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NEW: Agia Varvara-Almyras: An Iron Age Copper Smelting Site in Cyprus edited by Christina Peege in collaboration with Philippe Della Casa and Walter Fasnacht. xii+294 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (100 colour plates). 415 2018. ISBN 9781784918156. £48.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Iron Age copper smelting site situated near the Cypriot village Agia Varvara is of particular importance among the ancient copper processing places in the Near East because it has revealed spatial as well as technological aspects of copper production in a hitherto rarely-seen depth of detail. Agia Varvara-Almyras: an Iron Age Copper Smelting Site in Cyprus presents the results of a comprehensive post-excavation analysis of the stratigraphy (part I), also of the geology, metallurgical materials (furnaces, tuyeres), finds (pottery, furnace lining, stone tools), as well as a synthesis of the copper smelting technology at Agia Varvara-Almyras (part II).

The excavation analysis not only focuses on pyrotechnical information from individual furnaces, but also provides a detailed study of the spatial organisation as well as of the living conditions on the smelting site. An elaborate reconstruction of the features in a 3D model allows the visualisation of formerly-dispersed loci of copper production. Based on this virtual rebuilding of the hillock named Almyras, it becomes clear that archaeometallurgy must be unchained, and the idea of an ‘operational chain’ must be replaced by a more multidimensional research strategy labelled as an ‘operational web’. The present volume aims to stimulate future excavations which pay attention to the reasons behind the exploitation of the riches of the island, as well as to the needs of the markets where the final product was very likely to have been appreciated as a strategic commodity, by power players operating on the island as well as by ordinary people in need of a repair to an everyday commodity which had broken.

About the Editors
CHRISTINA PEEGE graduated at the Department of Classical Archaeology at the University of Zurich. She started her academic career as a research assistant at the Chair of Ancient History in Zurich, and as a scientific collaborator at the Mint Cabinet in the City of Winterthur. After having participated in archaeological excavations conducted by cantonal archaeology services in Switzerland, she started as a trench supervisor under the auspices of Walter Fasnacht at the excavation of Agia Varvara-Almyras. She completed her doctoral studies with this comprehensive publication of the excavation results at the University of Zurich in January 2017.

PHILIPPE DELLA CASA graduated in Roman Provincial Archaeology before taking his PhD with a thesis on the Bronze Age necropolis of Velika Gruda, Montenegro in 1994. He then engaged in a series of large Adriatic and Alpine projects on settlement survey and excavation, landscape history, as well as social and economic archaeology including mining archaeology. Since 2002, he has held the Chair of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Zurich as a full professor.

WALTER FASNACHT graduated in primary and secondary teaching before the award of his master’s degree in Prehistoric Archaeology and Geology at the University of Zurich. He is the director of the Almyras Excavation Cyprus. He has been lecturer in archaeometallurgy at the Universities of Fribourg and Zurich, curator of archaeology at the Swiss National Museum, researcher at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research as well as a member of the Swiss School of Archaeology in Eretria, Greece. He founded the Swiss Association of Experimental Archaeology and is an active teacher and educator.
NEW: The Gwithian Landscape: Molluscs and Archaeology on Cornish Sand Dunes by Thomas M. Walker with contributions from Rowena Y. Banerjea and C. Rob Batchelor. xiv+194 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (125 colour plates). 406 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918033. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918040. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Gwithian, on the north coast of Cornwall, is a multiperiod archaeological site. Excavations by Charles Thomas in the mid-twentieth century provided evidence of human activity from the Mesolithic to the post-medieval period. The present work explores the palaeoenvironment of the area around the settlement sites, from the Neolithic, when sand dunes initially developed in the Red River valley, to the present post-industrial landscape. Multiproxy analyses on sediments from coring, a test pit and mollusc columns provide a view of the changing landscape and how it may have influenced, or been influenced by, human presence and settlement. Mollusc studies are used as the principal analytical method. Multiple radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminesce dates permit these changes to be studied on a tighter time frame than was previously possible. Mining activity from the Bronze Age to the present is explored using fine-resolution geochemistry. Dating allows the timing of the extinction and introduction of some mollusc species to be refined.

About the Author
THOMAS WALKER is Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology, University of Reading. After a career in medicine he entered the world of archaeology in retirement, initially studying for a BSc at Reading and then progressing to a PhD. This monograph is based on his PhD thesis, which explored the palaeoenvironment of blown sands in Cornwall, principally at Gwithian. Table of Contents
NEW: Considering Creativity: Creativity, Knowledge and Practice in Bronze Age Europe edited by Joanna Sofaer. x+164 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (33 colour plates). 387 2017. ISBN 9781784917548. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Creativity is embedded in human history. Indeed, it is impossible to understand material change and the development of the new without invoking creativity. The location, exploration and analysis of creativity should therefore be of particular concern to archaeologists. This volume engages with this challenge by focusing on the outcomes of creativity – material culture – and an exploration of creative practice. The European Bronze Age provides a useful focus for discussions of the outcomes of creativity because in this period we see the development of new and pre-existing materials that we take for granted today, in particular textiles and bronze. We also see new ways of working with existing materials, such as clay, to create novel forms. In both new and existing materials it is frequently possible to see the growth of technical skill, to produce complex forms and elaborate decorated surfaces.

The papers in this volume view Bronze Age objects through the lens of creativity in order to offer fresh insights into the interaction between people and the world, as well as the individual and cultural processes that lie behind creative expression. Many have their origin in the international conference Creativity: An Exploration Through the Bronze Age and Contemporary Responses to the Bronze Age held at Magdalene College, University of Cambridge in 2103 as part of the HERA-funded project Creativity and Craft Production in Middle and Late Bronze Age Europe. Contributions span the early to late Bronze Age, deal with a range of materials including textiles, metal, and ceramics, and reflect on data from across the continent including Iberia, Scandinavia, Central and Eastern Europe. This breadth illustrates the wideranging importance and applicability of creativity as an heuristic concept. The volume further develops a range of theoretical and methodological directions, opening up new avenues for the study of creativity in the past.
FORTHCOMING: Special Place, Interesting Times: The island of Palagruža and transitional periods in Adriatic prehistory by Stašo Forenbaher with contributions by Zlatko Perhoč and Robert H. Tykot. x+194 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (60 colour plates). 421 2018. ISBN 9781784918491. Book contents pageBuy Now

While one might say that the prehistory of the Adriatic was always in transition, the rhythm of change was not always the same. On several occasions, a series of changes over a relatively short time period resulted in dramatic transformations. Three crucial episodes of change marked the later Adriatic prehistory. The first one, which took place around year 6000 BC, was a transformation of subsistence strategy, transition from hunting and gathering to farming. The second one was a social transformation that played out in the third millennium BC, when for the first time the power of individuals was clearly expressed by material culture. The third episode, inclusion into the classic Mediterranean civilization, coincided with the end of prehistory in the Adriatic region.

During all of those episodes, travel and connectivity with distant lands played an exceptionally important role, and certain places gained particular importance due to their unique geographic location. Palagruža is among the most prominent such places, its importance being out of all proportion to its physical size. Adriatic prehistory cannot be told without mentioning Palagruža, and prehistory of Palagruža cannot be understood without knowing Adriatic prehistory. Due to its strategic position in the very center of the Adriatic Sea, due to the mystery born of distance and isolation, due to its wild and spectacular landscape, Palagruža indeed is a special place. A reflection of its specialty is an unexpected abundance of high-grade archaeological evidence, dating precisely from the three aforementioned periods marked by radical change.

About the Author
STAŠO FORENBAHER is Senior Research Advisor at the Institute for Anthropological Research in Zagreb, Croatia. He studied archaeology at the University of Zagreb (Croatia), and received his PhD from the Southern Methodist University in Dallas (TX). His research interests cover Mediterranean Prehistory with a focus on the Adriatic, and include transition to farming, formation of early elites, archaeology of caves, and lithic analysis. He has excavated at many prehistoric stratified cave sites in the eastern Adriatic, including Pupićina Cave in Istria, Vaganačka Cave in Velebit Mountain, Grapčeva Cave on the island of Hvar, and Nakovana Cave on Pelješac Peninsula. His current fieldwork is focussed on the excavation of Vela Cave on the island of Korčula.
FORTHCOMING: Gifts, Goods and Money: Comparing currency and circulation systems in past societies edited by Dirk Brandherm, Elon Heymans and Daniela Hofmann. vi+228 pages; 73 figures (30 colour plates). 416 2018. ISBN 9781784918354. Book contents pageBuy Now

The papers gathered in this volume explore the economic and social roles of exchange systems in past societies from a variety of different perspectives. Based on a broad range of individual case studies, the authors tackle problems surrounding the identification of (pre-monetary) currencies in the archaeological record. These concern the part played by weight measurement systems in their development, the changing role of objects as they shift between different spheres of exchange, e.g. from gifts to commodities, as well as wider issues regarding the role of exchange networks as agents of social and economic change. Among the specific questions the papers address is what happens when new objects of value are introduced into a system, or when existing objects go out of use, as well as how exchange systems react to events such as crises or the emergence of new polities and social constellations. One theme that unites most of the papers is the tension between what is introduced from the outside and changes that are driven by social transformations within a given group.

About the Editors
DIRK BRANDHERM studied Archaeology, Classics and Social Anthropology at the universities of Münster, Edinburgh and Freiburg. Most of his work has been in European Bronze and Iron Age archaeology, with one focus on metalwork production and depositional practices. He currently holds a position of Lecturer at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

ELON HEYMANS studied archaeology at the University of Amsterdam and at Tel Aviv University. He completed his PhD in Tel Aviv on the early history of money in the eastern Mediterranean Iron Age, and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Utrecht University. His focus lies on the archaeology of Greece and the southern Levant, and he is particularly interested in the social, political and historical context of early money use.

DANIELA HOFMANN has obtained her PhD from Cardiff University and is currently Junior Professor at Hamburg University, Germany. She has published extensively on funerary archaeology, as well as the figurines and domestic architecture of the central European Neolithic, but she is also interested in instances of structured deposition and in spheres of exchange.
FORTHCOMING: Settlement and Land Use on the Periphery: The Bouros-Kastri Peninsula, Southern Euboia by Jere M. Wickens, Susan I. Rotroff, Tracey Cullen, Lauren E. Talalay, Catherine Perlès, and Floyd W. McCoy. 274pp; illustrated throughout in black & white. 410 2018. ISBN 9781784918194. Buy Now

The Bouros-Kastri peninsula at the south-eastern tip of the Greek island of Euboia has previously been overlooked in the archaeological literature. This survey by the Southern Euboea Exploration Project, conducted under the aegis of the Canadian Institute in Greece, now provides a wealth of intriguing information about fluctuations in long-term use and habitation in this part of the Karystia. While the peninsula is agriculturally poor, its coast is blessed with several small coastal inlets and one important ancient port, Geraistos. These provide access to vital maritime routes and connect the peninsula to Athens and other Aegean ports. The survey revealed modest use of the peninsula during the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age; it was then virtually abandoned for the following two and a half millennia. Occupation resumed in the Late Archaic–Early Classical period, followed by near desertion in the 3rd century BC of all but some coastal sites, a resurgence of activity in the Late Roman period, and modest use in Byzantine and Ottoman times. The authors analyse the ways in which the peninsula's use was connected to that of the main urban centre at Karystos, and how the peninsula and the greater Karystia were integrated into the political, economic, and cultural spheres of Athens and the broader region.

About the Authors
JERE M. WICKENS, a co-director of the Southern Euboea Exploration Project, is interested in the use of rural areas and the use of caves. Outside of the Karystia, he has conducted fieldwork in Albania and Attica, Greece, where he is conducting a diachronic study of the use of caves and rock shelters.

SUSAN I. ROTROFF has published several volumes on the Hellenistic pottery of the Athenian Agora and of Sardis, in Turkey, and is particularly interested in the use of pottery to reconstruct the activities of people of the past. She is a MacArthur Fellow and winner of the Gold Medal of the Archaeological Institute of America.

TRACEY CULLEN is an Aegean prehistorian who has participated in fieldwork in Greece and Cyprus, focusing on the study of early ceramics and funerary customs. She served as Associate Editor of the American Journal of Archaeology and later as Editor of Hesperia, and currently lives in northern Minnesota (USA).

LAUREN E. TALALAY is an Aegean prehistorian who focuses on the Neolithic period of Greece and the Mediterranean. Her research explores the use of the human body as a symbol, figurines, and gender. She also publishes on contemporary issues, particularly on the employment of archaeological and mythical images in modern advertising and political cartoons. The former Associate Director and Curator at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, University of Michigan, she is currently Curator Emerita and Research Associate at the Kelsey Museum.

CATHERINE PERLÈS is a specialist of Greek Prehistoric stone tools and of the Greek Neolithic. She has worked extensively on trade networks and holds an Honorary degree from Indiana University.

FLOYD W. MCCOY is a geoarchaeologist/geologist with research emphasis on the interaction of volcanism and climate change with ancient and modern cultures both in Hawaii and Greece. He is professor in geology, geophysics, and oceanography at the University of Hawaii.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction; Previous Research by SEEP in the Karystia; Archaeological Work on the Bouros-Kastri Peninsula; Goals and Scope of the Bouros-Kastri Survey; Chapter 2: Topography, Geology, and Tectonics; Topography; Geology and Tectonics of Southern Euboia; Geomorphology; Tectonics, Sea-Level Changes, and Palaeoclimates; Paleozoic–Mesozoic Bedrock; Cenozoic Rocks and Sediments; Soils; Natural Resources; Natural Hazards; Chapter 3: Chronological Overview of the Karystia; Prehistory; Late Neolithic; Final Neolithic; Early Bronze Age; Middle Bronze Age; Late Bronze Age; Historical Periods; Early
FORTHCOMING: Life on the Edge: The Neolithic and Bronze Age of Iain Crawford’s Udal, North Uist. Hardback; xxxii+270 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 408 2018. ISBN 9781784917708. Book contents pageBuy Now

The discovery of archaeological structures in North Uist in 1974 after storm damage led to the identification by Iain Crawford of a kerb cairn complex, with a cist and human remains. Six years later he went back, and over the next three years excavated another cist with human remains in its kerbed cairn, many bowl pits dug into the blown sand, and down to two late Neolithic structures and a ritual complex. He intensively studied the environmental conditions affecting the site and was among the first archaeologists in Scotland to understand the climate changes taking place at the transition between late Neolithic and the early Bronze Age. The deposition of blown sand and the start of the machair in the Western Isles, including the rise in sea-level and inundations into inhabited and farmed landscapes, are all part of the complex story of natural events and human activities.

Radiocarbon dating and modern scientific analyses provide the detail of the story of periods of starvation suffered by the people that were buried on the site, of the movement away of the community, of their attempts of bringing the ‘new’ land back into cultivation, of a temporary tent-like structure, and of marking their territory by the construction of enduring monuments to the dead.

About the Editor
BEVERLEY BALLIN SMITH took up the mantle left by Iain Crawford and has brought this first monograph on his Udal project area to publication. She has extensive experience of working on, and publishing, other large multi-period sites. She is an archaeologist who lived and worked on Orkney for many years and has first-hand experience of the archaeology of Shetland, the UK, Faroes, Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and is now based in Scotland. Beverley is the Publications Manager at GUARD Archaeology Ltd and editor of ARO (Archaeology Reports Online), with the aim of disseminating information to relevant audiences. She undertakes specialist analysis of prehistoric pottery and coarse stone tools. She has been a member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists for nearly all her professional life; she served on the former IfA Council, was Vice Chair for Outreach, a member of the Validation Committee and was a CIfA Board director. She is a member of the Society of Antiquaries of London and also a member of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, where she has been Vice President. She is currently President of Archaeology Scotland and a Research Associate at National Museums Scotland.
FORTHCOMING: The Luwians of Western Anatolia: Their Neighbours and Predecessors by Fred Woudhuizen. 232pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 405 2018. ISBN 9781784918279. Buy Now

In scholarly literature, there is much attention given to the Hittites and the Mycenaean Greeks, but the Luwians of Western Anatolia are notoriously neglected. Therefore, a study focussing on the latter is desirable. In this book, the presently available information on the western Luwians is assembled. This entails, primarily, the epigraphic evidence in the form of Luwian hieroglyphic inscriptions from the region and the historical information which can be deduced from it, as well as historical Hittite sources. As a prerequisite for the reconstruction of the history of the western Luwians during the Middle and Late Bronze Ages, the thorny question of the geography of their habitat needs to be tackled. This can now be done in an adequate manner owing to the most recent discoveries. Apart from Luwian hieroglyphic, the Luwians of Western Anatolia also used cuneiform script. Based on the linguistic data from both categories of evidence, a sketch of their language is presented. It must be realized, though, that not all inhabitants of Western Anatolia were speakers of the Luwian language. Thus, it will be argued that their northern neighbours in the Troad spoke a different language, of Thraco-Phrygian type. Finally, the Luwians were not autochthonous in the region, but preceded by speakers of a different Indo-European tongue, most adequately defined as Old Indo-European in Hans Krahe’s terms.

About the Author
FRED WOUDHUIZEN, born in 1959, graduated in Mediterranean Pre- and Protohistory at the University of Amsterdam (1985). He earned his PhD in 2006 at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, with a dissertation on ‘The Ethnicity of the Sea Peoples’. As an expert Luwologist, he is well-known for his books and articles on the Luwian dialects of Anatolia and the wider Aegean. Among his books, mention should be made of ‘Luwian Hieroglyphic Monumental Rock and Stone Inscriptions from the Hittite Empire Period’ (2004) and ‘Selected Luwian Hieroglyphic Texts: The Extended Version’ (2011).

Table of Contents
Preface; 1. The Homeland of the Luwians; 2. Geography of Western Anatolia; 3. Origin of the Luwian Hieroglyphic Script; 4. Luwian Hieroglyphic Evidence on the Great Kingdom of Assuwa; 5. Western Anatolia under Hittite Rule; 6. Western Anatolia in the Final Stage of the Bronze Age; 7. Amenhotep III: Historical Background to his Aegean Policy; 8. The Arzawan Language; 9. The Language of the Trojans; 10. Evidence for an Old Indo-European Substrate in Western Anatolia; Bibliography
NEW: Sites of Prehistoric Life in Northern Ireland by Harry and June Welsh. iv+236 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (47 colour plates). 398 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917937. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917944. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Much has been written about the history of Northern Ireland, but less well-known is its wealth of prehistoric sites, from which most of our knowledge of the early inhabitants of this country has been obtained. Until recently, the greatest sources for this information were prehistoric burial sites, which have been visible in our landscape for thousands of years and have attracted the attention of inquisitive people throughout this time, often removing items, or adding others and in doing so, making it difficult for later generations to sift through the evidence. Fortunately, sketches, notes and artefacts have been gathered by Ordnance Survey surveyors, antiquarians and archaeological and historical societies and these continue to be interrogated by modern archaeologists in their search for understanding.

A further problem has been the dependence on information about prehistoric societies from their burial sites. Very few sites where these people lived and worked were visible above ground and as a consequence, little was known about them. However, during the last few decades, large-scale infrastructure projects and associated archaeological investigation has revealed a wealth of information. Much of the detail has still to be published and made available for research, but has already enriched understanding of our prehistoric past.

This monograph brings together information on all the currently known sites in Northern Ireland that are in some way associated with prehistoric life. It has been compiled from a number of sources and includes many that have only recently been discovered. A total of 1580 monuments are recorded in the inventory, ranging from burnt mounds to hillforts. In addition to providing an inventory of all known sites, along with a selection of photographs and plans, the work also includes an introduction to the prehistory of Northern Ireland, an explanation of terms and a full bibliography. It should be considered alongside an earlier work by the same authors on prehistoric burial sites in Northern Ireland (The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland, Archaeopress Archaeology 2014). The aim is to provide a foundation for more specific research projects, based on a standardised format for this largely untapped resource and stimulate a renewed interest in the prehistory of Northern Ireland. Hopefully, this can then be considered along with our knowledge of the historical period to provide a more complete overview of the story of human activity in what is now Northern Ireland.

About the Authors: Harry Welsh is an archaeologist and historian and currently works at the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork at Queen’s University, Belfast. He has participated in and directed many archaeological excavations from Mesolithic to early modern periods and has published many books, articles and reports on archaeological sites and associated matters, as well as documenting and publishing on the history of the fire service in Northern Ireland. He has also managed the fieldwork activities of the Ulster Archaeological Society for many years and is an enthusiastic supporter of community archaeology projects.

June Welsh is a retired primary school teacher and has been a member of the Ulster Archaeological Society for many years. She has participated in a wide range of archaeological excavations and surveys, publishing many archaeological survey reports on the society website. She also took part in a research project funded by the Royal Irish Academy into prehistoric burials in Ireland. It was this project that led to her collaboration in the 2014 publication The Prehistoric Burial Sites of Northern Ireland, also published by Archaeopress, and this stimulated her interest in the life of prehistoric people.
Durovigutum: Roman Godmanchester by H. J. M. Green. Compiled, collated and edited by Tim Malim. xxiv+460 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (67 colour plates). 389 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 33. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917500. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917517. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication presents the results of over 30 years of investigation into Roman Godmanchester, (Cambridgeshire), by Michael Green. The book accurately locates the 25 “sites” investigated, and pinpoints the trenches against the modern street layout. Although some sites covered large areas, many often had to be conducted as small trenches undertaken by volunteers. The origins for Durovigutum include evidence for Iron Age settlement which preceded two Roman forts during the 1st century AD. After its initial military establishment the book goes on to reveal the development of the Roman civic community and its cemeteries along Ermine Street adjacent to its crossing of the Great Ouse.

The town was surrounded by defences in the 2nd century and a wall in the 3rd century, its public buildings included a mansio, bath-house and brewery, aisled barns, basilica and several temples, and the socio-economic foundation of the community is explored with specific examples from excavated evidence including different types of domestic housing and workshops. A tavern, glassware-shop, dairy equipment, pottery manufacture and a smithy are detailed in this book, as well as analysis of land organization, infield and outfield agriculture, and a villa estate at Rectory farm. Specialist analyses include samian and coarse wares, vessel and window glass, coins, animal bone, dairy production, belief systems and burial practices, as well as the exceptional finds of a hoard of jewellery from one of the mansio pits, and a burial casket of wood and bronze.

Although partial or full reports of various excavations have been published in journals and monographs previously, this is the first time Green’s full body of work on Godmanchester has been collated and presented in one comprehensive volume. The book has not tried to include more recent investigations, and most illustrations are by Michael Green, drawn contemporary with his excavations.

About the Author
Michael Green was born in St Ives, Huntingdonshire, in 1931. His father was a dentist, a WW1 flying ace and a Colonel in the Northamptonshire Regiment, who died in action with the BEF at Ypres in 1940. Michael was brought up by his mother, going to King’s College Choir School, Felsted, before training as an architect and starting his excavations in Godmanchester in 1951. He joined the Ministry of Works in the early 1950s and was made a Senior Investigator of Historic Buildings at the Department of the Environment, before later becoming an Inspector of Ancient Monuments and Historic Buildings. He undertook rescue excavations at Whitehall Palace between 1960-62 for the Ministry of Works and London Museum, and helped in the redesign of the Jewel Tower on College Green opposite the Houses of Parliament. In 1990 he was a founding member and President of the Centre for Crop Circle Studies which sought a more systematic approach to understanding these phenomena, and he published many articles in the cerealogist. He was a frequent contributor to various magazines and journals, including the Illustrated London News, The Archaeological News Letter, and the Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, a society of which he was elected President for two successive terms 1980-85. He is a Chartered Member of the Royal Institute of British Architects and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. In 2008 he published a definitive history of Clapham, where he has lived for some 30 years.

About the Editor
Tim Malim graduated from the Institute of Archaeology, London in 1980 and is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists, as well as Chair of the Federation of Archaeological Managers and Employers. He has conducted research in Chile, Peru, Sri Lanka and continental Europe, as well as the UK where his present role is Technical Director at SLR Consulting in Shrewsbury. In the 1980s and 1990s Tim w
The Classification of Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Copper and Bronze Axe-heads from Southern Britain by Stuart Needham. 74 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 plates in colour. 43 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917401. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917418. Download

This work presents a comprehensive classification of the morphology of early metal age axe-heads, chisels and stakes from southern Britain. It is illustrated by a type series of 120 representative examples.

Despite their relative simplicity, flat and early flanged axes from Britain and Ireland show considerable diversity in form. The main variation lies in outline shapes and the classification scheme arrived at therefore depends on careful evaluation of condition, followed by rigorous analysis of shape using metrical ratios. This ensures objectivity in both the formulation of the scheme and future object attributions, for which guidelines are given. Comparative material in northern Britain and Ireland is systematically referred to and a few crucial Continental parallels noted. Hoards and other associated finds, essential in underpinning the chronology, are cited throughout.

The style sequence outlined spans nine centuries of evolution, a regional trajectory which was nevertheless inextricably tied to axe developments in northern Britain, Ireland and, to a lesser extent, the near Continent. While technological advance is apparent at the broad scale, this was not the sole driver of the style changes taking place.

The study will be indispensable for those researching early metalwork, those concerned with European Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age cultures and those interested in patterns of style-cum-technological development.

About the Author
Stuart Needham specialised in metalwork in his early career and has since diversified to cover many aspects of the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age of north-west Europe, involving themes such as deposition practices, metal circulation systems, periodisation, life- and refuse-cycles of material culture, exchange systems, maritime interactions and alluvial archaeology. Further publications have emanated from excavations at Runnymede Bridge and Ringlemere. A curator at the British Museum for thirty years before becoming an independent researcher, he co-founded the Bronze Age Forum in 1999 and delivered the Rhind lectures for the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland in 2011. He is currently Research Director of the People of the Heath project investigating Early Bronze Age barrows in the Rother Valley of East Hampshire and West Sussex.

20% OFF: Parian Polyandreia: The Late Geometric Funerary Legacy of Cremated Soldiers’ Bones on Socio-Political Affairs and Military Organizational Preparedness in Ancient Greece by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. xii+400 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (58 colour plates). 375 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917197. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917203. Institutional Price £45.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Spotlight promotion: 20% off select 'death and burial' titles. RRP: £45. Offer Price: £36. Offer ends 31/03/2018. The anthropological study of two late 8th century BC monumental graves, designated as T144 and T105, at the ancient necropolis of Paroikia at Paros, initially intended to investigate inter-island features of the human condition, observable as ingrained traces in the human skeletal record, as it may have related to the Parian endeavors in the northern Aegean for the colonization of Thasos.

Through the ‘Paros Polyandreia Anthropological Project,’ it was possible to retrieve insights into aspects of the human environments and experiences that had transpired in a Parian context, elucidated by a considerable population sample of cremated male individuals, transcending to broader features that would have involved Thasos; discerning further facets of the human condition during the Late Geometric to the Early Archaic periods in the ancient Hellenic world.

This book integrates the basic anthropological data, evaluations and assessments derived from the study of the human skeletal record of Polyandreia T144, and T105. Bioarchaeological and forensic anthropological research results include the morphometric analyses of biological developmental growth and variability in relation to manifestations of acquired skeleto-anatomic changes, along with inquiries into the demographic dynamics, and the palaeopathologic profile of the individuals involved. Such intra-site data juxtaposed afforded the possibility to deliberate on issues of the preparedness, intended purpose, function, and symbolic meaning of the funerary activity areas and to reflect on the organizational abilities and capacities of the political and military affairs of the Parians.

Moreover, inter-site evaluations where relative with the burial grounds of Orthi Petra of Eleutherna-Crete, Plithos of Naxos, Athenian Demosion Sema, Pythagoreion of Samos, and Rhodes offer comparisons on taphonomy, on cremated materials’ metric analyses, and on aspects of the funerary customs and practices in the interring of cremated war dead.
Hillforts and the Durotriges A geophysical survey of Iron Age Dorset by Dave Stewart and Miles Russell. viii+176 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (115 colour plates). 372 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917159. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917166. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Hillforts are among the most dramatic and visually striking of prehistoric monuments in the British Isles. Dorset, in southern England, is particularly rich in these Iron Age earthwork enclosures, with over 30 examples being so far recorded, including the internationally famous sites of Maiden Castle, Hod Hill, Badbury Rings and Hambledon Hill. Many have been the subject of archaeological investigation, such as the excavations conducted at Maiden Castle in the 1930s by Tessa and Mortimer Wheeler, but few have, to date, been intensively examined.

This volume sets out the results of a detailed programme of non-intrusive geophysical survey conducted across the Dorset hillforts, generating detailed subsurface maps of archaeological features, in the hope of better resolving the phasing, form and internal structure of these iconic sites. The dataset presented here not only helps to change our perception of what hillforts were, how they functioned and what went on within them, but also provides a way of assessing their longevity, reconsidering how they were perceived and reused in subsequent periods. Given the oft-cited association between the Dorset enclosures and the Durotriges tribe, who are thought to have occupied the area in the Later Iron Age, serious consideration is also for the first time given to the belief that hillforts formed the focus of conflict between the native tribes and the armies of imperial Rome in the first century AD.
Remembered Places, Forgotten Pasts The Don Drainage Basin in Prehistory by Tim Cockrell. xii+222 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (10 colour plates). 366 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917012. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917029. Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

South Yorkshire and the North Midlands have long been ignored or marginalized in narratives of British Prehistory. In Remembered Places, Forgotten Pasts, largely unpublished data is used for the first time in a work of synthesis to reconstruct the prehistory of the earliest communities across the River Don drainage basin. The author uses a relational approach to account for the complex and sophisticated interaction between people and materiality. Monuments and material culture are considered together, in relation to the diverse landscapes across which they were deposited in the distant past. The memory of significant places along lines of movement are central to the approach taken, combined with the changing character of the land which supported people. Virtually absent in recent narratives, the forgotten prehistoric pasts of the region are now able to be approached on a systematic basis. The author concludes that a region that was the centre of dynamic interaction between mobile groups in its earliest phase gave way to a pastoral lifestyle facilitated by extensive wetlands. These wetlands were connected by waterways and gorges. Thus connected, the wetlands were located to either side of its drier, centrally defining feature, the Magnesian Limestone ridge.
Bridging Times and Spaces: Papers in Ancient Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian Studies Honouring Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday edited by Pavel S. Avetisyan and Yervand H. Grekyan. xx+404 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 371 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916992. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917005. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Bridging Times and Spaces is composed of papers written by colleagues of Professor Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion his 65th birthday reflecting the breadth and diversity of his scholarly contributions. The range of presented papers covers topics in Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian archaeology, theory of interpretation in archaeology and art history, interdisciplinary history, historical linguistics, art history, and comparative mythology. The volume opens with an extensive interview given by Gregory Areshian, in which Gregory outlines the pathways of his academic career, archaeological discoveries, different intellectual quests, and the organic connections between research questions that he explored across different social sciences and the humanities, stressing the importance of periodizations in interdisciplinary history as well as his views on holism and interdisciplinary studies.

About the Editors Pavel Avetisyan is a former student of Gregory Areshian during his study at the Yerevan State University in 1975-1980; he now leads together with Gregory and Kristine Martirosyan-Olshansky the joint Armenian-American archaeological team at the excavations of the Neolithic settlement at Masis Blur, Armenia. Pavel received his PhD in 2003 (Chronology and Periodization of the Middle Bronze Age of Armenia) and D.Sc. in 2014 (Armenian Highland during the 24-9th centuries BC. The Dynamics of Socio-Cultural Transformations, according to Archaeological Data). His areas of research are Old World archaeology and the Neolithic and Iron Age cultures of Transcaucasia, devoting his studies also to the periodizations and chronology of the Bronze and Iron Ages of Transcaucasia. Professor Avetisyan is the Director of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Professor at the Yerevan State University.

Yervand Grekyan is a leading researcher at the Institute of Oriental Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Associate Professor at the Armenian State Pedagogical University. He received his PhD in 2002 (History of the Mannean Kingdom) and defended his habilitation thesis on the structure of the Urartian Kingdom at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia in 2016 (Biainili-Urartu. State and Society). Dr Grekyan’s interests are ancient history and culture of the Near East and especially of the Armenian Highland in the Late Bronze and Iron Ages.
The Mycenaean Cemetery at Agios Vasileios, Chalandritsa, in Achaea by Konstantina Aktypi with contributions by Olivia A. Jones and Vivian Staikou. xii+296 pages; 287 figures, 8 tables, 3 maps (163 plates in colour). 367 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916978. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916985. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Mycenaean chamber-tomb cemetery at Agios Vasileios, near Chalandritsa in Achaea, was first investigated by Nikolaos Kyparissis in the late 1920s, followed by small-scale research in 1961 by Efthimios Mastrokostas. In the years 1989–2001 more rescue excavations were conducted by the Greek Archaeological Service, revealing 30 chamber tombs, some looted. Based mostly on the latest research, this study is the first major presentation of the cemetery and its finds. The topographical data are presented in chapter A, including the most important ancient sites in the region. Chapters B to E deal with the 45 chamber tombs and with the assemblage of the 260 artefacts found in them. The chipped stone assemblage and the ground stone implements are presented in chapter F by Vivian Staikou. Chapter G, by Olivia A. Jones, deals with the human skeletal remains, focussing on burial customs and practices. Chapters H and I handle the discussion and the concluding remarks, respectively. A series of 3D representations and photorealistic illustrations are presented, based on the original plans and architectural drawings of the tombs, to produce a visual appreciation of the important cemetery, unfortunately no longer visible.

About the Author
Konstantina Aktypi obtained her BA in Archaeology at the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and Certificates in Heritage Management, Administration, and Developing Communication Skills and Responses to Crisis. She has participated in projects of intensive archaeological survey and systematic excavations in Achaea and Aitoloakarnania. Since 1995, she has been working as an archaeologist in the Ephorate of Antiquities of Achaea, conducting rescue excavations in the region dating from the Early Bronze Age to the Roman period. From 2002 to 2011 she worked at the excavations of the Mycenaean settlement and chamber tomb cemetery at Voudeni, also holding a supervisorial position for the major restoration works there. Her current research interests include the study of the chamber tombs at Voudeni, an Early Bronze Age settlement near Patras and the two best preserved tholos tombs in Achaea, in the prehistoric cemetery at Rhodia. She is also working on educational programs, introducing students to the art of Archaeology.

Olivia A. Jones obtained a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and History at West Virginia University and a Masters in Aegean Archaeology at University College London. She has worked in academic and contract archaeology projects in the United States and Greece. She is currently completing her doctoral research at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. Her research interests include applying a bioarchaeological approach to Mycenaean mortuary practices.

Vivian Staikou is an archaeologist of the Ephorate of Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. She studied Archaeology and Fine Arts in the National Kapodistrian University of Athens and received an MA in Prehistoric Archaeology from the University of Crete. Over the years she has carried out archaeological fieldwork in Attica, Achaea, Aitoloakarnania and Lefkada. Her current research interests include lithic technologies, the Palaeolithic of Western Greece and the archaeology of the island of Lefkas. She also has a particular interest in developing educational programs for children.
Bodies of Maize, Eaters of Grain Comparing material worlds, metaphor and the agency of art in the Preclassic Maya and Mycenaean early civilisations by Marcus Jan Bajema. vi+352 pages; illustrated throughout in black &white with 22 colour plates. 364 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916916. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916923. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book provides a comparative study of the earliest urban civilisations of the Maya lowlands and the Greek mainland. The focus lies on the art styles of the Late Preclassic lowland Maya and Mycenaean Greece. Building on research from previous comparative studies, the approach used here seeks to combine more traditional iconographic approaches with more recent models on metaphor and the social agency of things. By comparing Maya and Mycenaean art styles through the three aspects of metaphor, semiotics and praxis, their differences and similarities are made clear. The book shows art to have played a more active role in the development of the earliest urban civilisations, rather than passively reflecting economic and political trends. In that way, the social role of art provides a key to understanding the relations between the different factors in the development of the two societies, as they played out at different temporal and geographical scales. To understand this, the notion of distinct Maya and Mycenaean ‘material worlds’, involving both materials and ideas, is proposed, with consequences for models about the earliest urban civilisations in general.
Interpreting the Seventh Century BC Tradition and Innovation edited by Xenia Charalambidou and Catherine Morgan. viii+460pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 326 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915728. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915735. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book has its origin in a conference held at the British School at Athens in 2011 which aimed to explore the range of new archaeological information now available for the seventh century in Greek lands. It presents material data, combining accounts of recent discoveries (which often enable reinterpretation of older finds), regional reviews, and archaeologically focused critique of historical and art historical approaches and interpretations. The aim is to make readily accessible the material record as currently understood and to consider how it may contribute to broader critiques and new directions in research. The geographical focus is the old Greek world encompassing Macedonia and Ionia, and extending across to Sicily and southern Italy, considering also the wider trade circuits linking regional markets. The book does not aim for the pan- Mediterranean coverage of recent works: given that much of the latest innovative and critical scholarship has focused on the western Mediterranean in particular, it is necessary to bring old Greece back under the spotlight and to expose to critical scrutiny the often Athenocentric interpretative frameworks which continue to inform discussion of other parts of the Mediterranean.
Minoan Extractions: A Photographic Journey 2009-2016 Sissi Archaeological Project by Gavin McGuire. Viii+168 pages; illustrated throughout with 137 black and white photographs. Text in English and Greek. 347 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916367. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916374. Institutional Price £25.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeologist and award-winning photographer Gavin McGuire’s involvement with the Sissi Archaeological Project, where he conducted a seven year photographic study of the Bronze Age Minoan excavations under the auspices of the Belgian School in Athens, Université Catholique de Louvain, offered an extraordinary opportunity to capture moments of human interaction during excavations as they interconnected with an ancient Minoan culture, stretching back millennia (2600-1200 BC).

With the Sissi Photography Project, at a unique coastal landscape four kilometres from Malia Palace in Crete, McGuire follows a proud photographic tradition that is now facing yet another major technological change – from digital to virtual, from handheld cameras to drones and to live excavation access. It is also the age of the smartphone – easy for anyone to use, producing high quality images that regularly engages a global general audience.

McGuire’s approach revolves around being at the right place and at the right fleeting moment, making images that highlight motion and emotion from the more than 80 ‘players’ on the archaeological stage for the excavation season during each July-August. There are images of scientists at work – archaeologists, anthropologists, technical specialists, local workmen digging (many proudly following in the wake of their forefathers) and restorers and conservators dealing with the thousands of finds housed at the apothiki or workshop.

Yet the Sissi Project encompasses not only the dig period but includes images of the site throughout the year, showing, in part, the impact of the environment.

137 black and white photographs are accompanied by a series of short essays presented in English and Greek providing an overview of the project’s photographic approach and an introduction to the long and complex relationship between archaeology and photography from their 19th century beginnings. The outcome shows that archaeological sites are not just created overnight but are the result of years of discovery, restoration and preservation. They are not just for now, but hopefully for the future. The ancient past deserves nothing less.

About the author
Gavin McGuire is a New Zealand archaeologist and award winning photographer with the Belgian School at Athens, Université catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve, excavating at Sissi, Crete. He lives in Vrachasi, Crete, with his wife, the artist, Rosemarie McGuire. He is involved in a long-term photographic study of the site, as well as a photographic project to record images of Byzantine history and local traditions of Crete. His work reflects the influences of photographers such as: Fox Talbot, Roger Frith, Flinders Petrie, John Beasly Greene, Roger Fenton, Gertrude Bell, Alison Frantz, Eugene Atget, Henri Cartier Bresson, Ansel Adams and especially Harry Burton. Gavin McGuire is a member of the Royal Photographic Society. (www.pastvirtuality.com)

Read Gavin’s article on the Archaeopress Blog, reflecting on his time spent excavating at Sissi, Crete.
Hillforts, Warfare and Society in Bronze Age Ireland by William O’Brien and James O’Driscoll. x+522 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 75 plates in colour. 353 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916558. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916565. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The later part of the Bronze Age (1500-700 BC) was a time of settlement expansion and economic prosperity in Ireland. This was a landscape of small autonomous farming communities, but there is also evidence for control of territory and population, involving centralized organization of trade and economy, ritual and military force. That concentration of power was connected to the emergence of chiefdom polities active in the consolidation of large regional territories. Their competitive tendencies led on occasion to conflict and warfare, at a time of growing militarism evident in the mass production of bronze weaponry, including the first use of swords. Hillforts are another manifestation of a warrior culture that emerged not only in Ireland but across Europe during the Middle and Late Bronze Age. They were centers for high-status residence, ceremony and assembly, and represented an important visual display of power in the landscape.

This is the first project to study hillforts in relation to warfare and conflict in Bronze Age Ireland. New evidence for the destruction of hillforts is connected to territorial disputes and other forms of competition arising from the ambitions of regional warlords, often with catastrophic consequences for individual communities. This project combines remote sensing and GIS-based landscape analysis with conventional archaeological survey and excavation, to investigate ten prehistoric hillforts across southern Ireland. There is also a detailed landscape study of nine examples in the Baltinglass area of Co. Wicklow, often termed ‘Ireland’s hillfort capital’. The results provide new insights into the design and construction of these immense sites, as well as details of their occupation and abandonment. The chronology of Irish hillforts is reviewed, with a new understanding of origins and development. The project provides a challenging insight into the relationship of hillforts to warfare, social complexity and the political climate of late prehistoric Ireland.
Knossos and the Near East A contextual approach to imports and imitations in Early Iron Age tombs by Vyron Antoniadis. xii+170 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 14 plates in colour. 351 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916404. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916411. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this book, Dr Vyron Antoniadis presents a contextual study of the Near Eastern imports which reached Crete during the Early Iron Age and were deposited in the Knossian tombs. Cyprus, Phoenicia, North Syria and Egypt are the places of origin of these imports. Knossian workshops produced close or freer imitations of these objects. The present study reveals the ways in which imported commodities were used to create or enhance social identity in the Knossian context. The author explores the reasons that made Knossians deposit imported objects in their graves as well as investigates whether specific groups could control not only the access to these objects but also the production of their imitations. Dr Antoniadis argues that the extensive use of locally produced imitations alongside authentic imports in burial rituals and contexts indicates that Knossians treated both imports and imitations as items of the same symbolic and economic value.
Catalogue of Etruscan Objects in World Museum, Liverpool by Jean MacIntosh Turfa and Georgina Muskett. xiv+254 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white with 107 plates in colour. 349 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916381. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916398. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £42.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

One of the finest collections of Etruscan artifacts outside of Italy was begun in the 19th century by Joseph Mayer, goldsmith, of Liverpool. His donation of the collection became the core of Liverpool Museum, now World Museum, and has been augmented over the years by additional gifts and other acquisitions, such as those from the Wellcome Collection and Norwich Castle Museum. Much of the original material came from the necropolis of Vulci (Canino) when it was excavated by Lucien Bonaparte, Prince of Canino, while additional objects represent several other cities and sites. Already famous for its gold jewelry and bronze vessels of the 6th to the 4th centuries BCE, the Liverpool collection includes a fine selection of Etruscan vases, especially bucchero ware and Archaic painted vases, several scarab seals in semiprecious stones, a small number of carved ivories, and funerary urns, including that of Larui Helesa, in which were found gold earrings identical to those worn by her colorful effigy on its lid. A large group of bronze fibulae (safety-pins) furnish examples of most major types of these important ornaments of the Iron Age and Archaic periods. Engraved bronze mirrors and terracotta votives in the form of heads and body parts (such as uteri) of the 4th and 3rd centuries BCE illustrate myths and offerings that were essential to Etruscan religion. From a Villanovan sword to Hellenistic epitaphs, the Liverpool Etruscan and Italic collection offers a rare glimpse of early civilization in central Italy.

About the Authors

Jean MacIntosh Turfa has participated in excavations in the US and abroad, and was consultant for the Etruscan Gallery of the University of Pennsylvania Museum, where she is currently a Consulting Scholar and adjunct lecturer. Her publications cover Etruscan architecture, shipbuilding, trade and the Etruscan-Punic alliance, votive offerings, health, and divination. Her books include A Catalogue of the Etruscan Gallery of the University of Pennsylvania Museum (2005), Divining the Etruscan World: The Brontoscopic Calendar and Religious Practice (2012), The Etruscan World (editor, 2013), Women in Antiquity (with Stephanie Budin, editor, 2016) and, with Marshall J. Becker, The Etruscans and the History of Dentistry: The Golden Smile through the Ages (2017). She is proud to be a Foreign Member of the Istituto di Studi Etruschi ed Italica.

Georgina Muskett was formerly Curator of Classical Antiquities at National Museums Liverpool, where she continues to research the classical collections. She is an Associate of the department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology at the University of Liverpool, where she taught Aegean and Classical archaeology. One of Georgina’s research interests is Roman mosaics, and she is a member of the Executive Committee of the Association for the Study and Preservation of Roman Mosaics. She is the author of a number of books and articles, including Greek Sculpture (2012).
Le guerrier, le chat, l’aigle, le poisson et la colonne: la voie spiralée des signes Approche sémiologique, structurale et archéologique du disque de Phaistos by Serge Collet. 90 pages; 15 tables, 1 colour illustration. French text with English Abstract and Foreword. 6 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916169. £14.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916176. £10.00 (Exc. VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Phaistos Disc is one of the most studied documents of the Minoan civilization, enticing scholars and simple enthusiasts with the mysterious aura that envelops it and with its singularity among Minoan scriptures. It has entered the collective imagination, both at academic and popular levels. Representations of the Disc can be found abundantly in popular culture, from appearances in Mickey Mouse comics to a prop amidst the curios on the tables of a television magician.

It is this very overexposure that risks undermining the understanding of an object that is, first and foremost, an archaeological artefact found in a chronological and cultural context. Much has been said and much and has been written about the Disc. Collet brings a new approach. It’s not a deciphering but an interpretation, a depiction of the Minoan Weltanschauung through the symbols on the Disc and their connections with reality. This begins with the spiral-shaped construction of the inscription and its possible temporal allusions, and moves on to a structuralist view of use of the signs, and in which the repetitions take on almost ritual significance. Hence it is a pictorial interpretation rather than syllabic, whereby the pictograph is not intended as a rigid reproduction of logical discourse, but rather a path.

About the Author:
Serge Collet (1950-2016) was a French scientist who became known for his interdisciplinary research on early sea-dependent societies. His main study “Uomini e Pesce, La caccia al pesce spada tra Scilla e Cariddi” as well as his publications with SAGE Publications over the years, as well as his several contributions to international conferences (inter alia funded by the EU and FAO) gave substantial examples as to what contributions maritime ethnology and archaeology can make for the preservation of cultures and the seas over the millennia.
20% OFF: Excavations at the Mycenaean Cemetery at Aigion – 1967 Rescue Excavations by the late Ephor of Antiquities, E. Mastrokostas by Thanasis I. Papadopoulos and Evangelia Papadopoulou-Chrysikopoulou. vi+124 pages; illustrated throughout with 26 plates in colour. 343 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916183. £16.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916190. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £20.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Spotlight promotion: 20% off select 'death and burial' titles. RRP: £20. Offer Price: £16. Offer ends 31/03/2018. In this monograph the authors present the finds of four Mycenaean chamber tombs, from the rescue excavation of Ephor Mastrokostas at Aigion in 1967. Unfortunately, no diary or any other information, regarding the architecture or the burial customs, was found. However, it is highly possible that they were similar to eleven tombs which were systematically excavated by Papadopoulos in 1970. In contrast with them, the four tombs produced a much greater number of finds, indicating richer burials. Furthermore, some of these finds are unique (e.g. “thronos”-straight-sided alabastron with unusual paneled decoration), rare (e.g. askoi) and exceptional (e.g. cylindrical stirrup jars) in the Achaean Mycenaean ceramic repertory, while the total absence of terracotta figurines as well as the rarity of small objects is surprising. Taken together the excavated tombs make a total of 15, but the actual number may be greater. It is noteworthy that the material is stylistically different and generally earlier from that of western Achaea. The supplementary information, provided by this publication, strengthens the evidence that this important Achaean cemetery was used for a long time (LHII-IIIC) and that the inhabitants had connections with the Argolid as well as with other areas to the east, especially with the Dodecanese.
Kratos & Krater: Reconstructing an Athenian Protohistory by Barbara Bohen. xvi+250 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with one plate in colour. 340 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916220. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916237. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £40.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Athenian governance and culture are reconstructed from the Bronze Age into the historical era based on traditions, archaeological contexts and remains, foremost the formal commensal and libation krater. Following Mycenaean immigration from the Peloponnesos during the transitional years, changes in governance are observable. Groups under aristocratic leadership, local and immigrant, aspired to coexist under a surprisingly formal set of stipulations that should be recognized as Athens’ first constitution. Synoikismos did not refer to a political union of Attica, sometimes attributed to Theseus, but to a union of aristocratic houses (oikoi). The union replaced absolute monarchy with a new oligarchical-monarchy system, each king selected from one of the favoured aristocratic houses and ruling for life without inheritance. The system prevailed through the late eleventh to the mid-eighth c. and is corroborated by Athenian traditions cross-referenced with archaeological data from the burial grounds, and a formerly discredited list of Athenian Iron Age kings. Some burial grounds have been tentatively identified as those of the Melanthids, Alcmeonids, Philaids and Medontids, who settled the outskirts of Athens along with other migrant groups following the decline of the elite in the Peloponnesos. While the Melanthids left during the 11th c. Ionian Migration other aristocratic houses remained and contributed to the evolution of the historical era polis of Athens. One noble family, the Alcmeonids preserved their cemetery into the Archaic period in a burial record of 600 years’ duration.

Incorporated into this work is a monograph on the Athenian formal krater used by these primarily Neleid aristocratic houses in assembly and ritual. Some Homeric practices parallel those found in Athens, so the Ionic poets may have documented customs that had existed on the Mainland and were transferred to Ionia during the Ionian Migration. The demise of both the constitution and the standard, ancestral krater in Athens following a mid-eighth c. watershed is testimony to an interval of political change, as noted by Ian Morris, before the systematized establishment of annual archonship in the following century. The support this research has given to the validity of the King List has resulted in a proposed new chronology, with an earlier onset for the Geometric period at 922 BC, rather than the currently accepted 900 BC. The relative chronology of Coldstream based on style is generally accepted here, but some intermediate stages are revised based on perceptible break data, such as the onset of a new kingship, a reported war, or the demise of a governance system.

About the Author:

Barbara Bohen has a 1979 PhD in Classical Art, Archaeology and Classics from New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. From 1981 to 1997 she served as director of the University of Illinois multicultural World Heritage Museum (now Spurlock). She has taught art history, museology, and archaeological methodology, given many public lectures, and published on topics ranging from Athenian burial cult, ceramic studies, and aesthetics to a multidisciplinary study of an Egyptian mummy. Awards include Fulbright, Danforth and Getty fellowships, and a three year NDEA Title IV award for classical studies at New York University Washington Square. The University of Illinois granted the Chancellor’s Academic Professional Excellence Award, as well as an Arnold Beckman award for travel and research in Greece which helped further the genesis of the current publication. Bohen has excavated Archaic Native American site Garvies Point on Long Island, Classical Greek sites on the island of Samothrace, Kalo Podi, Aphrodisias, Turkey, and from 1972 to 1981 the Kerameikos excavations of Athens, Greece. Since 2012 Bohen has held an appointment as Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics, at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, She is currently engaged in th
Physical Barriers, Cultural Connections: A Reconsideration of the Metal Flow at the Beginning of the Metal Age in the Alps by Laura Perucchetti. iv+180 pages; illustrated throughout with 35 plates in colour. 339 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916145. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916152. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Physical Barriers, Cultural Connections: A Reconsideration of the Metal Flow at the Beginning of the Metal Age in the Alps considers the early copper and copper-alloy metallurgy of the entire Circum- Alpine region. It introduces a new approach to the interpretation of chemical composition data sets, which has been applied to a comprehensive regional database for the first time. An extensive use of GIS has been applied to investigate the role of topography in the distribution of metal and to undertake spatial and geostastical analysis that may highlight patterns of distribution of some specific key compositional element.

The Circum-Alpine Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age show some distinctively different patterns of metal use, which can be interpreted through changes in mining and social choices. But there are also some signs of continuity, in particular those which respect the use of major landscape features such as watersheds and river systems. Interestingly, the Alpine range does not act as a north-south barrier, as major differences in composition tend to appear on an east-west axis. Conversely, the river system seems to have a key role in the movement of metal. Geostastical analyses demonstrate the presence of a remelting process, applicable also in the case of ingots; evidence that opens new and interesting questions about the role of ingots and hoards in the distribution of metal at the beginning of the Metal Age. New tools and new analysis may also be useful to identify zones where there was a primary metal production and zones where metal was mostly received and heavily manipulated.

About the Author: Laura Perucchetti is a researcher at the Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art at the University of Oxford. She is part of a team that is working on metal flows across Eurasia, where she is the database and GIS expert.

She completed her undergraduate studies in Archaeology at the University of Milan, and her BA thesis was on the creation of a database encompassing all archaeological finds of the Bronze Age from the Italian province of Veneto. She obtained a Master’s Degree in Earth Science at the University of Milan, based on her analysis of Copper and Early Bronze Age metal artefacts found in hoards and on sites of Northern Italy.

After working for two years in commercial archaeology she successfully completed a DPhil at the University of Oxford with a thesis in which she used a combination of GIS an chemical data on metal artefacts to understand the movement of metal across the Alps. This book is derived from that work.

In her career, Laura has won several student awards, participated in international conferences and published an article in the European Journal of Archaeology. She is actively contributing to the lab work of the RLAHA in teaching, organizing seminars and arranging lab space.
Bronze Age Monuments and Bronze Age, Iron Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon Landscapes at Cambridge Road, Bedford by Andy Chapman and Pat Chapman. x+146 pages; illustrated throughout with 55 plates in colour. 337 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916046. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916053. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Open area excavation on 14.45ha of land at Cambridge Road, Bedford was carried out in 2004-5 in advance of development. A background scatter of Early Neolithic flint, including a Langdale stone axe, may be related to the nearby presence of the Cardington causewayed enclosure.

Two Early Bronze Age ring ditches sat on a low lying gravel ridge between the River Great Ouse and the Elstow Brook. A causewayed ring ditch, 30m in diameter, had a broad entrance to the southwest, where a shallow length of ditch either silted or had been filled in. Adjacent to the shallow ditch was a pit containing three crouched burials, probably in an oak-lined chamber, radiocarbon dated to the early Middle Bronze Age. A nearby small round barrow enclosed a deep central grave containing the crouched burial of a woman, probably within an oak-lined chamber. An L-shaped ditch to the east, radiocarbon dated to the Middle to Late Bronze transition, may have been the final feature of the monument group. It parallels the addition of L-shaped ditches/pit alignments at other contemporary ring ditch monuments.

Shallow linear ditches formed a land boundary extending north and south from the Bronze Age ring ditch, and other contemporary ditches were remnants of a rectilinear field system, contemporary with a scatter of irregular pits and a waterhole. This phase came to an end at the Late Bronze Age/ Early Iron Age transition, when a large assemblage of decorated pottery was dumped in the final fills of the waterhole.

By the Middle Iron Age there was a new linear boundary, comprising three near parallel ditches, aligned north-south; a rectangular enclosure and a complex of intercut pits. The pottery assemblage was sparse, but the upper fills of both the deepest linear boundary ditch and the pit complex contained some Roman pottery. To the south-east an extensive Romano-British ladder settlement is dated to the 1st to 4th centuries AD. Only the northern fringe lay within the excavated area, comprising successive boundary ditches, along with pits, a stone-lined well, an inhumation burial and animal burials.

In the early Anglo-Saxon period (5th-6th centuries AD), there was a loose cluster of three sunken featured buildings with another to the south. In the middle Saxon period (8th-9th centuries AD) a small rectangular mausoleum contained a single inhumation burial, with a second inhumation to the immediate west. Subsequent land use comprised truncated furrows of the medieval ridge and furrow field cultivation and post-medieval quarry pits.

(Excavations were carried out primarily by Northamptonshire Archaeology, now MOLA Northampton.)
New Perspectives on the Bronze Age Proceedings of the 13th Nordic Bronze Age Symposium held in Gothenburg 9th to 13th June 2015 edited by Sophie Bergerbrant and Anna Wessman. x+450 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 61 colour plates. 334 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915988. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915995. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Nordic Bronze Age Symposium began modestly in 1977 with 13 participants, and has now expanded to over 120 participants: a tenfold increase that reflects the expanding role of Bronze Age research in Scandinavia, not least amongst younger researchers. From having taken a back seat in the 1970s, it is now in the driver’s seat in terms of expanding research themes, publications and international impact.

This collection of articles helps to explain why the Bronze Age has come to hold such a fascination within modern archaeological research. By providing new theoretical and analytical perspectives on the evidence new interpretative avenues have opened, it situates the history of the Bronze Age in both a local and a global setting.

About the Editors:
Sophie Bergerbrant completed her doctoral thesis in archaeology in 2007 at the University of Stockholm. She currently leads the research project Bronze Age wool economy: production, trade, environment, husbandry and society at the department of historical studies, University of Gothenburg.

Anna Wessman is currently a PhD candidate at the department of historical studies, University of Gothenburg. Her PhD project focuses on south Scandinavian rock art, with a special focus on regional features and styles in relation to time and change.

Catalogue of Artefacts from Malta in the British Museum by Josef Mario Briffa SJ and Claudia Sagona. viii+326 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 332 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915889. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915896. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £50.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The archaeology of the Maltese archipelago is remarkable. Lying at the heart of the central Mediterranean, ancient lives were, at times, moulded by isolation and harsh elements and the landscape is shaped by millennia of intensive land use. Ancient finds from the islands are rare, and those held in the British Museum form an important collection. Represented is a wide cultural range, spanning the Early and Late Neolithic, the Bronze Age, Roman and more recent historic periods. From the early 1880s, Malta attracted a fascinating array of historians, collectors and travellers and, on one level, the British Museum’s holdings represent their activities, but on another, the collections reflect the complex path antiquarianism has played out in Malta as it moved steadily toward fledgling archaeological investigations. Significantly, artefacts excavated by notable Maltese archaeologist, Sir Themistocles Zammit, at the key Neolithic site of Tarxien, and those uncovered by Margaret Murray at Borġ in-Nadur form a crucial part of the collection.

About the Authors:
Josef Mario Briffa SJ is Lecturer at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome, and a Roman Catholic priest. He has recently completed his PhD at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London on The Figural World of the Southern Levant during the Late Iron Age. He also holds a Licentiate in Sacred Scripture from the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome. His research has included the history of Maltese archaeology, with a focus on the work of Fr Emmanuel Magri SJ (1851-1907), pioneer in Maltese archaeology and folklore studies. He has excavated in Malta and Israel, and is currently a staff member of The Lautenschläger Azekah Expedition.

Claudia Sagona is Honorary Principal Fellow in the Centre for Classics and Archaeology at The University of Melbourne. Her research has taken her from the islands of the Maltese Archipelago, to the highlands of north-eastern Anatolia and the Caucasus. She has written a number of books concerning Malta’s ancient past, including a comprehensive volume for Cambridge University Press, The Archaeology of Malta: From the Neolithic through the Roman Period (2015), another on the Phoenician-Punic evidence, The Archaeology of Punic Malta (2002), and has delved into the Mithraic mystery cult, Looking for Mithra in Malta (2009). In 2007, she was made an honorary member of the National Order of Merit of Malta (M.O.M.).

Making a Mint Comparative Studies in Late Iron Age Coin Mould by Mark Landon. xii+198 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 268 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914080. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914073. £15.83 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents the first large-scale comparative study of Iron Age coin mould. The subject of Iron Age minting techniques is an important one that reveals a great deal about Iron Age political organisation and economy but which, until now, has remained largely unreported. In addition to examining in detail approximately 20% of all the coin mould ever found, the book also addresses the lack of an agreed reporting protocol, the main and considerable obstacle to progress in this field. In addition to the detailed interpretation of all mould studied the volume also serves as a field guide to best practice in dealing with new material and finds.

About the Author:
Although he has been involved in archaeology since he was 10, Mark Landon never anticipated that the chance find of a single fragment of coin mould in the River Rib would mean that he would spend the next nine years of his life writing this book. He lives in Hertfordshire with his wife, Sue, where he continues to work in archaeology. He does not see nearly enough of his two children, Jermyn and Esmée, or of his granddaughter, Jasmine.