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FORTHCOMING: Axe-heads and Identity An investigation into the roles of imported axe-heads in identity formation in Neolithic Britain by Katharine Walker. xiv+318 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (86 colour plates). 386 2017. ISBN 9781784917449. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The significant body of stone and flint axe-heads imported into Britain from the Continent has been poorly understood, overlooked and undervalued in Neolithic studies, particularly over the past half century. It is proposed, in this study, that the cause is a bias of British Neolithic scholarship against the invasion hypothesis and diffusionist model, and it is sought therefore to re-assess the significance accorded to these objects. The aim is to redress the imbalance by re-focusing on the material, establishing a secure evidence base, and exploring the probable conditions in which these often distinctive items made their way to Britain. The narrative presented here rests upon the argument that imported axe-heads came into what is today called Britain as objects of considerable significance. Specifically, they were items of high symbolic value that played a crucial role in fostering particular ways of thinking about, and addressing, social identity in the Neolithic period. These issues are the context for the study, whose main objectives are the close and detailed cataloguing of relevant material, and a documentation of the investigative work needed to establish the credentials of each artefact.

About the Author
Katharine Walker is a prehistorian who specialises in the Neolithic of northwest Europe. She is Visiting Research Fellow at Bournemouth University, Ecademy Project Officer at the New Forest Centre in Lyndhurst, and a freelance lithics and stone axe specialist. She studied at the Universities of Bristol, Cardiff, and Southampton where she completed a PhD in 2015. Her current research interests focus on materials and material culture, and she has also published on the first metalwork and the origins of social power in The Oxford Handbook of Neolithic Europe (2015). She is an active Committee Member of the Implement Petrology Group, as well as Editor of their newsletter Stonechat.
NEW: Remembered Places, Forgotten Pasts The Don Drainage Basin in Prehistory by Tim Cockrell. xii+222 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (10 colour plates). 366 2017. ISBN 9781784917012. £32.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

South Yorkshire and the North Midlands have long been ignored or marginalized in narratives of British Prehistory. In Remembered Places, Forgotten Pasts, largely unpublished data is used for the first time in a work of synthesis to reconstruct the prehistory of the earliest communities across the River Don drainage basin. The author uses a relational approach to account for the complex and sophisticated interaction between people and materiality. Monuments and material culture are considered together, in relation to the diverse landscapes across which they were deposited in the distant past. The memory of significant places along lines of movement are central to the approach taken, combined with the changing character of the land which supported people. Virtually absent in recent narratives, the forgotten prehistoric pasts of the region are now able to be approached on a systematic basis. The author concludes that a region that was the centre of dynamic interaction between mobile groups in its earliest phase gave way to a pastoral lifestyle facilitated by extensive wetlands. These wetlands were connected by waterways and gorges. Thus connected, the wetlands were located to either side of its drier, centrally defining feature, the Magnesian Limestone ridge.
Geology for Archaeologists A short introduction by J.R.L. Allen. viii+140 pages; illustrated in colour and black & white (28 colour plates). 363 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916879. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916886. £11.99 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This short introduction aims to provide archaeologists of all backgrounds with a grounding in the principles, materials, and methods of geology. Sections include coverage of main rock-forming minerals and classes of rocks. Geological maps and structures are introduced, and the elements of geological stratigraphy and dating are explained and related to archaeological experience. Fluvial and coastal environments are important archaeological landscapes and their formation processes, sediments and topography are outlined. Stone for building, implement-making, tool-making, and making mortar are all discussed, followed by an introduction to clays and ceramics. A final chapter introduces metallurgical landscapes: metalliferous ores, mining and smelting, and metal-making industries. Each chapter ends with a short reading list, and many have selected case-histories in illustration of the points made. Included is a glossary of technical terms.

About the author
Emeritus Professor John Allen is currently a Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Reading. He took a degree in Geology at the University of Sheffield and for many years taught Geology at Reading, where his chief interests were in the sedimentology of fluvial deposits (especially the Devonian Old Red Sandstone) and in sedimentary processes and structures. In the 1980s he turned his attention to modern estuarine sediments, and became increasingly interested in the archaeology of British coastal environments, especially those of the Severn and other estuaries, where he showed in collaboration with professional archaeologists that an appreciation of geological processes is essential to an understanding of the archaeological sites and their landscapes. His contributions to postgraduate courses in Geoarchaeology at Reading stress the importance of an understanding of geological principles, maps, and materials, especially rocks and minerals, to the refinement and resolution of numerous archaeological problems.
La ocupación humana del territorio de la comarca del río Guadalteba (Málaga) durante el Pleistoceno by Lidia Cabello Ligero. x+212 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Spanish text with English abstract. 338 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916121. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916138. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This investigation exhaustively gathers the archaeological evidence of the Palaeolithic human settlement in the Guadalteba river region (Malaga, Spain) during the Pleistocene. The main objective is to show the direct relationship between the reservoirs and the sources of raw materials, located in the fluvial terraces, in the geological outcrops and in the surface deposits. An important part of the work has been the geoarchaeological and archeometric surveys and the analysis of new lithic collections from surface archaeological surveys and recent systematic archaeological excavations in the Ardales Cave and Las Palomas de Teba Sima. In this sense, the methodological tools of other disciplines were used. Geoarchaeology enabled an understanding of the sedimentary and Post -depositional processes affecting the deposits and consequently its lithic industry. Archaeometry helped to see the petrographic features of lithic assemblies of deposits. These disciplines have been fundamental to propose a settlement pattern and mobility of these groups of Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers during the Pleistocene period in the interior of the province of Malaga, laying down a basic structure for future prehistoric investigations in the area.

Spanish Description: Una investigación que recoge de manera exhaustiva las evidencias arqueológicas del poblamiento humano Paleolítico en la comarca del río Guadalteba (Málaga, España) durante el Pleistoceno. El objetivo principal es mostrar la relación directa entre los yacimientos y las fuentes de materias primas, localizadas en las terrazas fluviales, en los afloramientos geológicos y en los propios yacimientos. Destacar la importancia del análisis del registro arqueológico de superficie, donde la prospección se convierte en la herramienta más efectiva para detectar yacimientos que han permanecido al aire libre, sobre todo del Paleolítico inferior y medio. De igual forma cobra especial relevancia el reconocimiento y la caracterización espacial y territorial, donde el artefacto se convierte en la unidad básica de investigación. Parte importante del trabajo han sido los muestreos geoarqueológicos y arqueométricos y el análisis de los nuevos conjuntos líticos procedentes de las prospecciones arqueológicas superficiales y de las recientes excavaciones arqueológicas sistemáticas, realizadas en la Cueva de Ardales y en la Sima de Las Palomas de Teba. En este sentido, hemos utilizado herramientas metodológicas de otras disciplinas, como la Geoarqueología, para comprender los procesos sedimentarios y postdeposicionales que afectan a los yacimientos y en consecuencia a su industria lítica, y la Arqueometría, para ver las características petrográficas de los conjuntos líticos, disciplinas fundamentales para proponer un patrón de asentamiento y movilidad de estos grupos de cazadores-recolectores del Pleistoceno. Este trabajo constituye un hito en la investigación del Paleolítico en el interior de la provincia de Málaga, convirtiéndose en una estructura básica para futuras investigaciones prehistóricas en la zona.
Stone Vessels in the Near East during the Iron Age and the Persian Period (c. 1200-330 BCE) by Andrea Squitieri. iv+284 pages; illustrated throughout with 50 plates in colour. 318 2017 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 2. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915520. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915537. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book focuses on the characteristics and the development of the stone vessel industry in the Near East during the Iron Age and the Persian period (c. 1200 – 330 BCE). Three main aspects of this industry are investigated. First, the technology behind the manufacture of stone vessels, the tools and techniques, and how these changed across time. Second, the mechanisms of exchange of stone vessels and how these were affected by the changing political landscape through time. Third, the consumption patterns of stone vessels in both elite and non-elite contexts, and how these patterns changed through time. The aim is to evaluate how the formation of new regional states, occurred in the Iron Age I-II, and their subsequent inclusion within large-scale empires, in the Iron Age III and Persian period, transformed the Near Eastern societies by exploring how the stone vessel industry was affected by these transformations. For the period and area under analysis, such a comprehensive study of stone vessels, covering a wide area and connecting this industry to the broader socioeconomic and political landscapes, has never been attempted before.

About the Author:
Andrea Squitieri obtained BA (2006) and MA (2008) at the University of Torino (Italy) in Archaeology of the Near East, with a final dissertation on alabaster vessels in the Mediterranean during the 1st millennium BC. He continued his academic career at the University College, London, where he completed the PhD in 2015 with a thesis on stone vessels in the Iron Age and the Persian period. Andrea has participated in excavation projects in Turkmenistan (Parthian Nisa), Sardinia (Tharros), Syria (Tell Afis), Turkey (Tell Atchana), Israel (Tell es-Safi/Gath) and in Iraqi Kurdistan (Gird-i Bazar and Qalat-i Dinka). Since 2015, he has been a member of the Peshdar Plain Project directed by prof. K. Radner of the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (Germany). He is also involved in the project for the study of the stone materials from Shahr-i Sokhta (east Iran), held in the Museum of Oriental Art of Rome (Italy).
Suyanggae and Her Neighbours in Haifa, Israel Proceedings of the 20th (1) Congress June 21–28, 2015 edited by Sharon Gonen and Avraham Ronen. 156 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 313 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915384. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915391. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Proceedings of the 20th symposium: Suyanggae and Her Neighbours. The 20th symposium took place across two meetings, the first in Haifa, Israel and the second in Danyang, Republic of Korea. This proceedings volume gathers papers, abstracts and posters from the meeting in Haifa, which took place from 21–28 June 2015.
Disponibilidad y explotación de materias primas líticas en la costa de Norpatagonia (Argentina) Un enfoque regional by Jimena Alberti. xxii+196 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access. South American Archaeology Series 27. ISBN 9781784914806. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The present book aims to study the use of lithic raw materials on the coast of the San Matías gulf (Río Negro, Argentina) during the middle and late Holocene. The understanding of this aspect of human group technology is of fundamental importance as the main archaeological materials recovered at the surface sites of the study area are lithic artefacts made from different types of rock. Thus, understanding how these were selected, reduced and finally discarded will contribute to the understanding of the way of life of the hunter-gatherer groups that inhabited the area during this period.

Spanish Description:
El presente libro tiene como objetivo estudiar el uso de las materias primas líticas en la costa del golfo San Matías (Río Negro, Argentina) durante el Holoceno medio y tardío. El entendimiento de este aspecto de la tecnología de los grupos humanos es de fundamental importancia ya que los principales materiales arqueológicos recuperados en los sitios de superficie del área de estudio son los artefactos líticos fabricados a partir de diferentes tipos de rocas. Así, entender la forma en que éstas fueron seleccionadas, reducidas y finalmente descartadas aportará a la comprensión del modo de vida de los grupos cazadores-recolectores que habitaron el área en el período mencionado.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Late Bronze Age Flintworking from Ritual Zones in Southern Scandinavia by Mirosław Masojć. xi+264 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 5 colour plates. 254 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913793. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913809. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is devoted to flintworking encountered in the so-called cult houses and ritual zones from the Late Bronze Age in southern Scandinavia, where thousands of barrows were built in the period from the Neolithic to the end of the Early Bronze Age. Considerable numbers of the barrows are still distinctly visible in the landscape of the area today. In the Late Bronze Age, the cult houses, as well as other ritual constructions in various forms, were built into the older barrows’ mounds or were located on their edges. The excavated material from Jutland abounds in flint artefacts, which nearly always constitute the predominating category of finds.
Cultural Dynamics and Production Activities in Ancient Western Mexico Papers from a symposium held in the Center for Archaeological Research, El Colegio de Michoacán 18-19 September 2014 edited by Eduardo Williams Blanca Maldonado. 237 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913557. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913564. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents a collection of papers from the Symposium on Cultural Dynamics and Production Activities in Ancient Western Mexico, held at the Center for Archaeological Research of the Colegio de Michoacán on September 18-19, 2014. While these thought-provoking essays on key topics in Western Mexican archaeology will spark debate among scholars interested in this cultural area, they will also be of interest to students of ancient Mesoamerica as a whole. The time is ripe for insightful discussions and new syntheses of archaeological research in Western Mesoamerica, and this volume represents, undoubtedly, a valuable contribution to this urgent task.

These papers are grouped into three thematic areas. The first, Cultural dynamics in Western Mexico, includes essays on: The challenges of archaeology in flood-prone areas; Exploitation of local resources and imported products; Settlement systems of the Tarascan state; and Stone tools as indicators of task specialization. The second section, Production of strategic resources, analyzes the following topics: The obsidian jewelry of the Teuchitlán Tradition; Differing obsidian economies in Teuchitlán culture; Source areas and obsidian exploitation in Michoacán; The history of pottery production in Capula, Michoacán; Ethnoarchaeology of Tarascan pottery: domestic production and decoration styles; Ceramics, social status, and the Tarascan state economy; and Copper as a strategic resource in pre-Hispanic Western Mexico; while part three focuses on Trade and exchange: Circulation of goods and communication routes between Western and Central Mexico; Contrasting models of ceramic production in the Tarascan state; and Ceramic evidence of contact between Teotihuacan, the Bajío, and southern Hidalgo.
Un estudio de tecnología lítica desde la antropología de las técnicas: el caso del Alero Deodoro Roca ca. 3000 AP, Ongamira, Ischilín, Córdoba by José María Caminoa. x+246 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text. Available both in print and Open Access. South American Archaeology Series 26. ISBN 9781784913496. £45.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

As part of a series of research projects on the Archaeology of hunter-gatherers societies in the Southern Pampean Hills this presents, among other things, the study of various aspects of the organization of lithic technology and strategies for the use of lithic resources by prehistoric populations. This is in order to understand the social aspects that allow us to recognize and describe habitus or ways of doing things. In this book we studied lithic assemblages, in the manner described above from stratigraphic levels of the Alero Deodoro Roca (Deodoro Roca Rockshelter) comprising chronologies between ca. 3000 years BP to ca. 3600 years BP. We propose that behind the technical movements, organization of the production, distribution of activities in space, the selection of raw materials and any other technological activity, there are people and groups who make decisions based on the context, needs, history and knowledge. We ask ourselves: What affected material selection for the production of stone tools rocks? Was there a differential selection depending on the desired end product? And if so, was it different in diachronic moments? What techniques were used in the production of what instruments? What productive activities were conducted in Alero Deodoro Roca and which were not? What role did the tools produced have?

This study aims to produce relevant and new information that expands our knowledge of technological strategies used by the human groups in order to compare them with those produced in other areas of the Sierras. It will contribute to a process of constructing knowledge about hunter-gatherers of the valleys of Cordoba province, by studying lithic technology and therefore raising new questions for further studies.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Mining and Materiality Neolithic Chalk Artefacts and their Depositional Contexts in Southern Britain by Anne M. Teather. viii+114 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. 218 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912659. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912666. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In this book Anne Teather develops a new approach to understanding the Neolithic flint mines of southern Britain. These mines include some of the earliest - and also some of the largest - monumental constructions that transformed the landscape of Britain during the period of social change that accompanied the transition from foraging to farming 6000 years ago. Yet the sophisticated architecture of these mines and the unique deposits that they contained have received relatively little attention from archaeologists. This book draws together the results of an extensive analysis of archival records and material to illustrate how these mines and the activities that took place in them can be seen as integral to Neolithic life.

Previous studies of the flint mines have focused on the functional demands of flint extraction and the ways in which the raw flint material was distributed and processed into tools such as axes. Yet there is compelling evidence that the voids – shafts and galleries created through the process of flint extraction – were not merely the abandoned features of flint exploitation but instead should be seen as dynamic and monumental architectural spaces where creative and meaningful social actions took place. This interpretation is evidenced through the recognition of repeated motifs of chalk art inscribed on the walls of the mines and in the deliberate placement and deposition of artefacts. These artefacts include both naturalistic and abstract forms made of chalk, items that have not previously been recognised as a cohesive class of material.

The book draws together for the first time a comprehensive typology, chronology and classification system for prehistoric chalk artefacts. The concept of artefact is broadened to include natural materials whose selection and placement in specific archaeological contexts is pivotal in understanding depositional complexity and the symbolic meaning conveyed by elements of the natural world.
Le Néolithique ancien en Italie du sud Evolution des industries lithiques entre VIIe et VIe millénaire by Carmine Collina. xvi+510; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. 206 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911867. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911836. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The principal aim of this study is to put forward a technological and typological analysis of the industries of the Early Neolithic concerned in the process of neolithisation in several regions of Southern Italy. The rooting concepts are centred on the principles of the lithic technology outlined by J. Tixier, H. Roche, and M.-L. Inizan, D. Binder, C. Perlès, N. Pigeot et J. Pelegrin. The lithic series examined belong to the different horizons concerned in the process of Neolithitisation of Southern Italy in several areas of the envisaged region. In a view to reconstruct the economy of débitage and the economy of raw materials and the possible formation of technical traditions, this research is based on the following points: the economic and petrographic analysis of the raw materials; the analysis of the technological aspects and of the technical facts; the typometrical analysis of the different products of the chaînes opératoires; the typological analysis through the creation of an inventory allowing to integrate the study of the technological criteria with that of specific characters of the lithic tools. The main targets of this research are to highlight the methods and the techniques of débitage and to identify the chaînes opératoires set up by the early groups of farmers in the South of Italy and in Sicily. Is it possible to recognize a techno-economic variability in the débitage systems of the Early Neolithic of Southern Italy? Is it possible to give a cultural value to the variability of technical facts? What is the rate of continuity and discontinuity among groups of hunters-gatherers and the first farming societies? These questions shed light on the whole of technical and cultural transformations between the seventh and sixth millennium B.C. in the South of Italy, a region that played a key role in the process of diffusion of Neolithic towards the West Mediterranean.
The Production, Use and Importance of Flint Tools in the Archaic Period and the Old Kingdom in Egypt by Michał Kobusiewicz. vi+168 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 203 2016 Archaeopress Egyptology 12. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912499. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912505. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book seeks to explore the issues of production, use and importance of flint tools in the Archaic Period, known also as the Early Dynastic Period, and the Old Kingdom of Egypt, the epoch immediately following the unification of pre-state organisms of Upper and Lower Egypt into one political body. This volume provides an in-depth study of tools made of flint, which unceasingly fulfilled a major role in the period being considered. Flint, occurring in a number of varieties, substantially outnumbers other raw materials used for manufacturing tools, to wit: chalcedony, obsidian, quartzite, carnelian or rock crystal, all found in small or even minute amounts, which attests to their minor role in the first periods of Egyptian history. Notwithstanding a growing number of implements made of copper, then bronze, flint tools constituted an essential element of a broad-based culture, and not only material culture, in the Archaic Period, the Old Kingdom and beyond.
Over The Hills and Far Away Last Glacial Maximum Lithic Technology Around the Great Adriatic Plain by Emanuele Cancellieri. x+125 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 198 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912345. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912352. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The research scope of this book is the human occupation of the northern Adriatic region at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (ca. 24,000- 20,000 calBP), and a point of view over the long debated occupation of the once exposed Great Adriatic Plain and the role it played within the early Epigravettian hunter-gatherers settlement system. The study relied on a comprehensive techno-economic approach to lithic technology, one among the possible means to investigate site function, mobility and land use.
Connecting Networks: Characterising Contact by Measuring Lithic Exchange in the European Neolithic edited by Tim Kerig and Stephen Shennan. x+167 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 162 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911416. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911423. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together a group of peer reviewed papers, most of them presented at a workshop held at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. The event took place on 15–17 October 2011 and was part of the European Research Council (ERC) funded project Cultural Evolution of Neolithic Europe (EUROEVOL 2010-2015).

The aim of the EUROEVOL project is to contribute to the new interdisciplinary field of cultural evolution that has developed over the last 30 years, and at the same time use these ideas and methods to address specific questions concerning the links between demographic, economic, social and cultural patterns and processes in the first farming societies of temperate Europe. The aim of the EUROEVOL project is to do that for the first time, and in doing so to provide the basis for a new account of the role of farming in transforming early European societies, c.6000-2000 cal BCE.
The late prehistory of Malta: Essays on Borġ in-Nadur and other sites edited by Davide Tanasi and Nicholas C. Vella. vii+199 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 155 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911270. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911287. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Borġ in-Nadur, on the south-east coast of the island of Malta, is a major multi-period site, with archaeological remains that span several thousand years. In the course of the Late Neolithic, the steep-sided ridge was occupied by a large megalithic temple complex that was re-occupied in the succeeding Bronze Age. In the course of the second millennium BC, the ridge was heavily fortified by a massive wall to protect a settlement of huts. Excavations were carried out here in 1881 and again in 1959. This volume brings together a number of contributions that report on those excavations, providing an exhaustive account of the stratigraphy, the pottery, the lithic assemblages, the bones, and the molluscs. Additional studies look at other sites in Malta and in neighbouring Sicily in an effort to throw light on the late prehistory of the south-central Mediterranean at a period when connections with regions near and far were increasing. The volume forms a companion to another monograph which concentrated on the temple remains at Borġ in-Nadur (D. Tanasi and N. C. Vella (eds), Site, artefacts and landscape: prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta. Praehistorica Mediterranea 3. Monza: Polimetrica, 2011).

About the Editors:
Davide Tanasi (Ph.D.) is Professor of Archaeology at Arcadia University, The College of Global Studies - Arcadia Sicily Center. His research interests include Mediterranean prehistory, island archaeology, archaeometry of ancient ceramics, computer graphics in archaeology, and digital communication of cultural heritage. He has authored a hundred scientific papers in these fields and produced 3D documentaries about Sicilian archaeology and cultural heritage. His publications include La Sicilia e l’arcipelago maltese nell’eta del Bronzo Medio (Palermo, 2008) and Site, Artefacts and Landscape: Prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta with Nicholas C. Vella (Monza, 2011). He is editor of the international scientific journal Open Archaeology (De Gruyter) and since 2012, he has been directing the Field School in Archaeology of Arcadia University in Sicily.

Nicholas C. Vella is Senior Lecturer and Head of the Department of Classics and Archaeology at the University of Malta, and works on Mediterranean history and archaeology. He has co-edited another volume of essays on Malta’s late prehistory called Site, Artefacts and Landscape: Prehistoric Borġ in- Nadur, Malta with Davide Tanasi (Monza, 2011) and contributed, with him, to the Cambridge Prehistory of the Bronze and Iron Age Mediterranean edited by P. van Dommelen and B. Knapp (Cambridge, 2014). He edits the Malta Archaeological Review, and co-directs excavations at the Żejtun Roman Villa (Malta). He is also co-investigator of the FRAGSUS project, funded by the European Research Council, that is examining the environmental and cultural background of prehistoric Malta.
Quarrying in Western Norway An archaeological study of production and distribution in the Viking period and Middle Ages by Irene Baug. xii+176 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 8 colour plates. 153 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911027. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911034. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The theme of this study is the large-scale exploitation of different stone products that took place in Norway during the Viking Age and the Middle Ages (c. AD 800–1500). The research is based on analyses of two different quarry landscapes in Western Norway: the quernstone quarries in Hyllestad, Sogn og Fjordane, and the bakestone quarries in Ølve and Hatlestrand, Hordaland. The centre of attention is the production of utility artefacts: quernstones, millstones and bakestones, and more symbolic products such as stone crosses. The production landscapes are also assessed within wider socio-economic perspectives related to organisation, control and landownership. Following the different products, from production in the quarries to their distribution and use in both urban and rural contexts in Northern Europe, questions regarding trade and networks are addressed. The material is also discussed and assessed in wider methodological and theoretical contexts, and an aim is to illuminate the control and right of use related to the quarrying, also to examine the groups of actors behind production as well as distribution and trade.
Eros, mercator and the cultural landscape of Melos in antiquity The archaeology of the minerals industry of Melos by Effie Photos-Jones and Alan J Hall. 261 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout.ISBN 9780956824011. £45.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

The island of Melos in the Cyclades has a rich archaeology having played an important part in prehistory and throughout history. But owing to its unique geology it is also home to a wide array of rocks and minerals which have been exploited since the first human occupation of the island. This book is about the archaeology of the minerals industries of Melos in antiquity. The localities of their extraction and the type of processing they may have been subject to have been reconstructed on the basis of archaeological evidence.

At the site of Aghia Kyriaki, SE Melos, there is evidence for large-scale exploitation of alum in the Late Roman period, its processing in large shallow vessels and packaging into amphorae; there is also evidence for the use of geothermal energy there and in neighbouring Palaeochori Bay; there are phreatic explosions near the sulphur mines at Fyrlingos; finally, there are the egkoila of Melos, the rock-cut cavities carved out of the island’s ubiquitous white altered volcanic rock which gave rise to its minerals.

The ancient texts and epigraphic evidence also take centre stage, depicting the nature of Melian society from the momentous events of 416BC to the Late Roman period. This book will have wide appeal to archaeologists and historians, to geologists and mineralogists and to all those interested in the island or just visiting it.

About the Authors:
Effie Photos-Jones is an archaeological scientist and director of SASAA, a company based in Glasgow specializing in the scientific analysis of archaeological materials. She has co-directed archaeological research projects in the Aegean and carried out many archaeometallurgical studies in Greece including at Lavrion. She has published extensively on the topic of ancient technologies. Her current interests focus on early mineral pharmacological agents and the industries that made them available in antiquity.

Alan J Hall recently retired as Senior Lecturer at the University of Glasgow where he taught geoarchaeology. His specialist research interests are in mineralogy and geochemistry. He co-directed the research project on Melos.
Fractures in Knapping by Are Tsirk. xii+261 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 117 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910228. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910235. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is for students and practitioners of not only knapping, lithic technology and archaeology, but also of fractography and fracture mechanics. At conferences on fractography of glasses and ceramics, the author has often been asked to demonstrate knapping as well as provide overviews of fractography learned from it. The first part of the book is intended to stimulate such interests further, in order to solicit contributions from a largely untapped pool of experts. Such contributions can advance significantly our understandings of knapping as well as fractography. In Part II of the book, fracture markings as the tools of fractography are introduced, with their formation, meaning and utility explained. Observations on the presence or absence of the markings in knapping are considered in Part III, along with a number of interpretations of fracture features.

The basic principles and concepts of fracture mechanics and fractography apply to fractures produced in any cultural context. This volume therefore addresses most questions on fracture in a generic sense, independent of cultural contexts. In general, understanding of fractures provides a sounder basis for lithic analysis, and use of more recent scientific tools opens new avenues for lithic studies.

“Tsirk understands lithic fracture mechanics better than anyone. … This his latest work will stand as his testament of a lifetime of critically important research in archeology.” –Errett Callahan, Consultant in Reconstructive Archeology, Lynchburg, VA

“For more than 40 years, Are Tsirk has developed interdisciplinary research on the physical phenomena in knapping, combining his experience in knapping with his longstanding interest in fracture. The work is enhanced by his curiosity and the minute observational ability of a natural scientist. It is the most complete monograph on the subject. It will be of interest to all amateurs in knapping and useful, if not indispensible, to fractographers as well as all archaeologists in the study of lithics.” –Jacques Pelegrin, Lab. “Préhistoire et Technologie” CNRS, Paris

“The book…is a delight to read. It contains information of interest and importance to the knapper, fractographer and anyone interested in flint knapping or finding out about knapping. It contains so much material in one place that it becomes an invaluable resource. It is easy to read and many of the sections are self-contained….The pictures are marvelous and very descriptive. If you have an interest in history, art, anthropology, fractography or knapping in any aspect, you will enjoy and appreciate this book.” –John J. Mecholsky, Jr., Materials and Engineering Department, University of Florida, Gainesville
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