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NEW: Mobility and Exchange across Borders: Exploring Social Processes in Europe during the First Millennium BCE – Theoretical and Methodological Approaches Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 9, Sessions XXXIV-4 and XXXIV-5 edited by Veronica Cicolani. Paperback; 205x290mm; 144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French. 707 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697292. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697308. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Mobility and Exchange across Borders presents the proceedings of Sessions XXXIVIV and XXXIV-V of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). Over the last few decades, the study of cultural interactions in the Iron Age has been considerably renewed thanks to the application of new methods and tools, opening the way to new research perspectives. The papers provide different examples from various archaeological contexts and regions while applying new methodologies able to highlight the diversity of cultural transfers. Their purpose is to stimulate a debate on human interactions and cultural transfers in order to open up new analytical perspectives on this topic and to critically examine the markers and approaches traditionally used to identify human and object mobility during the first millennium BC. Through the different approaches and perspectives presented herein, this volume aims to contribute to the renewal of the scientific debate on mobility and interactions as important drivers of societal change and to stimulate future research and debate.

About the editor
Veronica Cicolani is a permanent researcher at the CNRS French Institute, AOrOc UMR8546 CNRS-PSL and member of editorial team of Etudes Celtiques. Archaeologist specialist of European protohistory, and of the history of museum collections, her research focuses on technological and cultural interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds and on Italic craft practices. Since 2005, she has been a scientific collaborator of the National Museum of Saint-Germain-en-Laye (MAN), where she also co-curated the Golasecca French exhibition (2009-2010). She has been involved in international research programmes on Celtic-Italic interactions (DFG Die sitzbanck of Hochdorf, ANR Caecina) and led a French-Italian research program on Ligurian bronze craft production (Labex Archimede 2015-2016). During the past few years, she has been exploring new inter-disciplinary approaches to the study of cultural and technological interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds.
NEW: On the Borders of World-Systems: Contact Zones in Ancient and Modern Times by Yervand Margaryan. Paperback; 156x230mm; 148pp; 32 figures. 599 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693416. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693423. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £28.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

On the Borders of World-Systems: Contact Zones in Ancient and Modern Times draws on a diverse set of disciplines to explore historical, archaeological, and political interpretations of world-systems theory and geocivilizational analysis. The monograph has a prospective character, the main goal of which is the solution of a major problem – the study of worldwide practice, oriented towards the problems of the modern social world as a system. The principal focus is on the borderland - limes, which has been perceived variously as an impenetrable cordon, and as an open, interactive environment. In this locus of inter-world encounters, different civilizations developed, and an exchange of goods and ideas took place. Macrosociological issues of ancient and modern history are analyzed through five case studies of the Taurus-Caucasus region and its role as a contact zone in different periods.

About the Author Yervand Margaryan, Head of the Department of World History and Foreign Regional Studies of the Russian-Armenian University at Yerevan and Leading Researcher at the Institute of History, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, is a leading historian from the Republic of Armenia. His research focuses on the Ancient World, particularly problems of Classical period social relations, religion (Mithraism), identity and world-systems theory.
NEW: Archaeology Today: A Colouring Book by Cornelius Holtorf and Daniel Lindskog. Paperback; 210x297mm; 16 pages; black & white throughout. 704 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698190. £4.99 (No VAT). Download Full PDF   Buy Now

This colouring book offers a short introduction to the world of the contemporary archaeologist, exploring new approaches and theories of investigation. With text by professional archaeologist Cornelius Holtorf and beautiful, highly detailed illustrations by archaeologically trained professional illustrator Daniel Lindskog, each page is full of information to explore, and designs to colour.

About the Contributors
Cornelius Holtorf is Professor of Archaeology at Linnaeus University in Sweden. ;

Daniel Lindskog is a professional illustrator with a degree in archaeology.
NEW: ‘For My Descendants and Myself, a Nice and Pleasant Abode’ – Agency, Micro-history and Built Environment Buildings in Society International BISI III, Stockholm 2017 edited by Göran Tagesson, Per Cornell, Mark Gardiner, Liz Thomas and Katherine Weikert. Paperback; 205x290mm; 190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 693 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695816. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695823. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Agency, Micro-History and Built Environment examines how people have been making, using and transforming buildings and built environments in general, and how the buildings have been perceived. It also considers a diversity of built constructions – including dwellings and public buildings, sheds and manor houses, secular and sacral structures. Comparisons between different regions and parts of the globe, important when addressing buildings from a social perspective, are presented with studies from the UK, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Germany and Mexico. The chronological framework spans from the classical Byzantine period, over the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period and ends in 20th century Belfast.

About the Editors
Göran Tagesson is Associate Professor in Historical Archaeology at Lund University and Project Leader at The Archaeologists, The National Historical Museums, Sweden. ;

Per Cornell is Professor in Archaeology at the University of Gothenburg. ;

Mark Gardiner is Associate Professor of Archaeology at the University of Lincoln. ;

Liz Thomas is a Research Fellow in The Beam and is also an Affiliate Researcher at the Institute for Cultural Practices, University of Manchester. ;

Katherine Weikert is a Senior Lecturer in Early Medieval History at the University of Winchester.
NEW: Conversations in Human Evolution: Volume 1 edited by Lucy Timbrell. Paperback; 203x276mm; 124 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 128 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695854. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695861. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Conversations in Human Evolution is an ongoing science communication initiative seeking to explore the breadth and interdisciplinarity of human evolution studies. This volume reports twenty interviews (referred to as ‘conversations’ as they are informal in style) with scholars at the forefront of human evolution research, covering the broad scientific themes of quaternary and archaeological science, Palaeolithic archaeology, biological anthropology and palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary anthropology and evolutionary genetics. This project features academics at various different stages in their careers and from all over the world; in this volume alone, researchers are based at institutions in seven different countries (namely the United Kingdom, Australia, the United States of America, Germany, Denmark, India, and China), covering four continents.

Having arisen at the start of the COVID19 pandemic, Conversations in Human Evolution aims to encourage engagement with both human evolutionary studies and the broader socio-political issues that persist within academia, the latter of which is particularly pertinent during this time of global uncertainty. The conversations delve deeply into the study of our species’ evolutionary history through the lens of each sub-discipline, as well as detailing some of the most current advances in research, theory and methods. Overall, Conversations in Human Evolution seeks to bridge the gap between the research and researcher through contextualisation of the science with personal experience and historical reflection.

About the Editor
Lucy Timbrell is an AHRC-funded PhD researcher in the Archaeology of Human Origins Research Group at the University of Liverpool. Broadly, she is interested in the evolution of modern human diversity, with her doctoral research focussing on quantifying the population structure of early Homo sapiens in Late-Middle Pleistocene Africa. Alongside her PhD research, she organises the widely-known University of Liverpool Evolutionary Anthropology seminar series.
NEW: New Frontiers in Archaeology: Proceedings of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference 2019 edited by Kyra Kaercher, Monique Arntz, Nancy Bomentre, Xosé L. Hermoso-Buxán, Kevin Kay, Sabrina Ki, Ruairidh Macleod, Helena Muñoz-Mojado, Lucy Timbrell and Izzy Wisher. Paperback; 203x276mm; 308 pages; illustrated throughout (83 pages of colour). Print RRP: £48.00. 127 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697940. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697957. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume is the result of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference (CASA), held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research from September 13–15, 2019. CASA developed out of the Annual Student Archaeology Conference, first held in 2013, which was formed by students at Cambridge, Oxford, Durham and York. In 2017, Cambridge became the home of the conference and the name was changed accordingly. The conference was developed to give students (from undergraduate to PhD candidates) in archaeology and related fields the chance to present their research to a broad audience.

The theme for the 2019 conference was New Frontiers in Archaeology and this volume presents papers from a wide range of topics such as new geographical areas of research, using museum collections and legacy data, new ways to teach archaeology and new scientific or theoretic paradigms. From hunting and gathering in the Neolithic to the return of artefacts to Turkey, the papers contained within show a great variety in both geography and chronology. Discussions revolve around access to data, the role of excavation in today’s archaeology, the role of local communities in archaeological interpretation and how we can ask new questions of old data. This volume presents 18 papers arranged in the six sessions with the two posters in their thematic sessions.
NEW: An Educator's Handbook for Teaching about the Ancient World edited by Pınar Durgun. Paperback; 156x234mm; 248 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 670 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697605. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697612. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

With the right methods, studying the ancient world can be as engaging as it is informative. Many K-12 teachers, university instructors, and museum educators use hands-on, project-based, and experiential activities in their classes to increase student engagement and learning. This book aims to bring together such pedagogical methods and teaching activities about the ancient world for any educator to use. The teaching activities in this book are designed in a cookbook format so that educators can replicate these teaching "recipes” (which include materials, budget, preparation time, levels of students) in their ancient art, archaeology, social studies, and history classes. They can be implemented online or in-person, in schools, universities, libraries, museums, or at home. Find out more about the book and the contributors here.

About the Editor
Pınar Durgun is an art historically-trained archaeologist with a background in anthropology, cultural heritage, and museums, passionate about outreach and education. She received her Ph.D. from Brown University and has been teaching for about a decade in universities, museums, and school classrooms about archaeology and the ancient world. As a dedicated public scholar and educator, Dr. Durgun hopes to make academic information about the ancient world accessible, fun, and inclusive.
NEW: Public Archaeologies of Frontiers and Borderlands edited by Kieran Gleave, Howard Williams and Pauline Clarke. Paperback; 203x276mm; 270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 126 . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698015. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698022. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

From IndyRef and Brexit to the Refugee Crisis and Trump’s Wall, the construction and maintenance, subversion and traversing of frontiers and borderlands dominate our current affairs. Yet, while archaeologists have long participated in exploring frontiers and borderlands, their public archaeology has been starkly neglected. Incorporating the select proceedings of the 4th University of Chester Archaeology Student conference hosted by the Grosvenor Museum, Chester, on 20 March 2019, this is the first book to investigate realworld ancient and modern frontier works, the significance of graffiti, material culture, monuments and wall-building, as well as fictional representations of borders and walls in the arts, as public archaeology. Key themes include the heritage interpretation for linear monuments, public archaeology in past and contemporary frontiers and borderlands, and archaeology’s interactions with mural practices in politics, popular culture and the contemporary landscape. Together, the contributors show the necessity of developing critical public archaeologies of frontiers and borderlands.

About the Editors
Kieran Gleave is currently an archaeologist with the University of Salford. He graduated from the University of Chester in 2019 after graduating with a BA (Hons) Archaeology degree. ;

Howard Williams is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester and researches public archaeology and archaeologies of death and memory. He writes an academic blog: Archaeodeath. ;

Pauline Magdalene Clarke is a postgraduate researcher at the University of Chester, having recently completed both her BA (Hons) and MA there. She has a particular interest in material culture, and how it can demonstrate change (or not) in borderlands in the Anglo-Saxon period. She has recently published a review of the PAS finds from Cheshire for that period.

Reviews
'With libraries closed and bookshops closing down, there has never been a better time for open access books like this one that can be downloaded for free from publishers' websites. Its origins in a student conference at the University of Chester are obvious and admirable: there are several excellent papers by students including Fisher on the archaeology of homelessness and Clarke on Playmobil-based public engagement.'—Gabriel Moshenska, British Archaeology, No. 176
Archaeogaming Una introducción a la arqueología en y de los videojuegos by Andrew Reinhard. Paperback; 148x210mm; 298 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text. 30 2020. ISBN 9788416725083. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Video games are an example of material objects, resources and spaces that people use to define their culture. They also serve as archaeological sites in their traditional sense of place. Places where evidence of past activity is preserved and archaeological methodology can be applied. This book serves as a general introduction to archaeogaming: it describes the intersection between archaeology and video games, and applies archaeological theory and method to understand video games as sites as well as artifacts. It is also history, sociology and ontology; and everything that is necessary to define a culture, that of videogames, that is no longer emerging, but has been completely established in the humanity of the Anthropocene and late capitalism. What makes its valuation and cataloging more necessary as digital heritage.
El oscuro abismo del tiempo Memoria y Arqueología by Laurent Olivier. Paperback; 148x210mm; 280 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text. 29 2020. ISBN 9788416725007. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

With a very literary style and an unusual depth in current archaeology, Olivier makes a journey between metaphor and reality that questions archaeology as a discipline, in a positive way, highlighting that fundamental aspect as a science of "constantly recomposed memories." There, in the complex sphere of temporality, he shows us how archaeology is a discipline of the present that recovers memories from those remains that we recover like "rags from the past." It is a complex and stimulating book. In the prologue's words: "An unforgettable book that every professional archaeologist should read even if it is only to (re) think the fundamentals of what we do."

El oscuro abismo del tiempo es una obra majestuosa que nos ha llevado cinco años sacar adelante. Os la presentamos con un prólogo de Gonzalo Ruiz Zapatero y una nueva introducción que explora los años transcurridos desde su publicación original en Francia y esta edición. Con un estilo muy literario y una profundidad poco corriente en la arqueología actual, Olivier hace un recorrido entre la metáfora y la realidad que cuestiona la arqueología como disciplina, de forma positiva, resaltando ese aspecto fundamental como ciencia de las "memorias constantemente recompuestas". Ahí, en la compleja esfera de la temporalidad, nos plantea como la arqueología es una disciplina del presente que recupera memorias a partir de esos restos que recuperamos cual "traperos del pasado". Se trata de un libro complejo a la par que estimulante. En palabras del prologuista: "Un libro inolvidable, que todo profesional de la arqueología debería leer aunque solo sea para (re)pensar los fundamentos de lo que hacemos".
La guerra del fenicio Arqueología, política y turismo en el último rincón de Europa by Raúl Asensio. Paperback; 148x210mm; 286 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text. 28 2020. ISBN 9788416725250. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

In the midst of the crisis, Cádiz's Phoenician past became the axis of a project of economic, political and cultural transformation that aroused both adherence and discontent. The objective was to move from an industrial city to a model of urban development based on tourism. The three thousand years of history of the city should be the pillar on which the future was built. In this endeavour, politicians, journalists, archaeologists, intellectuals, businessmen and experts of all kinds were involved in endless polemics and controversies, alluding to the past and present of the city.

Hay ciudades que pueden ser muchas cosas y otras, en cambio, que sólo puede ser ellas mismas. En plena crisis, el pasado fenicio de Cádiz se convirtió en el eje de un proyecto de transformación económica, política y cultural que suscitó tanto adhesiones como descontentos. El objetivo era pasar de una ciudad industrial a un modelo de desarrollo urbano basado en el turismo. Los tres mil años de historia de la ciudad debían ser el pilar sobre el que se construyera el futuro. En este empeño, políticos, periodistas, arqueólogos, intelectuales, empresarios y expertos de todo tipo se vieron envueltos en polémicas y controversias sin fin, que aludían al pasado y al presente de la ciudad. Las "guerras patrimoniales" gaditanas, señala el autor, son un caso singular, pero al mismo tiempo también son un ejemplo de lo que ocurre en múltiples ciudades de la periferia europea, que en tiempos de globalización y deslocalización se ven obligadas a reinventarse a sí mismas en un esfuerzo por no perder su esencia.
Amor Estratigráfico El libro by Juan I. García. Paperback; 148x210mm; 300 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text. 27 2020. ISBN 9788494211034. £18.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

After years of waiting, with intermittent protests at the Arqueoart and JAS Arqueología headquarters, we have been able to carry out the edition of the final book on Stratigraphic Love with the entire first season, commented on and full of surprises. Worthy? Surely not, but we've had a great time doing it. So buy it and enjoy it. Rod and honour! Stratigraphy or death! A different archaeology is possible...

Uno de los objetivos de este proyecto es presentar la Arqueología de una forma amena, divertida, irónica pero incisiva científicamente, donde gracias a la utilización de un formato 3.0, poder presentar temas, personas, escenarios de una realidad, y hacerlo asequible al gran público, gracias a la difusión que nos dan las redes sociales y la red de redes. Aparte de esto, utilizamos estos caudales como un medio de adaptabilidad de contenidos a ciertos colectivos con algún tipo de discapacidad. Si tenemos 5 sentidos, ¿porque tan pocas veces adaptamos contenidos a todos los sentidos posibles?
Arqueologías Vitales edited by Henry Tantalean and Cristobal Gnecco. Paperback; 148x210mm; 300 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text. 26 2019. ISBN 9788416725229. £13.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The texts in this book are autobiographical. Unlike so many academic writings, they do not hide, but rather make visible, everything that happens between fieldwork and writing, that space so productive but so contentious that it is usually eliminated, denied, altered. The authors speak in the first person, without hiding behind anything and anyone, without resorting to the hackneyed formulas so repeated in academia that modernity made: an impersonal voice, without position, that speaks from nowhere but pretends to know and see everything. Archaeologists learn to do and write (not write) in a way and they never change it. They learn the canon of what can be said and what cannot be said. Correctly academic. Instead, these first-person voices decentralize the canon because they speak of what should not be spoken from where it cannot be said. The authors write about their transformation as archaeologists through their practice which, usually but not always, involved their relationship with other(s).

Table of Contents
Conversación en Lima – Cristóbal Gnecco y Henry Tantaleán ;
Seguir la huella y curar el rastro. Memorias de una experiencia colectiva de investigación y militancia en el campo de arqueología argentina – Ivana Carina Jofré ;
Arqueo-devenires, Zarankin-centrismos y presentes contaminados – Texto: Andrés Zarankin, Dibujos: Iván Zigarán ;
Cuando descubres que el arqueólogo local no eres tú. Dos encuentros con la isla Pariti – Juan Villanueva Criales ;
Sueño y catarsis: hacia una arqueología post- humanista – José Roberto Pellini ;
La cerámica de Anuma’i y las marcas del fin del mundo – Fabíola Andréa Silva ;
La arqueología en la era del multiculturalismo neoliberal: una reflexión autobiográfica desde San Pedro de Atacama (norte de Chile) – Patricia Ayala Rocabado ;
Confesiones de un postarqueólogo – Cristóbal Gnecco ;
Entre el Cauca y el Magdalena: una historia apócrifa de la arqueología colombiana en el último tercio del siglo XX – Wilhelm Londoño ;
Cuando el “otro” eres tú. Encuentros de un empresario español en América – Jaime Almansa Sánchez ;
Entrando y saliendo de la arqueología peruana: memorias presentes de un pasado reciente – Henry Tantaleán ;
Arqueólogos remando entre las verdades y las injusticias – José María López Mazz ;
Sobre los autores
NEW: Mapping the Past: From Sampling Sites and Landscapes to Exploring the ‘Archaeological Continuum’ Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 8 Session VIII-1 edited by Michel Dabas, Stefano Campana and Apostolos Sarris. Paperback; 205x290mm; 94 pages; 35 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 676 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697131. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697148 . Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Session VIII-1 of UISPP 2018 in Paris ‘Mapping the Past’ brought together several contributions reflecting on the need to develop sustainable and reliable approaches to mapping our landscape heritage. The session was guided by the crucial concept termed the ‘archaeological continuum’. This concept can be defined as a proactive approach to landscape survey based on the summative evidence detected (or detectable) within the area under examination, reducing spatial and chronological gaps as far as possible through the intensive and extensive application of a wide variety of exploratory methods and analytical techniques. Research work across Europe as well as contributions presented in this session have demonstrated that it is now possible to explore the whole landscape of carefully chosen areas and study them as an archaeological continuum. Archaeological interpretations derived from this kind of approach can be expected to reveal different layers of information belonging to a variety of chronological horizons, each displaying mutual physical (stratigraphic) and conceptual relationships within that horizon. The raising of new archaeological questions and also the development of alternative conservation strategies directly stimulated by the radical ideas inherent in the concept of the ‘archaeological continuum’ are among the major outcomes of the session.

About the Editors
Michel Dabas is Senior Researcher and Co-Director of the Laboratory of Archaeology at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris (AOROC) where he develops approaches for the provision of interactive maps on the web (chronocarto.eu portal) and focuses on the application of geophysical methods for archaeological sites. ;

Stefano R.L. Campana is Professor of Landscape Archaeology at the University of Siena. His research is focused on the understanding of past Mediterranean landscapes from late prehistory to contemporary times. ;

Apostolos Sarris is ‘Sylvia Ioannou’ Professor of Digital Humanities at the Archaeological Research Unit, University of Cyprus and Research Director at F.O.R.T.H.: Head of the GeoSat ReSeArch Lab. He is an Adjunct/Affiliate Professor at Cyprus University of Technology and a Research Associate of the Department of Anthropology, the Field Museum of Natural History of Chicago, Illinois, USA. His research focuses on geophysical prospection, GIS spatial modelling and satellite remote sensing in archaeology.
NEW: Places of Memory: Spatialised Practices of Remembrance from Prehistory to Today edited by Christian Horn, Gustav Wollentz, Gianpiero Di Maida, and Annette Haug. Paperback; 205x290mm; 164 pages; 56 figures, colour throughout. 674 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696134. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696141. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Places of Memory takes a new look at spatialised practices of remembrance and its role in reshaping societies from prehistory to today, gathering researchers representing diverse but complementary fields of expertise. This diachronic outlook provides important insights into the great variety of human and social reactions examining memory, encompassing aspects of remembering, the loss of memory, reclaiming memories, and remembering things that may not have happened. The contributions to this volume expand upon Pierre Nora’s concept of lieux des memoire (places of memory) and the notion that memory is not just stored in these places but activated through human engagement. The volume presents a reflection on the creation of memories through the organisation and use of landscapes and spaces that explicitly considers the multiplicity of meanings of the past. Thus, social identities were created, reaffirmed, strengthened, and transformed through the founding, change, and reorganization of places and spaces of memory in the cultural landscape.

About the Editors
Christian Horn is a researcher and lecturer at the Department for Historical Studies at the University of Gothenburg. His scholarship focuses on Scandinavian rock art and prehistoric conflict. He is the current research coordinator of the Swedish Rock Art Research Archives as well as an advisory board member. Currently, he develops Artificial Intelligence approaches to rock art in a project funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfond (Sweden). This project includes conducting fieldwork at UNESCO world heritage site Tanum documenting rock art in 3D. He is a prolific writer in the fields of prehistoric conflict, rock art, and digital archaeology. ;

Gustav Wollentz defended his PhD in the summer of 2018 at the Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Kiel University, Germany, focusing on the relationship between difficult heritage and temporalities. He received his Bachelor and Master degree in Archaeology from Linnaeus University in Sweden. He was previously (2012-2013) involved in a research project led by Cornelius Holtorf and Anders Högberg at Linnaeus University, where he studied future perspectives within heritage management. During a period in 2018 and 2019, he was hired within the AHRC-funded ‘Heritage Futures’ project to co-author a chapter on ‘Toxic heritage’. He is currently project leader/researcher at the Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity. ;

Gianpiero Di Maida, born in Palermo (Italy) in 1980, has completed his Ph.D. at CAU Kiel in 2018, defending a thesis on the Lateglacial rock and mobile art record of Sicily, Italy. This work, recently published, has been awarded with the Johanna Mestorf Price 2019. He is currently serving as the scientific manager of the DISAPALE project at the Neanderthal Museum. ;

Annette Haug is professor for Classical Archaeology at the Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel. Her research interests concern visual culture studies on the one hand, questions of urban lifestyles and urban design on the other. After her habilitation in 2009 in Leipzig, Haug became Heisenberg fellow at the University in Munich (LMU). After receiving the professorship in Kiel in 2012 she became the co-coordinator of the graduate school ‘Human Development in Landscapes’. She has received an ERC Consolidator Grant for research into Decorative Systems in Pompeii and Herculaneum.
NEW: IKUWA6. Shared Heritage: Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress for Underwater Archaeology 28 November–2 December 2016, Western Australian Maritime Museum Fremantle, Western Australia edited by Jennifer A. Rodrigues and Arianna Traviglia. Paperback; 205x290mm; 698 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 666 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916428. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916435. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Celebrating the theme ‘Shared heritage’, IKUWA6 (the 6th International Congress for Underwater Archaeology), was the first such major conference to be held in the Asia-Pacific region, and the first IKUWA meeting hosted outside Europe since the organisation’s inception in Germany in the 1990s. A primary objective of holding IKUWA6 in Australia was to give greater voice to practitioners and emerging researchers across the Asia and Pacific regions who are often not well represented in northern hemisphere scientific gatherings of this scale; and, to focus on the areas of overlap in our mutual heritage, techniques and technology. Drawing together peer-reviewed presentations by delegates from across the world who converged in Fremantle in 2016 to participate, this volume covers a stimulating diversity of themes and niche topics of value to maritime archaeology practitioners, researchers, students, historians and museum professionals across the world.

About the Editors
Jennifer Rodrigues graduated as an archaeologist in Australia before specialising her training at the University of Southampton’s Centre for Maritime Archaeology, England, in 2000, after which she joined the Mary Rose Trust. Upon returning to Australia, she worked as a heritage consultant in Victoria and New South Wales, investigating Indigenous heritage sites, before joining the Western Australian Museum as Curator, Collections Manager then Exhibitions Project Manager over 16 years. She completed her doctorate at the University of Western Australia in 2011, and was Editor of the Australasian Journal for Maritime Archaeology from 2012 to 2015. In 2019 she joined the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as Senior Curator of the Centre for Indigenous Knowledges.

Arianna Traviglia is the Coordinator of the IIT Centre for Cultural Heritage Technology (Italy). Trained as an archaeologist, her work primarily focuses on mediating the inclusion of digital technology within the study of archaeological landscapes, especially waterscapes and lagoon environments. From 2006 to 2015 she held positions as Postdoctoral Fellow in Australia at Sydney and Macquarie Universities, before re-entering European academia as recipient of a Marie Curie Fellowship in 2015. She is Co- Editor of the Journal of Computer Application in Archaeology (JCAA) and currently a member of the Management Committee of the EC COST Action Arkwork, and a PI on the H2020 NETCHER project focused on protection of endangered Cultural Heritage.
NEW: Studies in Archaeometry Proceedings of the Archaeometry Symposium at NORM 2019, June 16-19, Portland, Oregon, Portland State University. Dedicated to the Rev. H. Richard Rutherford, C.S.C., Ph.D edited by Mario Ramírez Galán and Ronda Sandifer Bard. Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 120 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697346. £46.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697339. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume is in honor of the American scholar Rev. H. Richard Rutherford, C.S.C, Ph.D (University of Portland). It contains the papers presented at the Archaeometry Symposium in the 74th Northwest Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society (NORM) which took place in Portland (Oregon), June 18th 2019, covering a wide range of topics. The volume includes papers about the application of different techniques in archaeology in order to comprehend some aspects during and after the excavation, for instance, physics, chemical analysis, remote sensing, LiDAR, etc. This work compiles papers about sites from different places around of the world, Spain, Canada, Thailand, Lithuania or Russia.

The aim of the symposium was to facilitate communication between scholars from different places, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research.

About the Editors
Mario Ramírez Galán, PhD., is Adjunct Professor in archaeology at the University of Portland (Portland, Oregon) and PhD. in archaeology from the UAH (Alcalá de Henares, Madrid). He has participated in international and Spanish congresses and roundtable sessions. He has participated in several archaeological excavations in the United States in collaboration with the city of Salem (Oregon) to study several aspects of its cultural heritage. Furthermore, he worked at different Spanish archaeological projects, for instance, the battle of Baecula or Complutum. Additionally, he has published papers in some of the most important journals (Archaeometry and Archaeological Prospection), and also books about battlefield archaeology, landscape archaeology, new technologies applied to archaeology, and archaeometry. During the last years, his investigation has been focused on the application of different techniques to study the medieval siege of Alcalá la Vieja. Ronda Sandifer Bard, PhD., is Lecturer in Chemistry at the University of Portland (Portland, Oregon). Her research interests include carbanion chemistry, polymer-bound reactive intermediates, and archaeometry, particularly XRF analysis of metal and bone artifacts. Since 2014, she has helped lead the annual UP Pollentia Undergraduate Research Expedition at the ancient Roman city of Pollentia in Mallorca, Spain, where UP faculty-student teams work at the invitation of the Consortium of the Roman City of Pollentia and its Directors and in collaboration with the Pollentia Field School associated with the University of Barcelona.
Building between the Two Rivers: An Introduction to the Building Archaeology of Ancient Mesopotamia by Stefano Anastasio and Piero Gilento. Paperback; 175x245mm; 220 pages; 136 figures. Print RRP: £34.0. 664 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696035. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696042. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Building between the Two Rivers aims to supply university students and scholars of Near Eastern archaeology with an introduction to 'Building archaeology' methods as applied to the context of Ancient Mesopotamia. It helps the reader understand the principles underlying the discipline, which deals with the registration and analysis of all building materials and techniques involved in the assembly and erection of a construction, and to outline what knowledge and skills are needed, beyond those that are specific to archaeologists.

The in-depth registration and analysis of building materials and techniques requires professional skills and experience, which cannot be achieved with only a standard university training in archaeology. However, archaeologists need to know the basics of the classification of building materials, their physical properties, the main techniques of their finishing, as well as the basic principles of statics. They should also be able to let architects understand how to better tune the registration of data to ensure a fruitful archaeological interpretation.

Due to the introductory nature of the book, contents are organised in didactic chapters, trying to cover all the main topics and displaying them by means of selected examples. Particular attention is given to the methods of the 'stratigraphic reading', which are discussed in a dedicated appendix authored by Piero Gilento. A thematic bibliography and a technical glossary complete the book, helping readers enhance their understanding of the subject.

About the Authors
Stefano Anastasio is an archaeologist who specialises in the Ancient Near East. He is currently storehouse-keeper of the archaeological deposits of the Superintendency for Archaeology, Arts and Landscape in Florence. He is also currently working on the implementation of the new Photo-Archive for the Archaeological Conservation Centre of the Superintendency ;

Piero Gilento is an Associate Researcher at the Research Unit UMR7041-ArScAn (France), co-director of the French archaeological mission in northern Jordan, and Principal Investigator of the ACTECH project founded by a Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship.
New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East Studies in Honour of Tony J. Wilkinson edited by Dan Lawrence, Mark Altaweel and Graham Philip. Paperback; 205x290mm; 346 pages; 181 figures, 22 tables, 10 plates (46 pages of colour). 662 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695731. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695748. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East is a collection of papers produced in honour of Tony James Wilkinson, who was Professor of Archaeology at Durham University from 2006 until his death in 2014. Though commemorative in concept, the volume is an assemblage of new research representing emerging agendas and innovative methods in remote sensing. The intention is to explore the opportunities and challenges faced by researchers in the field today, and the tools, techniques, and theoretical approaches available to resolve them within the framework of landscape archaeology. The papers build on the traditional strengths of landscape archaeology, such as geoarchaeology and settlement pattern analysis, as well as integrating data sources to address major research questions, such as the ancient economy, urbanism, water management and the treatment of the dead. The authors demonstrate the importance of an interdisciplinary approach for understanding the impact of human activity on shaping the landscape and the effect that landscape has on sociocultural development.

About the Editors
Dr Dan Lawrence is an Associate Professor in the department of Archaeology at Durham University and director of the Archaeology Informatics Laboratory, a specialist hub for remote sensing and computational approaches to the archaeological record. He has directed landscape survey projects across the Middle East and Central Asia, and is currently working on the publication of survey work in Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan. ;

Mark Altaweel
is Reader in Near East Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He has taught courses and conducted research on Near Eastern history and archaeology, using GIS, computational modelling, big data analytics, remote sensing methods, and socialecological theory. He has led many projects in the Near East while being also involved in various research projects on complex systems in other disciplines. ;

Graham Philip is Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Department of Archaeology, Durham University. He has served as Editor of the journal Levant since 2008. He excavated the Chalcolithic / Early Bronze Age site of Tell esh-Shuna North in Jordan (1991-94) and currently directs a collaborative project with the American University of Beirut at the Neolithic and EBA site of Tell Koubba in North Lebanon.
Un sistema per la gestione dell’affidabilità e dell’interpretazione dei dati archeologici Percezione e potenzialità degli small finds: il caso studio di Festòs e Haghia Triada by Marianna Figuera. Paperback; 148x210mm; 165pp; 32 figures. Italian text with English abstract. RRP: £30.00. 8 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696639. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696646. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Un sistema per la gestione dell’affidabilità e dell’interpretazione dei dati archeologici aims to identify the methodological problems associated with digitalized management of archaeological data and to introduce viable solutions that embrace interpretative aspects and the reliability concept. The work develops into a prototype system that manages the data regarding what are referred to as small finds dating back to the palatial periods from the Cretan sites of Phaistos and Ayia Triada which have been studied by the Italian Archaeological Mission since the early 20th century. The analysis of the data highlighted the value of this system and its ability to adapt to the needs of the archaeologist. It provides tools capable of assisting and implementing the interpretation of archaeological data well outside the findings and sites specific to this project for the management of other categories of archaeological finds and of any context. The book can furnish practical and theoretical contributions capable of feeding the methodological debate inherent in issues such as the treatment of sources, legacy data, reuse, the management of uncertainty, and of the rational and intuitive variables inherent in archaeological work, as well as the assessment of the reliability of an interpretative event.

Marianna Figuera is an archaeologist with a Doctorate in Cultural Heritage Studies. Currently a research fellow at the University of Catania, her research focuses on the perception of small finds, metallurgy in Minoan Crete, and the management, integrity, and reliability of digitalized archaeological data. She has been part of the Italian Archaeological Mission at Phaistos and Ayia Triada since 2010.
Archaeology: What it is, where it is, and how to do it (4th Edition) by Paul Wilkinson. Paperback; 190x250mm; 104 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout; additional material online. 612 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789695311. £15.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695601. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £15.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

BACK IN PRINT: Archaeology: What It Is, Where It Is, and How to Do It has been written as a practical introduction on the investigation of the material remains of the past which can be interpreted with contemporary historical and literary evidence. The book also explains where to find this evidence and what to do next. Many aspects of archaeological investigation are discussed, including aerial and ground survey, excavation and fieldwork, recording methods, soil sampling and small finds.

‘A very useful basic introduction to archaeology’Mick Aston

‘I wish this book had been available when I started out in archaeology back in the 1960s. It tells you everything you need to know in order to decide what sort of archaeology you’d like to learn more about. It doesn’t just deal with digging; instead it introduces you to aerial photography, geophysics, surveying, recording, finds processing, soil science and how to take samples – in fact all the subjects you’ll need to master if you want to become a field archaeologist. It’s well written and beautifully illustrated in full colour throughout. It would be cheap at twice the price!’Francis Pryor

First published in 2007. 4th edition published in 2020.
Bringing Down the Iron Curtain Paradigmatic Change in Research on the Bronze Age in Central and Eastern Europe? edited by Klára Šabatová, Laura Dietrich, Oliver Dietrich, Anthony Harding and Viktória Kiss. Paperback; 205x290mm; 186 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (30 pages in colour). 610 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694543. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694550. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Bringing down the Iron Curtain: Paradigmatic changes in research on the Bronze Age in Central and Eastern Europe? presents the researches of scholars of different generations from twelve countries (Hungary, Romania, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Serbia, Croatia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Germany, USA, Canada, Austria) who participated in a session of the same title at the 20th Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists in Istanbul, 2014. The papers addressed the question of change in the approaches to Bronze Age research in the Central and Eastern European countries from different points of view. It has been a quarter of a century since the fall of communism in Central and Eastern Europe and the opening up of these areas to the West. With this process, archaeology saw a large influx of new projects and ideas. Bilateral contacts, Europe-wide circulation of scholars and access to research literature has fuelled the transformation processes. This volume is the first study which relates these issues specifically to Bronze Age Archaeology. The contributions discuss not only theoretical issues, but also current developments in all aspects of archaeological practice.

About the Editors
Klára Šabatová studied archaeology at Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic, and teaches prehistory there. Her research focuses on Bronze Age and landscape archaeology in Central Europe. Her interests include the processing of large quantities of pottery and settlement archaeology. She has led excavations on Neolithic and Bronze Age sites in Moravia. At present she is particularly concerned with Bronze Age chronology and burial rites.

Laura Dietrich studied prehistoric archaeology in Bucharest and Berlin. She has worked on projects from south-eastern Europe to the Levant, and since 2011 has been a Research Assistant at the German Archaeological Institute. Her research focuses on the archaeology of food and conflict.

Oliver Dietrich studied prehistoric archaeology in Berlin and works at the German Archaeological Institute. His research focus is the Neolithic and Bronze Age between south-eastern Europe and the Near East. His interests include archaeology of religion and cult, metallurgy, agents of craft in prehistory and distribution modes of prehistoric innovations.

Anthony Harding is Emeritus Professor of Archaeology at the University of Exeter, UK, and an Affiliate of the Philosophical Faculty of Charles University, Prague. He specialises in European Bronze Age archaeology and has written several books and many articles on various aspects of the Bronze Age. He has led excavations in Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania as well as Britain. In recent years he has worked extensively on the archaeology of salt exploitation.

Viktória Kiss is a senior research fellow of the Institute of Archaeology, Research Centre for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. She specialises in Central European Bronze Age archaeology. She has written a book about Middle Bronze Age Encrusted Pottery in Western Hungary, and edited several other volumes concerning the Bronze Age archaeology of the region. In recent years she has worked on pottery, metal production, bioarchaeology and mobility.
Approaches to the Analysis of Production Activity at Archaeological Sites edited by Anna K. Hodgkinson and Cecilie Lelek Tvetmarken. Paperback; 205x290mm; 206 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (58 pages in colour). 609 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695571. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695588. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Approaches to the Analysis of Production Activity at Archaeological Sites presents the proceedings of an international and interdisciplinary workshop held in Berlin in 2018, which brought together scholars whose work focusses on manufacturing activities identified at archaeological sites. The various approaches presented here include new excavation techniques, ethnographic research, archaeometric approaches, GIS and experimental archaeology as well as theoretical issues associated with how researchers understand production in the past. These approaches are applied to research questions related to various technological and socio-economic aspects of production, including the organisation and setting of manufacturing activities, the access to and use of raw materials, firing structures and other production-related installations. The chapters discuss production activities in various domestic and institutional contexts throughout the ancient world, together with the production and use of tools and other items made of stone, bone, ceramics, glass and faience. Since manufacturing activities are encountered at archaeological sites on a regular basis, the wide range of materials and approaches presented in this volume provides a useful reference for scholars and students studying technologies and production activities in the past.

About the Editors
Anna K. Hodgkinson (PhD Liverpool 2014) has recently completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the Excellence Cluster Topoi. Her research focusses on Late Bronze Age (LBA) Egyptian settlement archaeology, LBA glass industries and chemical analysis of LBA glass objects. She has conducted archaeological fieldwork at the LBA Egyptian sites of Amarna, Gurob and Qantir.

Cecilie Lelek Tvetmarken (PhD Liverpool 2013) has worked as a post-doctoral researcher on several projects at the German Archaeological Institute (DAI), Berlin, and is currently involved in the joint Iranian-Danish research project ‘Tracking Cultural and Environmental Change’ (Razi University, Kermanshah, and the University of Copenhagen). Her research focusses on architecture and the use of space during the Neolithic in the Near East. She has conducted archaeological fieldwork at several Neolithic sites in Turkey, Jordan and Iran.
Digging into the Dark Ages Early Medieval Public Archaeologies edited by Howard Williams and Pauline Magdalene Clarke. Paperback; 203x276mm; 368 pages; 162 illustrations (138 pages in colour). 108 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695274. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695281. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

What does the ‘Dark Ages’ mean in contemporary society? Tackling public engagements through archaeological fieldwork, heritage sites and museums, fictional portrayals and art, and increasingly via a broad range of digital media, this is the first-ever dedicated collection exploring the public archaeology of the Early Middle Ages (5th–11th centuries AD).

Digging into the Dark Ages builds on debates which took place at the 3rd University of Chester Archaeology Student Conference hosted by the Grosvenor Museum, Chester, 13 December 2017. It comprises original perspectives from students integrated with fresh research by heritage practitioners and academics. The book also includes four interviews offering perspectives on key dimensions of early medieval archaeology’s public intersections. By critically ‘digging into’ the ‘Dark Ages’, this book provides an introduction to key concepts and debates, a rich range of case studies, and a solid platform for future research.

About the Editors
Professor Howard Williams is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester and researches mortuary archaeology, archaeology and memory, the history of archaeology and public archaeology. He regularly writes an academic blog: Archaeodeath.

Pauline Magdalene Clarke graduated with a BA (Hons) degree in Archaeology with History in 2018, and an MA Past Landscapes and Environments in 2019, both from the University of Chester. Her MA dissertation focussed on the taphonomy of plant macrofossils.
Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco y su entorno edited by Idoia Grau Sologestoa and Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+306 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (68 pages in colour). 106 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694383. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694390. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Post-medieval archaeology is currently going through a critical phase of consolidation and disciplinary redefinition across Europe, where mere proposals or ambitions are becoming tangible scientific and disciplinary realities. This renovation is most evident in Southern Europe, where, until recently, these studies have been treated as somewhat marginal. The convergence of new actors and disciplines (historical archaeology, archaeology of the post-medieval centuries, professional archaeology, ethnoarchaeology or archaeological sciences), the promotion of new patrimonialization initiatives, and the creation of new action frameworks as a result of the deep economic crisis of the years 2007-2008 are some of the factors that have shaped current approaches to the archaeology of the Modern Age. Focussing on archaeological studies of the Modern Age located in the Basque Country, Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco y su entorno recognises the main themes investigated (cities, rural spaces, funeral spaces, consumption and production, communications systems, maritime archaeology), detects some of the strengths and weaknesses, and proposes new lines of action and disciplinary consolidation. In short, this volume aims to provide a summary of the current archaeological framework for investigations of the Modern Age in the Basque Country, and to make proposals for developing these practices in the future.

Las arqueologías postmedievales atraviesan en la actualidad una fase critica de consolidación y redefinición disciplinar en casi toda Europa, donde han pasado de ser meras propuestas o ambiciones para convertirse en realidades científicas y disciplinares tangibles. Esta renovación es más evidente en el sur de Europa, donde estos estudios han tenido hasta ahora un peso más bien marginal. La convergencia de nuevos actores y disciplinas (arqueología histórica, arqueología de los siglos postmedievales, arqueología profesional, etnoarqueología o las ciencias arqueológicas), el impulso de nuevas iniciativas de patrimonialización, y la creación de nuevos marcos de actuación como consecuencia de la profunda crisis económica de los años 2007-2008, son algunas de las causas que explican por qué se han ido definiendo con mayor claridad los contornos de la Arqueología de la Edad Moderna. A partir del ejemplo del País Vasco, este volumen realiza un diagnóstico sobre las principales temáticas indagadas (ciudades, espacios rurales, espacios funerarios, consumo y producción, sistemas de comunicaciones, arqueología marítima), detecta algunas de las fortalezas y debilidades de la arqueología de la Edad Moderna y propone nuevas líneas de actuación y de consolidación disciplinar. En definitiva, este libro pretende mostrar qué es la Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco en la actualidad y qué puede llegar a ser.

About the Editors
Idoia Grau Sologestoa is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the Integrative Prehistory and Archaeological Science (IPAS/IPNA) department, University of Basel. Previously, she worked at the universities of Sheffield, Nottingham and the Basque Country. Her main research interest is human and animal relationships in historical periods, from Roman to modern times. She is currently editing a book on innovations in the rural world during the Early Modern Era. ;

Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo is a Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country and Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology (University College London). He is the director of the Heritage and Cultural Landscapes Research Group of the University of the Basque Country and the Rural Medieval Research Group, CSIC-UPV/EHU. His principal interests lie in the study of the archaeology of landscapes, the archaeology of rural societies, Mediterranean archaeology, the archaeology of architecture, and the study of social c
Heritage Management: The Natural and Cultural Divide edited by Heleen Van Londen, Marjo Schlaman and Andrea Travaglia. Paperback; 210x297mm; 148 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 4 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694864. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This timely collection of peer-reviewed papers and short essays seek to bridge the longstanding gap between natural and cultural heritage when it comes to landscape management. To this end, the editors foster a combined approach to both domains by promoting stronger internal cooperation and the systematic engagement of new forms of integrated heritage with the external world.

The volume contributes to the debate on the new role of heritage in an ever-changing framework for land use, infrastructural investment and sustainable development at national and international levels. All contributions are based on the papers presented in two sessions at the EAA annual meeting in Maastricht 2017.
What Difference Does Time Make? Papers from the Ancient and Islamic Middle East and China in Honor of the 100th Anniversary of the Midwest Branch of the American Oriental Society edited by JoAnn Scurlock and Richard H. Beal. Paperback; 176x250mm; 186pp; 10 figures. 589 2019 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 6. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693171. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693188. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A wide-ranging exploration of Time as experienced and contemplated. Included are offerings on ancient Mesopotamian archaeology, literature and religion, Biblical texts and archaeology, Chinese literature and philosophy, and Islamic law. In addition, the majority of the papers specifically address issues of differences and similarities between cultures, with or without actual cultural contact.

This volume is the publication of a conference designed to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Midwest branch of the American Oriental Society, held at St. Mary’s University in Notre Dame, Indiana, in February 2017.

About the Editors
JoAnn Scurlock, president of the Midwest Branch of the American Oriental Society, received her BA and PhD in Assyriology from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. She is the author of around one hundred articles in scholarly journals on ancient medicine, magic, mythology, religion, and political history.

Richard H. Beal received his BA in the Oriental Studies department at the University of Pennsylvania and his PhD from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago in Hittitology. He has worked for the Chicago Hittite Dictionary Project since its inception in 1976 and is now a senior research associate.
The Dialectic of Practice and the Logical Structure of the Tool Philosophy, Archaeology and the Anthropology of Technology by Jannis Kozatsas. Paperback; 150x210mm; 92pp. 7 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694048. £19.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694055. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The book undertakes a critical review of recent trends in the archaeological and anthropological theory of technology from processual neo-positivism and postprocessual relativism to the contemporary French and American anthropology, and the symmetrical theory of material culture. On the basis of a critique of their logical premises and epistemological consequences, it draws on the tradition of Hegelian dialectics in order to propose an alternative understanding of technology as a material social practice within which the subject and the object –the socio-cultural and the natural– are produced concurrently as inter-constituted elements, and they are unified through their mutual negative relation to each other. Consequently, it is argued that this dynamic practical relation is consolidated in the concept of the tool. The analysis of its logical structure shows its role as an immanent moment of technological practice. According to Hegel, a tool is not a neutral means for transmitting subjective ends to an external object but the material expression of the practical relationship between artisan and matter, and of their negative unity within practice. Concerning this point, the discussion follows a detailed reconstruction of Hegel’s theoretical reflections on the tool concept, and it evaluates their significance for the contemporary debates on the question of techniques and technology.

About the Author
Jannis Kozatsas’ research broadly focuses on philosophy and archaeology. Currently, he is a postdoctoral researcher in philosophy at the Department of Political Science and History, Panteion University of Athens, as a Fellow of the State Scholarship Foundation. Since 2018 he has been lecturing in modern European philosophy at the Department of Philosophy, University of Patras. Alongside his activity in philosophy, he is writing a doctoral thesis on Neolithic pottery at the Department of History and Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. He is currently co-editor-in-chief of KRISI – Biannual Scientific Review in Greece, which specializes in humanities and social sciences.
Dating Urban Classical Deposits: Approaches and Problems in Using Finds to Date Strata by Guido Furlan. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+288 pages; 153 figures, 6 tables (71 pages in colour). 576 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692525. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692532. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Dating Urban Classical Deposits: Approaches and problems in using finds to date strata considers the issues surrounding the dating of archaeological strata on the basis of the assemblages recovered from them. This process is one of the most common processes in archaeology, yet it is still poorly structured theoretically, methodologically and operatively. No manuals specifically tackle the issue as a whole and consideration of useful theoretical and methodological tools is fragmentary. This book has been developed to try to correct this failing; it is based on the idea that for dating a given layer through the materials recovered from it, the embedding process of the materials must be modelled.

The book reviews the present state of archaeological practice and follows this with a theoretical discussion of the key concepts involved in the issue of dating deposits; the main methodological tools which can be employed (quantitative, qualitative and comparative) are then discussed in detail. The text presents a problem-oriented taxonomy of deposits, with depositional models for assessing how different assemblages can be analysed for dating; each type of deposit is accompanied by case studies where the methodological tools used are explained. Finally, a structured working method is proposed.

The topic of dating deposits crosses the chronological and spatial borders of many archaeologies, but the book focusses on Classical cities (particularly Roman), as they present specific traits (continuous occupation, high rates of residuality, high impact architecture, waste management etc.) making them unique fields for study.

About the Author
Guido Furlan is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Padova, where he achieved his doctorate in 2015. His current research focuses on Roman archaeology and post-excavation methodologies. He was involved, among others, in the investigation of the forum of Nora (Sardinia) until 2008, and in the excavation of the House of Titus Macer, Aquileia, from 2009 to 2013. He is currently working on the theatre of the ancient city.
Architectures of Fire: Processes, Space and Agency in Pyrotechnologies edited by Dragoş Gheorghiu. 98 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693676. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693683. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Architectures of Fire attempts to present the entanglement between the physical phenomenon of fire, the pyro-technological instrument that it is, its material supports, and the human being. In this perspective, the physical process of combustion, material culture, as well as the development of human action in space, are addressed together.

Fire is located at the centre of all pre-modern architecture. It creates the living or technological space. Fire creates architectures since it imposes geometry, from the simple circles of stone or clay, which control its spread (and which are the geometrical figures of its optimal efficiency), to cone trunks, cylinders, half-spheres, half-cylinders or parallelepipeds, circular geometric figures that efficiently control the air-draught process required for combustion. All these forms involving the circle are determined by the control and conservation of thermal energy.

We should not imagine that the term ‘architecture’ evokes only constructed objects that delimit human action. Architecture means not only the built space, but also the experienced space, in the present case around the pyro-instruments. Pyro-instruments involve an ergonomic, kinesthetic and visual relationship, as well as the rhythmic actions of feeding or maintaining fire at a certain technological tempo. The technological agency is structured both by the physics of the combustion phenomenon, and by the type of operation to be performed.

About the Author
Dragoş Gheorghiu is an historical anthropologist/archaeologist and experimentalist whose studies focus on the process of cognition, material culture and ancient technologies.

He has edited books on fire in archaeology, fire as material culture, fire as an instrument, also on ceramics, figurines and stamps. He has contributed articles on ceramic technology, kilns and burned houses in the Chalcolithic, and during the last two decades has carried out experiments with the building and burning of wattle and daub houses, with kilns and with other structures involved with combustion.

Professor Gheorghiu is the Secretary of the UISPP Commission ‘Neolithic Civilizations of the Mediterranean and Europe’, and is a member of the European Association of Archaeologists. He is a Paul Mellon Fellow at the Centre of Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.