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Early Maritime Cultures in East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean Papers from a conference held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (African Studies Program) 23-24 October 2015, with additional contributions by Akshay Sarathi. Paperback; 203x276mm; viii+228 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 plates in colour). 66 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917128. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917135. Book contents pageDownload

The East African coast and the Western Indian Ocean are regions of global historical significance. This volume contains papers first presented at the conference, Early Maritime Cultures of the East African Coast, held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 23-24, 2015. Rather than limiting publication to the proceedings of the conference, additional contributions were solicited to expand the scope of the research presented and to place East Africa in its broader geographic and cultural contexts. The resulting volume focuses broadly on East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean and unites the papers under the general themes of movement and connection.

These papers represent a multi-disciplinary effort to examine East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean. Multiple lines of evidence drawn from linguistics, archaeology, history, art history, and ethnography come together in novel ways to highlight different aspects of the region’s past and offer innovative avenues for future research. The papers cover a diverse array of topics, including but not limited to: subsistence, watercraft traditions, trade and exchange (especially concerning the Silk Routes), migration, food ways, and familial relationships. This volume is unique in that it includes some speculative research as well, intended to present novel methods to deal with data-poor topics and to start important conversations about understudied topics.

The goal of this volume is to showcase aspects of the complex cultures and histories of this vast region and to emphasize its importance to world history. Ideally, it will generate scholarly and popular interest in the histories and cultures of the region and bring to the fore Africa’s and the Western Indian Ocean’s important (yet often overlooked) role in world historical narratives. It may also serve as a more advanced introduction to East Africa’s and the Western Indian Ocean’s history of interaction with other regions of the Old World and as a survey of methods used to understand the region’s past.

About the Editor
AKSHAY SARATHI is a graduate student of Archaeology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include the zooarchaeology of maritime adaptations, Indian Ocean trade and exchange, and East African coastal archaeology. More specifically, his current research project focuses on the island of Zanzibar, where he has excavated the sites of Unguja Ukuu, Kizimkazi Dimbani, and Kuumbi Cave. Data from these sites will form the basis of his dissertation, which will examine how dietary preferences changed over time at each site in response to various stimuli over time. He currently resides in Madison, WI (USA) with his two feline overlords.
Eastern Sudan in its Setting The archaeology of a region far from the Nile Valley by Andrea Manzo. viii+82 pages; illustrated throughout with 38 colour plates. 24 2017 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 94. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915582. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915599. Book contents pageDownload

Eastern Sudan, like other regions far away from the Nile valley, has often been overlooked historically on account of a kind of prejudice towards areas lacking in monumental or urban remains or evidence of any literary production. Despite the relevance of the deserts and marginal areas becoming increasingly evident in the last year or so, in Sudan only a few research projects have been conducted in these regions. The ongoing research project in Eastern Sudan by the University ‘L’Orientale’ has provided a preliminary reconstruction of the history of the region from c. 6000 BC to AD 1500. This publication outlines this reconstruction and also considers the more general setting known for the other regions of northeastern Africa. Several issues remain to be clarified and understanding of some phases is still limited, nevertheless it can be safely stated that Eastern Sudan, was in ancient times, as it is now, a crossroads between the Nile basin, Eastern Desert, the Ethio-Eritrean highlands and the Red Sea, represented a crucial region in several respects: the spread of domestic crops and animals towards the Ethio-Eritrean highlands, the spread of the Sahelian crops towards India via the Red Sea and Arabia, as well as the long-distance trade network characterizing northeastern Africa in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

About Bakr Awa Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Peter A. Miglus. Pages 229-239.Download

The site of Bakr Awa (35°13’14”N, 45°56’26”E) situated on the outskirts of the city of Halabja is one of the biggest ancient settlements in the western foothills of the Zagros in Iraqi Kurdistan (AAI 1970, 335 no. 54; AASI 1975-76, map 77 no. 14). It consists of a c. 800 x 600 m large lower city (max. +579 m a.s.l.) and a steep citadel mound (max. +595 m a.s.l.) dominating the plain (approx. +565 m a.s.l.). The citadel is crowned by an earthen parapet wall while the mound is surrounded by a moat dug probably in the Islamic period (Fig.1).
Tell Barri/Kahat (al Hassake) Taken from A History of Syria in One Hundred Sites by Raffaella Pierobon Benoit. Pages 304-308.Download

Tell Barri is located in western Jazira, on the left bank of the river JaghJagh, a tributary of the Habur. The river was fully navigable in antiquity and permitted easy communications as far as the Euphrates. The river supplied water, used not only for drinking but for crops and artisanal activities; cuneiform tablets provide evidence that fishing was also practised. This part of the Jazira was, in any case, favourable to settlements thanks to sufficient rainfall for the development of semi-arid agriculture. Its products, especially grains, combined with intense animal husbandry, notably sheep, formed the mixed economy that seems to have characterized all phases of the life of the site. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
History of Archaeology: International Perspectives Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain). Volume 11 / Sessions A8b, A4a and A8a organised by the History of Archaeology Scientific Commission edited by Géraldine Delley, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, François Djindjian, Victor M. Fernandez, Alessandro Guidi and Marc-Antoine Kaeser. viii+237 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Papers in English and French. 253 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784913977. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913984. Book contents pageDownload

The present volume gathers the communications of the three sessions organized under the auspices of the Commission ‘History of Archaeology’ at the XVII UISPP World Congress, Burgos 2014. The first part deals precisely with ‘International relations in the history of archaeology’. The eleven contributions tackle a particularly productive topic in the field today. In actual fact, this seminal research field currently echoes in a way the strong trend of scholarship about the influence of nationalism on the discipline, which since the end of the 1980s, has greatly contributed to the takeoff and overall recognition of the history of archaeology. The second part, entitled ‘The Revolution of the Sixties in prehistory and protohistory’, is the outcome of a partnership with the Commission ‘Archaeological Methods and Theory’. The seven contributions strive to document and analyse a recent past, which is still often burdened with the weight of teleological and presentist appraisals. The inclusion in this volume of this session significantly dedicated to the genealogy of schools of thought and to the study of complex methodological and technical issues illustrates the editors’ commitment to tackling historical issues as well, which are closely linked to current theoretical debates within archaeology. Such is also the aim of the third part, which addresses ‘Lobbying for Archaeology’. As shown by the five contributions of this session, archaeology has not only been instrumentalised by political powers and ideological interests. It has also found fruitful alliances with economic agents or bodies, where mutual advantages were gained on practical, technical bases. This volume suggests a reflexive, critical approach to these various forms of lobbying should ensure a useful awareness regarding the structural problems archaeology faces today, regarding its funding methods.

About the Editors:

Géraldine Delley (Dr. phil.) is a historian of archaeology. She published Au-delà des chronologies. Des origines du radiocarbone et de la dendrochronologie à leur intégration dans les recherches lacustres suisses (2015). She works in the project History of motorway archaeology in Switzerland (1958-2010) at the University of Neuchâtel. Her research interests concern the history of collaborations between archaeology and laboratory sciences, the epistemology and the politics of archaeology in the 20th century.

ICREA Professor, Margarita Díaz-Andreu is a prehistoric archaeologist based at the University of Barcelona (Spain), where she moved in 2012 after 16 years at Durham University (UK). She has been teaching, supervising PhD thesis and researching on history of archaeology for two decades. Her research interests lay on the relationship between nationalism and archaeology, the history of archaeological tourism and international relations in the history of archaeology.

Professor of prehistory at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Víctor M. Fernández has directed several archaeological excavations: Nubia (1978-1981), Spanish region of La Mancha (1984-1991), Central Sudan (1989-2000), Western Ethiopia (2001-2005) and Central Ethiopia (2006-2014). He published: Early Meroitic in Northern Sudan (1984), The Blue Nile Project (2003), Schematic rock art, rain-making and Islam in the Ethio-Sudanese borderlands (2011), Una arqueología crítica (2006), Los años del Nilo (2011). He is co-author of The archaeology of the Jesuit missions in Ethiopia, 1557-1632 (Brill, in press).

Alessandro Guidi is Professor of Prehistory at Roma Tre University. His research interests include the origin of the State in protohistoric Italy and the history of prehistoric archaeology. In 2011 he organized a congress on the history of Italian prehistoric archaeology whose proceedings are now published (A. Guidi ed., 150 anni di Preistoria e Protostoria in Italia, Istituto Italiano di Preistoria e P
Current Investigations into the Early Neolithic of the Zagros Foothills of Iraqi Kurdistan Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Roger Matthews, Wendy Matthews, Kamal Rasheed Raheem and Kamal Rauf Aziz. Pages 219-228.Download

One of the most significant transformations in history took place after the last Ice Age, from c. 12,000 BC (all dates calibrated BC), when human communities changed from being mobile hunter-foragers to more settled farmers and stock-keepers, with domesticated crops and animals. This Neolithic transformation was a fundamental development in the human condition across much of the world and led ultimately, through surplus accumulation and social differentiation, to the emergence of towns, cities, and empires, shaping the modern world. The full volume is available in paperback here.
In the Neo-Assyrian Border March of the Palace Herald: Geophysical Survey and Salvage Excavations at Gird-i Bazar and Qalat-i Dinka (Peshdar Plain Project 2015) Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Karen Radner, Andrei Ašandulesei, Jörg Fassbinder, Tina Greenfield, Jean-Jacques Herr, Janoscha Kreppner and Andrea Squitieri. Pages 353-367.Download

The Peshdar Plain is situated in the province of Sulaymaniyah, district of Raniyah (also known as Raparin district), in the Kurdish Autonomous Region of Iraq, directly at the border with Iran on the upper reaches of the Lower Zab. The regional centre is the town of Qaladze (Qalat Dizeh), in the northwest of the plain, whose impressive settlement mound (36° 11’ 7” N, 45° 6’ 53” E) demonstrates that the site has held this position since antiquity. The Peshdar Plain Project was inaugurated in 2015 with the goal of investigating the region in the Neo-Assyrian period and focuses on two sites: tiny Gird-i Bazar (36° 8’ 18” N, 45° 8’ 28” E; henceforth Bazar), a shallow mound (altitude: 539 m) of only 1.5 ha situated in the plain, and the more impressive Qalat-i Dinka (36° 8’ 12” N, 45° 7’ 57” E; henceforth Dinka), looming high over the Lower Zab on the imposing terminal outcrop of a crescent-shaped mountain range along the northern river bank. This first report will briefly detail the geophysical survey (section 1) and the excavations (section 2) conducted in 2015 before introducing the bioarchaeological sampling strategy (section 3) and presenting a first assessment of the sites and more generally of the significance of our work in the regional setting of the Peshdar Plain and within the Neo-Assyrian Empire and its client states (section 4). The full volume is available in paperback here.
Magnetic investigations in the Shahrizor Plain: Revealing the unseen in survey prospections Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Simone Mühl and Jörg Fassbinder. Pages 241-248.Download

Prospection by magnetometer in urban environments outside the limits of excavation offers the possibility to unveil the layout of entire settlements, including street networks and residential and other architectural features, without the use of a spade. Questions about city planning, the use of built and open space and the organization of religious and other architecture at sites can all be addressed (cf. Fassbinder 2002; Fassbinder et al. 2005; Benech 2007). Magnetic prospections of sites in the Shahrizor Plain, which have been conducted since October 2013, have the potential to provide insights into the diachronic use of rural space in the region. This paper will focus on the results of investigations which were carried out at Gird-i Shatwan (bečuk – ‘the small mound Shatwan’; SSP-51 & 52), a small Parthian site in the rural environment of Wadi Shamlu in the center of the Shahrizor Plain. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Satu Qala: an Assessment of the Stratigraphy of the Site Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Cinzia Pappi. Pages 297-307.Download

The view of historical developments within the area of Idu, identified with Sâtu Qalâ on the Lower Zāb in Iraqi Kurdistan (Van Soldt 2008), and its hinterland have so far been closely connected to available information on the imperial expansion of Assyria in the region. Through the support of the Directorate of Antiquities of the Kurdish Regional Government of Iraq, an international team consisting of the universities of Leiden (2010-12), Leipzig (2010-14), the Salahaddin University of Erbil (2010-12), and the University of Pennsylvania (2013) was able to conduct several seasons of fieldwork at Sâtu Qalâ. Data from this fieldwork can now provide a much wider historical sequence for the settlement. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
The Crowded Desert: a multi-phase archaeological survey in the north-west of Qatar Taken from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies 46 (2016) by Jose C. Carvajal Lopez, Laura Morabito, Robert Carter, Richard Fletcher & Faisal Abdullah al-Naimi. Pages 45-62.ISBN 9781784913632. Download

This paper introduces the conception, development, and results of the first campaign of the Crowded Desert Project, an archaeological survey of the area of Mulayhah (aka Mleiha), Umm al-Ma in north-west Qatar. The project aims to develop basic research on desert settlement and on processes of nomadism and sedentarization over a long timescale in Qatar. The first season has focused on two areas, the most important of which is the Mulayhah Depression, a geological silt trap with a well, around which there is documented occupation ranging from the Hellenistic period up to the present day. As expected, the seasonal flooding of the depression can offer potential stratigraphic sequences that can be combined with other methods of dating to establish a basic sequence of occupation of the area. In the survey more than 600 features were mapped, including campsites, Islamic and pre-Islamic cemeteries, and mosques of different sizes. This is the first multi-phasic intensive survey of the area in which an attempt to offer a long-term interpretation of settlement patterns has been undertaken. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
SOMA 2013. Proceedings of the 17th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology Moscow, 25-27 April 2013 edited by Sergei Fazlullin, Mazlum Mert Antika. 262 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 5 2015 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912673. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912291. Book contents pageDownload

Papers from the 17th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology, SOMA 2013 held in Moscow, 25-27 April 2013.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

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