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NEW: Arqueología funeraria y paleopatología de la población religiosa de Jerez en época moderna: una primera aproximación by Gonzalo Castro Moreno. Paperback; 203x276mm; 378 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (272 plates in colour). Spanish text. (Print RRP £95.00). 80 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691429. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691436. Book contents pageDownload

The main objective of this book has been to open a line of research into the religious population of the city of Jerez de la Frontera, in southern Spain, during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries – the ‘Modern Age’ - which until now has not been thoroughly investigated. The research focusses on the archaeological and paleopathological remains of the religious population. The archaeological excavations were supported with the existing archival material, and enabled the first assessment of Jerez society to be carried out, including a whole series of elements that have not been studied thus far, such as the causes of death and disease suffered by the people of the city.

To this end, a study was carried out examining the pathologies found in the skeletal remains housed at the municipal archaeological museum of Jerez de la Frontera, which originated mainly from epidemic burials.

Spanish Description El principal objetivo de este libro ha sido abrir una línea de investigación hasta ahora inédita en la ciudad de Jerez de la Frontera, en el sur de España, la cual es el estudio social a través de los restos arqueológicos y paleopatológicos de la población religiosa en la ciudad durante la Edad Moderna, y más concretamente los siglos XVI y XVII. En base a las intervenciones arqueológicas realizadas y con el apoyo del material de archivo existente hemos podido llevar a cabo una primera valoración de la sociedad jerezana con toda una serie de elementos hasta ahora no estudiados, como son las causas de muerte y enfermedades sufridas por los habitantes de la ciudad.

Para ello se ha realizado un estudio con las patologías halladas en los restos óseos de los depósitos del museo arqueológico municipal de Jerez de la Frontera, y que fueron hallados principalmente en enterramientos epidémicos. Igualmente se ha podido exponer un principio de localización de las zonas usadas como lugares inhumación y su posterior uso tras el cambio en las costumbres funerarias a principios del siglo XIX, con lo que se ha realizado una visión de la influencia en el ámbito del nuevo urbanismo de la ciudad.

Resumen
Doctor en historia por la Universidad de Cádiz (2016), con la siguiente tésis doctoral: Arqueología Funeraria y Paleopatología de la población religiosa de Jerez en época moderna: Una primera aproximación, dirigida por los doctores Dario Bernal y Miguel Botella de la Universidad de Cádiz y de Granada respectivamente. Licenciado en historia por la Universidad de Sevilla (2003), Master en Patrimonio Histórico Arqueológico por la Universidad de Cádiz (2010), con la tesina titulada: La Cripta del Teatro Thebussem (Medina Sidonia, Cádiz), una primera aproximación antropológica y paleopatológica a la comunidad religiosa de los siglos XVII y XVIII.
Human Mobility in Archaeology: Practices, Representations and Meanings Ex Novo: Journal of Archaeology, Volume 3, 2018 edited by Maja Gori, Martina Revello Lami and Alessandro Pintucci. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691214. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload

It has been abundantly demonstrated that theories and paradigms in the humanities are influenced by historical, economic and socio-cultural conditions, which have profoundly influenced archaeology’s representation of migration. This was mostly conceived as the study of the movement of large and homogenous population groups, whose identity was often represented as ethnically characterized. The present-day shift of attention from collective to individual agency and the countless facets of migration goes hand in hand with new socio-political and cultural scenarios such as the extraordinary migratory flows into Europe, shifting boundaries, alternative forms of citizenship and identity, and the emergence of emotive reactionism.

The third issue of Ex Novo gathers multidisciplinary contributions addressing mobility to understand patterns of change and continuity in past worlds; reconsider the movement of people, objects, and ideas alongside mobile epistemologies, such as intellectual, scholarly or educative traditions, rituals, practices, religions and theologies; and provide insights into the multifaceted relationship between mobile practices and their shared meanings and how they are represented socially and politically.

Table of Contents
Maja GORI, Martina REVELLO LAMI & Alessandro PINTUCCI
Editorial: Practices, Representations and Meanings of Human Mobility in Archaeology

Paraskevi ELEFANTI & Gilbert MARSHALL
Mobility during the Upper Palaeolithic Greece: Some Suggestions for the Argolid Peninsula

Maurizio CRUDO
Greek Migrations along the Ionian Coast (Southern Italy)

Anna RAUDINO
Variation in Material Culture: Adoption of Greek Ceramics in an Indigenous Sicilian Site (8th century BC)

Maria ÁLVAREZ-FOLGADO
The Jewish Diaspora in the Roman Empire. Diaspora, Social Agents and Social Networks: Towards the Creation of a New Analytical Toolkit

Domiziana ROSSI
A Road to Fīrūzābād

Marijn STOLK
Exploring Immigrant Identities: The Link between Portuguese Ceramics and Sephardic Immigrants in 17th Century Amsterdam

Jesùs GARCÍA SANCHEZ
From War Material Culture to Popular Heritage, and Beyond. The PSP “Cancelli di Venosa” as paradigms of Object Biography Theory.

Reviews
A. Falcone & A. D’Eredità (eds.) ARCHEOSOCIAL L’Archeologia Riscrive il Web: Esperienze, Strategie e Buone Pratiche, Rende (CS): Dielle Editore, 2018, 195 pp. Reviewed by Paola DI GIUSEPPANTONIO DI FRANCO
Étude paléoanthropologique et analyse des rituels funéraires de deux sites laténiens valaisans Randogne – Bluche et Sion – Parking des Remparts by Tobias Hofstetter. Paperback; 205x290mm; x+240 pages; 171 figs + 6 tables (colour and black & white throughout). French text; English abstract. 444 2018 Laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique UNIGE . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919375. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919382. Book contents pageDownload

This volume concerns the bioanthropological analysis and the investigation of Second Iron Age (also known as the La Tène period: 470–25 BC) funerary practices in central Valais. More precisely, it deals with the study of two necropolises lately discovered in this mountainous region of southern Switzerland: Randogne–Bluche (excavated between 2001 and 2005) and Sion–Parking des Remparts (excavated in 2006). The matter of Second Iron Age funeral practices has been investigated since the late 19th century in Switzerland and has ever since yielded many exceptional finds. In archaeological terms, the research presented in this work introduces a consistent summary of the current archaeological and historiographical state of knowledge regarding Second Iron Age funeral practices in southern Switzerland.

Étude paléoanthropologique et analyse des rituels funéraires de deux sites laténiens valaisans : Randogne – Bluche et Sion – Parking des Remparts porte sur l’analyse bioanthropologique et l’étude des rituels funéraires laténiens en Valais central. Plus précisément, elle traite des ensembles funéraires de Randogne – Bluche (fouillé entre 2001 et 2005) et de Sion – Parking des Remparts (fouillé en 2006). Le premier objectif de cette étude a consisté à attribuer une identité et des caractéristiques biologiques aux individus inhumés au sein de ces deux ensembles. Ensuite, il s’est agi de caractériser ces deux ensembles funéraires par leur insertion au cadre géographique et archéologique, de s’intéresser à leur organisation chronologique et spatiale et à l’architecture des sépultures, ainsi qu’aux positions d’inhumation, de même qu’au mobilier funéraire présent. Par la suite, nous avons développé une vision comparative de ces deux ensembles funéraires, avant de finalement les confronter à l’intégralité du corpus funéraire laténien actuellement connu pour le Valais central et ainsi chercher à proposer une vision synthétique de la question.

About the Author
TOBIAS HOFSTETTER (B.A, M.Sc.) was born in Zürich in 1992. He currently works as consulting bioanthropologist to the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Bioanthropology at the University of Geneva, where he has collaborated in various archaeological fieldwork operations and bioanthropological assessments, covering the Mesolithic to the Middle Ages, in Switzerland, Italy, Bulgaria, Kuwait and Jordan.

TOBIAS HOFSTETTER (BA ; MSc) est né à Zürich (Suisse) en 1992. Il a obtenu son Bachelor en archéologie préhistorique et classique ainsi qu’en anthropologie à l’Université de Neuchâtel (Suisse) en 2013. Il a poursuivi ses études en Master d’archéologie préhistorique et bioanthropologie à l’Université de Genève (Suisse) ; formation qu’il a terminée en 2016. Il travaille couramment en tant que bioanthropologue consultant pour le laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique et d’anthropologie de l’Université de Genève. À ce titre, il a participé à de nombreuses campagnes de fouilles archéologiques et expertises bioanthropologiques, s’étendant du Paléolithique jusqu’à la période médiévale, en Suisse, France, Italie, Bulgarie, Koweït et Jordanie. En parallèle, il a repris un deuxième cursus de Master en histoire et littérature anglaise à l’Université de Neuchâtel.
The Population of Tikal: Implications for Maya Demography by David Webster. Paperback; 203x276mm; vi+152 pages; 22 illustrations, 13 tables (Print edition RRP £34.00). 48 2018 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 49. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918453. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918460. Book contents pageDownload

The Classic Maya (AD 250-900) of central and southern Yucatan were long seen as exceptional in many ways. We now know that they did not invent Mesoamerican writing or calendars, that they were just as warlike as other ancient peoples, that many innovations in art and architecture attributed to them had diverse origins, and that their celebrated “collapse” is not what it seems. One exceptionalist claim stubbornly persists: the Maya were canny tropical ecologists who managed their fragile tropical environments in ways that supported extremely large and dense populations and still guaranteed resilience and sustainability. Archaeologists commonly assert that Maya populations far exceeded those of other ancient civilizations in the Old and New Worlds. The great center of Tikal, Guatemala, has been central to our conceptions of Maya demography since the 1960s. Re-evaluation of Tikal’s original settlement data and its implications, supplemented by much new research there and elsewhere, allows a more modest and realistic demographic evaluation. The peak Classic population probably was on the order of 1,000,000 people. This population scale helps resolve debates about how the Maya made a living, the nature of their sociopolitical systems, how they created an impressive built environment, and places them in plausible comparative context with what we know about other ancient complex societies.

About the Author
DAVID WEBSTER received his doctoral degree in anthropology from the University of Minnesota in 1972. He originally intended to become a Near Eastern archaeologist, but he was deflected into Mesoamerican archaeology by the opportunity to work at the fortified site of Becan, Campeche, Mexico. This experience stimulated a long interest in warfare among the Classic Maya and other complex societies. His field work and research included projects in Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala, and heavily focused on settlement survey, household archaeology, demographic reconstruction, and human ecology. Webster joined the faculty of the Anthropology Department at Penn State University in 1972 and spent his career there until his retirement in 2014. He is now emeritus professor at Penn State, where he continues an active program of writing and research.

Table of Contents
Introduction; A Short History of Maya Demographic Estimates and their Implications; Comparative Demographic Estimates for Other Civilizations; University of Pennsylvania Tikal Project Population Estimates; The “Managed Forest” Model for the Lowland Maya: Implications for Tikal; Biases and Limitations of the Tikal Research and some Comparisons with Copan; How Many Maya Lived in the Central and Southern Lowlands during Late and Terminal Classic Times? ; Discussion and Conclusions; Appendix A: Population Density Calculations; Appendix B: The Big Stuff; Appendix C: Agricultural Intensification; Appendix D: Maya Food Shortfalls and Their Consequences; Appendix E: Agrarian Capital, Land Tenure, Inheritance, Entitlements, and Agency; Appendix F: Classic Maya Political Organization and Institutions; Appendix G: Malthus, Boserup, and the Maya References cited
Problems of Chronology in Gandhāran Art Proceedings of the First International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 23rd-24th March, 2017 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781784918552. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 colour plates). 419 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918552. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918569. Book contents pageDownload

Since the beginning of Gandhāran studies in the nineteenth century, chronology has been one of the most significant challenges to the understanding of Gandhāran art. Many other ancient societies, including those of Greece and Rome, have left a wealth of textual sources which have put their fundamental chronological frameworks beyond doubt. In the absence of such sources on a similar scale, even the historical eras cited on inscribed Gandhāran works of art have been hard to place. Few sculptures have such inscriptions and the majority lack any record of find-spot or even general provenance. Those known to have been found at particular sites were sometimes moved and reused in antiquity. Consequently, the provisional dates assigned to extant Gandhāran sculptures have sometimes differed by centuries, while the narrative of artistic development remains doubtful and inconsistent.

Building upon the most recent, cross-disciplinary research, debate and excavation, this volume reinforces a new consensus about the chronology of Gandhāra, bringing the history of Gandhāran art into sharper focus than ever. By considering this tradition in its wider context, alongside contemporary Indian art and subsequent developments in Central Asia, the authors also open up fresh questions and problems which a new phase of research will need to address.

Problems of Chronology in Gandhāran Art is the first publication of the Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre, which has been supported by the Bagri Foundation and the Neil Kreitman Foundation. It presents the proceedings of the first of three international workshops on fundamental questions in the study of Gandhāran art, held at Oxford in March 2017.

About the Editors
WANNAPORN RIENJANG is Project Assistant of the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. She completed her doctoral degree in Archaeology at the University of Cambridge on Buddhist relic cult in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Before starting her PhD, she worked as a research assistant for the Masson Project at the Department of Coins and Medals, the British Museum. Her research interests include the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Buddhist studies, and working technologies of stone containers and beads.

PETER STEWART is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran art and Roman sculpture.

Giants in the Landscape: Monumentality and Territories in the European Neolithic Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 3 / Session A25d edited by Vincent Ard and Lucile Pillot. vi+94 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 214 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912857. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912864. Book contents pageDownload

In many European areas, the Neolithic period corresponds to the development of architectural monumentality which left important marks in the landscape, as well as the land clearing and the cultivation by the first agro-pastoral societies.

This volume presents proceedings from the session ‘Monumentality and territory: relationship between enclosures and necropolis in the European Neolithic’, part of the XVII World UISPP Congress, held in Burgos (Spain), the 4th September 2014. The session considered the various manifestations of the relationship between Neolithic enclosures and tombs in different contexts of Europe, notably through spatial analysis; the concept of landscape appropriation, combining domestic, symbolic, economic or natural spaces; and the patterns of territorial organization, in which enclosures and tombs have a fundamental role in some Neolithic contexts.
Monumental Earthen Architecture in Early Societies: Technology and power display Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 2 / Session B3 edited by Annick Daneels. iv+64 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 213 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912833. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912840. Book contents pageDownload

The theme of the symposium is the archaeology of earthen architecture in pre- and protohistoric cultures, with an emphasis on constructive techniques and systems, and diachronic changes in those aspects. The main interest is in monumental architecture (not domestic), where it is better possible to appreciate the building strategies that show raw earth to be as noble a material as stone or wood, but with its very own characteristics which required the development of original solutions and construction techniques. The scope on monumental buildings also allows analyzing the political, social and economical factors that made such architecture a recognized expression of societal values and political power.
The discovery of the fountain of Anna Perenna and its influence on the study of ancient magic Taken from The Wisdom of Thoth (ed. Bąkowska-Czerner/Roccati/Świerzowska) by Marina Piranomonte. Pages 71-85.Download

Anna Perenna was an ancient Roman goddess who had a festival ‘via Flaminia ad lapidem primum’, on the Ides of March, the primitive Roman New Year’s Eve, according to the Vatican, Antiates and Farnese Fasti (Fasti Vat., CIL XII, 342; Fasti Ant., Fasti Farn., CIL XII, 311). She was widely mentioned by Ovid and Silius Italicus and, as Macrobius recalls in the Satires, on the 15th of March ‘et publice et privatim ad Annam Perennam sacrificatum itur, ut annare perennareque commode liceat’ (Ov., Fasti, 3, 523–696; Sil. It., Pun., 8, 49–201; Macr., Satyr., 1, 12). Plinius Senior and Martial mention Anna but only Ovid in his Fasti describes the festival of the Idus of March (Plin., Nat. Hist, 35, 94; Mart., 4, 64, 17). The feast had a licentious nature and was held in an area not far from the Tiber banks. During the celebrations abundant wine libations were poured and the couples lay down on the grass making love. There were songs, mime performances and women dancing with their hair loose during all the festival.

More than two thousand years later in 1999 CE, the myth of the goddess became truth, with the discovery of the fountain of Anna Perenna in Rome in the modern quarter of Parioli. It can definitely be considered one of the most important new findings of religion of the ancient world for the concentration of materials related to the cult of the goddess and to magic for the presence of some professional sorcerers working at the fountain during the late Roman Empire. The recent studies about these materials, especially the deciphering of more than 24 defixiones and magical texts, the presence of different gods on the boxes and the voodoo dolls found inside the containers, made this finding the most important magical excavation of recent time and help the scholars to better analyse old and most famous findings.

This paper was originally published in The Wisdom of Thoth: Magical Texts in Ancient Mediterranean Civilisations edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner, Alessandro Roccati and Agata Świerzowska (Archaeopress, 2016) available in paperback and e-PDF here.
Site, Artefacts and Landscape Prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta by Davide Tanasi and Nicholas C. Vella. 450 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 3 450. ISBN 9788876992230. Download

The Bronze Age of the Maltese archipelago has long been overlooked by archaeologists whose attention has mostly been focused on the Late Neolithic temples. This book attempts to understand the islands’ Bronze Age society in the course of the second millennium BC by exploring the history of Borg in-Nadur in south-east Malta. The site of a megalithic temple and re-used in later periods when a fortified settlement was built on the plateau, Borg in-Nadur was visited by travellers and antiquarians in the course of the Early Modern period, and was investigated by archaeologists in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. This collection of essays discusses the early attempts to understand the site, and presents a comprehensive catalogue of the finds that have never been properly published. It also considers the site in its local landscape setting and in its regional south-central Mediterranean context, and explores issues related to past and present public outreach and site management.
Setting the Scene: The deceased and regenerative cult within offering table imagery of the Egyptian Old to Middle Kingdoms (c.2686 – c.1650 BC) by Barbara O’Neill. 123 pages. Archaeopress Egyptology . Download

Ancient Egyptian offering table scenes have been explored from chronological and art historical perspectives over the past century of Egyptological research. This descriptive overview has usually centred on the diachronic evolution of philology and food offerings, focussing less frequently on offering table images as discrete elements of highly codified information. The exploration into offering table imagery presented in this study examines two key elements: gender and the performance of ritual incorporated within scene structure. Latent and hidden potential of life within the ancient Egyptian tomb was subject to a complex process of metaphysical transformation achieved through external cult and provisioning provided by the family of the deceased, and through internalised cult present in ritually charged texts and imagery. The hypothesis that the offering table depiction functioned as an influential element in this transformational continuum will be explored in this work.

This study investigates gender-based and ritual-dependent afterlife expectations of the deceased over a key phase in Egyptian history from the latter part of the Old Kingdom to the end of the Middle Kingdom Period, c.2686 BC - c.1650 BC. Conclusions indicate that the transformational journey to the afterlife can be understood through a meaningful synthesis of people, produce and ritual embedded within offering table depictions.
Pilgrimage to Binsey: Medieval and Modern Taken from Binsey: Oxford's Holy Place by Lydia Carr. Pages 81-88.Download

Binsey’s holy well, with its literary and spiritual overtones, represents a key attraction of the little church for the modern visitor. In this brief essay, the broad history of pilgrimage in England is considered before approaching Binsey’s own post-Reformation history.

This paper is taken from Binsey: Oxford’s Holy Place - Its saint, village, and people edited by Lydia Carr, Russell Dewhurst and Martin Henig, Archaeopress 2014. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Maritime activity and the Divine: an overview of religious expression by Mediterranean seafarers, fishermen and travellers Chapter 1.1 from Ships, Saints and Sealore: Cultural Heritage and Ethnography of the Mediterranean and the Red Sea by Timmy Gambin. 3-12.Download

Over the past decades, modern technologies such as electronic navigational aids, improved ship designs and accurate weather forecasts have all contributed to making maritime activity safer. However, even today the undertaking of a journey by sea or even a fishing trip involves varying degrees of danger. Over the centuries, those involved with earning a living at sea, as well as those simply travelling by ship, have invoked specific rituals and developed particular superstitions. These could be aimed at alleviating fears, supplication for a safe journey or simply to plea for a bumper catch. The relationship between seafarers and the divine is not limited to a particular chronological period, religion or geographical zone. The aim of this paper is to illustrate broadly how the maritime-divine link has manifested itself through time. The presentation has been divided into a number of themes that include ritual, iconography and the deities themselves.

This paper is taken from Ships, Saints and Sealore: Cultural Heritage and Ethnography of the Mediterranean and the Red Sea edited by Dionisius A. Agius, Timmy Gambin and Athena Trakadas with contributions by Harriet Nash, Archaeopress 2014. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
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