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NEW: ‘Our Lincolnshire’: Exploring public engagement with heritage by Carenza Lewis, Anna Scott, Anna Cruse, Raf Nicholson and Dominic Symonds. Paperback; 203x276mm; vi+270 pages; 79 figures, 50 Tables (84 plates in colour). (Print RRP £55.00). 78 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691306. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691313. Book contents pageDownload

This monograph presents the aims, methods and outcomes of an innovative wide-ranging exploration of public attitudes to heritage, conducted in 2015-16 across Lincolnshire. England’s second-largest county extends from Yorkshire to Norfolk and hosts some of the most impressive heritage in Europe, but public interest in this has not been well understood and, particularly in rural areas, has often appeared to be muted.

Recognising the need for strategies to protect heritage and maximise its public benefit to be informed by a robust understanding of public attitudes, the University of Lincoln was funded by Arts Council England to undertake a programme of publicly engaged creative research. This volume presents the outcomes of this research which included a new comprehensive large-scale county-wide survey of public attitudes and several innovative initiatives exploring the impact of less conventional approaches to heritage engagement, including digital curation, sports club membership and theatrical performance.

As the need to improve understanding and effectiveness of public engagement with heritage extends well beyond Lincolnshire, this volume will be of interest to anyone wanting to know more about how and why people engage with the past. The data from the Lincolnshire project complement national surveys on heritage engagement and the methods used in the creative projects are relevant to the wider literature on heritage, performance, sport, rurality and cultural engagement. As policy and practice evolve, this research will remain valuable as a snapshot in time of public engagement with heritage in the second decade of the twenty-first century.

About the Authors
CARENZA LEWIS is Professor of Public Understanding of Research at the University of Lincoln and an archaeologist with research interests in rural settlement and childhood. Formerly an investigator for RHCME, presenter on Channel 4s television series Time Team and founding director of Access Cambridge Archaeology, she has published widely while leading initiatives engaging wider publics with heritage including the Higher Education Field Academy, Cambridge Community Heritage and Unearthing Middlefields Utopia. Director of Our Lincolnshire, from 2019-22 she is leading Community Archaeology in Rural Environments Meeting Societal Challenges (CARE-MSoC), a European Commission project exploring the social benefits of involving residents of rural communities in the Netherlands, Czech Republic and Poland in local archaeological excavations.

ANNA SCOTT is a heritage consultant and public historian affiliated with the Centre for Culture and Creativity at the University of Lincoln. Her research and practice explores critical heritage studies and the uses of the past. Current major projects include the Heritage Lottery Funds Pilgrim Roots project, Arts Council England-funded Illuminate and work with Mayflower 400, developed consequent to research on Pilgrims heritage in the UK and internationally.

ANNA CRUSE is studying for a PhD in History of Art at the University of Warwick. Her current research examines the influence of the ancient world upon the Florentine Renaissance, and the emergence of luxury goods markets under Duke Cosimo I de Medici. She is also a part-time filmmaker and has created a number of short promotional films for the University of Nottingham, documented at annacrusemarsh.com.

RAF NICHOLSON is a Postdoctoral Researcher at Bournemouth University. Her monograph on the history of womens cricket in Britain is due to be published by Peter Lang in 2019. She is also a freelance journalist who writes for ESPNCricinfo, Wisden and The Guardian as well as editing the womens cricket website, www.CRICKETher.com.

DOMINIC SYMONDS is Professor of Musical Theatre at the University of Li
NEW: Bridging the Gap in Maritime Archaeology: Working with Professional and Public Communities edited by Katy Bell. Paperback; 203x276mm; viii+148 pages; 62 figures (15 plates in colour). (Print RRP £35.00). 77 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690859. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690866. Book contents pageDownload

Bridging the Gap in Maritime Archaeology: Working with Professional and Public Communities marks the publication of a conference session held at CIfA 2014. The session was organised by the Marine Archaeology Special Interest Group which is a voluntary group of CIfA Archaeologists which exists to promote greater understanding of marine archaeology within the wider archaeological community. The session focused on ways in which it is possible, given the obvious constraints of working in the marine environment, to engage with a wider audience in the course of maritime archaeological work. The volume presents a series of case studies exhibiting best practice with regard to individual maritime projects and examples of outreach to local communities, including the creation of accessibility to remote and hard-to-reach archaeological sites.

About the Editor
KATY BELL is an archaeologist with 15 years’ experience of British Archaeology. She is a qualified scuba diver holds an MA in Maritime Archaeology from the University of Southampton. She is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Winchester and is examining the Mesolithic to Neolithic transition on the Isle of Wight. She has recently finished working on a community project ‘Dodnor Rediscovered’ training community archaeologists and recording the buildings of the Medina Cement Mills, Isle of Wight, which sent hydraulic cement all around the country via the Medina River and the Solent.
NEW: Archaeological Heritage Conservation and Management by Brian J. Egloff. Paperback; viii+330 pages; 8 tables, 34 figures (32 plates in colour). 76 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691054. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691061. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological heritage conservation is all too often highly conflicted and fraught with pitfalls in part due to a poor understanding of the historical and current underpinnings that guide best practice. When heritage places are managed with international principles in mind the sites stand out as evidencing superior outcomes. The International Scientific Committee on Archaeological Heritage Management expresses concern in the Salalah Guidelines of 2017 with the persistent problems facing archaeological sites that are open to the public. National heritage icons face overwhelming pressure to provide the mainstay of local, national and international tourism economies while in some instances being situated in locations destined for major development or military conflict. Leaders in the field of archaeological heritage conservation, particularly with respect to World Heritage listed properties, assert that economic interests often are at the forefront of management decision making while heritage values are given lesser, if any, consideration. Continuing and future zones of discomfort such as the impact of war, theft of national cultural property, over-development, unconstrained excavation, extreme nationalism, uncontrolled visitation and professionalisation need to be addressed if future generations are to be afforded the same heritage values as are available today.

About the Author
BRIAN J. EGLOFF is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Canberra and has been active in both field research and heritage management since the 1960s. He has undertaken studies on the cultural and ecological base of the Cherokee Nation, the prehistory of Eastern Papua and on Australian Aboriginal land rights as well as participated in projects in Wisconsin, Tasmania, Pohnpei, Mauritius and Laos. His current interests lie in Aboriginal land management and the implement of international heritage conservation and management programmes. Brian’s most recent publications focus on the illicit trade in cultural property.
Human Mobility in Archaeology: Practices, Representations and Meanings Ex Novo: Journal of Archaeology, Volume 3, 2018 edited by Maja Gori, Martina Revello Lami and Alessandro Pintucci. 3 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691214. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload

It has been abundantly demonstrated that theories and paradigms in the humanities are influenced by historical, economic and socio-cultural conditions, which have profoundly influenced archaeology’s representation of migration. This was mostly conceived as the study of the movement of large and homogenous population groups, whose identity was often represented as ethnically characterized. The present-day shift of attention from collective to individual agency and the countless facets of migration goes hand in hand with new socio-political and cultural scenarios such as the extraordinary migratory flows into Europe, shifting boundaries, alternative forms of citizenship and identity, and the emergence of emotive reactionism.

The third issue of Ex Novo gathers multidisciplinary contributions addressing mobility to understand patterns of change and continuity in past worlds; reconsider the movement of people, objects, and ideas alongside mobile epistemologies, such as intellectual, scholarly or educative traditions, rituals, practices, religions and theologies; and provide insights into the multifaceted relationship between mobile practices and their shared meanings and how they are represented socially and politically.

Table of Contents
Maja GORI, Martina REVELLO LAMI & Alessandro PINTUCCI
Editorial: Practices, Representations and Meanings of Human Mobility in Archaeology

Paraskevi ELEFANTI & Gilbert MARSHALL
Mobility during the Upper Palaeolithic Greece: Some Suggestions for the Argolid Peninsula

Maurizio CRUDO
Greek Migrations along the Ionian Coast (Southern Italy)

Anna RAUDINO
Variation in Material Culture: Adoption of Greek Ceramics in an Indigenous Sicilian Site (8th century BC)

Maria ÁLVAREZ-FOLGADO
The Jewish Diaspora in the Roman Empire. Diaspora, Social Agents and Social Networks: Towards the Creation of a New Analytical Toolkit

Domiziana ROSSI
A Road to Fīrūzābād

Marijn STOLK
Exploring Immigrant Identities: The Link between Portuguese Ceramics and Sephardic Immigrants in 17th Century Amsterdam

Jesùs GARCÍA SANCHEZ
From War Material Culture to Popular Heritage, and Beyond. The PSP “Cancelli di Venosa” as paradigms of Object Biography Theory.

Reviews
A. Falcone & A. D’Eredità (eds.) ARCHEOSOCIAL L’Archeologia Riscrive il Web: Esperienze, Strategie e Buone Pratiche, Rende (CS): Dielle Editore, 2018, 195 pp. Reviewed by Paola DI GIUSEPPANTONIO DI FRANCO
Digital Imaging of Artefacts: Developments in Methods and Aims edited by Kate Kelley and Rachel K. L. Wood. Paperback; 203x276mm; 190 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (80 plates in colour). 65 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690255. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690262. Book contents pageDownload

This volume brings together new lines of research across a range of disciplines from participants in a workshop held at Wolfson College, Oxford, on 23rd May 2017. In light of rapid technological developments in digital imaging, the aim in gathering these contributions together is to inform specialist and general readers about some of the ways in which imaging technologies are transforming the study and presentation of archaeological and cultural artefacts. The periods, materials, geography, and research questions under discussion therefore are varied, but the contributions are united in shared interests surrounding the aims of these techniques for imaging objects: what advantages do they offer, whether in research or museum contexts, what limitations are still faced, and how can technological development encourage new types of research and public engagement?

About the Editors
Dr KATE KELLEY received her Doctorate of Philosophy in Assyriology from the University of Oxford in 2018 and is a specialist in the socio-economic history of early Mesopotamia. She is a Research and Teaching Fellow at the University of British Columbia (2018–19), and formerly a Research Associate at the Oriental Institute, Oxford for the project Seals and Their Impressions in the Ancient Near East (2016–17). Kate has been working for the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative since 2012, including digitizing cuneiform tablets in the Louvre, the National Museum of Scotland, and the Yale Babylonian Collection.

Dr RACHEL K. L. WOOD is Lecturer in Classical Archaeology at Corpus Christi College, Oxford and a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, specialising in the art and archaeology of ancient Iran. In her previous position as a postdoctoral researcher with the British Museum and University of Oxford project Empires of Faith, she was an assistant curator of the Ashmolean Museum’s exhibition Imagining the Divine: art and the rise of world religions (October 2017–February 2018).
Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011 Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 edited by Jeanine Abdul Massih and Shinichi Nishiyama in collaboration with Hanan Charaf and Ahmad Deb. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+452 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (124 colour plates). (Print RRP £65.00). 452 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919474. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919481. Book contents pageDownload

Syria has been a major crossroads of civilizations in the ancient Near East since the dawn of human kind. Until the current crisis began in 2011, Syria was one of the foremost pioneers in the investigation of past human knowledge, diversity, and identity. However, due to the ongoing war, archaeological excavations came to an abrupt halt. Since then, there have been countless alarming reports of damage or destruction inflicted on archaeological, historical, and museum sites.

The International Syrian Congress on Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (ISCACH), held December 3-5, 2015 in Beirut, Lebanon, was designed to bring together international scholars who have directed or participated in archaeological expeditions in Syria, and colleagues from Syria. By doing so, not only could the results of years of archaeological investigations and cultural heritage management in Syria be shared and discussed, but also a spirit of friendship and collaboration could be fostered and strengthened during this turbulent period.

The Congress focussed on the scientific aspects of each explored site and region allowing researchers to examine in detail each heritage site, its characteristics and identity. Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011: Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 consists of two parts. The first part presents the results of archaeological investigations conducted between 2000 and 2010. The second part comprises abstracts of papers and posters presented during the Congress. It is hoped that this book will represent an important contribution to the scientific dialogue between international and Syrian scholars, and will appeal to the general public interested in the culture and history of Syria.

About the Editors
JEANINE ABDUL MASSIH is professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Hellenistic and Roman settlements, town planning, and architecture. She co-directed the excavations of Cyrrhus (Aleppo, Syria) on behalf of the Lebanese University and the DGAMS and coordinated many field and research projects in Syria and Lebanon. Since 2014, she has been in charge of the excavations and management of the Quarries of Baalbek (Lebanon) and of a survey project on the Southern Beqaa (Lebanon).

SHINICHI NISHIYAMA is associate professor at Chubu University, Japan. He specializes in the Iron Age culture of the ancient Near East, especially in the northern Levant. He has participated in various archaeological projects in the Near East and Central Asia including Syria, Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. He was also involved in the UNESCO-led cultural heritage projects in Afghanistan and Tajikistan. He currently co-directs archaeological projects in Iraqi Kurdistan (Yasin Tepe) and in Lebanon (Southern Beqaa).

HANAN CHARAF is assistant professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Near Eastern history and archaeology during the Bronze and Iron Ages in the central Levant. Her research interests include Bronze Age ceramic production and distribution, Bronze Age Cypriot pottery imported to Lebanon, supra and intraregional trade (exchange commodities and routes) in the Levant during the Bronze Age, and cultural characteristics of the transitional period Late Bronze Age-Iron Age in the central Levant.

AHMAD DEB holds a PhD in archaeology and is currently Head of the Department of the Historical Buildings and Archaeological Documentation at the Directorate General of Antiquities of Syria. He directed the Syrian excavations of Tell Nahr El-Arab (Tell Al-Shamiyeh) between 2011 and 2018. He specializes in Bronze Age settlements and burials in the Near East. Today, he dedicates his time to saving and documenting Syrian endangered cultural heritage.
Current Research in Egyptology 2017 Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Symposium: University of Naples, “L’Orientale” 3–6 May 2017 edited by Ilaria Incordino, Stefania Mainieri, Elena D’Itria, Maria Diletta Pubblico, Francesco Michele Rega, Anna Salsano. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (75 colour plates). 56 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919054. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919061. Book contents pageDownload

Current Research in Egyptology 2017 presents papers delivered during the eighteenth meeting of this international conference, held at the University of Naples “L’Orientale”, 3–6 May, 2017. Some 122 scholars from all over the world gathered in Naples to attend three simultaneous sessions of papers and posters, focussed on a large variety of subjects: Graeco-Roman and Byzantine Egypt, Nubian Studies, Language and Texts, Art and Architecture, Religion and Cult, Field Projects, Museums and Archives, Material Culture, Mummies and Coffins, Society, Technologies applied to Egyptology, Environment. The participants attended seven keynote presentations given by Rosanna Pirelli (Egyptologist), Irene Bragantini (Roman Archaeologist) and Andrea Manzo (Nubian Archaeologist) from the University of Naples “L’Orientale”; Marilina Betrò (Egyptologist) from Pisa University; Patrizia Piacentini (Egyptologist) from Milan University; Christian Greco (Director of Turin Egyptian Museum) and Daniela Picchi (Archaeological Museum of Bologna). Delegates were able to take advantage of a guided tour of the Oriental Museum Umberto Scerrato (University of Naples “L’Orientale”), access to the National Archaeological Museum of Naples (MANN) and guided tours of the archaeological site of Pompeii and the Gaiola Underwater Park. The editors dedicate this volume to the late Prof. Claudio Barocas who inaugurated the teaching of Egyptology and Coptic Language and Literature in Naples.
KYMISSALA: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability by Manolis I. Stefanakis. xii+192 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and Greek.. 52 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917685. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917692. Book contents pageDownload

The area of Kymissala on the southwest coast of Rhodes is of great archaeological interest, as it conceals a large number of important archaeological sites belonging to the lesser known ancient deme of the Rhodian countryside, the deme of Kymissaleis. The region is also of exceptional environmental and ecological importance, as it has a particular biodiversity and is protected by the European ‘Natura 2000’ network of nature protection areas.

Kymissala has systematically been researched during the past 10 years by the Kymissala Archaeological Research Project (KARP) inaugurated by the Department of Mediterranean Studies and the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese in 2006.

The research, escaping from its narrow academic and archaeological context and exploiting the comparative advantage of the region, may –and should– inter alia, intervene in a mild and sustainable manner in the promotion of the archaeological site of Kymissala. Its ultimate goal is to promote the antiquities of the area, its educational value and its historical and cultural continuity within a protected natural environment, in the context of an ecological-archaeological park.

Under the title Kymissala: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability, fourteen original studies have been published, constituting the first complete presentation of the area of Kymissala and the work in progress, after ten years of systematic research, in terms of Archaeology, Education and Sustainable Development.

About the Author
Manolis I. Stefanakis is an Associate Professor in Classical Archaeology and Numismatics in the Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean. Director of Postgraduate Studies in ‘Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean from the Prehistoric Era to the Late Antiquity: Greece, Egypt, Near East’.

Director of the University of the Aegean Archaeological Research in Kymissala, Rhodes (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese) since 2006. Co-director (with Professor Nikolaos Stampolidis) of the University of the Aegean excavation (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of Rethymno) of the fortified citadel of Orne in Retymno, Crete, since 2016.

Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Dr. Nikos Litinas) of the annual scientific journal Eulimene: Studies in Classical Archaeology, Epigraphy, Numismatics and Papyrology, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society (ISSN 1108-5800) and of Eulimene Series of Independent Publications, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society. Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Assistant Professor Sotiris Ntalis) of the annual scientific journal Yearbook of Mediterranean Studies, Rhodes.

His research interests focus on Field Archaeology, Classical Archaeology, Ancient Greek Numismatics, Archaeology and Sustainability.
Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los siglos XVIII al XX edited by Sergio España-Chamorro, Rebeca Arranz Santos, Alberto Romero Molero. xii+246 pages; illustrated throughout in color and black & white (71 colour plates). 50 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918637. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918644. Book contents pageDownload

The History of archaeological research has only recently become a research topic of interest within Spain. A congress, Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX, was held at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 2016 designed to bring this topic to the fore. Eleven papers are presented in this proceedings volume. They address several aspects from different perspectives that collectively enrich the historiography of Spanish archaeological research.

La Historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas es un campo de estudio muy reciente en el caso español. No obstante, las últimas décadas han sido muy fructíferas en esta línea de investigación. Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX es un volumen que recoge ese testigo con once trabajos originales que traen a la primera línea la historiografía de la Arqueología española. Estos trabajos, fruto de un congreso homónimo realizado en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid en 2016, abordan diferentes temas y perspectivas que abarcan importantes aspectos de la temática tratada con una variedad geográfica que atiende la diversidad y riqueza de la historiografía arqueológica española.

EDITORES
SERGIO ESPAÑA-CHAMORRO es doctor en Estudios del Mundo Antiguo por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Actualmente es investigador posdoctoral en la Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma (CSIC) y profesor adjunto en la Universidad Isabel I. Sus líneas de investigación versan sobre Arqueología del Paisaje centrándose en la Bética y en Italia, además de su participación en proyectos de investigación sobre el espacio doméstico en Pompeya y la escultura romana en Cartago. Ha realizado estancias de investigación en el Departamento de Arqueología de la University of Southampton, en el centro CIL de la Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, en la Università degli Studi di Bari ‘Aldo Moro’ y en el Musei dei Fori Imperiali-Mercati di Traiano (Roma).

Rebeca Arranz Santos es graduada en Historia del Arte por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, y posee un máster en Arqueología del Mediterráneo en la Antigüedad clásica por la misma universidad. Compagina su doctorando en Historia y Arqueología con su colaboración como profesora en el Centro de Estudios Artísticos Elba, donde imparte cursos de Arqueología de Grecia, Arqueología de Roma y Arte de Mesopotamia y del Mediterráneo Oriental. Es miembro del grupo de trabajo del Proyecto I+D+I de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando. Además, ha realizado una estancia de doctorado en Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma.

Alberto Romero Molero es doctor en Prehistoria, Arqueología y Patrimonio por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Actualmente es director del Grado en Historia y Geografía de la Universidad Isabel I. Ha formado parte de numerosos proyectos de investigación, tanto nacionales como en el extranjero, lo que le ha permitido asistir y organizar numerosos seminarios, congresos, cursos y eventos de difusión científica. Sus líneas de investigación se centran en la arquitectura romana, el estudio de las técnicas constructivas, el análisis arqueológico de los espacios domésticos y la historia de las investigaciones arqueológicas. Ha desarrollado trabajos de campo, tanto de excavación como de documentación, en Carteia (San Roque, Cádiz), Baelo Claudia (Tarifa, Cádiz), Banasa (Marruecos), Veio y Pompeya (Italia).
Who Owns the Past? Archaeological Heritage between Idealism and Destruction edited by Maja Gori (editor-in-chief). 123 pages; full colour throughout. 2 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917630. £25.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2531-8810-2-2017. Book contents pageDownload

The second issue of Ex Novo hosts papers exploring the various ways in which the past is remembered, recovered, created and used. In particular, contributions discuss the role of archaeology in present-day conflict areas and its function as peacekeeping tool or as trigger point for military action.

From the Fjords to the Nile: Essays in honour of Richard Holton Pierce on his 80th birthday edited by Pål Steiner, Alexandros Tsakos and Eivind Heldaas Seland. iv+118 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 7 colour plates. 395 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917760. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917777. Book contents pageDownload

From the Fjords to the Nile brings together essays by students and colleagues of Richard Holton Pierce (b. 1935), presented on the occasion of his 80th birthday. It covers topics on the ancient world and the Near East. Pierce is Professor Emeritus of Egyptology at the University of Bergen. Starting out as an expert in Egyptian languages, and of law in Greco-Roman Egypt, his professional interest has spanned from ancient Nubia and Coptic Egypt, to digital humanities and game theory. His contributions as scholar, teacher, supervisor and informal advisor to Norwegian studies in Egyptology, classics, archaeology, history, religion, and linguistics through more than five decades can hardly be overstated.

About the Editors:
Pål Steiner has an MA in Egyptian archaeology from K.U. Leuven and an MA in religious studies from the University of Bergen, where he has been teaching Ancient Near Eastern religions. He has published a collection of Egyptian myths in Norwegian. He is now an academic librarian at the University of Bergen, while finishing his PhD on Egyptian funerary rituals.

Alexandros Tsakos studied history and archaeology at the University of Ioannina, Greece. His Master thesis was written on ancient polytheisms and submitted to the Université Libre, Belgium. He defended his PhD thesis at Humboldt University, Berlin on the topic ‘The Greek Manuscripts on Parchment Discovered at Site SR022.A in the Fourth Cataract Region, North Sudan’. He is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Bergen with the project ‘Religious Literacy in Christian Nubia’. He is a founding member of the Union for Nubian Studies and member of the editorial board of Dotawo. A Journal of Nubian Studies.

Eivind Heldaas Seland is associate professor of ancient history and pre-modern global history at the University of Bergen. His research focuses on the relationship between ideology, trade, and political power in the Near East and Indian Ocean in the pre- Islamic period. He is the author of Ships of the Desert, Ships of the Sea: Palmyra in the world trade of the first three centuries CE (Harrassowitz 2016) and co-editor of Sinews of Empire: Networks in the Roman Near East and beyond (Oxbow 2017).
Archaeological Heritage Policies and Management Structures Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain) Volume 15 / Sessions A15a, A15b, A15c edited by Erika M. Robrahn-González, Friedrich Lüth, Abdoulaye Cámara, Pascal Depaepe, Asya Engovatova, Ranjana Ray and Vidula Jayswal. vi+130 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 382 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917388. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917395. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents proceedings from sessions A15a, A15b, A15c of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September 2014, Burgos, Spain). The sessions covered are: ‘Archaeological Heritage Policies and Management Strategies’, where international management models focused on legislation, public policies, management systems, and institutional contexts for research were presented; ‘Management and use of science data from preventive archaeology: quality control’, where reflections on the range of quality control in projects of applied science, including environmental topics and social standards were developed; ‘Cultural resources, management, public policy, people’s awareness and sustainable development’, which focused on local traditional crafts, many of which exist continuously from prehistory to the present day. Collectively this volume presents perspectives of archaeological heritage management in various countries and continents. It is hoped, through this, to contribute to the exchange of experiences, the sharing of solutions, and the broadening of Archaeology’s role in the sustainable development of people.
The Impact of the Fall of Communism on European Heritage Proceedings of the 20th EAA Meeting held in Istanbul 10–14 September 2014 edited by M. Gori and V. Higgins. 132 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white (print edition); full colour throughout (PDF edition). 1 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9788890318948. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 2531-8810-1-2016. Book contents pageDownload

EX NOVO: Journal of Archaeology: Volume 1, 2016

The first issue is concerned with quite a challenging topic, that is “The Impact of the Fall of Communism on European Heritage”: it results from a regular session held at the 2014 Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists in Istanbul. The proceedings are edited by Valerie Higgins (the American University of Rome) and Maja Gori.

Rediscovering Heritage through Artefacts, Sites, and Landscapes: Translating a 3500-year Record at Ritidian, Guam by Mike T. Carson. xiv+176 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white with 114 plates in colour. 32 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916633. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916640. Book contents pageDownload

The Ritidian Site in Guam contains multiple layers and components that together reveal the full scope of traditional cultural heritage in the Mariana Islands in the northwest tropical Pacific since 1500 B.C., dating from the beginning of human settlement of the Remote Pacific Islands. The material records of changing artefacts, sites, and landscapes here have been incorporated into a cohesive narrative in chronological order, mirroring the experience of visiting a museum to learn about the profound heritage of this special site and its larger research contributions. The primary data findings are presented as a translation or visitor’s guide of encountering a complex, multi-layered, and multi-vocal past.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.
CAMERA KALAUREIA An Archaeological Photo-Ethnography | Μια αρχαιολογική φωτο-εθνογραφία by Yannis Hamilakis & Fotis Ifantidis. Paperback; 170 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. Full text in English and Greek. 259 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784914127. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914141. Book contents pageDownload

How can we find alternative, sensorially rich and affective ways of engaging with the material past in the present?

How can photography play a central role in archaeological narratives, beyond representation and documentation?

This photo-book engages with these questions, not through conventional academic discourse but through evocative creative practice. The book is, at the same time, a site guide of sorts: a photographic guide to the archaeological site of the Sanctuary of Poseidon in Kalaureia, on the island of Poros, in Greece.

Ancient and not-so-ancient stones, pine trees that were “wounded” for their resin, people who lived amongst the classical ruins, and the tensions and the clashes with the archaeological apparatus and its regulations, all become palpable, affectively close and immediate.

Furthermore, the book constitutes an indirect but concrete proposal for the adoption of archaeological photo-ethnography as a research as well as public communication tool for critical heritage studies, today.

Click here to purchase hardback edition priced £55.00.
Quality Management of Cultural Heritage: problems and best practices Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain). Volume 8 / Session A13 edited by Maurizio Quagliuolo and Davide Delfino. 80 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 226 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912956. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912963. Book contents pageDownload

From Lascaux to Shanidar caves, from Malta temples to Stonenge (and the ‘new’ one...), from Serra da Capivara to Foz Coa park, from Australia to North Africa’s Rock Art, from Pechino to Isernia excavations, from the Musée de l’Homme in Paris to the Museum of Civilization in Quebéc, from Çatal Hüyük to the Varna village, from the Rift Valley to the Grand Canyon, most problems have to be fronted in a common perspective. But which perspective? Is it possible to have a common point of view on different values, different sites, different methodologies? The Scientific Commission for the Quality Management of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sites, Monuments and Museums© set up at UISPP by initiative of the author (UISPP-PPCHM) is aimed to examine these issues and propose solutions acceptable to all those who want to contribute to common understanding of our past history.

The only certainty in fact is our Past. It is undoubted that it happened, it is undoubted that its consequences are in place today, it is undoubted that it is affecting persons, social groups or larger structures in some ways also when it is disregarded. The help of specialists from different Countries and the exchange of opinions with other colleagues from other fields and/or organizations is then needed in order to: discuss the reasons and possibilities for preservation and use of Sites, Monuments and Museums; let the management of Rock Art Sites and Parks, Prehistoric excavations, Museums and Interpretations Centres and related structures open to the public to be made according to criteria agreed at an International level, both in normal and critical conditions; enhance standards in preserving, communicating and using Sites, Monuments and Museums; involve the public and diffuse awareness; analyse tourism benefits and risks at these destinations; introduce new opportunities for jobs and training; develop networks on these topics in connection with other specialized Organizations.

This session aimed to ask: what is your experience? Which problems would you like to address? What solutions can be considered?

Australia and Oceania Chapter 27 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Dan Hicks. 525-553.Download

This chapter presents an overview of the collections from Oceania, and provides the context for a more detailed discussions of the material from New Zealand (Chapter 28), and from Easter Island and Pitcairn (Chapter 29). After Australia, the largest bodies of archaeological material from the region are represented by the c. 841 objects from Papua New Guinea, the c. 622 objects from Easter Island (Rapa Nui), and the c. 595 objects from New Zealand (but see the discussion of New Zealand in 27.2.1 below). Other significant bodies of material comprise the c. 133 objects from the Solomon Islands, the c. 105 objects from the Federated States of Micronesia, the c. 102 objects from French Polynesia, the c. 99 objects from New Caledonia, the c. 93 objects from the Pitcairn Islands, and the c. 71 objects from Fiji (Figure 27.1). Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Central America Chapter 18 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Elizabeth Graham, Dan Hicks and Alice Stevenson. 384-400.Download

This chapter presents an overview of the collection of c. 2,115 ‘archaeological’ objects from Central America (Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua and Panama). The collections are mostly made up of ceramic and stone objects in almost equal proportions. Over half of these objects come from two major regions: central Mexico, and the Maya area (Belize, Guatemala, and the Yucatán area of Mexico). Much of the material was purchased from collectors rather than procured from fieldwork, although most of the notable 212-strong collection of Maya objects from Belize was recovered through archaeological excavation. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Characterizing the World Archaeology Collections of the Pitt Rivers Museum Chapter 1 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Dan Hicks. 1-15.Download

The Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM) is the University of Oxford’s museum of Anthropology and World Archaeology. It was founded in 1884 with a donation of a collection of c. 22,092 archaeological and ethnological objects, which had been assembled between c. 1851 and the early 1880s by General Augustus Henry Lane Fox Pitt-Rivers (1827-1900) – who was known until 1880 simply as Augustus Henry Lane Fox (Chapman 1981: 34–5; cf. Bowden 1991; Chapman 1984, 1985, 1989; Lane Fox 1877; Thompson 1977). The PRM founding collection was donated to the University four years after Pitt-Rivers had inherited a large estate (and his new surname): an event that transformed his life.1 After 1884, and especially through the activities of Henry Balfour, who was Curator of the Museum between 1891 and 1939, the PRM collections rapidly grew in size (cf. Balfour 1893, 1906). Today, the Museum is a very different collection from that donated by the General: it holds c. 312,686 artefacts, as well as more than 174,000 photographs2 and extensive manuscript collections. The ‘typological’ arrangement of archaeological and anthropological material in the Museum (Lane Fox 1884; Pitt-Rivers 1891) was reimagined and reordered under the curatorships of Balfour, Tom Penniman (Curator 1939-1963), Bernard Fagg (Curator 1964-1975), Brian Cranstone (Curator 1976-1985), and most recently the directorships of Schuyler Jones (Director 1985-1998) and Michael O’Hanlon (Director 1998-present). Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
China Chapter 25 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Lukas Nickel. Download

The Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM) holds c. 6,873 objects from China, of which c.253 are currently defined as ‘archaeological’. As with other parts of the world, the ‘ethnographic’ material includes much of value for historical and material cultural studies, but this is not considered in this chapter. The Museum also holds an unquantified amount of Chinese export ceramics, collected from elsewhere in the world, which are not formally considered here, but are briefly discussed below. The types of ‘archaeological’ objects range from Neolithic ceramics to religious and curio items of the 19th century. There is material from the estate of the Silk Road explorer Sir Aurel Stein, a range of coins, medals and talismans, and a significant collection of ceramics. This chapter reviews the history of the collection (25.2), and then considers four significant elements of the collection – the Stein collection (25.3.1), the numismatic collections (25.3.2), a rubbing of the Nestorian stele (25.3.3), and the Chinese export ceramics (25.3.4) – before drawing brief conclusions about the research potential of the collections (25.4). Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Easter Island and Pitcairn Island Chapter 29 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Dan Hicks, Sue Hamilton, Mike Seager Thomas and Ruth Whitehouse. 564-572.Download

The Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM) holds c. 667 artefacts from Rapa Nui (Easter Island), of which c. 620 are recorded on the PRM database as ‘archaeological’ There are also c. 93 archaeological objects from Pitcairn Island, all of which are stone tools. This chapter provides an overview of these c. 713 archaeological objects, discussing the ‘ethnographic’ material where this is relevant. The material from Easter Island is addressed in section 29.2, the Pitcairn material in 29.3, and brief conclusions are drawn in 29.4. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Egypt and Sudan: Old Kingdom to Late Period Chapter 6 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Elizabeth Frood. 90-114.Download

This chapter considers the archaeological material held by the Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM) from Egypt and Sudan that dates from the beginning of the Old Kingdom (Fourth Dynasty, from c. 2575 BCE) to the end of the Late Period (i.e. to Alexander the Great’s conquest of Egypt, 332 BCE). These collections have been largely unstudied, therefore quantifying their extent is particularly difficult. However, we can estimate that the Museum holds c. 12,413 archaeological objects from Egypt and Sudan (some of which were historically recorded on the PRM database as from Nubia)1 that date from this timeframe. This material includes, in addition to objects from Egypt, some 785 database records for artefacts excavated in sites in Nubia under the direction of under the direction of Frances Llewellyn Griffith, the first Professor of Egyptology at the University of Oxford (e.g. Griffith 1921). Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Greco-Roman Egypt Chapter 7 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Christina Riggs. 115-121.Download

This Chapter considers the c. 252 Greco-Roman (332 BCE–650 CE) objects from Egypt in the Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM), which form only a small part of its c. 11,639-strong Egyptian archaeological collections. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
India and Sri Lanka Chapter 23 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Dan Hicks, Michael D. Petraglia and Nicole Boivin. 482-503.Download

This chapter presents an overview of the collections from India (23.2) and Sri Lanka (23.3), and reflects on their significance in a concluding section (23.4). The PRM holds c. 7,029 ‘archaeological’ objects from India and Sri Lanka (Figure 23.1): c. 5,449 from India, and c. 1,580 from Sri Lanka. A few collecting activities undertaken before 1857 are represented by these collections but, while there were transfers, exchanges and purchases between museums, virtually no collecting was carried out after the Second World War and Independence from Britain. Almost all are prehistoric stone tools, although a range of other material is also present. These collections are virtually unstudied, although many were published around the time of their discovery or donation,1 and are often unquantified, but they include some unique assemblages for the history of archaeology in the region. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Iron Age and Roman Italy Chapter 16 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Zena Kamash, Lucy Shipley, Yannis Galanakis and Stella Skaltsa. 336-357.Download

The Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM) holds c. 346 artefacts from Italy that are recorded as Iron Age or Roman in date. A further c. 302 artefacts are listed as ‘Roman’, but with no country of provenance. This chapter therefore presents a characterization of c. 648 artefacts, complementing the discussions of Iron Age and Roman material in the chapters on Egypt (Chapter 7), Europe (Chapter 11), the Aegean and Cyprus (Chapter 15), the Levant (Chapter 22) and South-West Asia (Chapter 23). After setting this collection in its geographic and temporal context (16.2), this chapter presents an overview of the collectors represented by the Iron Age and Roman Italian collections (16.3), with reference to the PRM founding collection (16.3.1), and the material collected by John Wickham Flower (16.3.2), Henry Balfour (16.3.3), Robert William Theodore Gunther (16.3.4), Anthony John Arkell (16.3.5), Walter Leo Hildburgh (16.3.6), and other collectors (16.3.7). The collections from Iron Age Italy are considered in section 16.4 by Lucy Shipley, Yannis Galanakis and Stella Skaltsa, with reference to the Etruscan collections (16.4.1) and the other Iron Age material from Italy (16.4.2). Collections from Roman Italy and unprovenanced Roman objects are considered by Zena Kamash in section 16.5, and brief conclusions are drawn in section 16.6.
Japan Chapter 24 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Alice Stevenson, Simon Kaner and Fumiko Ohinata. 504-510.Download

In 1883 Edward Tylor received a letter from one of the foremost British Japanologists of the 19th century, Basil Hall Chamberlain, introducing himself and ‘the interest which I [Chamberlain] feel in Japanese subjects’.1 The timing was fortuitous. It coincided with Pitt-Rivers’ negotiations with the University of Oxford on the donation of his collection. Only 15 years previously the 250-year isolationist policies imposed by the Japanese government on the country had been lifted and western scholars, like Basil Hall Chamberlain, were for the first time welcomed by the Meiji government to introduce western science and technology. Such ‘employed foreigners’ or oyatoi-gaikokujin (Umesawa 1968) facilitated not only Japanese/western intellectual exchanges, but also material exchanges that benefited collections on both sides of the world, including that of the Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM). In this manner the 13 stone pieces that made up Japanese archaeological portion of the PRM founding collection expanded to c. 510 archaeological artefacts over the course of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, from a range of sites (Figure 24.1). A full catalogue of this unpublished archaeological collection is in preparation, and provides a detailed account of the PRM’s Japanese archaeological holdings (Ohinata et al. forthcoming). This chapter provides an overview of the collections.
Of the ‘three archaeologies’ of Japanese later prehistory (Mizoguchi 2006), material from the hunter-gatherer societies of the Jomon is best represented in the PRM collections, primarily in the form of stone tools, followed by pottery from the complex agrarian society of the Kofun (Table 24.1). Only one artefact is attributable to the Yayoi period. The Hokkaido sequence is also well represented, principally again from the long Jomon period. Five medieval artefacts represent the historical periods, although the PRM undoubtedly houses many more. Overall, whilst miscellaneous in character, with many objects of unknown provenance, the collection provides a tangible snapshot of the material available to western and Japanese scholars at the end of the 19th and early 20th centuries. As such, the collection’s primary significance lies in its historical associations, a subject that is of considerable scholarly interest today. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Kenyan Stone Age: the Louis Leakey Collection Chapter 3 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Ceri Shipton. 35-51.Download

This chapter begins by briefly outlining Leakey’s early career, from which the PRM collections largely derive (3.2). It then outlines the unprovenanced and mixed assemblages (3.3), and Neolithic (3.4), Late Stone Age (LSA) (3.5), Middle Stone Age (MSA) (3.6), and Early Stone Age (ESA) material. A Conclusion (3.8) considers the significance and potential of the Kenyan material. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Later Holocene Africa Chapter 8 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Paul Lane. 122-168.Download

The Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM) holds an assorted range of post-‘Stone Age’/later Holocene archaeological materials from Africa. Overall, the PRM database indicates that the total possible number of later Holocene archaeological objects from Africa is c. 7,419 (c. 69% is currently confirmed as archaeological on the database and c. 31% is possibly archaeological). In all, only 11 countries are definitely represented, if one includes Egypt and Sudan (see also Chapters 5, 6 and 7), by a total of c. 5,112 items. With the exception of Cape Verde and Algeria, all of these were either former British colonies or subject to periods of shared British rule. A further c. 2,307 items that are probably of a post-Stone Age archaeological origin are recorded as possibly ‘archaeological’ on the PRM database. These derive from 22 countries, with the largest collections (> 50 objects) being from Zimbabwe (c. 4,484 artefacts), South Africa (c. 961 artefacts), Sudan (c. 693 artefacts), Ghana (c. 318 artefacts), Nigeria (c. 286 artefacts), the Canaries (c. 217 artefacts), Egypt (c. 212 artefacts), Tanzania (c. 142 artefacts) and Cape Verde (c. 59 artefacts) (Figure 8.1). Of these 22 countries, 13 were either former British Colonies or subject to periods of shared British rule, and it is material from these territories that dominate. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Later Prehistoric and Roman Europe Chapter 11 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Joshua Pollard and Dan Hicks. 240-261.Download

This chapter considers the collections of European later prehistoric and Romano-British material held by the Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM). The term ‘later prehistoric’ is used here to refer to the Mesolithic, Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age: c. 10,000 BCE–c. 500 CE. The term ‘Roman’ is used to refer to those areas of Europe which fell within the Roman Empire between the 1st century BCE and the 5th century CE – i.e. from 43 CE for Romano-British period – while the ‘Iron Age’ is understood to have continued into the 5th century CE beyond the limits of the Roman Empire, for example in Scotland, Wales and Ireland. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Myanmar and Malaysia Chapter 26 from World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum by Huw Barton. 517-524.Download

A recent overview of museum collections in the UK (Glover 2002) noted that only a handful of institutions in Great Britain, around 14 in total, hold archaeological material from south-east Asia. In this context the Pitt Rivers Museum (PRM) was acknowledged to be amongst only three institutions that held ‘significant archaeological materials’ (Glover 2002: 417): along with the Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and the British Museum. The PRM holds c. 355 ‘archaeological’ artefacts from Malaysia and c. 248 ‘archaeological’ objects from Myanmar (Burma) (Table 26.1). Most of these are Holocene stone tools. As with the collections from the Indian subcontinent (Chapter 23 above), the collections from Myanmar and Malaysia were formed between the 1880s and the 1940s. The majority of the collection consists of polished stone tools including axes, adzes (of three main forms), including sharpening stones, touchstones, charm stones, sumatraliths, and two nut crackers. The bias in the collection towards polished stone artefacts is typical of the attention paid by amateurs and professionals during the 19th and early 20th centuries towards formal tools. As a result such collections are generally haphazard, rarely contain detailed information on the context of discovery and usually represent the finest examples rather than the range of implements originally produced. That being said, this collection represents a significant assemblage of polished stone tools containing the main range of forms typical of both regions as summarized by Tweedie (1953) and Noone (1941). Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.