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Egypt 2015: Perspectives of Research Proceedings of the Seventh European Conference of Egyptologists (2nd-7th June, 2015, Zagreb – Croatia) by Mladen Tomorad and Joanna Popielska-Grzybowska. xii+358 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 329 2017 Archaeopress Egyptology 18. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915841. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915858. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seventh Central European Conference of Egyptologists. Egypt 2015: Perspectives of Research (CECE7) was held at the University of Zagreb in Croatia in 2015. It was co-organised by two scholarly institutions: the Department of History at the Centre for Croatian Studies of the University of Zagreb, Croatia (Dr Mladen Tomorad), and the Department of Ancient Cultures of the Pułtusk Academy of Humanities in Pułtusk, Poland (Dr Joanna Popielska-Grzybowska).

This book presents a selection of papers which were read at the conference. The volume is divided into six sections in which thirty-two scholars from fourteen European countries cover various fields of modern Egyptological research. The first group of five papers is devoted to language, literature and religious texts; in the second section three authors describe various themes related to art, iconography and architectural studies; the third group contains four contributions on current funerary and burial studies; in the fourth (largest) section, ten authors present their recent research on material culture and museum studies; the fifth is concerned with the history of Ancient Egypt; and in the last (sixth), two authors examine modern Egyptomania and the 19th century travellers to Egypt.
Eastern Sudan in its Setting The archaeology of a region far from the Nile Valley by Andrea Manzo. viii+82 pages; illustrated throughout with 38 colour plates. Available both in print and Open Access. Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 94. ISBN 9781784915582. £25.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Eastern Sudan, like other regions far away from the Nile valley, has often been overlooked historically on account of a kind of prejudice towards areas lacking in monumental or urban remains or evidence of any literary production. Despite the relevance of the deserts and marginal areas becoming increasingly evident in the last year or so, in Sudan only a few research projects have been conducted in these regions. The ongoing research project in Eastern Sudan by the University ‘L’Orientale’ has provided a preliminary reconstruction of the history of the region from c. 6000 BC to AD 1500. This publication outlines this reconstruction and also considers the more general setting known for the other regions of northeastern Africa. Several issues remain to be clarified and understanding of some phases is still limited, nevertheless it can be safely stated that Eastern Sudan, was in ancient times, as it is now, a crossroads between the Nile basin, Eastern Desert, the Ethio-Eritrean highlands and the Red Sea, represented a crucial region in several respects: the spread of domestic crops and animals towards the Ethio-Eritrean highlands, the spread of the Sahelian crops towards India via the Red Sea and Arabia, as well as the long-distance trade network characterizing northeastern Africa in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Atlas of Mammal Distribution through Africa from the LGM (~18 ka) to Modern Times The zooarchaeological record by Hélène Jousse. 316 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 309 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915407. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915414. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This work provides the first overview of mammal species distributions in Africa since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18 ky) to modern time. It is derived from data published mainly in the zooarchaeological literature until 2009. During a post-doctoral project hosted in the zoological department of mammal collection at the Naturhistoriches Museum in Vienna (Austria), the occurrences of taxa in archaeological sites on the African continent were recorded in a database, integrating geographical and chronological information. This record offers the opportunity to produce a chronological atlas of mammalian distributions by presenting their occurrences on successive maps over the last 18 ky.

This work is useful for zooarchaeologists dealing with one particular species by providing a bibliographical work that documents its past locations. It must be noted that fauna are mainly documented through their presence at archaeological sites and are therefore tied to the presence of humans and their activities. This may only partially reproduce their true past distribution. However, the sites offer a good coverage throughout space and time and generally reflect the extent of mammalian distributions, although the limits of their distributions may be further refined. The atlas will aid in the investigation of palaeoecological issues, such as the capacity of mammals to adapt to climatic change and respond to human disturbance in the recent past of Africa.

The database also provides information that is fundamental to a better understanding of what influenced the present-day distribution, dynamism and structure of mammalian communities in Africa. By incorporating a larger temporal scale to modern ecological studies, it may help control their conservation since desiccation and human disturbance in Africa is still a worrying question for their future.
Reprinting: An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology edited by Werner Steinhaus and Simon Kaner. v+344 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. *eBook version coming soon*. 273 2016 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology 1. ISBN 9781784914257. £35.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology provides, for the first time a comprehensive visual introduction to a wide range of sites and finds from the earliest occupation of the Japanese archipelago prior to 35,000 years ago to the early historical periods and the establishment of the Chinese-style capital at Heijō, modern-day Nara, in the 8th century AD.

The volume originated in the largest ever exhibition of Japanese archaeological discoveries held in Germany in 2004, which brought together over 1500 exhibits from 55 lenders around Japan, and research by over 100 specialists. The Illustrated Companion brings the fruits of this project to an English-reading audience and offers an up-to-date survey of the achievements of Japanese archaeology.

About the Editors:
Werner Steinhaus is Lecturer in Archaeology at Hiroshima University in Japan. After graduating from Freiburg University in Germany he undertook postgraduate research at Osaka University in Japan, specializing in the archaeology of the Kofun period. He spearheaded the largest overseas exhibition of Japanese archaeology ‘Die Zeit der Morgenröte’, which was held in Germany in 2004/2005. His recent publications include the Online Dictionary of Japanese Archaeology (www.wakoku.eu). He is currently developing a new program of research on the ancient mounded tombs of the Kofun period.

Simon Kaner is Head of the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures (www.sainsbury-institute.org) and Director of the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. While Studying for his PhD in Jōmon settlement archaeology at the University of Cambridge, he undertook research based at Kyōto University in Japan. His publications include The Power of Dogū: ceramic figures from Ancient Japan (London, British Museum) and the Online Resource for Japanese Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (www.orjach.org). He currently directs the Shinano-Chikuma River Project, investigating the development of historic landscapes along the longest river drainage in Japan.

Table of Contents:
Introduction and Acknowledgements
Map of Japan
Paleolithic period (c. 35,000 – 13,000 BC)
Jōmon period (c. 13,000 – 300 BC)
Yayoi period (c. 900 BC – 250 AD)
Kofun period (c. 250 AD – 710 AD)
Asuka and Nara periods (c. 538 AD – 794 AD)
Accessories and Ornaments
Archaeology in Japan: the past in the present
List of Sites
Bibliography
Further Reading
Figure Credits
Plates images list


Please note this book is reprinting. To be informed when this title is available to order please contact info@archaeopress.com.

History of Archaeology: International Perspectives Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain). Volume 11 / Sessions A8b, A4a and A8a organised by the History of Archaeology Scientific Commission edited by Géraldine Delley, Margarita Díaz-Andreu, François Djindjian, Victor M. Fernandez, Alessandro Guidi and Marc-Antoine Kaeser. viii+237 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Papers in English and French. Available both in print and Open Access. 253 2016. ISBN 9781784913977. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The present volume gathers the communications of the three sessions organized under the auspices of the Commission ‘History of Archaeology’ at the XVII UISPP World Congress, Burgos 2014. The first part deals precisely with ‘International relations in the history of archaeology’. The eleven contributions tackle a particularly productive topic in the field today. In actual fact, this seminal research field currently echoes in a way the strong trend of scholarship about the influence of nationalism on the discipline, which since the end of the 1980s, has greatly contributed to the takeoff and overall recognition of the history of archaeology. The second part, entitled ‘The Revolution of the Sixties in prehistory and protohistory’, is the outcome of a partnership with the Commission ‘Archaeological Methods and Theory’. The seven contributions strive to document and analyse a recent past, which is still often burdened with the weight of teleological and presentist appraisals. The inclusion in this volume of this session significantly dedicated to the genealogy of schools of thought and to the study of complex methodological and technical issues illustrates the editors’ commitment to tackling historical issues as well, which are closely linked to current theoretical debates within archaeology. Such is also the aim of the third part, which addresses ‘Lobbying for Archaeology’. As shown by the five contributions of this session, archaeology has not only been instrumentalised by political powers and ideological interests. It has also found fruitful alliances with economic agents or bodies, where mutual advantages were gained on practical, technical bases. This volume suggests a reflexive, critical approach to these various forms of lobbying should ensure a useful awareness regarding the structural problems archaeology faces today, regarding its funding methods.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

About the Editors:

Géraldine Delley (Dr. phil.) is a historian of archaeology. She published Au-delà des chronologies. Des origines du radiocarbone et de la dendrochronologie à leur intégration dans les recherches lacustres suisses (2015). She works in the project History of motorway archaeology in Switzerland (1958-2010) at the University of Neuchâtel. Her research interests concern the history of collaborations between archaeology and laboratory sciences, the epistemology and the politics of archaeology in the 20th century.

ICREA Professor, Margarita Díaz-Andreu is a prehistoric archaeologist based at the University of Barcelona (Spain), where she moved in 2012 after 16 years at Durham University (UK). She has been teaching, supervising PhD thesis and researching on history of archaeology for two decades. Her research interests lay on the relationship between nationalism and archaeology, the history of archaeological tourism and international relations in the history of archaeology.

Professor of prehistory at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Víctor M. Fernández has directed several archaeological excavations: Nubia (1978-1981), Spanish region of La Mancha (1984-1991), Central Sudan (1989-2000), Western Ethiopia (2001-2005) and Central Ethiopia (2006-2014). He published: Early Meroitic in Northern Sudan (1984), The Blue Nile Project (2003), Schematic rock art, rain-making and Islam in the Ethio-Sudanese borderlands (2011), Una arqueología crítica (2006), Los años del Nilo (2011). He is co-author of The archaeology of the Jesuit missions in Ethiopia, 1557-1632 (Brill, in press).

Alessandro Guidi is Professor of Prehistory at Roma Tre University. His research interests include the origin of the State in protohistoric Italy and the history of prehisto
Archaeology of the Ouse Valley, Sussex, to AD 1500 edited by Dudley Moore, Michael J. Allen, and David Rudling. xxii+138 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 1 colour plate. 251 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913779. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913786. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Ouse valley, East Sussex, is a key communication route from the Channel coast, via the Downs (and the historic county town of Lewes), to the wide expanse of the Weald. It traverses and encompasses landscapes and archaeological sites of both regional and national importance – all connected by the river Ouse and its valley. This is the first review of the archaeology of this important landscape – from Palaeolithic to medieval times by contributors all routed in the archaeology of Sussex. Binding together the archaeology is a review of the geoarchaeology and palaeo-environment following which the chapters document the collective archaeology and potential from the Palaeolithic of Boxgrove vs Piltdown, via Mesolithic archaeology from the textbook excavations of Grahame Clark to recent 21st century investigations. Monuments of causewayed enclosures, long barrows and round barrows represent some of the Neolithic and Bronze Age evidence with some extraordinary finds recorded in the Bronze Age. From hillforts and villas, to medieval rural and urban excavation; the Ouse valley represents a microcosm of the wider region, the contributions collectively reveal the importance and significance of this valley to the development of landscape history and society of a quintessential English county. The narrative concludes with the first detailed research agenda for the Ouse valley.
A History of Syria in One Hundred Sites edited by Y. Kanjou and A. Tsuneki. viii+452 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 247 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913816. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913823. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the long history of Syria through a jouney of the most important and recently-excavated archaeological sites. The sites cover over 1.8 million years and all regions in Syria; 110 academics have contributed information on 103 excavations for this volume. Based on these contributions the volume offers a detailed summary of the history of Syria, a history as important as any in terms of the development of human society. It is hoped that this knowledge will offer not only an increased understanding of the country but also act as a deterrent to the destruction of Syrian cultural heritage and facilitate the protection of Syrian sites.

Reviews:

'When Syria's magnificent cultural heritage came under threat, editors Kanjou and Tsuneki mobilised more than 110 international academics, working in all regions of the country, to produce this exhaustive reference book. ...[A] wonderful source to be endlessly mined by scholars and enthusiasts alike.' - Nicholas Bartos (Current World Archaeology, Issue #84, 2017)
The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions edited by Konstantinos Kopanias and John MacGinnis. xviii+456 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 245 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913939. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913946. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Kurdistan is home to some of the most important archaeological sites in the world, ranging from the Stone Age to the most recent past. While in earlier decades this exceptional potential did not receive the degree of attention which it merited, the past ten years has seen a burgeoning of cuttingedge archaeological field projects across the region. This volume, the outcome of a conference held at the University of Athens in November 2013, presents the results of this research. For the first time the archaeological inventory of the region is being systematically documented, laying the foundations for intensive study of the region’s settlement history. At the same time the area has seen a flourishing of excavations investigating every phase of human occupation. Together these endeavours are generating basic new data which is leading to a new understanding of the arrival of mankind, the development of agriculture, the emergence of cities, the evolution of complex societies and the forging of the great empires in this crucible of mankind.

About the Editors:
Dr. Konstantinos Kopanias studied at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Paris- Lodron University of Salzburg and the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. He worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Athens, as adjunct faculty at the University of Crete and as an Allgemeiner Referent at the German Archaeological Institute in Athens. He works as an Assistant Professor at the Department of History and Archaeology of the University of Athens for the subject of Ancient Civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean. Since 2011 he is the director of the excavation of the University of Athens in Tell Nader and Tell Baqrta in the Kurdistan Region in Iraq. He has coorganized several international conferences and published extensively on various aspects of the archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Near East.

Dr. John MacGinnis did both his degree and his PhD at Cambridge University and is a specialist in the archaeology and inscriptions of ancient Babylonia and Assyria, on which he has published extensively. He has worked on sites across the middle east, including Cyprus, Egypt, Iraq, Syria, Sudan and Turkey. For fifteen years he was a field director at the site of Ziyaret Tepe, the ancient Assyrian provincial capital of Tušhan. He has worked on many sites in Iraq, particularly in Iraqi Kurdistan, and has since 2011 been Archaeological Advisor to the High Commission for Erbil Citadel Revitalisation. He is currently based at the British Museum as Lead Archaeologist in a training scheme for archaeologists from across the whole of Iraq and is also a Research Associate at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.
Ōsaka Archaeology by Richard Pearson. viii+127 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 238 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913755. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913762 . £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is an archaeological study of the Ōsaka region, Japan, from the about 20,000 years ago to 1868 AD. Its purpose is to introduce the recently excavated rich archaeological heritage of the Ōsaka area and to show how archaeology contributes to our general knowledge of Ōsaka in unique ways. The study focuses on excavations, environmental data, sites, and artifacts and their interpretation.
Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 43 2013 Papers from the forty-sixth meeting, London, 13–15 July 2012 edited by Lloyd Weeks and Janet Watson. 361 pages; illustrated in colour and black and white. PSAS43 2013. ISBN 9781905739653 . £65.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Contents: 1) Abdullah al-Ghafri et al.: Timing water shares in Wādī Banī Kharūs, Sultanate of Oman; 2) Valentina Azzarà: Architecture and building techniques at the Early Bronze Age site of HD-6, Rā’s al-Hadd, Sultanate of Oman; 3) Soumyen Bandyopadhyay et al.: In times of war: typological and morphological characteristics of dwellings in Hārat al-Yemen in Izkī, Oman; 4) Anne Benoist: A green paradise. Economic strategies, collective practices, and local ancestors of the Iron Age community of Masāfī (Emirate of Fujairah, UAE); 5) Lucy Blue et al.: Developing an integrated policy for the maritime and coastal heritage of the UAE: a collaborative approach; 6) Manfred Böhme: The ‘petrographic-polychrome style’ and the symbolic meaning of white stones in Hafit grave architecture (poster); 7) Vincent Charpentier et al.: Conquering new territories: when the first black boats sailed to Masirah Island; 8) Richard Cuttler et al.: Typological and chronological variation of burial in Qatar: ‘Ubaid to late pre-Islamic (poster); 9) Hans Georg K. Gebel: Arabia’s fifth-millennium BCE pastoral well cultures: hypotheses on the origins of oasis life; 10) Julie Goy et al.: Archaeometallurgical survey in the area of Masafi (Fujairah, UAE): preliminary data from an integrated programme of survey, excavation, and physicochemical analyses; 11) Hanadi Ismail: Communities of healing practice on al-Batinah coast of Oman; 12) Carine Juvin: Calligraphy and writing activities in Mecca during the medieval period (twelfth–fifteenth centuries); 13) Moritz Kinzel et al.: Conserving Zubarah: towards a conservation strategy for Al Zubarah Archaeological Site, Qatar (poster); 14) Adelina Kutterer & Sabah A. Jasim: An infant burial from late pre-Islamic Mleiha (Sharjah, UAE) (poster); 15) Johannes Kutterer et al.: Second report on the copper smelting site HLO1 in Wādī al-Hilo (Sharjah, UAE); 16) Marion Lemée et al.: Jabal al-ΚAluya: an inland Neolithic settlement of the late fifth millennium BC in the Ādam area, Sultanate of Oman; 17) Romolo Loreto: New Neolithic evidence from the al-Jawf region: an outline of the historical development of Dūmat al-Jandal; 18) Gen Mitsuishi & Derek Kennet: Kiln sites of the fourteenth–twentieth-century Julfar ware pottery industry in Ras al-Khaimah, UAE; 19) Miranda J. Morris: The use of ‘veiled language’ in Soqotri poetry; 20) Andrew Petersen & Faisal al-Naimi: Qal‘at Ruwayda and the fortifications of Qatar; 21) Valeria Fiorani Piacentini: The eleventh–twelfth centuries: an ‘Umān–Kīj–Kirmān/Harmuz axis?; 22) Hannah Russ & Andrew D. Petersen: Fish and fishing during the late Islamic period at Rubayqa, northern Qatar: preliminary results (poster); 23) Jérémie Schiettecatte et al.: The oasis of al-Kharj through time: first results of archaeological fieldwork in the province of Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); 24) Julie Scott-Jackson & William Scott-Jackson: Route planning in the Palaeolithic? (poster); 25) Juan Manuel Tebes: Investigating the painted pottery traditions of first-millennium BC north-western Arabia and southern Levant; 26) Emma Tetlow et al.: Landscape visualization, sea-level change, and human occupation in Wādī Debayān, north-western Qatar (poster); 27) Yosef Tobi: The Jews of Yemen in light of the excavation of the Jewish synagogue in Qanī’.
World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum: A Characterization edited by Dan Hicks and Alice Stevenson. xi+572 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black and white; paperback. Was £39.50. 82 2013. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739585. £12.95 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910754. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Special Offer: £12.95 (RRP: £39.50): World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum: a characterization introduces the range, history and significance of the archaeological collections of the Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford. In 29 newly-commissioned essays written by a specialist team, the volume explores more than 136,000 artefacts from 145 countries, from the Stone Age to the modern period, and from England to Easter Island. Pioneering a new approach in museum studies, this landmark volume is an essential reference work for archaeologists around the world, and a unique introduction to the archaeological collections of one of the world’s most famous museums.
An Archaeological Guide to Bahrain by Rachel Maclean and Timothy Insoll. Colour throughout; 162 pages; paperback. 59 2011. ISBN 9781905739363. £13.99 (No VAT). Buy Now

People have lived on the islands of Bahrain for over six thousand years. There are traces of their lives scattered across the landscape or hidden in the sands: burial mounds, villages, palaces, temples and forts. This guidebook introduces readers to Bahrain’s rich and varied past, and takes them to some of the most important sites in the Kingdom. Using the evidence from decades of archaeological work it not only details what can be seen by the visitor today, but how people once lived, worked and worshipped here. It is an indispensable guide for residents and visitors to Bahrain’s unique heritage.

'....written in a clear, authoritative voice and is packed with useful information and insights. As a guidebook it is an excellent model. One can only regret that ongoing political tensions in Bahrain will no doubt impact tourism there for some time to come. Yet anyone travelling to Bahrain, or any scholar interested in a short overview of the island’s main sites and finds, will profit from this nicely produced volume.' (Orientalistische Literaturzeitung 108 (2013) 2 p.99)
World Rock Art: The Primordial Language Third Revised and updated edition by Emmanuel Anati. vi+180 pages; illustrated throughout with drawings and photographs in colour and black and white. 58 2010. ISBN 9781905739318. £19.95 (No VAT). Buy Now

This volume is a basic introduction to rock art studies. It marks the starting point of the new methodology for rock art analysis, based on typology and style, first developed by the author at the Centro Camuno di Studi Preistorici. This book demonstrates the beginnings of a new discipline, the systematic study of world rock art. This edition is a revised and updated version of Anarti’s classic text, first published in English in 1993. Additions have been made and a major new category of rock art has been included.
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