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Bridging Times and Spaces: Papers in Ancient Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian Studies Honouring Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday edited by Pavel S. Avetisyan and Yervand H. Grekyan. xx+404 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 371 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916992. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917005. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Bridging Times and Spaces is composed of papers written by colleagues of Professor Gregory E. Areshian on the occasion his 65th birthday reflecting the breadth and diversity of his scholarly contributions. The range of presented papers covers topics in Near Eastern, Mediterranean and Armenian archaeology, theory of interpretation in archaeology and art history, interdisciplinary history, historical linguistics, art history, and comparative mythology. The volume opens with an extensive interview given by Gregory Areshian, in which Gregory outlines the pathways of his academic career, archaeological discoveries, different intellectual quests, and the organic connections between research questions that he explored across different social sciences and the humanities, stressing the importance of periodizations in interdisciplinary history as well as his views on holism and interdisciplinary studies.

About the Editors Pavel Avetisyan is a former student of Gregory Areshian during his study at the Yerevan State University in 1975-1980; he now leads together with Gregory and Kristine Martirosyan-Olshansky the joint Armenian-American archaeological team at the excavations of the Neolithic settlement at Masis Blur, Armenia. Pavel received his PhD in 2003 (Chronology and Periodization of the Middle Bronze Age of Armenia) and D.Sc. in 2014 (Armenian Highland during the 24-9th centuries BC. The Dynamics of Socio-Cultural Transformations, according to Archaeological Data). His areas of research are Old World archaeology and the Neolithic and Iron Age cultures of Transcaucasia, devoting his studies also to the periodizations and chronology of the Bronze and Iron Ages of Transcaucasia. Professor Avetisyan is the Director of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Professor at the Yerevan State University.

Yervand Grekyan is a leading researcher at the Institute of Oriental Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia and Associate Professor at the Armenian State Pedagogical University. He received his PhD in 2002 (History of the Mannean Kingdom) and defended his habilitation thesis on the structure of the Urartian Kingdom at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences of Armenia in 2016 (Biainili-Urartu. State and Society). Dr Grekyan’s interests are ancient history and culture of the Near East and especially of the Armenian Highland in the Late Bronze and Iron Ages.
Encounters, Excavations and Argosies Essays for Richard Hodges edited by John Mitchell, John Moreland and Bea Leal. iv+358 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 365 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916817. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916824. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Richard Hodges is one of Europe’s preeminent archaeologists. He has transformed the way we understand the early Middle Ages, and has put the past to work for the present, through a sequence of paradigmatic excavations in England, Italy and Albania. Encounters, Excavations and Argosies pays tribute to him with a series of reflections on some of the themes and issues which have been central to his work over the last forty years. The contributors are colleagues, many his students, above all friends of the man whose ideas, example, trust, and loyalty have touched and inspired us all.

About the Authors
John Mitchell first met Richard Hodges at Castel San Vincenzo in 1981, a jobbing art-historian dropping by to assess some excavated fresco-fragments, was hooked and has been working with him ever since, in Molise, southern Albania and more recently in Tuscany. He is Professor in the History of Art (emeritus) at the University of East Anglia.

John Moreland took his first Archaeology tutorial with Richard Hodges at the University of Sheffield in 1977. Richard also supervised his PhD, and they worked closely together on excavations at Roystone Grange (Derbyshire), San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), and Butrint (Albania). He is Professor of Historical Archaeology at the University of Sheffield.

Bea Leal studied metalwork at Camberwell Art College and history of art at the University of East Anglia, finishing her PhD there (on Images of Architecture in Late Antiquity) in 2016. Her interests are in the art and architecture of the late antique and early medieval Mediterranean, and especially the early Islamic period.
Parcours d’Orient Recueil de textes offert à Christine Kepinski edited by Bérengère Perello et Aline Tenu. xiv+242 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 9 colour plates. Papers in French and English; all abstracts in both French and English. 294 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914585. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914592. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume contains 23 articles written by 26 authors in order to express the extent of their respect and friendship for Christine Kepinski. The topics addressed in their papers reflect the scientific work of Christine Kepinski, who always promoted interdisciplinary approaches and developed multi-scale analysis from the object itself to regional study. Several papers are directly connected to fieldwork she conducted in Iraq and in Turkey: Haradum and the Middle Euphrates area, Tilbeshar and Kunara. Others are devoted to material study, notably glyptic, seals and sealing practices. Others evoke Syria: she never directed archaeological excavation there but she always integrated Syria in her studies. Finally, some are inspired by Christine Kepinski’s interest for urban life. The chronological time span of the book as well as the various specialisations of the authors clearly show the great value of her scientific background guided by her taste for the Orient.

Reviews:

'In total, the 23 written contributions in French or English not only reflect the interests of [Christine Kepinski], but they do justice to her fine work.' - Daniel Bonneterre, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (Histara les comptes rendus (translated from the French), 2017) - read the full review here: http://histara.sorbonne.fr/cr.php?cr=3125
Achaios: Studies presented to Professor Thanasis I. Papadopoulos edited by Evangelia Papadopoulou-Chrysikopoulou, Vassilis Chrysikopoulos, Gioulika Christakopoulou. xx+280 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 2 colour plates. 261 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913410. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913427. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In a career spanning more than forty years Prof. Thanasis I. Papadopoulos exhibited his intensive devotion to the Bronze Age of Greece, and especially to Mycenaean Achaea (his native land), through his excavations, publications and lessons to innumerable students in Greece and abroad. The origins, as well as the interconnections of the Mycenaeans with other civilizations, were always of great interest to Prof. Papadopoulos. This honorary volume expands to diverse eras, from Neolithic to Byzantine times, following Mycenaean paths that lead even to the distant East: to Egypt, whose culture Prof. Papadopoulos taught for many years at Ioannina University, and to Jordan, where he excavated for more than 10 years.

In Achaios, thirty-five scholars from six different countries have contributed with thirty-one papers, as a small token of appreciation, gratitude and affection to a true scholar, who devoted his life studying and revealing the long journeys of the Mycenaeans and their culture, but also, to a passionate professor who, by transmitting his scientific knowledge, left an invaluable legacy for future generations.
AEGIS Essays in Mediterranean Archaeology: Presented to Matti Egon by the scholars of the Greek Archaeological Committee UK edited by Zetta Theodoropoulou Polychroniadis and Doniert Evely. vi+242 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 196 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912000. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912017. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The honorand of this volume, Matti Egon, has been a great benefactor to museums, schools, universities and hospitals in the UK and also in Greece: all areas that her background and life’s interests have made dear to her. One of these is the Greek Archaeological Committee UK, that she helped found in 1992: an organization dedicated to informing academe and the public in Britain of archaeological work carried out in Greece, and of enabling the ‘brightest minds’ of Greece and Cyprus to pursue post-graduate research at British institutions, to the mutual enrichment of both. Some fifty-five graduates have so benefited.

This volume offers essays by a good half of those so assisted: roughly split between the sexes, they range between post-graduates still completing their studies in the UK, up to those with doctorates, almost half the group, now successfully in employment at Universities and similar Institutions in the UK, Greece, Cyprus and the USA, with rather fewer working in Museums, within the Greek Ephorates and even at a Foreign School in Athens.

The hugely varied topics they offer cover the entire range of prehistory and history down to the modern day on Greek and Cypriot soil. Neolithic animal butchery rubs shoulders with regional assessments of the end of the Mycenaean era, investigations into Hellenistic sculptors and lamps, life in Byzantine monasteries and the politics behind modern exhibitions; the Phoenicians and even an Islamic general make cameo appearances. This startling range of subjects accurately reflects the depth of scholarship Matti Egon has nurtured into being; the affection and gratitude expressed by the graduates equally mirrors the deep appreciation they acknowledge for the opportunities so given.
Small Things – Wide Horizons Studies in honour of Birgitta Hårdh edited by Lars Larsson, Fredrik Ekengren, Bertil Helgesson and Bengt Söderberg. 308 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 172 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911317. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911324. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This publication honours Birgitta Hårdh on her 70th birthday. Birgitta Hårdh is one of the leading experts on European Viking Age, engaged in diverse research projects, and also a vital collaborator in various networks specializing in the period. Through time, Birgitta has extended her research to comprise other periods of the Iron Age.

A feature common to all Birgitta Hårdh’s research is that she has been able, through analysis of a body of finds, to broaden the perspective, not least geographically through her profound knowledge of phenomena in Northern Europe and indeed all of Europe. Therefore, this book has been given the title Small Things – Wide Horizons.

A total of fourty titles have been submitted to the volume. The presentations include a number of perspectives mainly of Iron Age. Themes as silver economy, coins, trinkets, burials, crafts, farms and fields, centrality and transformations give a view of the variation of contributions nationally and internationally.
ΑΘΥΡΜΑΤΑ: Critical Essays on the Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean in Honour of E. Susan Sherratt edited by Yannis Galanakis, Toby Wilkinson and John Bennet. iv+274 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 114 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910181. £43.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910198. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Over her career Susan Sherratt has questioned our basic assumptions in many areas of the later prehistory of the Mediterranean and Europe, deploying a canny eye for detail, but never losing sight of the big picture. Her collected works include contributions on the relationship between Homeric epic and archaeology; the economy of ceramics, metals and other materials; the status of the ‘Sea Peoples’ and other ethnic terminologies; routes and different forms of interaction; and the history of museums/collecting (especially relating to Sir Arthur Evans).

The editors of this volume have brought together a cast of thirty-two scholars from nine different countries who have contributed these twenty-six papers to mark Sue’s 65th birthday – a collection that seeks to reflect both her broad range of interests and her ever-questioning approach to uncovering the realities of life in Europe and the Mediterranean in later prehistory.
The European Archaeologist: 1 – 21a 1993 – 2004 edited by Henry Cleere, Karen Waugh & Ross Samson. iv+356 pages; black & white throughout. 110 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910129. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910136. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume gathers together the first 10 years of The European Archaeologist (ISSN 1022-0135), from Winter 1993 through to the 10th Anniversary Conference Issue, published in 2004 for the Lyon Annual Meeting. In reality, like the Journal of European Archaeology, The European Archaeologist (TEA) was born before the official foundation of the EAA at Ljubljana in September 1994, and began publication the year before. The first issue announces the Ljubljana Inaugural Meeting, and documents the work of the International Steering Committee which promoted the Association. Readers can then trace the initial development of their brainchild, from the euphoria of a post-1989 Europe where Archaeologists could at last freely communicate to the consolidation of the Association as a key player in the Archaeology of the continent. Perhaps the most striking thing, reading through these early issues of TEA, is how the central concerns of the EAA, for heritage, commercial and academic archaeology have remained central to its content. This volume is published as the Association meets in Istanbul for its 20th Annual Meeting. –from the preface by Mark Pearce
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