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The Archaeology of Time Travel Experiencing the Past in the 21st Century edited by Bodil Petersson and Cornelius Holtorf. viii+318 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available both in print and Open Access. 303 2017. ISBN 9781784915001. £38.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume explores the relevance of time travel as a characteristic contemporary way to approach the past. If reality is defined as the sum of human experiences and social practices, all reality is partly virtual, and all experienced and practiced time travel is real. In that sense, time travel experiences are not necessarily purely imaginary. Time travel experiences and associated social practices have become ubiquitous and popular, increasingly replacing more knowledge-orientated and critical approaches to the past. Papers discuss the implications and problems associated with the ubiquity and popularity of time travelling and whether time travel is inherently conservative because of its escapist tendencies, or whether it might instead be considered as a fulfilment of the contemporary Experience or Dream Society. Whatever position one may take, time travel is a legitimate and timely object of study and critique because it represents a particularly significant way to bring the past back to life in the present.

About the Editors:
Bodil Petersson is an archaeologist teaching and researching archaeology and heritage studies at Linnaeus University, Sweden. Her research concerns archaeology and time travel, experimental heritage, history of archaeology, the role of archaeology in society, archaeology/heritage and identity, archaeology/heritage and communication, heritage on display, digital heritage and digital archaeology. During the years 2013–2016 she conducted research in a Swedish Science Council-funded project called ArkDIS, Archaeological Information in the Digital Society. Since autumn 2014, she has been Program Director of the Bachelor’s Programme in Heritage in Present and Future Society at Linnaeus University.

Cornelius Holtorf gained his PhD at the University of Wales, UK, in 1998 and was subsequently employed at the University of Gothenburg, the University of Cambridge, the Swedish National Heritage Board in Stockholm, and the University of Lund. Since 2008 he has lived in Kalmar, Sweden, where he is currently a Professor of Archaeology at Linnaeus University, Director of the Graduate School in Contract Archaeology (http://lnu.se/grasca) and the spokesperson of the Centre for Applied Heritage. He is also o-Investigator in the major AHRC funded project on ‘Heritage Futures’ (2015–2019).


This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Making a Mint Comparative Studies in Late Iron Age Coin Mould by Mark Landon. xii+198 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 268 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914080. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914073. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents the first large-scale comparative study of Iron Age coin mould. The subject of Iron Age minting techniques is an important one that reveals a great deal about Iron Age political organisation and economy but which, until now, has remained largely unreported. In addition to examining in detail approximately 20% of all the coin mould ever found, the book also addresses the lack of an agreed reporting protocol, the main and considerable obstacle to progress in this field. In addition to the detailed interpretation of all mould studied the volume also serves as a field guide to best practice in dealing with new material and finds.

About the Author:
Although he has been involved in archaeology since he was 10, Mark Landon never anticipated that the chance find of a single fragment of coin mould in the River Rib would mean that he would spend the next nine years of his life writing this book. He lives in Hertfordshire with his wife, Sue, where he continues to work in archaeology. He does not see nearly enough of his two children, Jermyn and Esmée, or of his granddaughter, Jasmine.

Iron Age Hillfort Defences and the Tactics of Sling Warfare by Peter Robertson. xii+132 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 257 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914103. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914110. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Was the purpose of an Iron Age hillfort to defend people and resources or was it there to show the power of the community and its leaders? Was the Middle Iron Age trend to large complex ‘defences’ a response to developing tactics of assault or did the huge amounts of construction work serve the purpose of building community identity through shared labour?

The name ‘hillfort’ implies a defensive purpose, but in recent decades alternative interpretations have gained favour, based on analyses suggesting that hillforts are poorly suited to military purposes and on views of Iron Age society that emphasise the importance of boundaries, symbolic display and communitybuilding. Excavations of hillfort interiors reveal they were sites for many activities; large caches of stones suggest that sling warfare was one.

This book reports an investigation of these issues. Sling accuracy at a hillfort was measured for the first time, in a controlled experiment comparing attack and defence across single and developed ramparts. Tactical scenarios modelled from the results showed that hillfort development gave defenders increased advantage. These results support defence as the explanation for the features of the enclosing works of hillforts. Full details of the method and analyses are included.

Reviews:
…it is a very interesting account of what seems to have been a well-conducted piece of experimental archaeology, and contains some valuable data. It would serve as extremely useful source material for a comprehensive study of Iron Age British warfare. - Slingshot (March/April Issue, 2017)

This study has produced some exciting, though still provisional, results and highlights the potency of the sling. On demonstrating that hillforts were constructed for military reasons it is less conclusive; that old controversy will not be so easily resolved, but this type of rigorous study at least provides some empirical patterning to bring to the debate. - Harold Mytum, University of Liverpool, www.prehistoricsociety.org (August, 2017)

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