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NEW: New Home, New Herds: Cuman Integration and Animal Husbandry in Medieval Hungary from an Archaeozoological Perspective by Kyra Lyublyanovics. 338 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 383 2017 Archaeolingua Central European Archaeological Heritage Series 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917524. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917531. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Cumans, a people that inhabited the steppe zone in the medieval period and actively shaped the fate of the region from the Black Sea to the Carpathian Basin, have been primarily known to history as nomadic, mounted warriors. Some of them arrived in the Hungarian Kingdom in the mid-thirteenth century as a group of refugees fleeing the invading Mongol army and asked for asylum. In the course of three centuries they settled down in the kingdom, converted to Christianity, and were integrated into medieval Hungarian society.

This study collects all available information, historical, ethnographic and archaeological alike, on the animal husbandry aspect of the complex development of the Cuman population in medieval Hungary. Although this medieval minority has been in the focus of scholarly interest in the past decades, no attempt has been made so far to study their herds using interdisciplinary methods. The research of faunal assemblages through archaeozoological methods has the potential to reveal direct, and by other means, unavailable information on animal keeping practices, although this source of evidence often escapes scholarly attention in Central and Eastern Europe. This book combines a primary scientific dataset with historical information and interprets them within the framework of settlement history in order to investigate the manifold integration process of a medieval community.
FORTHCOMING: Manx Crosses: A Handbook of Stone Sculpture 500-1040 in the Isle of Man by David M. Wilson. iv+182 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 388 2018. ISBN 9781784917579. £19.99 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The carved stone crosses of the Isle of Man of the late fifth to mid-eleventh century are of national and international importance. They provide the most coherent source for the early history of Christianity in the Island, and for the arrival and conversion of Scandinavian settlers in the last century of the Viking Age – a century which produced some of the earliest recognisable images of the heroes and gods of the North; earlier, indeed, than those found in Scandinavia. This, the first general survey of the material for more than a century, provides a new view of the political and religious connections of the Isle of Man in a period of great turmoil in the Irish Sea region. The book also includes an up-to-date annotated inventory of the monuments.

About the Author:
David M. Wilson, Director of the British Museum from 1977-1992, is a leading authority on the Viking Age and has written a number of studies of the art and archaeology of the Anglo-Saxon period and the Viking Age in their Northern European context. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and lives in the Island.
FORTHCOMING: Huosiland: A Small Country in Carolingian Europe by Carl I. Hammer. viii+250 pages; black & white throughout. Available both in print and Open Access. 44 2018. ISBN 9781784917593. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Discussed here is the landscape of western Bavaria in the early-medieval period, between about 750 and 850. The title of the study derives from several indications that a noble genealogia, the Huosi, were particularly influential there during the period. Huosiland may be the best documented European landscape of this time. This is due to the extraordinary cartulary or register of deeds prepared for the diocese of Freising by the monk, Cozroh, in the second quarter of the ninth century. The first part of the study (Contexts) describes Cozroh’s codex and Huosiland and then analyzes the main political, ecclesiastical, social and economic structures and features there, based upon the available historical and archaeological evidence. The second part (Connections) explores a selection of particular issues raised by specific documents or related groups of documents from Huosiland. The third part provides all of the voluminous and highly-informative documentary evidence for Huosiland, both from Cozroh’s codex and other sources, complete in full English translation. As a result, the reader is able to construct his or her own Contexts and Connections. A full annotated Bibliography of the relevant secondary literature is included as is a complete Gazetteer of the translated documents. The publication will provide a valuable resource both for advanced teaching and for scholarly research.

About the Author
Carl Hammer graduated from Amherst College (B.A.) and the University of Toronto (Ph.D.). He has also studied and conducted research at the universities of Munich, Chicago and Oxford. After a brief teaching career, he spent the balance of his professional life in international business with Westinghouse Corporation and the former Rail Systems Division of Daimler Benz. He is now retired. He has published four other scholarly monographs on early-medieval Bavaria, two of them with Archaeopress, and numerous articles in North American and European academic journals. He and his wife live in Pittsburgh but spend several months each year in Easthampton, MA, where he has acquired a new research interest in the Puritans of the Connecticut Valley and colonial western Massachusetts.
FORTHCOMING: Shipwrecks and Provenance: in-situ timber sampling protocols with a focus on wrecks of the Iberian shipbuilding tradition by Sara A. Rich, Nigel Nayling, Garry Momber and Ana Crespo Solana. vi+66 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (21 colour plates). 42 2017. ISBN 9781784917173. £20.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Two of the questions most frequently asked by archaeologists of sites and the objects that populate them are ‘How old are you?’ and ‘Where are you from?’ These questions can often be answered through archaeometric dating and provenance analyses. As both archaeological sites and objects, shipwrecks pose a special problem in archaeometric dating and provenance because when they sailed, they often accumulated new construction material as timbers were repaired and replaced. Additionally, during periods of globalization, such as the so-called Age of Discovery, the provenance of construction materials may not reflect where the ship was built due to long-distance timber trade networks and the global nature of these ships’ sailing routes. Accepting these special challenges, nautical archaeologists must piece together the nuanced relationship between the ship, its timbers, and the shipwreck, and to do so, wood samples must be removed from the assemblage. Besides the provenance of the vessel’s wooden components, selective removal and analysis of timber samples can also provide researchers with unique insights relating to environmental history. For this period, wood samples could help produce information on the emergent global economy; networks of timber trade; forestry and carpentry practices; climate patterns and anomalies; forest reconstruction; repairs made to ships and when, why, and where those occurred; and much more.

This book is a set of protocols to establish the need for wood samples from shipwrecks and to guide archaeologists in the removal of samples for a suite of archaeometric techniques currently available to provenance the timbers used to construct wooden ships and boats. While these protocols will prove helpful to archaeologists working on shipwreck assemblages from any time period and in any place, this book uses Iberian ships of the 16th to 18th centuries as its case studies because their global mobility poses additional challenges to the problem at hand. At the same time, their prolificacy and ubiquity make the wreckage of these ships a uniquely global phenomenon.
NEW: A Life in Norfolk's Archaeology: 1950-2016 Archaeology in an arable landscape by Peter Wade-Martins. xviii+380 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (87 plates in colour). Casebound with dust jacket. 358 2017 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916572. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916589. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This is a history of archaeological endeavour in Norfolk set within a national context. It covers the writer’s early experiences as a volunteer, the rise of field archaeology as a profession and efforts to conserve the archaeological heritage against the tide of destruction prevalent in the countryside up to the 1980s when there was not even a right of access to record sites before they were lost. Now developers often have to pay for an excavation before they can obtain planning consent. The book features progress with archaeology conservation as well as the growth of rescue archaeology as a profession both in towns and in the countryside. Many of the most important discoveries made by aerial photography, rescue excavations and metal detecting from the 1970s onwards are illustrated. The last section covers the recent growth of the Norfolk Archaeological Trust as an owner of some of the most iconic rural sites in Norfolk. The book concludes with a discussion of some issues facing British field archaeology today.

About the author
Peter Wade-Martins obtained a PhD studying the evidence for the history of rural settlement in Norfolk from the Anglo- Saxon period through the Middle Ages up to the enclosures. This involved what was then a new technique of collecting sherds of pottery off ploughed fields and from that evidence working out where people lived in a parish at different periods from the seventh to the nineteenth centuries. He also excavated two deserted villages revealing evidence for the first time about village life in Norfolk in the Middle Ages. He followed this by excavating a high-status Anglo- Saxon settlement at North Elmham, where it was possible to work out the plans of Anglo-Saxon timber buildings from patterns left by their post-holes in the subsoil.

Then, as County Field Archaeologist for Norfolk from 1973 to 1999, he organised and ran a county service for field archaeology developing a Sites and Monuments Record, an aerial photography programme, which made many startling discoveries, and a series of rescue excavations on a wide range of sites from prehistoric to medieval. His passion for countryside conservation led him to organise a number of ground-breaking conservation projects often trying to move a lot faster than English Heritage seemed willing to go.

Having retired early as County Field Archaeologist in 1999, he became the first Director of the Norfolk Archaeological Trust where he was instrumental in raising funds to buy an Iron Age fort, most of the Roman town at Caistor near Norwich, the remarkably well preserved Roman fort at Burgh Castle, a medieval castle and a complete monastery. All of them have been opened to the public. His one regret was that he didn’t have the opportunity to buy a deserted medieval village for the Archaeological Trust as well.

His other countryside interests include writing books on the decline and revival of the Manx mountain sheep, The Manx Loghtan Story (1990), the decline and eventual extinction of the old Norfolk Horn sheep, Black Faces (1993) and, with others, a two-volume work on Britishmade toy farm vehicles Farming in Miniature (2013 and 2014). His particular interest here has been to see how farm machinery familiar to each generation of farmers has been represented by contemporary toy makers. Other interests have included the creation of a photo archive of some 3,000 pictures of crofting life on the Isle of Eigg in the Inner Hebrides where his family have been regular visitors. He has also kept a flock of sheep since 1978.

NEW: Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla by Mario Ramírez Galán. 434 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (145 colour plates). Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access. 39 2017. ISBN 9781784917098. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla is a project that aims to encompass all aspects of battlefield archaeology, in order to be a reference work in this study area. Therefore, a detailed historiographical study about this branch of archaeology has been made, from early origins until the present day, allowing us to gain a deeper understanding of the evolution of battlefield archaeology. Two methodologies, archaeological and museographical, are proposed for the treatment of this particular type of archaeological site. In order to prove the viability of both methodologies, a theoretical application has been carried out in two research examples from different periods, demonstrating both the project’s methodological validity and reinforcing our theories.

Two registers were made regarding battlefields ¬- one historical and another archaeological. The purpose of this was to catalogue all possible existing sites in the interior of the Iberian Peninsula from Roman times through to the Spanish Civil War, which will hopefully serve as a point of reference for future researchers. Through this book, people will be able to understand the great potential of Spanish battlefields and their heritage. Furthermore, Spain could be regarded as a very important country regarding battlefield archaeology.

Spanish Description:
Los yacimientos olvidados: registro y musealización de campos de batalla es un trabajo que recoge todos los aspectos referentes a la arqueología de campos de batalla, con el objetivo de ser una obra de referencia en esta área de estudio. En ella se ha llevado a cabo un estudio historiográfico pormenorizado de esta rama de la arqueología, remontándose hasta los orígenes de la misma, permitiendo comprender su evolución hasta nuestros días. Se han planteado dos propuestas metodológicas, arqueológica y museográfica, para el tratamiento de esta tipología de yacimiento. Para comprobar la viabilidad de ambas metodologías se realizó una aplicación teórica en dos casos de estudio de distinta época, lo que nos permitió ver su validez y reforzar nuestras teorías.

Para esta obra elaboramos dos registros de campos de batalla, uno de tipo histórico y otro de tipo arqueológico, con el objetivo de catalogar todos los posibles yacimientos existentes en interior peninsular desde la época romana hasta la Guerra Civil, sirviendo así de punto de partida para futuros investigadores. A través de este libro se puede comprobar el gran potencial que posee España en campos de batalla y que podría situarse entre los países más destacados.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Foreigners and Outside Influences in Medieval Norway edited by Stian Suppersberger Hamre. ii+124 pages; illustrated throughout (14 plates in colour). Available both in print and Open Access. 368 2017. ISBN 9781784917050. £16.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Foreigners and Outside Influences in Medieval Norway results from an international conference held in Bergen, Norway, in March 2016, entitled ‘Multidisciplinary approaches to improving our understanding of immigration and mobility in pre-modern Scandinavia (1000-1900)’. The articles in this volume discuss different aspects of immigration and foreign influences in medieval Norway, from the viewpoint of different academic disciplines. The book will give the reader an insight into how the population of medieval Norway interacted with the surrounding world, how and by whom it was influenced, and how the population was composed.

About the Editor
Dr Stian Suppersberger Hamre is a biological anthropologist with a BA in palaeoanthropology from the University of New England, Australia, and an MSc in forensic anthropology from Bournemouth University, England. His PhD research at the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bergen, Norway, has focussed on different aspects of the medieval population in Norway. From 2013, his main interest has been to improve our understanding of pre-modern immigration, mobility and population composition in Norway, with a special emphasis on bringing different disciplines together to illuminate these topics and to complement his own research as a biological anthropologist.

PDF available as a free download in Archaeopress Open Access. Click here to view.
Encounters, Excavations and Argosies Essays for Richard Hodges edited by John Mitchell, John Moreland and Bea Leal. iv+358 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 365 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916817. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916824. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Richard Hodges is one of Europe’s preeminent archaeologists. He has transformed the way we understand the early Middle Ages, and has put the past to work for the present, through a sequence of paradigmatic excavations in England, Italy and Albania. Encounters, Excavations and Argosies pays tribute to him with a series of reflections on some of the themes and issues which have been central to his work over the last forty years. The contributors are colleagues, many his students, above all friends of the man whose ideas, example, trust, and loyalty have touched and inspired us all.

About the Authors
John Mitchell first met Richard Hodges at Castel San Vincenzo in 1981, a jobbing art-historian dropping by to assess some excavated fresco-fragments, was hooked and has been working with him ever since, in Molise, southern Albania and more recently in Tuscany. He is Professor in the History of Art (emeritus) at the University of East Anglia.

John Moreland took his first Archaeology tutorial with Richard Hodges at the University of Sheffield in 1977. Richard also supervised his PhD, and they worked closely together on excavations at Roystone Grange (Derbyshire), San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), and Butrint (Albania). He is Professor of Historical Archaeology at the University of Sheffield.

Bea Leal studied metalwork at Camberwell Art College and history of art at the University of East Anglia, finishing her PhD there (on Images of Architecture in Late Antiquity) in 2016. Her interests are in the art and architecture of the late antique and early medieval Mediterranean, and especially the early Islamic period.
The History and Archaeology of Cathedral Square Peterborough by Stephen Morris. xii+84 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (38 plates in colour). 356 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916619. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916626. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Northamptonshire Archaeology, now MOLA Northampton, was commissioned by Opportunity Peterborough (Peterborough City Council) to undertake archaeological work ahead of an improvement scheme centred on Cathedral Square, the historic centre of Peterborough. The construction of two triangular arrays of fountains in the central part of Cathedral Square formed the core of the archaeological investigation, which was undertaken from November 2008 to August 2011.

The archaeological work identified a succession of stone surfaces from the creation of the market square in the 12th century through to the 19th century. The cobbled surface of the original market square was overlaid by an accumulation of dark organic silts, containing finds dating through to the 16th century. At the start of the 15th century the parish church of St John the Baptist was constructed over the western half of the medieval market square with a cemetery immediately to the west of the church. Following the closure of this cemetery by the later 16th century, a small area of floor surfaces were the probable remains of a building, perhaps the Sexton’s house, at the north end of Butchers Row.

On the south side of the market square there were the remains of a rectangular stone building, dated to the late 15th to 17th centuries, perhaps containing shops. Between this building and the church, a raised area of rubble was probably a remnant of the plinth for the recorded market cross. The late 17th century saw the construction of the still extant Guildhall to the east of the church. The raising of the ground level and resurfacing of the square was probably contemporary with the Guildhall. This would have involved the removal of all existing buildings on the south side of the square, as well as the removal of the market cross.

In the late 18th or early 19th centuries the square was again raised and resurfaced, now with pitched limestone. Shallow gutters between the pavement and the road facilitated drainage. A surface of granite sets of the 19th-century survived in a few places below the late 20th-century slab pavement, which has now been replaced by the fountain development.
The Archaeological Activities of James Douglas in Sussex between 1809 and 1819 by Malcolm Lyne. vi+60 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 5 plates in colour. 350 2017 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916480. £15.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916497. £12.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

James Douglas (1753-1819) was a polymath, well ahead of his time in both the fields of archaeology and earth-sciences. His examinations of fossils from the London Clay and other geological formations caused him to conclude that the Earth was much older than the 4004 BC allotted to it by his contemporaries. He had come to this conclusion by 1785 and published these findings in that year, long before other researchers in the same field. His Nenia Britannica, published in 1793, reveals a remarkably accurate grasp of the dating of Anglo-Saxon burials; further illuminated by the contents of his common-place book for 1814-16, discovered by the author in a second-hand bookshop. This common-place book, correspondence with his contemporaries and other sources resulted in the present publication recounting his archaeological and other activities in Sussex during the first two decades of the 19th century.
Working with the Past: Towards an Archaeology of Recycling edited by Dragoş Gheorghiu and Phil Mason. viii+134 pages; illustrated throughout with 21 plates in colour. 346 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916299. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916305. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Recycling is a basic anthropological process of humankind. The reutilization of materials or of ideas from the Past is a process determined by various natural or cultural causes. Recycling can be motivated by a crisis or by a complex symbolic cause like the incorporation of the Past into the Present.

What archaeology has not insisted upon is the dimensional scale of the process, which operates from the micro-scale of the recycling of the ancestors’ material, up to the macro-scale of the landscape.

It is well known that there are direct relations between artefacts and landscapes in what concerns the materiality and mobility of objects. An additional relation between artefact and landscape may be the process of recycling. In many ways artefact and landscape can be considered as one aspect of material culture, perceived at a different scale, since both have the same materiality and suffer the same process of reutilisation.

This book invites archaeologists to approach the significant process of recycling within the archaeological record at two different levels: of artefacts and of landscape.
A Time of Change: Questioning the “Collapse” of Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka by Keir Magalie Strickland. 208 pages; illustrated throughout with 18 plates in colour. 345 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916329. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916336. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book reassesses the apparent collapse of Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka, through explicit reference to the archaeological record. The study of Anuradhapura’s terminal period has long been dominated by an over-reliance upon textual sources, resulting in the establishment of a monocausal and politically charged narrative that depicts a violent eleventh century invasion by the South Indian Chola Empire as the primary cause of Anuradhapura’s collapse, bringing to an end over a millennium of rule from Sri Lanka’s first capital. Such is the dominance of this narrative that few alternative explanations for the abandonment of Anuradhapura have ever been posited, with just two alternative models ever described; epidemic malaria, and an imperial economic model.

Synthesising and analysing archaeological data from over a century of investigation, this book first tests whether or not Anuradhapura can truly be said to have “collapsed” at all, before moving on to then test the existing explanations for this apparent collapse through reference to the physical archaeological record of Anuradhapura, before finally proposing a new synthetic model for the polity’s collapse.

About the Author:
Keir is a lecturer in the Department of Archaeology and History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia. After completing his undergraduate and master’s degrees at the University of Bradford, Keir spent several years working in the British commercial archaeological sector – working on sites of every possible period across the UK and Ireland.

However, after bailing out yet another near frozen trench he decided to return to academia, where it was warmer and there were chairs. Following an immensely enjoyable fellowship at the Library of Congress (Washington, D.C.), several field seasons spent crawling through dense jungle, and one unfortunate incident with a dugout canoe in a crocodile infested lake, he received his PhD from Durham University for an examination of the collapse of the Anuradhapura Kingdom, Sri Lanka. He subsequently worked as a lecturer at the Archaeology Institute of the University of the Highlands and Islands in Orkney for several years, before joining La Trobe University in 2016.

In addition to his work in Sri Lanka, and his commercial sector work, he has also excavated on sites across Nepal, Iran, Belize, and the Scottish Highlands and Islands. When not teaching, excavating, or falling out of canoes he enjoys sunshine, rum, and baseball.
Bronze Age Monuments and Bronze Age, Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon Landscapes at Cambridge Road, Bedford by Andy Chapman and Pat Chapman. x+146 pages; illustrated throughout with 55 plates in colour. 337 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916046. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916053. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Open area excavation on 14.45ha of land at Cambridge Road, Bedford was carried out in 2004-5 in advance of development. A background scatter of Early Neolithic flint, including a Langdale stone axe, may be related to the nearby presence of the Cardington causewayed enclosure.

Two Early Bronze Age ring ditches sat on a low lying gravel ridge between the River Great Ouse and the Elstow Brook. A causewayed ring ditch, 30m in diameter, had a broad entrance to the southwest, where a shallow length of ditch either silted or had been filled in. Adjacent to the shallow ditch was a pit containing three crouched burials, probably in an oak-lined chamber, radiocarbon dated to the early Middle Bronze Age. A nearby small round barrow enclosed a deep central grave containing the crouched burial of a woman, probably within an oak-lined chamber. An L-shaped ditch to the east, radiocarbon dated to the Middle to Late Bronze transition, may have been the final feature of the monument group. It parallels the addition of L-shaped ditches/pit alignments at other contemporary ring ditch monuments.

Shallow linear ditches formed a land boundary extending north and south from the Bronze Age ring ditch, and other contemporary ditches were remnants of a rectilinear field system, contemporary with a scatter of irregular pits and a waterhole. This phase came to an end at the Late Bronze Age/ Early Iron Age transition, when a large assemblage of decorated pottery was dumped in the final fills of the waterhole.

By the Middle Iron Age there was a new linear boundary, comprising three near parallel ditches, aligned north-south; a rectangular enclosure and a complex of intercut pits. The pottery assemblage was sparse, but the upper fills of both the deepest linear boundary ditch and the pit complex contained some Roman pottery. To the south-east an extensive Romano-British ladder settlement is dated to the 1st to 4th centuries AD. Only the northern fringe lay within the excavated area, comprising successive boundary ditches, along with pits, a stone-lined well, an inhumation burial and animal burials.

In the early Anglo-Saxon period (5th-6th centuries AD), there was a loose cluster of three sunken featured buildings with another to the south. In the middle Saxon period (8th-9th centuries AD) a small rectangular mausoleum contained a single inhumation burial, with a second inhumation to the immediate west. Subsequent land use comprised truncated furrows of the medieval ridge and furrow field cultivation and post-medieval quarry pits.
The Archaeology of Time Travel Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century edited by Bodil Petersson and Cornelius Holtorf. viii+318 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. 303 2017. ISBN 9781784915001. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume explores the relevance of time travel as a characteristic contemporary way to approach the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practiced time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-orientated and critical approaches to the past. Papers discuss the implications and problems associated with the ubiquity and popularity of time travelling and whether time travel is inherently conservative because of its escapist tendencies, or whether it might instead be considered as a fulfilment of the contemporary Experience or Dream Society. Whatever position one may take, time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way to bring the past back to life in the present.

About the Editors:
Bodil Petersson is an archaeologist teaching and researching archaeology and heritage studies at Linnaeus University, Sweden. Her research concerns archaeology and time travel, experimental heritage, history of archaeology, the role of archaeology in society, archaeology/heritage and identity, archaeology/heritage and communication, heritage on display, digital heritage and digital archaeology. During the years 2013–2016 she conducted research in a Swedish Science Council-funded project called ArkDIS, Archaeological Information in the Digital Society. Since autumn 2014, she has been Program Director of the Bachelor’s Programme in Heritage in Present and Future Society at Linnaeus University.

Cornelius Holtorf gained his PhD at the University of Wales, UK, in 1998 and was subsequently employed at the University of Gothenburg, the University of Cambridge, the Swedish National Heritage Board in Stockholm, and the University of Lund. Since 2008 he has lived in Kalmar, Sweden, where he is currently a Professor of Archaeology at Linnaeus University, Director of the Graduate School in Contract Archaeology (http://lnu.se/grasca) and the spokesperson of the Centre for Applied Heritage. He is also o-Investigator in the major AHRC funded project on ‘Heritage Futures’ (2015–2019).


This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

The Archaeology of Kenilworth Castle’s Elizabethan Garden Excavation and Investigation 2004–2008 by Brian Dix, Stephen Parry and Claire Finn. iv+76 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 324 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915742. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915759. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

As part of the Property Development Programme for Kenilworth Castle in Warwickshire, English Heritage created an ambitious reconstruction of the Elizabethan garden which formerly stood on the north side of the castle keep. In order to achieve a reliable representation of the original garden, a programme of archaeological trenching, open area excavation and watching brief was carried out by Northamptonshire Archaeology (now MOLA) from 2004 to 2008.

This report discusses the results of the excavations which uncovered for the first time the foundation and culverts of an octagonal fountain basin, described by Robert Langham in a contemporary letter relating to Queen Elizabeth I’s visit in 1575. The results of the excavation also clarified to some extent the original dimensions of the garden and the foundation level upon which the fine surfacing detail would have been applied. Contributions to understanding the geometry of the garden’s architectural features are made by the identification of a series of rubble-and-mortar-filled pits, which probably formed bases for plinths for structures or other structural elements. The terrace which formed a viewing promenade over the garden was shown to have undergone substantial alteration. The impact of Civil War defences and slighting on the north of the keep and outer bailey wall were investigated. Following this, the area was subsequently cultivated as a kitchen garden and orchard from at least the beginning of the eighteenth century. Twentieth-century activity included consolidation of the castle fabric, the construction of paths and the remodelling of the terrace, and the remains of an ornamental knotwork garden created in 1975. The archaeology of the garden and its surroundings are discussed from the remnants of medieval features through to the present day.
Coventry’s Medieval Suburbs Excavations at Hill Street, Upper Well Street and Far Gosford Street 2003-2007 by Paul Mason, Danny McAree and Iain Soden. xii+196 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 323 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915629. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915636. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Hill Street, Upper Well Street and Far Gosford Street comprise three suburban streets which stood directly outside the city gates of Coventry for much of the medieval period. As a result of the 2003-2007 excavations an extensive body of archaeological, environmental and documentary evidence has been brought together to allow comparison in terms of land planning, construction methodologies, character and relative fluctuations in the long-term economy of two of the city’s medieval and post-medieval suburbs.

As well as evidence for street frontage occupation, the sites contain substantial portions of the city’s defences, never before looked at in such detail. The new data is of great value in comparing the results with those previously gained from a variety of smaller sites in Coventry and comparable sites elsewhere in the country. The work has, in some detail, married up excavated data and documentary sources for the working of the defences over a period of 250 years. In addition the immediate suburban environment has come under scrutiny and an unprecedented level of botanical data has come to light in a programme of sampling for both seeds and pollens as a guide to the changing character of the suburbs.

At Hill Street, excavation uncovered two medieval and post-medieval frontage properties 50m wide and their rear yards adjacent to the city ditch. While upstanding structural remains were scant, analysis of contemporary pits has highlighted mainly domestic but also some industrial aspects of the properties and given an insight into the diet, economy and changing face of suburban Hill Street from the 13th to 19th centuries. Excavation also uncovered some 55m of the city ditch adjacent to Bond Street, into which four large sections were cut, three close to Hill Street and one at the junction with Upper Well Street. The excavations highlight the huge investment made in digging and maintaining the ditch as a defensive line for the first half of the 15th century before it was gradually misused for fly-tipping and eventually lost beneath a welter of dumping by the later 17th century. It was probably indefensible long before the Civil War. A varied and rich environmental profile of the site has been constructed, which paints a picture of a suburban, semi-rural habitat which was increasingly spoiled in the 16th and 17th centuries by unrestricted dumping of refuse and cess. A wide variety of finds was recovered, indicative of both domestic and industrial occupation and use. This range was dominated by a large group of well-preserved late medieval leather shoes.

The Far Gosford Street excavations revealed evidence for some 800 years of human activity. The earliest remains comprised a solid timber post, possibly related to a bridge over the River Sherbourne, for which tree-ring dating established a felling date of 1162-1212. A frontage was first occupied in the early 14th century when buildings were laid out along the street. A hoard of silver pennies found buried beneath the floor of one of the buildings probably represents the savings of one of the street’s earliest residents. These structures were replaced in the first half of the 15th century, probably at the same time as the city wall was built a short distance to the west. A second medieval frontage lasted until 1643 when it was again dismantled during the Civil War. Entrenchments dating to this period were also excavated. In the 18th century a third frontage was built, replaced in the 19th century and finally demolished to make way for Singer Motors car showroom after they acquired the site in 1926.
Due antiche diocesi dello stretto di Messina Insediamento, manufatti, infrastrutture e produzione nell’eparchia delle Saline e nelle isole Eolie tra Tardoantico e alto Medioevo by Francesca Zagari. iv+186 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Italian text with English abstract. 322 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915681. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915698. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This monograph is a comparative study of the Saline area and of the Aeolian Islands dioceses’ settlement in Late Antiquity and in the Early Middle ages. Both regions overlook the Straits of Messina, between Calabria and Sicily. The Saline area is located in Southern Tyrrhenian Calabria, and in the Middle Ages it is mentioned as an “Eparchy”, a Byzantine administrative division. The Aeolian archipelago is in the Tyrrhenian Sea off the North-Eastern coast of Sicily. It includes seven islands, the biggest of which is Lipari.

The aim of the book is to reconstruct the settlement layout of these areas in an historical period that has been studied relatively little in Southern Italy. The settlement reconstruction was carried out by examining topographical features, patterns and dynamics, material culture, degree of continuity and discontinuity – especially compared to the Roman habitat – as well as agricultural and manufacturing systems and the road network.
Late Roman to Late Byzantine/Early Islamic Period Lamps in the Holy Land The Collection of the Israel Antiquities Authority by Varda Sussman. iv+635 pages; highly illustrated throughout in black and white with 10 colour plates. 321 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915704. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915711. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume illustrates lamps from the Byzantine period excavated in the Holy Land and demonstrates the extent of their development since the first enclosing/capturing of light (fire) within a portable man-made vessel. Lamps, which held important material and religious functions during daily life and the afterlife, played a large role in conveying art and cultural and political messages through the patterns chosen to decorate them. These cultural, or even more their religious affinities, were chosen to be delivered on lamps (not on other vessels) more than ever during the Byzantine period; these small portable objects were used to ‘promote’ beliefs like the ‘press’ of today. Each cultural group marked the artifacts / lamps with its symbols, proverbs from the Old and New Testaments, and this process throws light on the deep rivalry between them in this corner of the ancient world.

The great variety of lamps dealt with in this volume, arranged according to their various regions of origin, emphasizes their diversity, and probably local workshop manufacture, and stands in contrast to such a small country without any physical geographic barriers to cross, only mental ones (and where one basket of lamps could satisfy the full needs of the local population). The lamps of the Byzantine period reflect the era and the struggle in the cradle of the formation of the four leading faiths and cultures: Judaism (the oldest), Samaritanism (derived from the Jewish faith), newly-born Christianity – all three successors to the existing former pagan culture – and the last, Islam, standing on a new threshold.

Unlike during the former Greek and Roman periods of rule, the land of Israel during the Byzantine period did not really have a central government or authority. The variety of the oil lamps, their order and place of appearance during the Byzantine period can be described as a ‘symphony played by a self-conducted orchestra, where new soloists rise and add a different motet, creating stormy music that expresses the rhythm of the era’.

This volume, like the author’s earlier books on this subject, is intended to create a basis for further study and evaluation of the endless aspects that lamps bring to light and which are beyond the capacity of any single scholar.

About the Author:
Varda Sussman was born in Palestine (now Israel) and graduated from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (BA and MA) in the faculties of Prehistory and Archaeology. She majored in prehistory with Professor M. Stekelis, in Classical archaeology with Professor M. Avi Yonah, and in ancient history with Professor B. Mazar. She studied for one year in the Oriental Institute in Chicago (USA). From 1950, while studying and working at the Department of Antiquity (now the Israel Antiquities Authority), she participated in various archaeological excavations. In 1964 she became curator / keeper of all treasures (finds) discovered since 1948 and developed the system of storage which enabled students and scholars to obtain, examine and study the material which she had catalogued. Among the catalogued finds were many oil lamps which were objects of artistic and historical significance. Two exhibitions were held of the material: the first on Decorated Jewish Oil Lamps (with catalogue) in 1972 in The Israel Museum, the second illustrating the regional lamps of the northern part of the country in the University of Haifa Museum. These established the recognition of typical workshops which had fashioned special lamps for the use of the Jewish and Samaritan populations. The author’s Ornamented Jewish Oil Lamps from the Fall of the Second Temple through the Revolt of Bar Kochba was published in Hebrew by Mosad Bialik and the Israel Exploration Society in 1972; it was translated into English and published by Aris & Phillips Ltd in 1982. She has also published other articles concerning various aspect of art derived from oil lamps, and a num
Sweet Waste: Medieval sugar production in the Mediterranean viewed from the 2002 excavations at Tawahin es-Sukkar, Safi, Jordan by Richard E. Jones and contributors. 245pp; Illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Published by Potingair Press.ISBN 9780956824035. £45.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The history of cane sugar from its origins in the east to its status as a luxury foodstuff and even medicine in the medieval period to a commodity produced and consumed globally in today’s world is well known. Yet archaeologically, sugar is an invisible commodity, its presence usually being inferred from the humble sugar pots used in the last stages of its sophisticated production process. This book attempts to redress the imbalance between history and archaeology by reporting on the excavation of a medieval sugar refinery, Tawahin es-Sukkar near Safi, situated south of the Dead Sea in Jordan. There it was possible to explore many of the steps in the sugar-making process. The book’s title refers to the industrial waste whose study has shed light on those steps. To place this refinery in chronological and economic context, excavation was extended to the adjacent ‘support town’ of Khirbet Shaykh ‘Isa; the book presents its results.

The available archaeological evidence for sugar production across the Mediterranean is reviewed. There is particular emphasis on the sugar vessels and the light they can shed on the poorly understood relationship between primary production centres, refining, storage and consumption centres. The book, which is fully illustrated, can be profitably read by archaeologists, archaeological scientists, historians and visitors to Jordan alike.

About the Author: Richard Jones has wide-ranging experience in archaeological science in the Mediterranean and especially in Greece and Italy The production and distribution of pottery is one of his main interests. Until recently he was Senior Lecturer in archaeological science at the University of Glasgow.
Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon Settlement along the Empingham to Hannington Pipeline in Northamptonshire and Rutland by Simon Carlyle, Jason Clarke and Andy Chapman. xii+132 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 308 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915346. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915353. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Between January 2008 and July 2009, Northamptonshire Archaeology, now part of MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology), carried out a series of excavations along the route of a new water pipeline being constructed by Anglian Water Services as part of a major project to increase the supply of water to new homes and businesses in the south-east Midlands region. Nineteen sites were investigated, dating primarily to the Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods.

The earliest remains were a late Bronze Age/early Iron Age pit alignment near Seaton, Rutland. The Iron Age and Roman sites were small rural settlements comprising ditched enclosures, the remains of roundhouses and pits. Settlements were located near Seaton and Caldecott in Rutland and in Northamptonshire at Swinawe Barn near Corby, Thorpe Malsor, White Hill Lodge, Great Cransley and Willows Nursery. A Roman site near Rushton, Northamptonshire may be associated with a villa estate. Other sites included part of a Roman field system at Violet Lane, near Corby, and Roman cremation burials near Gretton, Northamptonshire. The settlements mainly date from the late middle Iron Age, 2nd century BC, through to the 4th century AD, although there was little evidence for direct continuity of settlement between the Iron Age and Roman periods.

An Anglo-Saxon cremation cemetery dated to the late 5th century to mid-7th century AD, at Glaston, Rutland, contained 16 cremation burials deposited in decorated and plain urns along with small assemblages of grave goods, often also burnt on the pyre, and including a brooch, glass beads, and fragments of a bone comb and mount.

Later features generally comprised medieval and post-medieval furrows from ridge and furrow field systems and field boundary ditches.
Croatia at the Crossroads: A consideration of archaeological and historical connectivity Proceedings of conference held at Europe House, Smith Square, London, 24–25 June 2013 to mark the accession of Croatia to the European Union edited by David Davison, Vince Gaffney, Preston Miracle and Jo Sofaer. iv+264 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 2016 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915308. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915315. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Croatia has a unique geographical and historical position within Europe, bridging central and south-east Europe. From the Pannonian Plain to the southern Adriatic maritime landscape, interconnectedness flows through Croatia’s history. This dynamic past is increasingly being reflected upon by a new and exciting generation of Croatian scholars who are firmly embedded within a strong national tradition of archaeology but who also look outward to draw insights into the nature of material culture they encounter in Croatia and Croatian identity itself.

Croatia at the Crossroads (24-25 June, Europe House, London) provided the opportunity to reflect upon such interconnectedness and Croatia’s historic place within Europe. This event typified the desire of Croatian archaeologists to engage with such matters on an international level and to situate their scholarship within broader regional dynamics. Following the foundation of the new Croatian state, the opportunities for new forms of engagement have grown. This has stimulated thinking regarding both approaches to archaeology and the potential cultural cross-fertilisation that has resulted in Croatia’s rich archaeological and historical record. This has led to in new, exciting understandings of archaeological material, and this was revealed in contributions to the Croatia at the Crossroads conference.

The papers published here arise from the exceptionally interesting presentations and discussions held in London at the conference. Each of them takes Croatia’s particular interconnectedness in terms of social and cultural relationships with the wider region as the starting point for exploring issues across a broad chronological range, from human origins to modernity. Within this, contributors pick up on a variety of different fields of interconnectedness and forms of interaction including biological, cultural, religious, military, trade, craft and maritime relationships. In many ways, these papers represent opening conversations that explore ways of thinking about new and established data sets that are entering Croatian scholarship for the first time. They also act as a set of complementary discussions that transcend traditional period and national boundaries. We hope that by bringing them together the volume will provide an insight into current trends in Croatian archaeology and stimulate fruitful discussions regarding future directions.
Medieval Urban Landscape in Northeastern Mesopotamia by Karel Nováček, Miroslav Melčák, Lenka Starková and Narmin Ali Muhammad Amin with contributions by Jan Petřík and Emily Neumeier. viii+206 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 302 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915186. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915193 . £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

More than fifteen sites of either confirmed or conjectured urban status existed between the 6th and 19th centuries in the particular region of northeastern Mesopotamia, bounded by the rivers Great Zāb, Little Zāb and Tigris. This present study concentrates on the investigation of this urban network. The archaeological substance of the deserted sites is mostly very well preserved in the relief of the arid steppe environment and can be excellently identified in satellite images of several types. The archaeological investigation of these settlements, augmented by a revised historical topography, offers a unique opportunity for the holistic study of the diversity, temporal dynamics and mutual relationships within the urban network that developed in the hinterland of Baghdad and Samarra, the two largest super-centres of the Old World.

This collective monograph puts together archaeological and historical data available for the individual sites, including analyses of pottery obtained by surface survey. The materially rich final report of the three-year project is supplemented by an interpretative chapter that focuses on detailed topographical comparisons of the sites, their landscape contexts, and the dynamics of the urban system within the framework of studies on Near-Eastern Islamic-period cities.

About the authors: Karel Nováček is associate professor of medieval archaeology in the Department of History, Palacky University Olomouc, combining in his research backgrounds in archaeology and history of architecture. Last eleven years, his field work is focussed on landscape archaeology and built environment of the Islamic period in Northern Mesopotamia

Miroslav Melčák is a research fellow at the Oriental Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague. He studied Arabic language and Islamic Studies at Charles University in Prague, where he obtained his PhD in 2009. His main research interests include charitable foundations (awqaf) in Syria and Egypt and Islamic urbanism of Northern Mesopotami

Lenka Starková received her PhD from the University of West Bohemia Plzeň, Department of Archaeology, where she presently works as assistant professor of the landscape archaeology. She is specialized in remote sensing, analysis of satellite imagery, airborne laser scanning and GIS

Narmin Ali Muhammad Amin is professor of archaeology at University of Salahaddin, Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan, and also a research fellow in CRNS Paris (UMR 8167 – Orient et Méditerranée). Her main area of research is the Islamic period and Eastern Christian monasteries in Iraqi Kurdistan

Jan Petřík graduated in 2011 from the interfaculty double-major programme combining geology with archaeology at the Masaryk University in Brno. He is currently involved in research oriented in archeometry, geoarcheology of artifacts and sites from the Neolithic period up to the 20th century

Emily Neumeier received her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania, presently, she hold an ACLS Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities at The Ohio State University. She is a historian of Islamic art and architecture, specializing in the visual culture and built environment of the Ottoman Empire.
Stone Carving of the Hospitaller Period in Rhodes: Displaced pieces and fragments by Anna-Maria Kasdagli. ii+212 pages; illustrated through in black & white with 1 colour plate. 287 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914783. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914790. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The work presents 230 stone carvings of the Hospitaller period in Rhodes (1309-1522), which for various reasons are no longer in their original setting. Most of them are cut in local stone or reused antique marble and belong to three broad groups: decorative architectural elements, funerary slabs and markers, and heraldry from secular and religious buildings and fortifications.

Their architectural, artistic, inscriptional and social significance are discussed, providing insights into the way cultural influences from different parts of Western Europe were introduced, maintained and adapted in an Eastern Mediterranean context by the Knights of Saint John, other Westerners the presence of the Order encouraged to travel to Rhodes and even live there and, occasionally, by wealthy Greeks. The study includes a full catalogue and touches upon recent archaeological activity in the historic centre of the town of Rhodes.
Social complexity in early medieval rural communities The north-western Iberia archaeological record edited by Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. vi+134 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 18 colour plates. 300 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915087. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915094. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents an overview of the results of the research project DESPAMED funded by the Spanish Minister of Economy and Competitiveness. The aim of the book is to discuss the theoretical challenges posed by the study of social inequality and social complexity in early medieval peasant communities in North-western Iberia. Traditional approaches have defined these communities as poor, simple and even nomadic, in the framework of a self-sufficient economy that prioritised animal husbandry over agriculture. This picture has radically changed over the last couple of decades as a result of important research on the archaeology of peasantry and the critical analysis of ninthand tenth-century documentary evidence that show the complexity of these rural societies. These new records are discussed in the light of a new research agenda centred on the analysis of the emergence of villages, the formation of local elites, the creation of socio-political networks and the role of identities in the legitimation of local inequalities. The nine chapters of this book explore the potential and the limits of the archaeological record to tackle social inequality in rural communities. Those considerations have a wider theoretical and methodological potential and are applicable to other regions and chronologies. The different chapters explore local societies through different methodologies and approaches such as food, settlement patterns, social exclusion, consumption patterns and social practices.

In addition, the book introduces some of the most relevant topics studied currently by Iberian Medieval archaeologists, which are not always accessible to an international audience.
Castles, Siegeworks and Settlements Surveying the Archaeology of the Twelfth Century edited by Duncan W. Wright Oliver H. Creighton. xii+180 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. 288 2016. ISBN 9781784914769. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents twelve reports on archaeological investigations carried out at sites across England in support of a project investigating the so-called ‘Anarchy’ of King Stephen’s reign in the mid-twelfth century. Sites and their landscape settings are analysed through topographical and geophysical survey, as well as LiDAR and viewshed analysis, supported by cartographic and archival research. The reports examine sites at Burwell (Cambridgeshire), Castle Carlton (Lincolnshire), Corfe (Dorset), Crowmarsh (Oxfordshire), Faringdon (Oxfordshire), Hailes (Gloucestershire), Hamstead Marshall (Berkshire), Malmesbury (Wiltshire), Mountsorrel (Leicestershire), Rampton (Cambridgeshire), Wellow (Nottinghamshire) and Woodwalton (Cambridgeshire). The results help characterise the archaeological potential of this turbulent and controversial period, shedding new light on the castles, siegeworks and settlements of the twelfth century as well as antecedent activity and later phases of reuse.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 2 2017 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). 2 2017. ISBN JGAVOL22017. Book contents pageBuy Now

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Editorial: Volume 1 (John Bintliff)

Prehistory and Proto-History
New insights into the Upper Pleistocene archaeology of Northwestern Greece: The evidence from three open-air sites and its implication for Middle and Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers’ activity and behaviour in Southeastern Europe (S. Ligkovanlis)

Preserving memory in Minoan CreteFilled-in bench and platform deposits from the First Palace of Phaistos (Ilaria Calo)

Statio amoena Sostare e vivere lungo le strade romane edited by Patrizia Basso and Enrico Zanini. viii+264 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. All papers in Italian with English abstracts. Available both in print and Open Access. 295 2016. ISBN 9781784914981. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Roman road system was the main service infrastructure for administrative management, economic operation and defense of the empire.

Along with roads, a key element of this infrastructure were the resting places more or less directly linked with vehiculatio / cursus publicus, or with a system run or controlled by the state to ensure essential services (safe stop, supplies, maintenance of horses and other animals) to those traveling on behalf of the public administration.

New archaeological research and new studies on a rich and diverse body of extra-archaeological sources have recently reported the attention of the international scientific community on the subject of parking places, within the more general theme of the smaller settlements in the Roman world and their evolution in late antiquity and early medieval times.

This volume brings together contributions from scholars from three different generations, starting from different sources and methodological approaches, converging towards the construction of an area of common reflection on a theme still relatively underdeveloped. The goal is to lay the foundation for a deepening of the interdisciplinary debate and to develop new research projects.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Italian description:
Il sistema stradale romano rappresentava la principale infrastruttura di servizio per la gestione amministrativa, il funzionamento economico e la difesa dell’impero.

Insieme con le strade, elemento fondamentale di questa infrastruttura erano i luoghi di sosta più o meno direttamente legati con la vehiculatio/cursus publicus, ovvero con il sistema gestito o controllato dallo stato per assicurare i servizi indispensabili (sosta sicura, rifornimenti, cambio dei cavalli, manutenzione di animali e mezzi) a chi viaggiava per conto della pubblica amministrazione.

Nuove ricerche archeologiche e nuovi studi su un ricco e variegato corpus di fonti extra-archeologiche hanno recentemente riportato l’attenzione della comunità scientifica internazionale sul tema dei luoghi di sosta, all’interno della tematica più generale degli insediamenti minori nel mondo romano e della loro evoluzione in epoca tardoantica e altomedievale.

Questo volume raccoglie contributi di studiosi di tre diverse generazioni che, partendo da sistemi di fonti e da approcci metodologici differenti, convergono verso la costruzione di un terreno di riflessione comune su un tema ancora relativamente poco frequentato. L’obiettivo è quello di gettare le basi per un approfondimento del dibattito interdisciplinare e per lo sviluppo di nuovi progetti di ricerca, più organici e specificamente mirati.
The Maritime Traditions of the Fishermen of Socotra, Yemen by Julian Jansen van Rensburg. x+186 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout. 286 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914820. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914837. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Socotra archipelago lies approximately 135 nautical miles (Nm) northeast of Cape Guardafui, Somalia and 205Nm south of Rās Fartaq, Yemen. The archipelago is made up of four main islands, Socotra, cAbd al-Kūri, Samḥa and Darsa, of which Socotra is the largest and most densely populated. The population of Socotra is divided between the interior pastoralists and the coastal fishermen and traders. While scholarly studies concerning the interior population abound, the fishermen of Socotra have received comparatively less attention and little about them or their traditions is known. This research seeks to address this balance by analysing the Socotri maritime traditions and addressing the question as to how social, environmental and technological influences have shaped the maritime traditions of the fishermen of Socotra. The primary data forming the basis of this book is author’s ethnographic fieldwork carried out on the islands of Socotra and Samḥa between 2009 and 2010. This data is incorporated within a transdisciplinary framework that looks at some of the essential factors of historical, archaeological and environmental evidence to gain a holistic insight into the spatial and temporal factors affecting the maritime traditions of the fishermen.

About the author: Julian Jansen van Rensburg received his doctorate in September 2013 from the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies at the University of Exeter. His thesis examined how local, regional and global influences have, over time, influenced the traditions and technologies of the maritime communities on the island of Socotra, Yemen. This research formed part of the MARES Project, a multi-disciplinary, multi-period project focusing on the maritime traditions of the peoples of the Red Sea and Arabian-Persian Gulf. Following his doctorate he was awarded funding from the Honor Frost Foundation to undertake research into the tangible and intangible maritime heritage of the fishing communities in Anfeh, Lebanon. This research project included a maritime ethnographic workshop for Lebanese students and members of local NGOs. The workshop was used to train the participants in quantitative and qualitative techniques of maritime ethnography and traditional vessel recording. This research formed a part of the wider Anfeh Project being run by the University of Balamand. Subsequently, Julian received a National Geographic grant to study rock art on Socotra, the results of which are part of his current research as a Dahlem Research School POINT Fellow within the Excellence Cluster Topoi. He holds positions on the steering committee for the British Foundation for the Study of Arabia and the Executive Committee of the Friends of Socotra. He is also an Assistant Editor of the Proceedings for the Study of Arabia. His research interests include underwater archaeology, maritime ethnography and the typology of traditional boats of the Near East, rock art studies, GIS applications in archaeology, landscape archaeology, island and coastal archaeology, Indian Ocean trade networks in Antiquity and the Islamic Period, and cultural heritage management.
Le décor architectural artuqide en pierre de Mardin placé dans son contexte regional: contribution à l’histoire du décor géométrique et végétal du Proche-Orient des XIIe-XVe siècles by Deniz Beyazit. xx+552 pages; illustrated throughout with 302 colour plates. French text. 285 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911225. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911232. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Artuqids were one of the successor dynasties that rose to power in the aftermath of the eleventh-twelfth century invasion of Western and Central Asia by the Seljuq Turks. While the political power of the Artuqids was limited to the Diyar Bakr, a small region in northern Jazira corresponding to Southeastern Turkey, their artistic legacy is noteworthy. The many surviving Artuqid monuments, built over three hundred years (early 12th – early 15th century), and their decoration exemplify the mastery of stone carving which is reflected in intricate designs and motifs. Mardin, alongside other Artuqid centers such as Amid, Mayyafariqin and Hisn Kayfa, was set within a larger zone of diverse Christian and Islamic artistic traditions.

This book defines Mardin’s artistic context in relation to the other Artuqid centers, as well as the neighboring zones that encompass Anatolia, the Caucasus, Iran, Iraq, Syria and Egypt. During the Artuqid period an original style developed in Mardin and the Diyar Bakr, which itself was rooted in a well-established local school of stone carving. Connected with Christian traditions found in the Syriac Tur ‘Abdin and in Late Antique Syria, the decoration also compares with that of monuments in Armenia and Georgia, and resonates with artistic practices seen in areas controlled by the regional Muslim powers of the time: the Zangids, Ayyubids, Mameluks, Great and Anatolian Seljuqs and the Ilkhanids. The Artuqid buildings reflect the spirit of the time, when the Jazira served as an artistic platform, fostering the circulation of ideas that led to new inspiration, and open-minded rulers and patrons, curious and receptive to new creations, stimulated the creative efforts of architects, stone carvers and craftsmen. The decorated monuments also attest to the existence of significant economic wealth and the need to commission sophisticated buildings that magnified the political and social status of the ruling elite’s.

French description:
Les Artuqides comptaient parmi les nombreuses dynasties successeurs (« successor states ») qui sont arrivées simultanément au pouvoir à la suite de l’invasion des Turcs Seljuqides dont les armées avaient conquis, au cours des XIe et XIIe siècles, de vastes territoires s’étendant des limites de la Chine occidentale à la Méditerranée orientale. Bien que le pouvoir politique des Artuqides fût limité à une petite région, le Diyar Bakr – au nord de la Jazira correspondant à la Turquie du sud-est – l’héritage artistique qu’ils ont légué est pourtant remarquable. Les nombreux monuments artuqides et leur décor architectural, créés sur une période de trois siècles (du début du XIIe au début du XVe siècle), témoignent de la maîtrise de la sculpture et de la taille de pierre qui se reflète dans des motifs et compositions complexes. Mardin, à l’instar des autres centres artuqides d’Amid, Mayyafariqin et Hisn Kayfa, se situe dans une zone englobant diverses traditions artistiques chrétiennes et musulmanes.

Ce livre détermine le contexte artistique de Mardin par rapport aux autres centres artuqides, ainsi qu’aux zones voisines comprenant l’Anatolie, le Caucase, l’Iran, l’Iraq, la Syrie et l’Egypte. Durant la période artuqide, un style original se développe à Mardin ainsi qu’au Diyar Bakr. Ce style puise lui-même sa source dans une école locale bien établie de tailleur de pierre. Bien qu’étant liée aux précédentes traditions chrétiennes du Tur ‘Abdin syriaque et à la Syrie de l’Antiquité tardive, la décoration se compare également avec les monuments de l’Arménie et de la Géorgie, et résonne avec les traditions artistiques observées dans les régions contrôlées par les pouvoirs régionaux musulmans de l’époque : les Zangides, Ayyubides, Mamelukes, Grands Seldjuqides, Seldjuqides d’Anatolie et les Ilkhanides. Les monuments artuqides reflètent l’esprit d’une époque durant laquelle la Jazira était une sorte de plateforme artistique qui favorisait la circul
The Archaeology and History of the Church of the Redeemer and the Muristan in Jerusalem A Collection of Essays from a Workshop on the Church of the Redeemer and its Vicinity held on 8th/9th September 2014 in Jerusalem edited by Dieter Vieweger and Shimon Gibson. 322 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 266 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914196. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914202. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Muristan is situated in the heart of the Old City of Jerusalem and was a prime property in medieval times with numerous churches, a hospice, and a large hospital complex. This monograph contains fifteen chapters written by leading scholars from around the world dealing with the archaeological and historical aspects of the Muristan from the Iron Age through to Ottoman times. A number of chapters also address its immediate urban surroundings, notably the complex of structures associated with the Church of the Holy Sepulchre on the north and the Church of St John the Baptist to the south-west. Key chapters in this monograph are dedicated to the history of the Church of the Redeemer and on its underlying archaeological remains. Many of the chapters are based on research that was originally presented at an international workshop held in Jerusalem in 2014.

About the Editors:
Dieter Vieweger (born 1958) is the managing Director of the German Protestant Institute of Archaeology in Jerusalem and Amman (www.deiahl.de), Professor at the Church University of Wuppertal, Director of the Biblical Archaeological Institute at Wuppertal (www.bainst.de), Visiting Professor at the Private University of Witten-Herdecke, and Director of a number of archaeological research projects conducted in Jordan, Israel and Palestine (www.tallziraa.de; www.durch-die-zeiten.info).

Shimon Gibson (born 1958) is a Visiting Professor of Archaeology in the History Department at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and is the Head of the Archaeology Department in the University of the Holy Land, Jerusalem. His academic interests include the Archaeology of the Holy Land, History of Photography, and Jerusalem. He has many publications to his name, and directs archaeological projects (www.digtmountzion.com).