. Much of the detail has still to be published and made available for research, but has already enriched understanding of our prehistoric past.

This monograph brings together information on all the currently known sites in Northern Ireland that are in some way associated with prehistoric life. It has been compiled from a number of sources and includes many that have only recently been discovered. A total of 1580 monuments are recorded in the inventory, ranging from burnt mounds to hillforts. In addition to providing an inventory of all known sites, along with a selection of photographs and plans, the work also includes an introduction to the prehistory of Northern Ireland, an explanation of terms and a full bibliography. It should be considered alongside an earlier work by the same authors on prehistoric burial sites in Northern Ireland (The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland, Archaeopress Archaeology 2014). The aim is to provide a foundation for more specific research projects, based on a standardised format for this largely untapped resource and stimulate a renewed interest in the prehistory of Northern Ireland. Hopefully, this can then be considered along with our knowledge of the historical period to provide a more complete overview of the story of human activity in what is now Northern Ireland.

About the Authors:
Harry Welsh is an archaeologist and historian and currently works at the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork at Queen’s University, Belfast. He has participated in and directed many archaeological excavations from Mesolithic to early modern periods and has published many books, articles and reports on archaeological sites and associated matters, as well as documenting and publishing on the history of the fire service in Northern Ireland. He has also managed the fieldwork activities of the Ulster Archaeological Society for many years and is an enthusiastic supporter of community archaeology projects.

June Welsh is a retired primary school teacher and has been a member of the Ulster Archaeological Society for many years. She has participated in a wide range of archaeological excavations and surveys, publishing many archaeological survey reports on the society website. She also took part in a research project funded by the Royal Irish Academy into prehistoric burials in Ireland. It was this project that led to her collaboration in the 2014 publication The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland, also published by Archaeopress, and this stimulated her interest in the life of prehistoric people.

Reviews
‘Unusually for this kind of publication, the book is sumptuously illustrated, featuring finds from particular sites and stunning landscape phot
Ceramic manufacturing techniques and cultural traditions in Nubia from the 8th to the 3rd millennium BC Examples from Sai Island by Giulia D’Ercole. xviii+186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (33 colour plates). 41 2017 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 96. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916718. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916725. Book contents pageDownload

In Sudan the first ceramic containers appeared at the beginning of the 9th millennium BC, with the earliest dates c. 8700 BC from Sorourab 2, in Central Sudan, and c. 8600 BC from the district of Amara West, in Northern Sudan.

This book presents a comprehensive critical analysis of diverse ceramic assemblages from Sai Island, in the Middle Nile Valley of Northern Sudan, on the border between ancient Upper and Lower Nubia. The assemblages included in this study cover about five millennia, spanning the period c. 8000 to c. 2500 BC. They go from the initial appearance of ceramic technology within hunting-fishing-gathering communities living in permanent or semi-permanent settlements (locally named ‘Khartoum Variant’ or ‘Mesolithic’ horizon: c. 7600–4800 BC), through the ceramic productions of the first ‘Neolithic’ pastoral societies (Abkan horizon: c. 5550−3700 BC), to those of the Pre-Kerma Nubian culture (c. 3600−2500 BC).

A thorough stylistic macroscopic observation of the finds is integrated with a solid technological approach by means of archaeometric petrographic (OM), mineralogical (XRPD) and chemical (XRF) analyses. Data are discussed and compared across a broad geographical area, including Lower and Upper Nubia, Central Sudan and the Egyptian Western Desert. They provide an original synthesis and interpretation of the ceramic traditions in Nubia and Sudan and propose a critical review of the debate on the invention of pottery and the functional and cultural reasons for the emergence of the ceramic technology.
Remembered Places, Forgotten Pasts The Don Drainage Basin in Prehistory by Tim Cockrell. xii+222 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (10 colour plates). 366 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917012. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917029. Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

South Yorkshire and the North Midlands have long been ignored or marginalized in narratives of British Prehistory. In Remembered Places, Forgotten Pasts, largely unpublished data is used for the first time in a work of synthesis to reconstruct the prehistory of the earliest communities across the River Don drainage basin. The author uses a relational approach to account for the complex and sophisticated interaction between people and materiality. Monuments and material culture are considered together, in relation to the diverse landscapes across which they were deposited in the distant past. The memory of significant places along lines of movement are central to the approach taken, combined with the changing character of the land which supported people. Virtually absent in recent narratives, the forgotten prehistoric pasts of the region are now able to be approached on a systematic basis. The author concludes that a region that was the centre of dynamic interaction between mobile groups in its earliest phase gave way to a pastoral lifestyle facilitated by extensive wetlands. These wetlands were connected by waterways and gorges. Thus connected, the wetlands were located to either side of its drier, centrally defining feature, the Magnesian Limestone ridge.
Palaeolithic Pioneers: Behaviour, abilities, and activity of early Homo in European landscapes around the western Mediterranean basin ~1.3-0.05 Ma. by Michael J. Walker. 342 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916206. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916213. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaic humans were present for over a million years in western Mediterranean Europe where they left very many traces of their early stone-age activities and behaviour, and sometimes even human skeletal remains. This book evaluates archaeological findings about their life-ways at many important sites in Italy, southern France, and Spain, from the earliest ones 1,300,000 years ago, to those of Neanderthals fifty-thousand years ago, just before they were superseded by skeletally-“modern” humans. The cognitive and manual skills of archaic humans in western Mediterranean Europe are considered in the Pleistocene contexts of major climatic fluctuations and changing environmental circumstances. The book focusses on their remarkable capacity to adapt, frequently reinvent themselves, and persist for long periods of time, even though finally they did not endure. Their achievements and abilities withstand comparison to those of ancient humans in Africa or Asia during Early, Middle, and early Late Pleistocene times.

About the Author Michael Walker (Colchester, 1941) is Honorific Emeritus Professor in the Department of Zoology and Physical Anthropology at the University of Murcia in Spain, and directs field-work at Cueva Negra del Estrecho del Río Quípar (Caravaca, Murcia) and Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo (Torre Pacheco, Murcia). He studied at University College, Oxford, graduated in Animal Physiology and Medicine, took the Postgraduate Diploma in Prehistoric Archaeology and gained his D.Phil. for research in S.E. Spanish prehistory and palaeoanthropology. Following a junior research fellowship at The Queen’s College, Oxford, he lectured at the universities of Edinburgh and Sydney before being appointed in 1988 to establish Physical Anthropology at the University of Murcia. Paleoanthropologist Erik Trinkaus (Washington University of St. Louis) and Michael Walker have edited The People of Palomas, Neandertals from the Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, Southeastern Spain (Texas A&M University Press, 2017).
La ocupación humana del territorio de la comarca del río Guadalteba (Málaga) durante el Pleistoceno by Lidia Cabello Ligero. x+212 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text with English abstract. 338 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916121. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916138. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This investigation exhaustively gathers the archaeological evidence of the Palaeolithic human settlement in the Guadalteba river region (Malaga, Spain) during the Pleistocene. The main objective is to show the direct relationship between the reservoirs and the sources of raw materials, located in the fluvial terraces, in the geological outcrops and in the surface deposits. An important part of the work has been the geoarchaeological and archeometric surveys and the analysis of new lithic collections from surface archaeological surveys and recent systematic archaeological excavations in the Ardales Cave and Las Palomas de Teba Sima. In this sense, the methodological tools of other disciplines were used. Geoarchaeology enabled an understanding of the sedimentary and Post -depositional processes affecting the deposits and consequently its lithic industry. Archaeometry helped to see the petrographic features of lithic assemblies of deposits. These disciplines have been fundamental to propose a settlement pattern and mobility of these groups of Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers during the Pleistocene period in the interior of the province of Malaga, laying down a basic structure for future prehistoric investigations in the area.

Spanish Description: Una investigación que recoge de manera exhaustiva las evidencias arqueológicas del poblamiento humano Paleolítico en la comarca del río Guadalteba (Málaga, España) durante el Pleistoceno. El objetivo principal es mostrar la relación directa entre los yacimientos y las fuentes de materias primas, localizadas en las terrazas fluviales, en los afloramientos geológicos y en los propios yacimientos. Destacar la importancia del análisis del registro arqueológico de superficie, donde la prospección se convierte en la herramienta más efectiva para detectar yacimientos que han permanecido al aire libre, sobre todo del Paleolítico inferior y medio. De igual forma cobra especial relevancia el reconocimiento y la caracterización espacial y territorial, donde el artefacto se convierte en la unidad básica de investigación. Parte importante del trabajo han sido los muestreos geoarqueológicos y arqueométricos y el análisis de los nuevos conjuntos líticos procedentes de las prospecciones arqueológicas superficiales y de las recientes excavaciones arqueológicas sistemáticas, realizadas en la Cueva de Ardales y en la Sima de Las Palomas de Teba. En este sentido, hemos utilizado herramientas metodológicas de otras disciplinas, como la Geoarqueología, para comprender los procesos sedimentarios y postdeposicionales que afectan a los yacimientos y en consecuencia a su industria lítica, y la Arqueometría, para ver las características petrográficas de los conjuntos líticos, disciplinas fundamentales para proponer un patrón de asentamiento y movilidad de estos grupos de cazadores-recolectores del Pleistoceno. Este trabajo constituye un hito en la investigación del Paleolítico en el interior de la provincia de Málaga, convirtiéndose en una estructura básica para futuras investigaciones prehistóricas en la zona.
Sig y análisis espacial en la arqueología de cazadores recolectores de Magallania (extremo sur de Sudamérica) by María Cecilia Pallo. 426 pages; illustrated throughout with 102 plates in colour. Spanish text. 28 2017 South American Archaeology Series 28. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916060. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916077. Book contents pageDownload

Magallania defines the region between the Santa Cruz river basin to the north and the Fuegian expression of the Andes to the south. It is one of the southernmost spaces in the world and the last to be occupied by humans, a process that occurred at least at the end of the Pleistocene (11,000 to 9,000 AP) and before the complete formation of the Strait of Magellan (ca. 8000 AP). Thereafter, the Strait functioned as a biogeographic barrier, creating conditions for divergent cultural evolution between the populations of the mainland and Tierra del Fuego. For this reason, the archeology of Magallania offers a unique possibility to inquire about the relationship between the environmental dynamics and the spatial organization of populations of hunter-gatherers settled on both sides of the Strait of Magellan.

Spanish Description: En su versión original, Magallania es el nombre acuñado por Martinic para definir la región comprendida entre la cuenca del río Santa Cruz al norte hasta la expresión fueguina de la cordillera de los Andes al sur. Es uno de los espacios más australes del mundo y de los últimos en ser ocupados por humanos, proceso que ocurrió al menos a fines del Pleistoceno (11.000 a 9.000 AP) y antes de la completa formación del estrecho de Magallanes (ca. 8000 AP). A partir de entonces el Estrecho funcionó como una barrera biogeográfica, creando condiciones para que ocurra la evolución cultural divergente entre las poblaciones del continente y la Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego. Por este motivo, la arqueología de Magallania ofrece una posibilidad única para indagar acerca de la relación entre la dinámica ambiental y la organización espacial de las poblaciones de cazadores recolectores asentadas a un lado y otro del estrecho de Magallanes.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative edited by Renata Grifoni Cremonesi & Anna Maria Tosatti. 276 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text. 26 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915568. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915575. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents the proceedings of the conference “L’arte rupestre dell’età dei metalli nella penisola italiana: localizzazione dei siti in rapporto al territorio, simbologie e possibilità interpretative” that took place in Pisa at the Cantiere delle Navi di Pisa under the aegis of the Soprintendenza Archeologica della Toscana and of the University of Pisa on 15th June 2015. The addressed issues were related to the Post-Pleistocene rock art along the Apennine ridge; in recent years more and more evidence has been identified, which is different from the magnificent evidence found in the Alps such as, for example, the well-known Monte Bego and Val Camonica. This evidence, despite various and peculiar features, can be all related to the iconographic field whose main expressions are anthropomorphic figures, weapons, daggers, halberds and several other symbols, all similarly stylised. A peculiarity of these manifestations is their location in small shelters inappropriate for habitation or in places suitable for supervising mountain and territory roads, bearing comparison to evidence from Western Mediterranean coastal areas. An interpretative possibility has emerged: these sites could have been not only ceremonial places, but also spaces linked to the socio-economic fields or perhaps to the power of communities that occupied these territories.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Suyanggae and Her Neighbours in Haifa, Israel Proceedings of the 20th (1) Congress June 21–28, 2015 edited by Sharon Gonen and Avraham Ronen. 156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 313 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915384. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915391. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Proceedings of the 20th symposium: Suyanggae and Her Neighbours. The 20th symposium took place across two meetings, the first in Haifa, Israel and the second in Danyang, Republic of Korea. This proceedings volume gathers papers, abstracts and posters from the meeting in Haifa, which took place from 21–28 June 2015.
Myths about Rock Art by Robert G. Bednarik. ii+218 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 278 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914745. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914752. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Rather than considering the myths supposedly depicted in the world’s rock art, this book examines the myths archaeologists and others have created about the meanings and significance of rock art. This vast body of opinions dominates our concepts of the principal surviving cultural manifestations of early worldviews. Here these constructs are subjected to detailed analysis and are found to consist largely of misinterpretations. From the misidentification of natural rock markings as rock art to mistaken interpretations, from sensationalist claims to pareidolic elucidations of iconographies, the book presents numerous examples of myths researchers have created about pre-Historic ‘art’. The claims about a connection between rock art and the neuropathologies of its producers are assessed, and the neuroscience of rock art interpretation is reviewed. The book presents a comprehensive catalogue of falsities claimed about palaeoart, and it endeavours to explain how these arose, and how they can be guarded against by recourse to basic principles of science. It therefore represents a key resource in the scientific study of rock art.

About the Author:
Robert G. Bednarik is the Convener and Editor-in-Chief of the International Federation of Rock Art Organisations and is affiliated with Hebei Normal University, China. His principal research interests are the origins of the human ability to create constructs of reality, the evolution of humans, and in a variety of fields providing supplementary information in that quest, including the world’s rock art. He has produced more than 1350 academic publications.
Les sépultures mésolithiques de Téviec et Hoedic: révisions bioarchéologiques by Bruno Boulestin. 292 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914967. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914974. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The sites of Teviec and Hoedic, located in Brittany and excavated from 1928 to 1934 by Marthe and Saint-Just Péquart, have yielded twenty-odd graves dating to the end of the Mesolithic and containing almost forty individuals. Nearly a century later, they remain the most important funerary groups ever discovered in France for this period, and two major French Mesolithic sites. Until these days though, despite previous re-examinations of part of the unearthed material, no general review of the field data or of the human remains had ever been carried out, and all the debates concerning the functioning of both cemeteries relied on the interpretations once made by the Péquart and on the anthropological studies by Marcellin Boule and Henri Victor Vallois. This book presents the long lacking bioarchaeological review study of the Teviec and Hoedic graves: the field data have been reconsidered, relying in particular on a large series of pictures taken by the excavators, and the number of dead individuals, their age and sex have been reevaluated using anthropological techniques in accordance with our current knowledge. This review also gives us the occasion to carry out a global reflection on the circumstances under which the dead were grouped during the Mesolithic period and on the society of Atlantic Europe’s last hunters-gatherers as perceived through the filter of their funerary practices.

About the author:
Bruno Boulestin is an anthropologist at the University of Bordeaux, France, member of the research unit “De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie” (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). He is working on the diachronic study of practices around death in ancient societies from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data and is specialized in the study of bone modifications and corpse treatments.

French Description:
Fouillés entre 1928 et 1934 par Marthe et Saint-Just Péquart, Téviec et Hoedic, en Bretagne, ont livré une vingtaine de tombes datant de la fin du Mésolithique et contenant près de quarante individus. Presque un siècle plus tard, ils demeurent les ensembles funéraires les plus importants de cette période découverts en France, et parmi les sites majeurs du Mésolithique français. Mais jusque-là, si une partie des matériels mis au jour avaient été réexaminés, ni les données de terrain ni les restes humains n’avaient fait l’objet d’une révision générale, et toutes les discussions sur le fonctionnement des deux cimetières s’appuyaient sur les anciennes interprétations des Péquart et sur les études anthropologiques de Marcellin Boule et Henri Victor Vallois. Cet ouvrage présente le travail de révision bioarchéologique des sépultures de Téviec et Hoedic qui faisait jusqu’à présent défaut : les données de terrain y sont reconsidérées, en s’appuyant en particulier sur une importante série de photographies prises par les fouilleurs, et le nombre de morts, leur âge et leur sexe y sont réévalués en utilisant des techniques anthropologiques conformes au savoir actuel. Cette révision est également l’occasion d’une réflexion générale sur les regroupements des morts au Mésolithique, ainsi que sur la société des derniers chasseurs-cueilleurs d’Europe atlantique telle qu’elle est perçue à travers le filtre de leurs pratiques funéraires.

Bruno Boulestin est anthropologue à l’Université de Bordeaux, France, membre de l’UMR 5199 du CNRS PACEA, « De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement et Anthropologie ». Ses recherches portent sur l’étude diachronique des pratiques autour de la mort dans les sociétés anciennes, à partir à la fois des données archéologiques, bioarchéologiques et de l’anthropologie sociale, et il est spécialisé dans l’étude des modifications osseuses et des traitements du cadavre.
Palaeoart and Materiality The Scientific Study of Rock Art edited by Robert G. Bednarik, Danae Fiore, Mara Basile, Giriraj Kumar and Tang Huisheng. ii+254 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 6 colour plates. 267 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914295. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914301. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book contains a series of selected papers presented at two symposia entitled ‘Scientific study of rock art’, one held in the IFRAO Congress of Rock Art in La Paz, Bolivia, in June 2012, the other held in the IFRAO Congress in Cáceres, Spain, in September 2015; as well as some invited papers from leading rock art scientists. The core topic of the book is the presentation of scientific approaches to the materiality of rock art, ranging from recording and sampling methods to data analyses. These share the fact that they provide means of testing hypotheses and/or of finding trends in the data which can be used as independent sources of evidence to support specific interpretations. The issue of the materiality of visual productions of the distant past, which in archaeological theory has attracted much attention recently and has stimulated much conceptual debate, is addressed through a variety of scientific approaches, including fieldwork methods, laboratory work techniques and/or data analysis protocols. These, in turn, will provide new insights into human agency and people-image engagements through the study of rock art production, display and use.

About the Editors:
Robert G. Bednarik is the Convener and Editor-in-Chief of the International Federation of Rock Art Organisations and is affiliated with Hebei Normal University, China. His principal research interests are the origins of the human ability to create constructs of reality, the evolution of humans, and in a variety of fields providing supplementary information in that quest, including the world’s rock art. He has produced more than 1350 academic publications.

Dr Danae Fiore is a researcher at Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas, Argentina, and a lecturer at Universidad de Buenos Aires. Her main interests are focused on the archaeology of rock art, portable art and body art viewed from technological, economic and cognitive perspectives; hunter-gatherer archaeology; archaeological theory and methods; and visual archaeology (the study of indigenous material culture through ethnographic photographs).

Dr Mara Basile is an archaeologist and a researcher at the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research, Argentina. She has been a member of the Archaeological Project Chaschuil Abaucán (www.proyectopacha.com.ar) since 2002. Her main research interest is to delineate the visual languages that circulated in different expressive media over time in the region of Fiambalá (Catamarca, Argentina).

Dr Giriraj Kumar is Professor in Rock Art Science and Indian Culture and Founding Secretary General and Editor, Rock Art Society of India (estd. 1990), carrying out scientific research on early Indian petroglyphs and their dating in collaboration with Australian and other scientists. He published a book on Indian rock art and more than eighty research papers on Stone Age Indian rock art and culture.

Dr Tang Huisheng is the Director of the International Centre of Rock Art Dating and Conservation, Hebei Normal University, China. He also teaches as a Professor at the of Archaeology Department of Nanjing Normal University. His principal interests are the rock art of China and its dating, and the Chinese Neolithic period.


Holocene Prehistory in the Télidjène Basin, Eastern Algeria Capsian occupations at Kef Zoura D and Aïn Misteheyia edited by David Lubell. vi+226 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 4 colour plates. Papers in English and French. 239 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913731. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913748. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

From 1972 to 1979, field work was conducted in the Télidjène Basin, Eastern Algeria, as part of a project called The Prehistoric Cultural Ecology of Capsian Escargotières. The primary objective was the controlled excavation of two stratified Capsian sites, the open-air escargotière Aïn Misteheyia (1973 and 1976) and the rock shelter Kef Zoura D (1976 and 1978), both of which have remained incompletely published until now. Aïn Misteheyia and Kef Zoura D have proven to be key sites in a discussion that has been ongoing since at least the 1930s when Vaufrey published his interpretation of Capsian stratigraphy, trying to understand if there was a temporal succession between the Capsien typique and the Capsien supérieur. These are the only Capsian escargotières excavated with modern methods and extensive radiocarbon dating that have a clear stratigraphic sequence in which both variants of the Capsian are represented. We show that Capsien typique precedes Capsien supérieur, that the latter saw the introduction of a new technique for the production of blanks (pressure flaking), that the change is more-or-less contemporary with the 8200 cal BP cold event, and that it was accompanied by a subtle change in a subsistence regime of continued foraging despite the introduction of some herding of apparently introduced domestic stock in neighbouring regions that suggests the changes observed at these two sites may have eventually led in some areas to the introduction of Neolithic subsistence patterns, although there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the central Capsian area of eastern Algeria and southern Tunisia. Aïn Misteheyia was described in two previous reports in Libyca, but the artifact illustrations were never published and appear here as an addendum. Four chapters describe the chronology, stratigraphy, lithic, faunal and charcoal assemblages from Kef Zoura D. In addition, there are chapters analyzing the well preserved assemblages of worked bone from the Capsien supérieur deposits at both sites as well as the small assemblages of marine shell. One chapter is a reprinted paper that originally appeared in Sahara on an engraved stone plaque from Kef Zoura D, and a final chapter is the first report on an ongoing study of use-wear in the lithic assemblage from Kef Zoura D.

About the Editor:
David Lubell (Professor Emeritus, University of Alberta and Adjunct Professor, University of Waterloo) received his PhD in 1971 from Columbia University. He has directed archaeological field work in Algeria, Portugal and Italy, always with an emphasis on the inter-relationship of human groups with their environments as reflected in their subsistence patterns and the analysis of the artifacts they made and used. In collaboration with Mary Jackes, he has expanded his horizons to take into account the bioarchaeology and palaeodemography of the human populations involved. He has also made a decades-long study of the occurrence of edible land snails in Holocene archaeological sites throughout the Mediterranean region and is convinced (but unable yet to prove) that their presence in abundance represents a part of the transition from foraging to food production.

Reviews:

'This volume is a detailed and convincing interdisciplinary presentation of important archaeological material, illustrated with numerous very informative, high-quality figures.' -Jörg Linstädter (Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa, 2017)

'The major achievement of this book is the systematic description of well stratified Capsian sites, offering a high-resolution representation of the transformation of this horizon from the beginning, during the Early Holocene, until its evolved phase... The book is undoubtedly an important entry point for the research in Kef Zoura and at the same time a significant contribution to the knowledge of the Holocene of Algeria.' -Giuseppina Mut
‘A Mersshy Contree Called Holdernesse’: Excavations on the Route of a National Grid Pipeline in Holderness, East Yorkshire Rural Life in the Claylands to the East of the Yorkshire Wolds, from the Mesolithic to the Iron Age and Roman Periods, and beyond edited by Gavin Glover, Paul Flintoft, Richard Moore. xii+286 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 225 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913137. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913144. Book contents pageDownload

Twenty sites were excavated on the route of a National Grid pipeline across Holderness, East Yorkshire. These included an early Mesolithic flint-working area, near Sproatley. In situ deposits of this age are rare, and the site is a significant addition to understanding of the post-glacial development of the wider region. Later phases of this site included possible Bronze Age round barrows and an Iron Age square barrow. Elsewhere on the pipeline route, diagnostic Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age flints, as well as Bronze Age pottery, provide evidence of activity in these periods.

Iron Age remains were found at all of the excavation sites, fourteen of which had ring gullies, interpreted as evidence for roundhouse structures. The frequency with which these settlements occurred is an indication of the density of population in the later Iron Age and the large assemblage of hand-made pottery provides a rich resource for future study. Activity at several of these sites persisted at least into the second or early third centuries AD, while the largest excavation site, at Burton Constable, was re-occupied in the later third century. However, the pottery from the ring gullies was all hand-made, suggesting that roundhouses had ceased to be used by the later first century AD, when the earliest wheel-thrown wares appear. This has implications for understanding of the Iron Age to Roman transition in the region.

Late first- or early second-century artefacts from a site at Scorborough Hill, near Weeton, are of particular interest, their nature strongly suggesting an association with the Roman military.

Public Images, Private Readings: Multi-Perspective Approaches to the Post-Palaeolithic Rock Art Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 5 / Session A11e edited by Ramón Fábregas Valcarce and Carlos Rodríguez-Rellán. vi+70 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. All papers in English, abstracts in English and French. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912895. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912901. Book contents pageDownload

A significant number of Holocene societies throughout the world have resorted at one time or another to the making of paints or carvings on different places (tombs, rock-shelters or caves, openair outcrops). The aim of the session A11e. Public images, private readings: multi-perspective approaches to the post-Palaeolithic rock art, which was held within the XVII World UISPP Congress (Burgos, September 1-7 2014), was to put together the experiences of specialists from different areas of the Iberian Peninsula and the World. The approaches ranged from the archaeological definition of the artistic phenomena and their socioeconomic background to those concerning themselves with the symbolic and ritual nature of those practices, including the definition of the audience to which the graphic manifestations were addressed and the potential role of the latter in the making up of social identities and the enforcement of territorial claims. More empirical issues, such as new recording methodologies and data management or even dating were also considered during this session.