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The Archaeology of Time Travel Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century edited by Bodil Petersson and Cornelius Holtorf. viii+318 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 303 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915001. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915018. Book contents pageDownload



To Download the complete volume scroll down past the contents list, right-click "Download PDF" and save target file to your computer. Individual chapters can be downloaded by clicking on the entry in the contents listing below. The paperback edition can be ordered via the green buttons at the bottom of the page.

This volume explores the relevance of time travel as a characteristic contemporary way to approach the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practiced time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-orientated and critical approaches to the past. Papers discuss the implications and problems associated with the ubiquity and popularity of time travelling and whether time travel is inherently conservative because of its escapist tendencies, or whether it might instead be considered as a fulfilment of the contemporary Experience or Dream Society. Whatever position one may take, time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way to bring the past back to life in the present.

Introduction
Chapter 1: The Meaning of Time Travel (Cornelius Holtorf)

Part One: Emerging Possibilities in Virtual Time Travels
Chapter 2: Time Travel Using 3D Methodologies – Visualising the Medieval Context of a Baptismal Font (Nicoló Dell’Unto, Ing-Marie Nilsson† and Jes Wienberg)
Chapter 3: The Kivik Grave, Virtual Bodies in Ritual Procession – Towards New Artistic Interactive Experiences for Time Travellers (Magali Ljungar-Chapelon)
Commentary: Time Travel Paradoxes and Archaeology (Per Stenborg)
Commentary: Taking Us to the Past and the Past to Us (Isto Huvila)

Part Two: Time Travel as an Educational Method
Chapter 4: Use the Past, Create the Future – The Time Travel Method, a Tool for Learning, Social Cohesion and Community Building (Ebbe Westergren)
Chapter 5: To Make and to Experience Meaning – How Time Travels are Perceived amongst Participants (Niklas Ammert and Birgitta E. Gustafsson)
Commentary: Forming Bridges through Time Travel (Cecilia Trenter)

Part Three: Living the Distant Past
Chapter 6: Performing the Past – Time Travels in Archaeological Open-air Museums (Stefanie Samida)
Metallurgical Production in Northern Eurasia in the Bronze Age by Stanislav Grigoriev. 831 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 6 2015 Access Archaeology . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784912758. £80.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912369. Book contents pageDownload

Copper is the first metal to play a large part in human history. This work is devoted to the history of metallurgical production in Northern Eurasia during the Bronze Age, based on experiments carried out by the author and analyses of ancient slag, ore and metal. It should be noted that archaeometallurgical studies include a huge range of works reflecting different fields of activity of ancient metallurgists. Often, all that unites these is the term ‘metallurgy’. This work considers the problems of proper metallurgy, i.e. extracting metal from ore. A number of accompanying operations are closely connected with it, such as charcoal-burning, ore dressing, furnace constructing, and preparation of crucibles. In some instances the author touches upon these operations; however the main topic of the work is the smelting process. The closing stage of the metallurgical production is metalworking including various casting and forging operations, and also auxiliary operations: making of crucibles, casting molds, stone tools for metal forging. These problems are, as a rule, out of frameworks of this research.

Access Archaeology: Our newest imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material will range from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We will provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point.
Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

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