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NEW: Alexandria and Qumran: Back to the Beginning by Kenneth Silver. xxvi+586 pages; 42 figures, 11 maps and plans (24 plates in colour). 381 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917289. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917296. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This year, 2017, marks 70 years since the discovery of the famous Dead Sea Scrolls at Khirbet Qumran by the Dead Sea in 1947. The Dead Sea Scrolls are one of the most well-known archaeological discoveries of the 20th century. This book addresses the proto-history and the roots of the Qumran community and of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the light of contemporary scholarship in Alexandria, Egypt. Alexandria, as the centre for Hellenistic Jews and the location of the Library of Alexandria, forms a key to understanding the theme of the book. The relationship of this context to the thoughts of the Essenes, the Jewish philosopher Philo of Alexandria, the Jewish Therapeutae of Egypt living in the neighbourhood of Alexandria and the Pythagoreans are especially studied in this work. Historical sources (both Jewish and Classical authors) and archaeological evidence are taken into account in the wider Graeco-Roman context. The connection between the Jewish Therapeutae in the Lake Mareotis region and the Palestinian Essenes is explained by the ‘Jewish Pythagoras’ based on the idea that the movements share the same philosophical tradition based on Judaism and Pythagoreanism. The prototypes of the Dead Sea Scrolls are explained in their Egyptian context, in association with the Library of Alexandria, the Egyptian temple manuals, and the formation of libraries in the Hellenistic period including that of Qumran.

About the Author:
Dr Kenneth Silver is a historian and professional archaeologist, who has lived and worked for decades in the Near East. He is a specialist in Hellenistic and Roman archaeology, history and numismatics. He has worked with archaeological material in Israel, Egypt, Jordan, Syria and Turkey. He has previously published a number of scientific articles and monographs in this field. His current research interests include the study of early Jewish-Christian relations and the history of early Christianity. Presently he is the director of a survey and mapping project in Northern Mesopotamia studying the border zone between the late Roman/ Byzantine Empire and Persia.
FORTHCOMING: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 2 2017 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). 2 2017. ISBN SBN 2399-1844-2-2017. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

ISSN 2399-1844 (Print)
ISSN 2399-1852 (online)

Articles:
• Nadia Aleotti, Rhodian Amphoras from Butrint (Albania): Dating, Contexts and Trade
• Donald T. Ariel, Imported Hellenistic Stamped Amphora Handles and Fragments from the North Sinai Survey
• Ofra Guri-Rimon, Stone Ossuaries in the Hecht Museum Collection and the Issue of Ossuaries Use for Burial
• Gabriel Mazor & Walid Atrash, Nysa-Scythopolis: The Hellenistic Polis
• Hélène Machline & Yuval Gadot, Wading Through Jerusalem’s Garbage: Chronology, Function, and Formation Process of the Pottery Assemblages of the City’s Early Roman Landfill
• Kyriakos Savvopoulos, Two Hadra Hydriae in the Colection of the Patriarchal Sacristy in Alexandria
• Wolf Rudolph & Michalis Fotiadis, Neapolis Scythica – Simferopol – Test Excavations 1993

Archaeological News and Projects:
• »Dig for a Day« with the Archaeological Seminars Institute

Reviews:
• John Lund, A Study of the Circulation of Ceramics in Cyprus from the 3rd Century BC to the 3rd Century AD (by Brandon R. Olson)
• Gloria London, Ancient Cookware from the Levant. An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective (by John Tidmarsh)
• Michela Spataro & Alexandra Villing (eds.), Ceramics, Cuisine and Culture: The Archaeology and Sience of Kitchen Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom)
• James C. R. Gill, Dakhleh Oasis and the Western Desert of Egypt under the Ptolemies (by Andrea M. Berlin)
• Anna Gamberini, Ceramiche fini ellenistiche da Phoinike. Forme, produzioni, commerce (by Carlo De Mitri)
• Maja Mise, Gnathia and Related Hellenistic Ware on the East Adriatic Coast (by Patricia Kögler)
• Jens-Arne Dickmann & Alexander Heinemann (eds.), Vom Trinken und Bechern. Das antike Gelage im Umbruch (by Stella Drougou)

2017 PRINT SUBSCRIPTION RATES (1 issue in 2017):

Institutions:
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Agents will receive 25% discount on institutional print price including shipping rates as stated

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NEW: Journal of Greek Archaeology Subscriptions and Back-Issues One volume published annually in October/November edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). vi+498 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in printed and e-versions. 1 2016 Journal of Greek Archaeology . ISBN 2059-4674-2-2017. Book contents pageBuy Now

An annual, international peer-reviewed English-language journal specializing in synthetic articles and in long reviews. The scope of this journal is Greek archaeology both in the Aegean and throughout the wider Greek-inhabited world, from earliest Prehistory to the Modern Era. Thus we include contributions not just from traditional periods such as Greek Prehistory and the Classical Greek to Hellenistic eras, but also from Roman through Byzantine, Crusader and Ottoman Greece and into the Early Modern period. Outside of the Aegean contributions are welcome covering the Archaeology of the Greeks overseas, likewise from Prehistory into the Modern World. Greek Archaeology for the purposes of the JGA thus includes the Archaeology of the Hellenistic World, Roman Greece, Byzantine Archaeology, Frankish and Ottoman Archaeology, and the Postmedieval Archaeology of Greece and of the Greek Diaspora. the Editorial Board is headed by Professor John Bintliff (Edinburgh University, U.K. and Leiden University, The Netherlands).

For a full mission statement and information on the editorial and advisory board please visit the JGA page of our website.

Subscriptions are now open for JGA Vol 2 via our website. Please find links for private and institutional subscriptions below. Print and digital copies are expected to become available in October 2017. Please send all subscription-based queries to info@archaeopress.com.

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BACK-ISSUES

Volume 1 2016: Purchase back issues of JGA Volume 1 2016 by following the links below:

For private subscriptions for personal use please click here.

For institutional subscriptions please click here.

A free 70+ page sampler is available to download in our Open Access section designed to act as an introduction and taster to the scope and style of this new journal. It includes one complete paper and two review articles as well as full contents listings for Volume 1.

NEW: Autour de l’infanterie d’élite macédonienne à l’époque du royaume antigonide Cinq études militaires entre histoire, philologie et archéologie by Pierre O. Juhel. x+278 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. 373 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917326. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917333. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents five articles relating to military studies in the context of Macedonia of the Antigonids. Combining literary studies and archaeological research, the author proposes several new concepts on Hellenistic Macedonian military studies. Originally conceived as separate journal articles supporting a more general publication on the Macedonian army of Alexander the Great, it became clear it would be more useful and valuable to publish the articles together in one volume as they closely reference each other. Articles consider the Macedonian phalanx, Antigonid elite infantry, heavy infantry and defensive weaponry under the following headings: I. La nature de la phalange macédonienne ou quand la science recule; II. Antigonid Redcoats. L’infanterie d’élite de l’armée du royaume de Macédoine à l’époque hellénistique. Histoire et iconographie; III. ‘Infanterie lourde’ : une notion entre armement et ordonnance tactique; IV. Remarques philologiques et historiques sur l’ambivalence de termes relatifs aux institutions militaires macédoniennes chez les historiens de l’Antiquité; V. Deux nouvelles armes défensives de l’époque hellénistique.

French Description:
Ces cinq études militaires résultent essentiellement de développements présentés dans le manuscrit doctoral de l’auteur, L’Armée du royaume de Macédoine à l’époque hellénistique (323-148 av. J.-C.). Les troupes « nationales », présenté en Sorbonne le 11 janvier 2007. L’idée première avait été de les publier sous forme d’articles. Mais ce projet se heurtait à une difficulté. Ces textes se faisant écho, il s’avèrerait difficile d’attendre la diffusion du premier d’entre eux pour présenter les suivants tout en faisant exactement référence à un voire à plusieurs textes en cours de publication. Aussi apparut-il qu’il valait mieux les réunir en un recueil dont la cohérence serait assurée par un thème commun : l’histoire et l’archéologie militaire de l’époque hellenistique, tout particulièrement dans le cadre de la Macédoine des Antigonides.

Pierre Olivier Juhel est docteur en histoire et civilisation de l’Antiquité de l’Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV). Il est également titulaire d’une maîtrise de philosophie de l’Université Paris I (Panthéon–Sorbonne). Auteur de profession, il est spécialiste de l’histoire militaire de la fin de l’époque napoléonienne. En parallèle, dans la foulée de son doctorat consacré à l’armée macédonienne après Alexandre le Grand, il poursuit ses travaux académiques sur la Macédoine antique.
NEW: Imágenes de centauros en los vasos áticos de figuras negras y de figuras rojas Siglos VIII A.C. – IV A.C. by María Herranz. 298 pages; 15 graphs, 124 tables (all in colour). Spanish text with English summary. Available both in print and Open Access. 38 2017. ISBN 9781784916831. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The centaur, a hybrid being with the body of horse and a human head and torso, first appeared in the mountains of Thessaly. This was the Greek horse-breeding region and it seemed natural for the centaur to have originated there, in the heart of this exclusive heritage of the landed gentry. Centaurs belonged to the spheres of heroic mythology, with clear ties to the values of the aristocracy.

This book is composed of a catalogue divided into nine chapters. Each chapter comprises catalogue entries for a number of black-figure and red-figure Attic vases. The division into chapters is based on the various types of centaurs and different conflicts, either among themselves or against a hero. In addition to the catalogue is a chapter on images and statistics. Each of these nine chapters corresponds to a section of catalogue entries and statistics, as the information refers to two examples in each section, one in black figures and another in red figures. The highlighted examples illustrate the variety of different vase types (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC). The statistics are likewise divided into black and red figures, and various themes, such as the centaur Pholos and the banquet, or Herakles and Nessos. For each of these themes or groups of examples, a table is given showing the number of vases (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their place in the chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC, etc.).

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Bridging Times and Spaces: Papers in Ancient Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian Studies Honouring Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday edited by Pavel S. Avetisyan and Yervand H. Grekyan. xx+404 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 371 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916992. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917005. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Bridging Times and Spaces is composed of papers written by colleagues of Professor Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion his 65th birthday reflecting the breadth and diversity of his scholarly contributions. The range of presented papers covers topics in Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian archaeology, theory of interpretation in archaeology and art history, interdisciplinary history, historical linguistics, art history, and comparative mythology. The volume opens with an extensive interview given by Gregory Areshian, in which Gregory outlines the pathways of his academic career, archaeological discoveries, different intellectual quests, and the organic connections between research questions that he explored across different social sciences and the humanities, stressing the importance of periodizations in interdisciplinary history as well as his views on holism and interdisciplinary studies.

About the Editors Pavel Avetisyan is a former student of Gregory Areshian during his study at the Yerevan State University in 1975-1980; he now leads together with Gregory and Kristine Martirosyan-Olshansky the joint Armenian-American archaeological team at the excavations of the Neolithic settlement at Masis Blur, Armenia. Pavel received his PhD in 2003 (Chronology and Periodization of the Middle Bronze Age of Armenia) and D.Sc. in 2014 (Armenian Highland during the 24-9th centuries BC. The Dynamics of Socio-Cultural Transformations, according to Archaeological Data). His areas of research are Old World archaeology and the Neolithic and Iron Age cultures of Transcaucasia, devoting his studies also to the periodizations and chronology of the Bronze and Iron Ages of Transcaucasia. Professor Avetisyan is the Director of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Professor at the Yerevan State University.

Yervand Grekyan is a leading researcher at the Institute of Oriental Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Associate Professor at the Armenian State Pedagogical University. He received his PhD in 2002 (History of the Mannean Kingdom) and defended his habilitation thesis on the structure of the Urartian Kingdom at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia in 2016 (Biainili-Urartu. State and Society). Dr Grekyan’s interests are ancient history and culture of the Near East and especially of the Armenian Highland in the Late Bronze and Iron Ages.
Glassware and Glassworking in Thessaloniki 1st Century BC – 6th Century AD by Anastassios Ch. Antonaras. viii+384 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (70 colour plates). 360 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 27. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916794. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916800. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Glassware and Glassworking in Thessaloniki: 1st Century BC – 6th Century AD is a detailed examination of the production of glass and glass vessels in the eastern Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Age to the Early Christian period, analysing production techniques and decoration. The volume establishes the socio-economic framework of glassmaking and glassmakers’ social status in the Roman world generally and in Thessaloniki specifically, while identifying probable local products. Presented are all the excavation glass finds from Thessaloniki and its environs found between 1912 and 2002. A typological classification was created for almost 800 objects – which encompass the overwhelming majority of common excavation finds in the Balkans – as well as for the decorative themes that appear on the more valuable pieces. Comparative material from the entire Mediterranean was studied, verified in its entirety through primary publications. A summary of the excavation history of these vessels’ find-spots is provided, with details for each excavation, in many cases unpublished and identified through research in the archives of the relevant museums and Ephorates of Antiquities. The uses of glass vessels are presented, and there is discussion and interpretation of the reasons that permitted, or imposed, the choice of glass for their production. The finds are statistically analysed, and a chronological overview examining them century by century on the basis of use and place of production is given. Finally, there is an effort to interpret the data from the study in historical terms, and to incorporate the results into the political-economic evolution of the region’s political history. Relatively unfamiliar glassmaking terms are explained in a glossary of glassworking technology and typology terms. The material is fully documented in drawings and photographs, and every object in the catalogue is illustrated. A detailed index of the 602 geographical terms in the work, many unknown, concludes the book.

About the Author:
Anastassios C. Antonaras, a specialist in the history of glass, jewellery and textiles, is an archaeologist and curator at the Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki. His books include: Glassworking, Ancient and Medieval: Terminology, Technology and Typology; A Greek- English-English-Greek Dictionary; Roman and Early Christian Glassworking: Vessels from Thessaloniki and its Region (which received a prize from the Academy of Athens in 2010); Fire and Sand: Ancient Glass in the Princeton University Art Museum; and Artisanal Production in Ancient and Byzantine Thessaloniki: Archaeological, Literary and Epigraphic Evidence. Antonaras has organized numerous exhibitions and symposia, and has published numerous articles on objects from Thessaloniki. He currently serves on the board of the Christian Archaeological Association and is the secretary general of the International Association for the History of Glass.

Ras il-Wardija Sanctuary Revisited A re-assessment of the evidence and newly informed interpretations of a Punic-Roman sanctuary in Gozo (Malta) by George Azzopardi. vi+82 pages; black & white illustrations throughout. 354 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916695. £19.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916701. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The secluded sanctuary on the coastal promontory of Ras il-Wardija on the central Mediterranean island of Gozo (near Malta) constitutes another landmark on the religious map of the ancient Mediterranean. Ritual activity at the sanctuary seems to be evidenced from around the 3rd century BC to the 2nd century AD and, possibly, even as late as the 4th century AD. This ritual activity was focused in a small built temple and in a rock-cut cave that seems to have incorporated a built extension in a later stage. But the practised cult or cults were aniconic and remained so largely throughout. This may explain why the sanctuary’s excavators did not report any findings of statuettes or any figural images. Contemporaneously, figural images were also venerated on other sites showing that, for a long while, iconism and aniconism co-existed on the Maltese islands. There might have been more than one deity venerated in this sanctuary. Dionysos could have been one of them. But whoever they were, they are likely to have been somehow connected with the sea and / or with a maritime community or communities as the sanctuary itself evidently was.

About the Author
George Azzopardi is a practising archaeologist hailing from the island of Gozo and is quite familiar with the site. His main research interests focus on the Classical period with the phenomenon of continuity as a marked backdrop. In line with this view, he directed his recent research on religious activity in Classical times as being often in continuity from earlier – sometimes, even prehistoric – traditions or inspired from earlier sources. To this effect, human history is seen as a continuum with hardly any identifiable beginnings or intervals.
El Sur de la Península Ibérica y el Mediterráneo Occidental: relaciones culturales en la segunda mitad del II milenio a.C. by Juan Manuel Garrido Anguita. 580 pages; illustrated throughout with 181 plates in colour. Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784916442. £65.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

In ancient times, the first communities, societies and civilizations in the Iberian peninsula, according to archaeological evidence, began to develop following a progressive local evolution tempered by the significance of outside contacts. In order to reconstruct our history, resorting to ancient poets, we strive to distinguish reality from myth in the pursuit of a bond of certainty between the data provided by historical and literary sources and the excavated remains. Greek epics, based on the Illiad and the Odyssey, are the basis for the first speculations that link societies all along the Mediterranean coast, from east to west, with a common thread. However, how many times have we been told about mythical places, such as cities of great splendour and unique cultural progress? Did the land which Plato called Atlantis and Adolf Schulten linked to Tartessos truly exist? These answers may never be revealed (they are not at the forefront of research interests nowadays); for the time being, they are lost into a mythical and legendary world. Nonetheless, they remain alive over time.

Spanish description: En tiempos lejanos, ahora sepultadas bajo la caída de los años, comienzan a formarse las primeras comunidades, sociedades y civilizaciones que se irán desarrollando en la Península Ibérica, por una progresiva evolución local, sin descuidar la atención de los contactos foráneos previa contrastación arqueológica. Refugiándonos en figuras creadas por los antiguos poetas, tratamos de discernir entre lo que comúnmente se ha denominado mito-leyenda y lo real, buscando un vínculo de certeza entre los datos que revelan las fuentes literario-históricas y los vestigios que se desentierran de nuestra primera historia, aquella que tratamos de reconstruir. La épica occidental apoyada en los relatos homéricos de la Ilíada y la Odisea, son la base de las primeras conjeturas que con un hilo, unen a las sociedades que conviven en el Mar Mediterráneo desde Oriente hasta Occidente. Pero ¿cuántas veces hemos oído contar relatos sobre míticas ciudades de gran esplendor e inigualable progreso cultural? ¿Existió aquella tierra denominada por Platón “Atlántida” y que fue asociada por Adolf Schulten a Tartessos? Estas respuestas quizá nunca lleguen a desvelarse (tampoco están en la vanguardia de los intereses de la investigación), por ahora sólo están inmersas en un mundo mítico y legendario, pero es cierto que se mantienen vivas, nostálgicas, con el paso del tiempo.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

SOMA 2014. Proceedings of the 18th Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology Wrocław – Poland, 24-26 April 2014 edited by Blazej Stanislawski and Hakan Öniz. viii+192 pages; illustrated throughout with 35 plates in colour. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784914943. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The 18th annual meeting of the Symposium on Mediterranean Archaeology (SOMA) was held in Wrocław-Poland, 24th to 26th April 2014.

Since prehistoric times the Mediterranean has acted as a stage for intense interactions between groups inhabiting regions that are now studied mainly within various sub-fields of ancient studies. In recent years, however, the development of research techniques and analytical models of archaeological evidence have identified similar historical paths that are similar, if not, in some cases, common to these disparate areas of the ancient world from West (Iberian peninsula) to East (Anatolia and Levant), from North (Europe, Black Sea Coast) to South (Maghreb and Egypt).

The 18th SOMA provided a forum for presentations related to the above-mentioned topics, as well as general themes such as the role of the sea, trade, colonization, even piracy, using archaeological data collected within contexts associated with the Mediterranean Basin and the area referred to as the Ancient Near East, ranging chronologically from the Prehistoric to Medieval periods. This current volume contains 22 papers selected from the 90 presented.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Kratos & Krater: Reconstructing an Athenian Protohistory by Barbara Bohen. xvi+250 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with one plate in colour. 340 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916220. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916237. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Athenian governance and culture are reconstructed from the Bronze Age into the historical era based on traditions, archaeological contexts and remains, foremost the formal commensal and libation krater. Following Mycenaean immigration from the Peloponnesos during the transitional years, changes in governance are observable. Groups under aristocratic leadership, local and immigrant, aspired to coexist under a surprisingly formal set of stipulations that should be recognized as Athens’ first constitution. Synoikismos did not refer to a political union of Attica, sometimes attributed to Theseus, but to a union of aristocratic houses (oikoi). The union replaced absolute monarchy with a new oligarchical-monarchy system, each king selected from one of the favoured aristocratic houses and ruling for life without inheritance. The system prevailed through the late eleventh to the mid-eighth c. and is corroborated by Athenian traditions cross-referenced with archaeological data from the burial grounds, and a formerly discredited list of Athenian Iron Age kings. Some burial grounds have been tentatively identified as those of the Melanthids, Alcmeonids, Philaids and Medontids, who settled the outskirts of Athens along with other migrant groups following the decline of the elite in the Peloponnesos. While the Melanthids left during the 11th c. Ionian Migration other aristocratic houses remained and contributed to the evolution of the historical era polis of Athens. One noble family, the Alcmeonids preserved their cemetery into the Archaic period in a burial record of 600 years’ duration.

Incorporated into this work is a monograph on the Athenian formal krater used by these primarily Neleid aristocratic houses in assembly and ritual. Some Homeric practices parallel those found in Athens, so the Ionic poets may have documented customs that had existed on the Mainland and were transferred to Ionia during the Ionian Migration. The demise of both the constitution and the standard, ancestral krater in Athens following a mid-eighth c. watershed is testimony to an interval of political change, as noted by Ian Morris, before the systematized establishment of annual archonship in the following century. The support this research has given to the validity of the King List has resulted in a proposed new chronology, with an earlier onset for the Geometric period at 922 BC, rather than the currently accepted 900 BC. The relative chronology of Coldstream based on style is generally accepted here, but some intermediate stages are revised based on perceptible break data, such as the onset of a new kingship, a reported war, or the demise of a governance system.

About the Author:

Barbara Bohen has a 1979 PhD in Classical Art, Archaeology and Classics from New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. From 1981 to 1997 she served as director of the University of Illinois multicultural World Heritage Museum (now Spurlock). She has taught art history, museology, and archaeological methodology, given many public lectures, and published on topics ranging from Athenian burial cult, ceramic studies, and aesthetics to a multidisciplinary study of an Egyptian mummy. Awards include Fulbright, Danforth and Getty fellowships, and a three year NDEA Title IV award for classical studies at New York University Washington Square. The University of Illinois granted the Chancellor’s Academic Professional Excellence Award, as well as an Arnold Beckman award for travel and research in Greece which helped further the genesis of the current publication. Bohen has excavated Archaic Native American site Garvies Point on Long Island, Classical Greek sites on the island of Samothrace, Kalo Podi, Aphrodisias, Turkey, and from 1972 to 1981 the Kerameikos excavations of Athens, Greece. Since 2012 Bohen has held an appointment as Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics, at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, She is currently engaged in th
Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times Η ΜΕΓΑΛΗ ΡΟΔΙΑΚΗ ΠΛΑΣΤΙΚΗ ΤΩΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΣΤΙΚΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΡΩΜΑΪΚΩΝ ΧΡΟΝΩΝ by Kalliope Bairami. xviii+864 pages; 222 plates, 23 in colour. Greek text with 19 page English summary. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784915766. £80.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hellenistic society of the Rhodian metropolis, a naval aristocracy (Gabrielsen), dedicated bronze statues of their members in the sanctuaries and public buildings and used marble and -occasionally-lartios lithos to carve portrait-statues originally for funerary use and in a later period also for honorific purposes, figures of deities and decorative sculpture for the houses and the parks. The artists, local and itinerant, from Athens, the islands and the Asia Minor, established artistic workshops on Rhodes, some of them active for three centuries and for more than one generation. The impact of Rhodian art is evident on the islands of the Aegean and the cities of Asia Minor, due to the expansion of the Rhodian Peraia. Together with Pergamon, Rhodes emerges as a productive artistic centre of the Hellenistic era, creating statuary types and combining them with landscape elements. The radiance of its art is evident in the late Hellenistic period in Rome, the new capital of the world, where the Rhodian artists create mythological statuary groups set in grottoes.

This volume presents the large-scale Rhodian sculpture of the Hellenistic and Roman period through the publication of sixty unpublished sculptures of life size or larger than life size, together with forty-five sculptures already published. The sculptures are grouped according to their statuary type (gods, mortals and portraits), while those unable to be firmly identified due to their fragmentary condition are grouped under the category ‘uncertain identification’. The presentation of the sculptures is further supplemented by a technical description and an analysis of stylistic characteristics according to chronological development. Excavation data, wherever available, are also provided.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Greek Art: From Oxford to Portugal and Back Again by Rui Morais. vi+58 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 330 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915865. £15.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915872. £15.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

One of the most fascinating topics in the study of ancient art concerns artistic practices and models and the means of transmission of iconographic designs and decorative compositions. This phenomenon, although well known, has not drawn much attention of scholars of the ancient art. Apart from copies of originals, the practice dates back to the first civilizations and may be even older. The media used could be painted vignettes on papyri, paint on leather, or sketches painted on ostraca, used as pattern books.

This issue is practically unheard of regarding ancient Greece, although a few media have been found which may have facilitated the transmission of iconographic designs and decorative compositions. In this study we present some examples that suggest the existence of pattern books in the Greek world.

If the media used in the Greek world are insofar unknown, the same cannot be said of the Roman world. Written sources mention the existence of manuals in the form of papyrus scrolls (stemmata, imagines) which served as models as well as inspiration for the artists.

About the author:
Rui Manuel Lopes de Sousa Morais was born in Porto in 1969 and has a degree in history from the University of Coimbra, MA in Urban Archaeology, PhD in archaeology, technology and materials, both from the University of Minho, Braga. He was a professor at Minho University until 2013 and is currently an Assistant Professor with Aggregation at the Faculty of Arts, Oporto University. Rui has dedicated special attention to the study of trade in antiquity, with numerous published works, individually or with other national and foreign authors. He is also a researcher in the Classical and Humanistic Centre at Coimbra University (CECH) where he has developed his interest in classical art with several books published. He is a consultant of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for the classical antiquities, member of the Scientific Committee of the IBERIA GRAEGA Project, and the coordinator of the monographic series Classica Instrumenta from Coimbra University.
The Death of the Maiden in Classical Athens Ο ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ ΤΗΣ ΑΓΑΜΟΥ ΚΟΡΗΣ ΣΤΗΝ ΑΘΗΝΑ ΤΩΝ ΚΛΑΣΙΚΩΝ ΧΡΟΝΩΝ by Katia Margariti. xlviii+636 pages; 105 plates in colour and black & white. Text in Greek with extensive 63 page english summary. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784915469. £80.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The present study examines the death of maidens in classical Athens, combining the study of Attic funerary iconography with research on classical Attic maiden burials, funerary inscriptions, tragic plays, as well as the relevant Attic myths.

The iconography of funerary reliefs focuses on the idealized image of the deceased maiden, as well as the powerful bonds of love and kinship that unite her with the members of her family, whereas the iconography of vases emphasizes the premature death of the maiden, the pain of loss and mourning felt by her family, as well as the observance of the indispensable funerary rites concerning her burial and ‘tomb cult’. Particularly interesting is the fact that the ‘traditional’ theory according to which the loutrophoros marked the graves of the unmarried dead alone has been proven non valid.

The study of classical Attic maiden burials indicates that the prematurely dead maidens were buried as children who didn’t live long enough to reach adulthood.

The untimely death of maidens in Attic drama and mythology is beneficial to the family or the city. In great contrast to that, the premature death of real - life Athenian maidens was a terrible disaster for the girls’ families, as well as the polis itself. Despite this, the iconography of dead maidens in classical Athens is in accordance with the ‘image’ of the deceased maidens presented by funerary epigrams, tragedy, and mythology. It has to be noted though, that the same is not true in the case of maiden burials.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Artemis and Her Cult by Ruth M. Léger. vi+178 pages; thirteen colour plates. 316 2017. ISBN 9781784915506. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Greek sanctuaries are among the best known archaeological sites in ancient Greece. However, after over 150 years of excavations and research we know surprisingly little about some of their aspects, such as the rituals enacted in the sanctuary, the nature of original local deities and how aspects of their character were assimilated into those of the Olympians, why sanctuaries were established in certain places, and how to determine who the sanctuary was established for when no epigraphical material is present.

Artemis and Her Cult provides a first attempt to bring together archaeological and literary sources from two main Artemis sanctuaries, hoping to contribute to a clearer picture of her cult. An account of Artemis’ different characters describes her as a mother of gods, a goddess of wilderness, animals and hunt; a goddess of birth, infants and children (and young animals); as well as a goddess of youth and marriage and rites of passage.

These descriptions are followed by an up-to-date account of the archaeological record of the sanctuaries of Artemis Orthia at Sparta and Artemis Ephesia at Ephesus. For the comparison the site of Athena Alea at Tegea is examined. The three accounts offer a full study of the architectural development and the range of artefacts made of different materials. The varied character is Artemis are further analysed by looking at the archaeology relating to the cult and the rites of passage taking place at the sites. The rites of passage are reconstructed by using the literary accounts.

About the author:
Ruth Léger's love for ancient culture started with the subjects of Latin and Greek at secondary school. After a BA and MA degrees at the Universiteit Utrecht, she moved to Birmingham to pursue her PhD. This book is the result of her research in the Department of Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology under supervision of Dr K.A. Wardle, and is a starting point for mapping out sanctuaries and their history throughout the Greek world.
Social Identity and Status in the Classical and Hellenistic Northern Peloponnese The Evidence from Burials by Nikolas Dimakis. x+358 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 4 colour plates. 299 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915063. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915070. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Classical and Hellenistic cemeteries can give us more than descriptions and styles of pottery, art and burial architecture; they can speak of people, societies, social conventions as well as of social distinctions. This book aims to employ and illustrate the unique strengths of burial evidence and its contribution to the understanding of social identity and status in the Classical and Hellenistic Northern Peloponnese. By thoroughly reviewing published burials from the regions of Achaia, Arcadia, the Argolid and Cynouria, Corinthia, Elis and Triphylia, spatial and temporal variations which led to a change in definitions of ‘society’ and perceptions of ‘community’ on the basis of shifting reactions to death and the dead are demonstrated. Social roles of men, women, children, elite and non-elite individuals as expressed or negotiated in the mortuary record are explored. Preconceived ideas and stereotypes within and about the Classical and Hellenistic burials are challenged. In spite of the many constraints imposed by the limited previous research, what clearly emerges from this study is the wide degree of variation in what are often loosely termed ‘customary’ or unappealing Classical and Hellenistic burial practices in the Northern Peloponnese. If death was indeed an occasion or ‘opportunity’, then the meaning of this opportunity varied along the shifting dimensions, in time and space, of identity and status.

About the Author: Dr Nikolas Dimakis is a RCH Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. His research on ‘The Archaeology of Child Death: child burials in Classical and Hellenistic Attica’, funded by the Research Centre for the Humanities, examines the interplay of identity, status and emotions within the context of child burials in Attica. He is also a Research Associate inw the ‘THALES – University of Athens – Apollo’s Sanctuary at ancient Halasarna on Kos’ project of excellence. Nikolas received a thorough classical education at the University of Athens, and further pursued postgraduate studies at the University of Nottingham where he obtained his PhD, on prestigious studentships and awards. He has published on Classical and Hellenistic burial customs, deathscapes and terracotta lamps. He has coordinated and participated in international meetings and in many archaeological projects in the Peloponnese, Attica and the Dodecanese.
Epigraphy of Art Ancient Greek Vase-Inscriptions and Vase-Paintings by Dimitrios Yatromanolakis. x+206 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 298 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914868. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914875. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ancient Greek vase-paintings offer broad-ranging and unprecedented early perspectives on the often intricate interplay of images and texts. By bringing together—for the first time in English-language scholarship—an international group of leading scholars in classical art and archaeology who have worked on vase-inscriptions, this book investigates epigraphic technicalities of Attic and non-Attic inscriptions on pottery as well as their broader iconographic and sociocultural significance. The ten chapters in this book propose original and expert methodological approaches to the study of vase-inscriptions and vasepaintings, while also foregrounding the outstanding but not fully examined importance of the area of vase-inscriptions for current research on ancient Greek visual representations. Epigraphy of Art: Ancient Greek Vase-Inscriptions and Vase-Paintings constitutes a major contribution to the fields of Greek epigraphy and classical art and archaeology and will prove significant for epigraphists, archaeologists, and art-historians interested in the complexities of the interaction of art and text.
Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 2 2017 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). 2 2017. ISBN JGAVOL22017. Book contents pageBuy Now

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Editorial: Volume 1 (John Bintliff)

Prehistory and Proto-History
New insights into the Upper Pleistocene archaeology of Northwestern Greece: The evidence from three open-air sites and its implication for Middle and Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers’ activity and behaviour in Southeastern Europe (S. Ligkovanlis)

Preserving memory in Minoan CreteFilled-in bench and platform deposits from the First Palace of Phaistos (Ilaria Calo)

Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 1 2016 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). xiv+212 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available in print and Open Access. 1 2016. ISBN 2399-1844-1-2016. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

ISSN 2399-1844 (Print)
ISSN 2399-1852 (online)

Table of Contents:
A Fill from a Potter’s Dump at Morgantina – by Shelley Stone
Trade in Pottery within the Lower Adriatic in the 2nd century BCE – by Carlo De Mitri
Hellenistic Ash Containers from Phoinike (Albania) – by Nadia Aleotti
Pottery Production in Hellenistic Chalkis, Euboea. Preliminary Notes – by Yannis Chairetakis
A Terracotta Figurine of a War Elephant and Other Finds from a Grave at Thessaloniki – by Eleni Lambrothanassi & Annareta Touloumtzidou
Moldmade Bowls from Straton’s Tower (Caesarea Maritima) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom
Greco-Roman Jewellery from the Necropolis of Qasrawet (Sinai) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECTS
Panathenaic Amphorae of Hellenistic and Roman Times – by Martin Streicher

BOOK REVIEWS
Shelley C. Stone, Morgantina Studies 6. The Hellenistic and Roman Fine Wares – by Peter J. Stone
Pia Guldager Bilde & Mark L. Lawall (eds.), Pottery, Peoples and Places, BSS 16 – by Kathleen Warner Slane
Susan I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pottery. The Plain Wares, Agora 33 – by Patricia Kögler

2016 PRINT SUBSCRIPTION RATES (1 issue in 2016):

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Complete eJournal available to download now in Open Access - click here to follow the link
Houses in Graeco-Roman Egypt Arenas for Ritual Activity by Youssri Ezzat Hussein Abdelwahed. viii+104; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 271 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914370. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914387. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book examines different forms of ritual activities performed in houses of Graeco- Roman Egypt. It draws on the rich archaeological record of rural housing and evidence from literature or papyrological references to both urban and rural housing. The introduction critically considers the literature relevant to the topic in order to identify the research gap. Chapter I attempts to reconstruct the structure of urban and rural houses in Graeco- Roman Egypt in the light of papyri and archaeology. This aims to establish the physical and spatial framework for the rituals considered in the following chapters. In line with this reconstruction of domestic properties is the reconstruction of the architectural layout and use of the domestic pylon in Chapter II. Chapter III deals with two rituals enacted before the front door of the house, namely the sacrifice of fish on the 9th of Thoth and the sacrifice of pigs on the 15th of Pachon. Chapter IV considers the ritual of the illumination of lamps for the goddess Athena-Neith within and around houses on the 13th of Epeiph. Chapter V highlights the use of the house as an arena for social types of rituals associated with dining, birthdays, the mallokouria, the epikrisis, and marriage. Chapter VI explores the religious sphere of houses, which is obvious from domestic shrines, wall paintings with religious themes, and figurines of Egyptian and Graeco-Roman deities uncovered from houses. The last chapter deals with mourning rituals, which the house occupants performed after the demise of their beloved animals, such as dogs, and their family members. In the conclusion, I summarize my work and draw out its implications, suggesting that the house was the locus of social, religious, and funerary rituals in Graeco-Roman Egypt.
Die antike Münze als Fundgegenstand Kategorien numismatischer Funde und ihre Interpretation by Günther E. Thüry. vi+200 pages; 13 plates of which 11 are in colour. German text with English abstract. 265 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914158. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914165. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Interpretation of coin finds is not quite an easy thing. How to distinguish, e. g., material of ‘hoards’ from that of ‘votive deposits’? Where are the ‘border lines’ dividing numismatic find categories from each other? Questions like these deserve a closer scrutiny. This book tries to face the problems by

- proposing clear definitions for categories and sub-categories of coin finds;
- by collecting and interpreting written testimonies (from ancient literature, epigraphy and papyrology) casting light on reasons and circumstances of coin deposition and coin loss in antiquity;
- by describing differences of composition between the categories;
- and by discussing difficulties of ‘differential diagnosis’;
- and the role of secondary finds.

For each problem and for each find category a large number of examples is offered.

ΠΟΤΑΜΙΚΟΝ: Sinews of Acheloios A Comprehensive Catalog of the Bronze Coinage of the Man-Faced Bull, with Essays on Origin and Identity edited by Nicholas J. Molinari and Nicola Sisci. x+354 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 255 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914011. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914028. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Potamikon attempts to solve a question that has perplexed scholars for hundreds of years: Who exactly is the man-faced bull featured so often on Greek coinage? It approaches this question by examining the origin of the iconography and traces its development throughout various Mediterranean cultures, finally arriving in Archaic and Classical Greece in the first millennium BC. Within the context of Greek coinage, the authors review all the past arguments for the identity of the man-faced bull before incorporating the two leading theories (Local River Gods vs. Acheloios) into a new theory of local embodiments of Acheloios, thereby preserving the sanctity of the local rivers while recognizing Acheloios as the original god of all water. The second part of the book exhibits many of these ‘Sinews of Acheloios’ as they appear throughout the Greek world on bronze coinage, in each case paying careful attention to the reasons a specific group adopted the iconography and shedding further light on the mythos of Acheloios.

Italian Description:
Potamikon tenta di dare risposte ad una domanda che per centinaia di anni ha assillato gli studiosi di Numismatica antica: chi è esattamente il toro androprosopo che compare così frequentemente sulla monetazione greca? Lo studio introduttivo pubblicato nel volume affronta tale questione esaminando l'origine preistorica dell'iconografia e tracciando il suo sviluppo nelle varie culture del Mediterraneo antico, per arrivare infine alla sua diffusione nel mondo greco arcaico e classico. Nell'ambito della monetazione greca gli autori passano in rassegna tutti gli argomenti passati riguardanti l'identità del toro androprosopo, prima di integrare le due teorie principali (divinità fluviali locali o Acheloios) in una nuova teoria, che propone di leggere tale figura come declinazione locale di Acheloios, inteso come il dio originario di tutte le acque da cui scaturisce la "deità" dei vari fiumi locali: i 'tendini' di Acheloios, così come furono descritti dalle fonti antiche. La seconda parte del libro presenta un repertorio dei 'tendini di Acheloios' che furono rappresentati come tori androprosopi nella monetazione in bronzo delle varie zecche greche, prestando attenzione caso per caso alle ragioni che spinsero le comunità emittenti ad adottare tale iconografia, possibilmente gettando ulteriore luce sul mito di Acheloios.

German Description:
Potamikon versucht, eine Frage zu lösen, die Wissenschaftler seit Hunderten von Jahren verwirrt hat: Wer genau ist dieser menschengesichtige Stier, der so oft auf griechischen Münzen dargestellt wird?Es nähert sich dieser Frage, indem es den Ursprung dieser Ikonographie untersucht und ihre Entwicklung innerhalb verschiedener Kulturen des Mittelmeerraumes nachverfolgt, um schließlich im Griechenland des ersten vorchristlichen Jahrtausends anzukommen. Im Rahmen der griechischen Münzprägung bewerten die Autoren alle bisher vorgebrachten Argumente für die Identität des menschengesichtigen Stiers um dann die zwei führenden Theorien (lokale Flussgötter oder Acheloios) in einer neuen Theorie von lokalen Verkörperungen von Acheloios zusammenzuführen, womit die Heiligkeit der lokalen Flüsse erhalten bleibt, währen trotzdem Acheloios als Gott aller Gewässer anerkannt wird. Der zweite Teil des Buches zeigt viele der "Sehnen von Acheloios", wie sie in der gesamten griechischen Welt auf Bronzemünzen erscheinen, wobei jeweils großes Augenmerk auf die Frage gelegt wird, warum eine spezifische Gruppe sich dieser Ikonographie bediente und der Mythos von Achelaios näher beleuchtet.

French Description:
Potamikon tente de répondre à la question qui embarrasse les chercheurs depuis de nombreuses années : Qui est le personnage figuré par un taureau androcéphale que l’on rencontre si souvent sur les monnaies grecques ? L’ouvrage aborde cette question par l’examen de l’origine iconographique puis de son développ
Drawings in Greek and Roman Architecture by Antonio Corso. vi+112 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with one colour plate. 243 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913717. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913724. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is an essay on architectural drawings of the Greek and Roman world. The first chapter is focused on the possibility that ancient treatises of architectures were endowed with drawings in order to make clear expositions which sometimes were not easily explainable only with words. Then the drawings which once clarified the treatise of Vitruvius are considered. The problem concerning the possible presence of drawings in post-Vitruvian architectural treatises is also discussed. The issue as to whether descriptive literary compositions sometimes contained illustrations as well is also examined. Then representations of architecture in Roman treatises on divisions of land (the so called gromatic treatises) are considered. The references to architectural drawings in literary and epigraphical testimonia are collected and a catalogue of the surviving Greek and Roman drawings of buildings or of parts of them is given. Thus this research offers all the basic data for the study of an important tool in the context of architecture in antiquity.
A Dignified Passage through the Gates of Hades The Burial Custom of Cremation and the Warrior Order of Ancient Eleutherna by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. 24pp; illustrated throughout in colour. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784913830. £8.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeological excavations at the Eleuthernian burial ground of Orthi Petra continue to yield significant elements of the archaeo-anthropological record, the subject matter of continuous interdisciplinary research, outreach, national and international acclaim. Among a plethora of features discovered, unearthing components of a unique nexus to the Geometric-Archaic Periods, was an unspoiled time capsule in astonishing contextual preservation, a hand carved tomb with a drómos into the softer bedrock material of Orthi Petra. Designated in short as contextual association A1K1, the tomb as a funerary activity area yielded a remarkable collection of jar burials in complex internal tomb stratification, containing cremated human bones accompanied by a most noteworthy assembly of burial artifacts of exquisite wealth, along a multitude of traces of “fossilized” behavior left resolutely behind by the ancients in their transactions on the paths of their perceived realities and obligations of life norms, but also of the arcane matters of afterlife. Such evidentiary data of funerary behavior in conjunction with the rest of the archaeo-anthropological record afford the opportunity to document where possible and deduce where pertinent aspects of the transitional period, overlapping the end of life’s journey and the unfolding of death in light of a number of the principles, the values, and the modes that guided the lives of the ancients as mortuary habits may have the transcending power to be revealing of certain codes of ante mortem conduct, of main beliefs, of ideologies and viewpoints, characteristic of their ideational world and hence of their attitudes toward, and expectations of, post mortem life. Such understandings, based on critical and deductive thinking combined with the data offered through the scope of anthropological archaeology and forensics by the decoding of traces permanently recorded on bone and dental surfaces, construct a persuasive dialectic, regarding important facets of the human condition in Eleutherna from Geometric through Archaic times.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Off the Beaten Track. Epigraphy at the Borders Proceedings of 6th EAGLE International Event (24-25 September 2015, Bari, Italy) edited by Antonio E. Felle and Anita Rocco. vi+154 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. 222 2016. ISBN 9781784913229. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume contains the papers presented during the Meeting ‘Off the Beaten Track – Epigraphy at the Borders’, the sixth in a series of international events planned by the EAGLE, Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy international consortium.

The Meeting was held on 24–25 September 2015, with the support of the Department of Classics and Late Antiquity Studies at the University of Bari Aldo Moro (Italy).

During the event, the EAGLE Portal (http://www.eagle-network.eu) was officially launched and presented to the public for the first time. The event was intended to address the issues which arise in digitizing inscriptions characterised by ‘unusual’ features in comparison with the epigraphic norm. Here are collected contributions from several ongoing digital projects raising questions and proposing solutions regarding encoding inscriptions – from the Archaic period to the Middle Ages and beyond, even in languages other than Greek and Latin – which do not fall within those labelled as standard.

The projects involved are the following: ILA – Iscrizioni Latine Arcaiche; The Ancient Graffiti Project; DASI – Digital Archive for the Study of pre-Islamic Arabian Inscriptions; EDB – Epigraphic Database Bari; EDV – Epigraphic Database Vernacular Inscriptions; AshLi – Ashmolean Latin Inscriptions Project.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Reviews:

'...the projects presented in the volume, though very diverse in terms of chronology, geography and focus, share numerous challenges. Some of them are still works in progress and have not yet been launched, others already have a long web presence but nonetheless need to overcome new encoding hurdles. Precisely because of this, the volume will be of interest to digital epigraphists everywhere, also outside the beaten tracks of the Graeco Latin world.' – Ortal-Paz Saar, Utrecht University (Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 2016 View online.)
Elis 1969: The Peneios Valley Rescue Excavation Project British School at Athens Survey 1967 and Rescue Excavations at Kostoureika and Keramidia 1969 by John Ellis Jones and Ourania Kouka. vi+184 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 210 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912307. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912314. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the 1960s a great new barrier dam was built across the Peneios Valley in Elis in the N.W. Peloponnese to create an artificial lake for irrigation purposes. In 1967 the Greek Archaeological Service organised a preliminary survey of the areas to be affected and also asked all the Foreign Archaeological Schools to assist and allocated specific sections to each. The British School at Athens sent a small team in late 1967 to survey part of the south-west fringes of the area to be flooded; this team identified many sites and opened test-trenches at six of them. In 1969 further work was undertaken in that area for the British School: a small team from Birmingham University and from Bangor undertook excavations at two of the identified sites, ‘Kostoureika’ and ‘Keramidia’. This account describes the results in detail. ‘Kostoureika’, identified as a likely Hellenistic ‘villa’ proved structurally disappointing (the 1967 test-trench had located the only surviving wall), but revealed a deposit of Early Helladic pottery, which supplements very usefully evidence for early occupation in the north-west Peloponnese. ‘Keramidia’ proved to be a site occupied, at least at times, from the Hellenistic to the late Roman imperial period.
The Wisdom of Thoth Magical Texts in Ancient Mediterranean Civilisations edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner, Alessandro Roccati and Agata Świerzowska. ii+130 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 15 colour plates. 204 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912475. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912482. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume represents a selection of contributions on Mediterranean themes from a wider international interdisciplinary conference on Magical Texts in Ancient Civilizations, organised by the Centre for Comparative Studies of Civilizations at Jagiellonian University in Kraków in Poland between 27-28 June 2013. The meeting welcomed researchers from Hungary, Italy, Poland and Ukraine, covering various disciplines including comparative civilizations, comparative religions, linguistics, archaeology, anthropology, history and philosophy.

In the past ‘magic’ was often misunderstood as irrational behaviour, in contrast to the tradition of philosophical or rational thought mostly based on Greek models. Evidence collected from ancient high cultures, like that of Pharaonic Egypt, includes massive amounts of documents and treatises of all kinds related to what has been labelled ‘magic’. Today it cannot be written off as merely a primitive or ‘lesser human’ phenomenon: the awareness of magic remains to the present day in many societies, at all social levels, and has not been generally replaced by what might be considered as more advanced thinking. The researches in this volume focus heavily on Egypt (in particular Predynastic, Pharaonic, Hellenistic, Roman and Christian evidence), but Near Eastern material was also presented from Pagan (Ugaritic) and Christian (Syriac) times.
Rhesus' Gold, Heracles' Iron: the archaeology of metals mining and exploitation in NE Greece by Nerantzis X Nerantzis. ISBN 9780956824028. £35.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

East Macedonia in northern Greece has rich deposits of gold and silver as well as copper and iron ores. The gold and silver were important to Classical Athens and even more so to Alexander the Great’s Hellenistic world. Copper was extracted as early as the Late Neolithic, and iron was worked from the Iron Age to Ottoman times. Bringing to life the essential background to this wealth derived from metals, this book looks at the archaeological and archaeometallurgical evidence, some of it very new, for the mining and processing of the ores and the extraction of the metal. The book is written with the visitor to the region very much in mind, taking the reader closer to the landscapes where these practices took place to make sense of ‘silent landscapes’ where so much happened at one time but where nature has now taken over the remains of buildings, installations and heaps of waste rendering them ‘mute’ and meaningless for all but the expert historian of technology. Written by a native of the region who has himself been directly involved in field and laboratory work on ancient metallurgy, this book will raise the profile of this aspect of the region’s past as well as the region’s great natural beauty.

About the Author:
N Neratzis is an archaeologist working for the Greek Archaeological Service in eastern Macedonia. He combines extensive fieldwork experience with a specialism in archaeometallurgy; his recent PhD was on metals extraction during the Byzantine period, in N. Greece.
Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 1 2016 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). vi+498 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 1 2016. ISBN JGAVOL12016. Book contents pageBuy Now

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Click 'Download (pdf)' towards the bottom of the page to open a complete PDF edition of the Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 1 2016 in
AEGIS Essays in Mediterranean Archaeology: Presented to Matti Egon by the scholars of the Greek Archaeological Committee UK edited by Zetta Theodoropoulou Polychroniadis and Doniert Evely. vi+242 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 196 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912000. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912017. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The honorand of this volume, Matti Egon, has been a great benefactor to museums, schools, universities and hospitals in the UK and also in Greece: all areas that her background and life’s interests have made dear to her. One of these is the Greek Archaeological Committee UK, that she helped found in 1992: an organization dedicated to informing academe and the public in Britain of archaeological work carried out in Greece, and of enabling the ‘brightest minds’ of Greece and Cyprus to pursue post-graduate research at British institutions, to the mutual enrichment of both. Some fifty-five graduates have so benefited.

This volume offers essays by a good half of those so assisted: roughly split between the sexes, they range between post-graduates still completing their studies in the UK, up to those with doctorates, almost half the group, now successfully in employment at Universities and similar Institutions in the UK, Greece, Cyprus and the USA, with rather fewer working in Museums, within the Greek Ephorates and even at a Foreign School in Athens.

The hugely varied topics they offer cover the entire range of prehistory and history down to the modern day on Greek and Cypriot soil. Neolithic animal butchery rubs shoulders with regional assessments of the end of the Mycenaean era, investigations into Hellenistic sculptors and lamps, life in Byzantine monasteries and the politics behind modern exhibitions; the Phoenicians and even an Islamic general make cameo appearances. This startling range of subjects accurately reflects the depth of scholarship Matti Egon has nurtured into being; the affection and gratitude expressed by the graduates equally mirrors the deep appreciation they acknowledge for the opportunities so given.