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Yellow Beach 2 after 75 Years The Archaeology of a WWII Invasion Beach on Saipan and its Historic Context in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands by Boyd Dixon, Brenda Tenorio, Cherie Walth and Kathy Mowrer with contributions by Isla Nelson and Robert Jones. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+128 pages; 88 figures, 10 tables (50 colour pages). 92 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692587. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692594. Book contents pageDownload

After 75 years, this story presents archaeological evidence, archival records, and respected elders’ accounts from WWII and the most catastrophic period in Pacific Basin history, and then into modern times on Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. On June 15, 1944, Afetna Point was called ‘Yellow Beach 2’ by the U.S. Marines and Army infantry braving Japanese resistance to establish a beachhead before capturing As Lito airfield the following days. The beachhead then served as a resupply landing for the next two weeks or more as U.S. forces slowly cleared the island of enemy strongpoints, and removed wounded Americans and battle weary civilians to off-shore medical treatment. At the end of the battle Chamorro, Carolinian, Okinawan, and Korean residents were relocated into stockades for their separation from Japanese soldiers until liberation on July 4, 1946. American military and eventual civilian administration of the San Antonio area transformed the agrarian landscape into a busy corridor of residential, industrial, and then tourist development. Once again in the 21st century, competition for regional tourism and investment makes Saipan a nexus of geopolitical intrigue and economic speculation where the past is not forgotten.

About the Authors
Boyd Dixon is Senior Archaeologist for the Cardno GS office in Guam and the CNMI. With over 40 years of archaeological experience in North America, Latin America, Western Europe, and the Pacific Basin, his interests are equally varied. They embrace prehistoric and historic patterns of settlement, subsistence, interaction, power, and conflict. Boyd holds a BA from the University of Alabama, with MA and PhD in Anthropology from the University of Connecticut. He has also been a research associate in the Micronesian Area Research Center at the University of Guam.

Brenda Y. Tenorio has played a role in shaping US/CNMI relations, has worked with, represented and advised leadership in the CNMI executive and legislative branches of government in negotiations with the U.S. and in the process developed public policy on a variety of issues locally. Over the years, Ms. Tenorio has also provided research/consulting services for proposed multi-million dollar private development projects and a number of firms in the gaming, construction and energy fields. As staff for CNMI Covenant negotiators, Ms. Tenorio worked on issues ranging from the labor and immigration to bonds and financial assistance packages to the CNMI. As a CNMI Covenant negotiator Ms. Tenorio addressed CNMI concerns over citizenship by birth and ownership of submerged land. Ms. Tenorio has a Bachelor’s Degree in History and Philosophy from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Cherie Walth is a Project Manager, Principal Investigator, and Bioarchaeologist for SWCA Environmental Consultant’s Albuquerque Office. Cherie has worked in such diverse regions as the Rocky Mountains, the U.S. Southwest, the Pacific West, Micronesia, and North Africa. Her experience is in all levels of prehistoric and historic archaeological investigations and includes human and non-human osteological analysis (bioarchaeology). In her 30+ years of experience in cultural resource management, the analysis of human remains has remained her passion. Cherie has an M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Colorado and her thesis reported on human remains from her fieldwork in Tunisia, North Africa.

Kathy Mowrer is an Archaeologist and Bioarchaeologist for SWCA Environmental Consultant’s Albuquerque Office. Kathy has 20 years of archaeological experience in the U. S. Southwest, Pacific Coast, Plains, and CNMI, Saipan. She has been the consulting osteologist for Crow Canyon Archaeological Center in Cortez, Colorado for 13 years. Kathy’s experience includes prehistoric and historic data recovery, survey, and research. Kathy holds a B.A .from Fort Lewis College with a major in Anthropol
Hasanlu, the Southern Caucasus and Early Urartu by Megan Cifarelli. Pages 144-156 from Over the Mountains and Far Away: Studies in Near Eastern history and archaeology presented to Mirjo Salvini on the occasion of his 80th birthday edited by Pavel S. Avetisyan, Roberto Dan and Yervand H. Grekyan.Download

Abstract: The past decades witnessed an increasing recognition of the complexity of Hasanlu’s place in the Iron Age world that it shared with Assyria, due to research in the highlands to the north of Hasanlu and the proliferation of studies about the kingdom of Urartu. This paper explores evidence, ‘circumstantial’ and archaeological, for interaction between Hasanlu during Period IVb (1050-800 BC) and the incipient Urartian state. There is little question that during the latter half of Period IVb at Hasanlu, the entity that would become the kingdom of Urartu was coalescing in eastern Anatolia and northwestern Iran. The material culture of Hasanlu Period IVb provides hints of interaction between Hasanlu and the larger southern Caucasus region, and between Hasanlu and Urartu. The impact of this cultural contact is bilateral, although it is challenging to trace the steps by which the material culture of northwestern Iran contributed to the development of that in Urartu. This paper argues that material connections between Urartu and Hasanlu, the objects displayed on its citadel and the bodies of its citizens, in the rich and diverse collections safeguarded in storerooms and presumably taken as spoils by its destroyers, indicate the debt Urartu owed to northwest Iran.

Keywords: Hasanlu, Urartu, Iron Age, South Caucasus, trident, bident, lion pin
Afetna Point, Saipan: Archaeological Investigations of a Latte Period Village and Historic Context in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands by Boyd Dixon, Cherie Walth, Kathy Mowrer and Danny Welch with contributions by Isla Nelson and Robert Jones. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+188 pages; 106 figures, 52 tables (66 plates in colour). 81 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691764. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691771. Book contents pageDownload

When Ferdinand Magellan first anchored off the island of Guam in 1521, the inhabitants of the small Chamorro village at Afetna Point on the southwest coast of Saipan were likely unaware. Archaeological investigations of the traditional village yielded Latte Period burials, ceramics, stone and shell tools, microfossils from food remains, and charcoal from cooking features dating between A.D. 1450 and 1700. No direct evidence of Spanish Contact before forced abandonment of the island circa 1730 was encountered, after which time Saipan remained virtually unpopulated until the arrival of Carolinian and Chamorro settlers from Guam nearly a century later. Spanish settlement in 1668, the German occupation from 1898-1914, and the Japanese sugarcane period from 1914-1944 left few traces at the site until WWII and subsequent American administration. Afetna Point and Saipan have therefore been a contested landscape for centuries, but the island’s prehistory has deep roots that tie the Mariana Islands and its modern culture to ancestral SE Asia.
Taymāʾ I: Archaeological Exploration, Palaeoenvironment, Cultural Contacts edited by Arnulf Hausleiter, Ricardo Eichmann, Muhammad al-Najem. Hardback; 210x297mm; xii+268 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (66 plates in colour). 499 2018 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690439. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690446. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological investigations in the north-western part of the Arabian Peninsula has increased during the last 15 years. One of the major sites in the region is the ancient oasis of Taymāʾ, known as a commercial hub on the so-called Incense Road connecting South Arabia with the Eastern Mediterranean. In the context of this new research a multidisciplinary project by the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and the Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) has been investigating the archaeology and ancient environment of Taymāʾ since 2004. A major aim of this project was the development of new perspectives of the site and the region, characterised by elaborating the local socio-cultural and economic contexts. So far, Taymāʾ has been known mainly through exogenous sources.

The present volume is the first of the publication series of the Saudi-German archaeological project and focuses on three fundamental aspects of research at Taymāʾ: the current archaeological exploration of the oasis is contextualised with previous and ongoing research within the region, while at the same time offering a first overview of the settlement history of the site, which may have started as early as more than 6000 years ago. New information on the palaeoenvironment has been provided by multiproxy- analysis of sediments from a palaeolake immediately north of the settlement. The results indicate an Early Holocene humid period in the region that is shorter than the so-called African Humid Period. The abrupt aridification at around 8 ka BP, known from other regions in the Near East, is also attested in north-western Arabia. The reconstruction of the past vegetation of the site and its surroundings demonstrates that oasis cultivation at Taymāʾ started during the 5th millennium BCE with grapes and figs, rather than with the date palm. According to hydrological investigations on water resources, groundwater aquifers provided the main source of local water supply. These were exploited through wells, some of which have been identified in the area of the ancient oasis. Finally, since the time of early travellers to Northwest Arabia evidence of cultural contacts has been observed in the records from the site, which had been occupied by the last Babylonian king, Nabonidus (556–539 BCE) for ten years. A historical-archaeological essay on Egypt and Arabia as well as a study on the ambiguous relationship between Assyria and Arabia – characterised by conflict and commerce – shed new light on the foreign relations of ancient Taymāʾ.

About the Editors
ARNULF HAUSLEITER is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Taymāʾ project, funded by the German Research foundation (DFG). He has been field director of the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 and has co-directed the project with Ricardo Eichmann.

RICARDO EICHMANN is director of the Orient Department at the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin. He is the head of the German component of the Taymāʾ project and has co-directed it with Arnulf Hausleiter.

MUHAMMAD AL-NAJEM is head of the Antiquities Office of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and director of the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography at Taymāʾ, Province of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
Hellenistic Alexandria: Celebrating 24 Centuries Papers presented at the conference held on December 13–15 2017 at Acropolis Museum, Athens edited by Christos S. Zerefos and Marianna V. Vardinoyannis. Hardback; 205x290mm; xx+296 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 plates in colour). 493 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690668. £68.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690675. Book contents pageDownload

Hellenistic Alexandria: Celebrating 24 Centuries presents the proceedings of a conference held at the Acropolis Museum in Athens, on December 13–15, 2017, and includes high-level dialogues and philosophical discussions between international experts on Hellenistic Alexandria. The goal was to celebrate the 24 centuries which have elapsed since its foundation and the beginning of the Library and the Museum of Alexandria. The conference was divided into two parts, to include in the first part archaeology, history, philosophy, literature, art, culture and legal issues and in the second part science, medicine, technology and environment. A total of 28 original and peer-reviewed articles point to the importance of the brilliantly-original ideas that emerged during the Hellenistic age and the curious modernity of the whole atmosphere of the time. The range of presented topics covers a variety of new data on the foundation of Alexandria to comparison between Ptolemaic Alexandria and Ptolemaic Greece through philosophy, culture and drama to the forgotten revolution of science, medicine and the prevailing climatological and geophysical conditions throughout the Hellenistic Period. The conference and its proceedings were co-sponsored by the Μarianna V. Vardinoyannis Foundation, the Acropolis Museum, the Alexandria Center for Hellenistic Studies at Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the Mariolopoulos-Kanaginis Foundation for the Environmental Sciences.

The Publication also celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Alexandria Center for Hellenistic Studies, a joint collaboration between the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, the Vardinoyannis Foundation and the University of Alexandria. Scholars from around the world follow the Center’s programme in various specialisations, ranging from historyliterature- art, to archaeology and architecture-philosophy, and science.

About the Editors
Christos Zerefos is Head of Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens and president-elect of the General Assembly of the Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation; Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Physics at the Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki; Visiting Professor, Universities of Minnesota and Boston; Samarbeidspartnere (Scientific Collaborator), University of Oslo. He is known for his research into ozone, UV, ozone-climate interactions and climate-extreme events. He is member of the Academy of Athens, Academia Europaea, Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters, European Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Natural Sciences and other distinguished scientific societies. He is recipient of the UNEP Global Ozone Award, 1997 and of a number of distinctions, awards and medals from WMO/UNEP, and various scientific societies (e.g. Blaise Pascal Medal, European Academy of Sciences; AGU Kaufman Award; European and Balkan Physics Societies’ Award; European Union Prize for Cultural Heritage-Europa Nostra Award, and others). He received the Award Certificate and Letter from UNEP and IPCC for substantial contribution to the reports of IPCC, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with the former Vice President of USA, Al Gore (December 2007). He is honorary professor, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; has an honorary doctoral degree from the Physics Department, University of Patras; honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, university division of the American College ANATOLIA, Thessaloniki. He has supervised 50 MSc and 30 PhD degrees and has originated eight international research centres. His research work in peer-reviewed scientific journals is acknowledged widely by the scientific community. (For more see www.christoszerefos.com/)

Marianna V. Vardinoyannis is a Goodwill Ambassador of UNESCO for the protection of children, founder and president of the ‘Marianna V. Vardinoyannis Foundation’, of the ‘ELPIDA Friends’ Association of Children with cancer
Une archéologie des provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo edited by Bernard Clist, Pierre de Maret and Koen Bostoen. Paperback; 205x290mm; 500pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (approx. 205 plates in colour). French text throughout. 465 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919726. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919733. Book contents pageDownload

Of all the great kingdoms that flourished in Africa, the Kongo is one of the most famous. It remains an important historical and cultural reference for Africans and their diaspora. The KongoKing inter-university project (2012-2016), funded by the European Research Council, aimed, through an interdisciplinary approach, to understand the origin of the kingdom and to shed light on the phenomena of political centralization, economic integration and linguistic evolution that took place there. This book presents in detail the results of archaeological research carried out by the KongoKing project in the former northern provinces of the Kongo Kingdom, currently located in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

French Description: De tous les grands royaumes qui fleurirent en Afrique, le royaume Kongo est l’un des plus célèbres. Il reste une référence historique et culturelle importante pour les Africains et leur diaspora. Entraînés très tôt dans le commerce de traite, les esclaves originaires de la région font que du Brésil à New York, en passant par les Caraïbes, la culture Kongo a laissé de nombreuses traces.

Le projet interuniversitaire KongoKing (2012-2016), financé par le Conseil Européen de la Recherche a été coordonné par Koen Bostoen, tandis que Bernard Clist et Pierre de Maret en ont dirigé le volet archéologique. Ce projet visait par une approche interdisciplinaire à comprendre l’origine du royaume et à éclairer les phénomènes de la centralisation politique, d’intégration économique et d’évolution linguistique qui s’y sont déroulés .

Cet ouvrage présente de façon détaillée les résultats des recherches archéologiques menées par le projet KongoKing dans les anciennes provinces septentrionales du royaume Kongo, situées actuellement en République Démocratique du Congo. Dans une première partie on présente le contexte général, l’évolution du milieu, l’histoire du groupe linguistique kikongo et ce que l'on sait des périodes qui précèdent le royaume, ainsi que des informations récoltées dans diverses sources historiques sur ces provinces. Les prospections et fouilles des différents sites étudiés sont ensuite présentées. Puis vient le bilan des recherches archéologiques avec une synthèse des datations, une esquisse de la séquence chrono-culturelle de la poterie kongo et les études systématiques des différents types de vestiges récoltés. Pour conclure, on présente la synthèse de l'ensemble de ces découvertes et la façon dont celles-ci viennent compléter les données issues des autres disciplines pour éclairer d'un jour nouveau l'histoire du royaume Kongo.

BERNARD CLIST est actuellement professeur invité de l’Université de Gand (UGent). Il est archéologue depuis 38 ans, spécialiste de l’Afrique centrale où il a dirigé des projets de recherches notamment en Angola, Cameroun, Gabon et Guinée-Equatoriale. Entre 1985 et 1995 il a été le responsable du Département d’Archéologie du CICIBA au Gabon qu’il a créé. Il a aussi réalisé de nombreuses Etudes d’Impact Environnemental pour des sociétés américaines, britanniques, françaises au Gabon et en Zambie. Pendant toutes ces années, il a publié ou co-publié plus de 130 articles et 8 ouvrages. Entre 2015 et 2016, il a contribué à la version finale du dossier de classement par l’UNESCO du centre historique de Mbanza Kongo au Patrimoine Mondial de l’Humanité, chose acquise en juillet 2017.

PIERRE DE MARET est professeur d’anthropologie et d’archéologie à l’Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) dont il a été le recteur, et Honorary professor à l’University College de Londres. Il poursuit depuis plus de 45 ans des recherches sur le terrain en Afrique centrale et est l’auteur de nombreuses publications sur l’histoire précoloniale, l’anthropologie économique et appliquée, et la gestion culturelle. Membre de l’Académie Royale de Belgique, il est aussi président du conseil scientifique du Musée Royal de l’Afrique Centrale (MRAC)
The Roman Pottery Manufacturing Site in Highgate Wood: Excavations 1966-78 by A E Brown and H L Sheldon. Paperback; 205x290mm; xii+392 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (70 plates in colour). (Print RRP £60.00). 456 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 43. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919788. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919795. Book contents pageDownload

Excavations over a period of eight years uncovered at least ten pottery kilns, waster heaps, ditches and pits, but only a few definite structures. The pottery from the site indicates a period of operation extending from the first half of the 1st century AD to the later 2nd century. The pottery made at the site included initially a vegetable tempered handmade ware, but subsequently the bulk of it consisted of a grog tempered ware and then pottery in a sandy fabric which is well known from assemblages in London. The type of kiln varied with the pottery fabric; there was possible evidence for a pre-Roman pit firing, and later kilns set in ditches were of the twin flued type, eventually replaced by the more familiar above ground kilns with raised floors. Changes in pottery fabric were reflected in different methods of clay preparation, which led to changes in the function of the various ditches, the stratigraphy of which, along with the variation in the fabrics, was significant in enabling the four broad phases into which the site has been divided, to be proposed.

The report includes a very detailed analysis of the forms and fabrics of the pottery made at Highgate. Finds of prehistoric flintwork and pottery during the excavation, and of material of later date, together with the observation of earthworks and historical research, have been used to show the place of the pottery kilns as an element in the exploitation of the woodland of northern London over the last eight thousand years.

In addition to the full eBook being available as a free download in Open Access (click 'Download (pdf)' further down this page), these web pages take the published pottery illustrations, but rearrange them by their typological category rather than their archaeological context. This allows the full spectrum of Highgate pottery forms across all phases of the site to be compared, and parallels for vessels of possible Highgate origin from domestic sites can be identified.


About the Authors
TONY BROWN was a member of the academic staff of the University of Leicester for over thirty years, moving there in 1964 as an Assistant Staff Tutor (Organising Tutor for Leicestershire). In 1966 he became Organising Tutor for Northamptonshire and in 1968 Staff Tutor in Archaeology. From 1990 he held a joint appointment with the School of Archaeological Studies, retiring in 2001 as an Emeritus Reader.
Rockshelter Excavations in the East Hamersley Range, Pilbara Region, Western Australia edited by Dawn Cropper and W. Boone Law, foreword by Maitland Parker and Slim Parker, Martidja Banyjima Elders. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+454 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £90.00). 458 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919764. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919771. Book contents pageDownload

Rockshelter Excavations in the East Hamersley Range offers a detailed study of six exceptional rockshelter sites from the inland Pilbara Region of Western Australia. It provides highly descriptive, chapter-length accounts of archaeological investigations at Jundaru, Djadjiling, HS-A1, HD073APAD13, PAD 3, and HD073A03 rockshelters, which were excavated as part of a mitigative salvage program conducted at the Hope Downs 1 mine between 2007 and 2010. The research findings show that early Aboriginal peoples initially occupied the area ca. 45,000 years ago, demonstrating that the east Hamersley Range contains some of the oldest known Aboriginal archaeological sites in the Australian arid zone. The story of the Pleistocene and Holocene Aboriginal occupation at Hope Downs 1 is long and complex. Using an extensive radiocarbon and OSL chronology that spans from >47,000 years ago to the recent past, the story of the Aboriginal archaeological record is explored via prominent changes in lithic technology, artefact use-wear/residues, combustion features, faunal remains, rockshelter geomorphology, archaeomagnetism, and pollen/phytolith analysis. The work investigates the early occupation of the region and examines the archaeological evidence for occupation during the last glacial maximum. It chronicles significant changes in Aboriginal stone artefact technology over time with its analysis of more than 35,000 chipped stone artefacts.

Consisting of 18 chapters, the volume is rich with colour photographs, illustrations, and figures, including high-resolution images of the rockshelter sites, excavations, stratigraphic sections, cultural features, and artefacts. It includes a foreword by the Martidja Banyjima elders, who contextualise the cultural importance of this work to Banyjima Peoples and Traditional Owners of the region. The monograph also includes comprehensive synthesis of the regional archaeological record by the editors and a chapter on Banyjima culture and traditions by consulting anthropologists Dr Nadia Butler, Dr Neale Draper, and Fiona Sutherland. Many specialist studies were commissioned for the Hope Downs work, including an archaeomagnetism report by Dr Andy Herries (LaTrobe University), a faunal analysis study by Dr. Matthew McDowell (University of Tasmania), a phytolith analysis by Dr Lynley Wallis (University of Notre Dame Australia), a palynological study by Dr Simon Haberle, Feli Hopf, and Dr Phil Roberts (Australian National University), artefact usewear/residue analysis by Dr Richard Fullagar (University of Wollongong), optically stimulated luminescence dating by Frances Williams (University of Adelaide), and a rockshelter geomorphological study by Prof Martin Williams (University of Adelaide).

About the Editors
DAWN CROPPER is the Director of Archaeology at leading consulting company, New Zealand Heritage Properties, which has branches in Dunedin, Christchurch, and Invercargill. As Director, Dawn’s responsibilities include the management of all archaeology teams across the branches, development of process and training, as well as the development of proprietary methodology for archaeological risk management across large areas. She also specialises in heritage impact assessments and is a leading expert in the management of large-scale archaeological projects throughout New Zealand. Dawn holds a PhD in Archaeology from the University of Sydney (Australia) and a Master’s in Archaeology from the University of Saskatchewan (Canada), with a focus on technological analysis of flaked stone tools. From 2007 to 2013 she worked as a senior archaeologist and lithic specialist for Australian Cultural Heritage Management Pty Ltd, co-managing and supervising the Hope Downs 1 rockshelter excavations with W. Boone Law.

W. BOONE LAW is a scientist and heritage professional that specialises in the Aboriginal archaeology of the Australian Arid Zone. His qualifications include a BA in Anthr
Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011 Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 edited by Jeanine Abdul Massih and Shinichi Nishiyama in collaboration with Hanan Charaf and Ahmad Deb. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+452 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (124 colour plates). (Print RRP £65.00). 452 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919474. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919481. Book contents pageDownload

Syria has been a major crossroads of civilizations in the ancient Near East since the dawn of human kind. Until the current crisis began in 2011, Syria was one of the foremost pioneers in the investigation of past human knowledge, diversity, and identity. However, due to the ongoing war, archaeological excavations came to an abrupt halt. Since then, there have been countless alarming reports of damage or destruction inflicted on archaeological, historical, and museum sites.

The International Syrian Congress on Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (ISCACH), held December 3-5, 2015 in Beirut, Lebanon, was designed to bring together international scholars who have directed or participated in archaeological expeditions in Syria, and colleagues from Syria. By doing so, not only could the results of years of archaeological investigations and cultural heritage management in Syria be shared and discussed, but also a spirit of friendship and collaboration could be fostered and strengthened during this turbulent period.

The Congress focussed on the scientific aspects of each explored site and region allowing researchers to examine in detail each heritage site, its characteristics and identity. Archaeological Explorations in Syria 2000-2011: Proceedings of ISCACH-Beirut 2015 consists of two parts. The first part presents the results of archaeological investigations conducted between 2000 and 2010. The second part comprises abstracts of papers and posters presented during the Congress. It is hoped that this book will represent an important contribution to the scientific dialogue between international and Syrian scholars, and will appeal to the general public interested in the culture and history of Syria.

About the Editors
JEANINE ABDUL MASSIH is professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Hellenistic and Roman settlements, town planning, and architecture. She co-directed the excavations of Cyrrhus (Aleppo, Syria) on behalf of the Lebanese University and the DGAMS and coordinated many field and research projects in Syria and Lebanon. Since 2014, she has been in charge of the excavations and management of the Quarries of Baalbek (Lebanon) and of a survey project on the Southern Beqaa (Lebanon).

SHINICHI NISHIYAMA is associate professor at Chubu University, Japan. He specializes in the Iron Age culture of the ancient Near East, especially in the northern Levant. He has participated in various archaeological projects in the Near East and Central Asia including Syria, Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. He was also involved in the UNESCO-led cultural heritage projects in Afghanistan and Tajikistan. He currently co-directs archaeological projects in Iraqi Kurdistan (Yasin Tepe) and in Lebanon (Southern Beqaa).

HANAN CHARAF is assistant professor in art and archaeology at the Lebanese University. She specializes in Near Eastern history and archaeology during the Bronze and Iron Ages in the central Levant. Her research interests include Bronze Age ceramic production and distribution, Bronze Age Cypriot pottery imported to Lebanon, supra and intraregional trade (exchange commodities and routes) in the Levant during the Bronze Age, and cultural characteristics of the transitional period Late Bronze Age-Iron Age in the central Levant.

AHMAD DEB holds a PhD in archaeology and is currently Head of the Department of the Historical Buildings and Archaeological Documentation at the Directorate General of Antiquities of Syria. He directed the Syrian excavations of Tell Nahr El-Arab (Tell Al-Shamiyeh) between 2011 and 2018. He specializes in Bronze Age settlements and burials in the Near East. Today, he dedicates his time to saving and documenting Syrian endangered cultural heritage.
La ocupación cazadora-recolectora durante la transición Pleistoceno-Holoceno en el oeste de Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil: geoarqueología de los sitios en la formación sedimentaria Touro Passo by Viviane Pouey Vidal. Paperback; 203x276mm; xviii+238 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text (Print RRP £55.00). 57 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919139. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919146. Book contents pageDownload

This book presents the results obtained during geoarchaeological studies carried out in the locality of Touro Passo, municipality of Uruguaiana, Brazil. There, the Paleoindian sites studied by the team of the PRONAPA-National Archaeological Research Program in the 1960s and 1970s were relocated and others with excellent study potential have been recognized. The archaeological sites are located in the alluvial plains of the Uruguay River and the Touro Passo Stream and correspond to the late Pleistocene-early Holocene transition.

The geoarchaeological approach allowed the understanding of the stratigraphic sequence and the processes of formation and post-depositional disturbance of the archaeological sites in a fluvial environment. Archaeological excavations, soundings, stratigraphic profile surveys, sequence correlations and numerical dates were carried out. The dispersion of artifacts on the surface and cave erosion was recorded, and a lithic taphonomy study was carried out. Four Paleoindian sites located in the Touro Passo Formation were analyzed: Barranca Grande, RS-I-66: Milton Almeida, RS-I-69: Laranjito and Casualidade. The new chronologies obtained for the initial period of human occupation in the region represent a scientific advance for the study of hunter-gatherer occupations during the Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene in the triple border of Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay.

About the Author
Viviane Pouey Vidal has a PhD in Archaeology (Faculty of Social Sciences, UNICEN-National University of the Center of the Province of Buenos Aires-Olavarría). She is a researcher at the GEGAL - Group of Geoarchaeological Studies of Latin America. She was a PhD Fellow abroad by the CAPES - Coordination of Improvement of Higher Level Personnel. She acted as University teacher in the Interdisciplinary Degree Course in Human Sciences at UNIPAMPA - Federal University of Pampa, São Borja Campus / Rio Grande do Sul (2015/2017). She is a member of the Frontier Relations Research Group: History, Politics and Culture in the Triple Frontier Brazil and Uruguay (CNPq-Federal University of Pampa). She is the author of the PPC- Pedagogical Project of the Bachelor's Degree Course in Archaeology that aims to be implemented in the UNIPAMPA. She acts as a consultant in archaeological and patrimonial research in environmental licensing, with experience in Precolonial research and Patrimonial Education.

Spanish Description: Este libro presenta los resultados obtenidos durante los estudios geoarqueológicos realizados en la localidad Touro Passo, municipio de Uruguaiana, Brasil. Alli se reubicaron los sitios paleoindios estudiados por el equipo del PRONAPA-Programa Nacional de Investigaciones Arqueológicas en las décadas de 1960 y 1970 y han sido reconocidos otros con excelente potencial de estudio. Los sitios arqueológicos están situados en las planicies aluviales del Río Uruguay y del Arroyo Touro Passo y corresponden a la transición Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno temprano.

El enfoque geoarqueológico permitió la comprensión de la secuencia estratigráfica y los procesos de formación y perturbación postdepositacional de los sitios arqueológicos en ambiente fluvial. Fueron realizadas excavaciones arqueológicas, sondeos, relevamiento de perfiles-estratigráficos, correlaciones de secuencias y fechados numéricos. Se registró la dispersión de los artefactos en superficie y en las cárvavas de erosión, y se realizó, un estudio de tafonomía lítica. Se analizaron 4 sitios paleoindios situados en la Formación Touro Passo: Barranca Grande, RS-I-66:Milton Almeida, RS-I-69: Laranjito y Casualidade. Las nuevas cronologías obtenidas para el período inicial de ocupación humana en la región, representan un avance científico para el estudio de las ocupaciones cazadoras-recolectoras durante el Pleistoceno tardío-Holoceno temprano en la triple frontera Brasil, Argentina y Uruguay.

Biografía da autora: Viviane P
Current Research in Egyptology 2017 Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Symposium: University of Naples, “L’Orientale” 3–6 May 2017 edited by Ilaria Incordino, Stefania Mainieri, Elena D’Itria, Maria Diletta Pubblico, Francesco Michele Rega, Anna Salsano. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (75 colour plates). 56 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919054. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919061. Book contents pageDownload

Current Research in Egyptology 2017 presents papers delivered during the eighteenth meeting of this international conference, held at the University of Naples “L’Orientale”, 3–6 May, 2017. Some 122 scholars from all over the world gathered in Naples to attend three simultaneous sessions of papers and posters, focussed on a large variety of subjects: Graeco-Roman and Byzantine Egypt, Nubian Studies, Language and Texts, Art and Architecture, Religion and Cult, Field Projects, Museums and Archives, Material Culture, Mummies and Coffins, Society, Technologies applied to Egyptology, Environment. The participants attended seven keynote presentations given by Rosanna Pirelli (Egyptologist), Irene Bragantini (Roman Archaeologist) and Andrea Manzo (Nubian Archaeologist) from the University of Naples “L’Orientale”; Marilina Betrò (Egyptologist) from Pisa University; Patrizia Piacentini (Egyptologist) from Milan University; Christian Greco (Director of Turin Egyptian Museum) and Daniela Picchi (Archaeological Museum of Bologna). Delegates were able to take advantage of a guided tour of the Oriental Museum Umberto Scerrato (University of Naples “L’Orientale”), access to the National Archaeological Museum of Naples (MANN) and guided tours of the archaeological site of Pompeii and the Gaiola Underwater Park. The editors dedicate this volume to the late Prof. Claudio Barocas who inaugurated the teaching of Egyptology and Coptic Language and Literature in Naples.
London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 by John Schofield, Lyn Blackmore and Jacqui Pearce, with Tony Dyson. Hardback; 210x297mm; xxiv+514 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (132 colour plates). English text with summaries in French and German. 422 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918378. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918385. Book contents pageDownload

London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 presents and celebrates the mile-long Thames Street in the City of London and the land south of it to the River Thames as an archaeological asset. The argument is based on the reporting of four excavations of 1974–84 by the Museum of London near the north end of London Bridge: Swan Lane, Seal House, New Fresh Wharf and Billingsgate Lorry Park. Here the findings of the period 1100–1666 are presented.

Buildings and property development on sixteen properties south of Thames Street, on land reclaimed in many stages since the opening of the 12th century, include part of the parish church of St Botolph Billingsgate. The many units of land reclamation are dated by dendrochronology, coins and documents. They have produced thousands of artefacts and several hundred kilos of native and foreign pottery. Much of this artefactual material has been published, but in catalogue form (shoes, knives, horse fittings, dress accessories, textiles, household equipment). Now the context of these finds, their deposition in groups, is laid out for the first time. Highlights of the publication include the first academic analysis and assessment of a 13th- or 14th-century trumpet from Billingsgate, the earliest surviving straight trumpet in Europe; many pilgrim souvenirs; analysis of two drains of the 17th century from which suggestions can be made about use of rooms and spaces within documented buildings; and the proposal that one of the skeletons excavated from St Botolph’s church is John Reynewell, mayor of London in 1426–7 and a notable figure in London’s medieval history.

The whole publication encourages students and other researchers of all kinds to conduct further research on any aspect of the sites and their very rich artefactual material, which is held at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive. This is a significantly large and varied dataset for the archaeology and history of London in the period 1100 to 1666 which can be continuously interrogated for generations to come.

About the Authors
JOHN SCHOFIELD was an archaeologist at the Museum of London from 1974 to 2008. He has written several well-received books on the archaeology of London and of British medieval towns; and as Cathedral Archaeologist for St Paul’s Cathedral, archaeological accounts of the medieval and Wren buildings.

LYN BLACKMORE is a Senior Ceramics and Finds Specialist who has worked for MOLA and its predecessors since 1986. During this time she has established the Anglo-Saxon fabric type series for London, has contributed to the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery and has published widely on aspects of post- Roman pottery. Her special research interests are the development of London and the role of local, regional and imported pottery and finds in trade and exchange. In 2009–14 she was Assistant Treasurer of the Medieval Pottery Research Group and in 2017 was elected co-editor of its journal Medieval Ceramics, a role she first held in 1989–94.

JACQUI PEARCE is a Senior Ceramics Specialist with MOLA, focusing especially on medieval and later pottery, on which she has published widely. She joined the Museum of London’s Department of Urban Archaeology in 1977 and has played a major role in the development and publication of the Type-Series of London Medieval Pottery. She has served as Joint Editor of Medieval Ceramics, as well as of Post-Medieval Archaeology and is currently Joint Editor of English Ceramic Circle Transactions. In 2017 she was elected President of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology.

TONY DYSON was the principal documentary historian and general editor at the Department of Urban Archaeology of the Museum of London from 1974 to 1998.
Life on the Edge: The Neolithic and Bronze Age of Iain Crawford’s Udal, North Uist edited by Beverley Ballin Smith. Hardback; xxxii+270 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 408 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917708. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917715. Book contents pageDownload

The discovery of archaeological structures in North Uist in 1974 after storm damage led to the identification by Iain Crawford of a kerb cairn complex, with a cist and human remains. Six years later he went back, and over the next three years excavated another cist with human remains in its kerbed cairn, many bowl pits dug into the blown sand, and down to two late Neolithic structures and a ritual complex. He intensively studied the environmental conditions affecting the site and was among the first archaeologists in Scotland to understand the climate changes taking place at the transition between late Neolithic and the early Bronze Age. The deposition of blown sand and the start of the machair in the Western Isles, including the rise in sea-level and inundations into inhabited and farmed landscapes, are all part of the complex story of natural events and human activities.

Radiocarbon dating and modern scientific analyses provide the detail of the story of periods of starvation suffered by the people that were buried on the site, of the movement away of the community, of their attempts of bringing the ‘new’ land back into cultivation, of a temporary tent-like structure, and of marking their territory by the construction of enduring monuments to the dead.

About the Editor
BEVERLEY BALLIN SMITH took up the mantle left by Iain Crawford and has brought this first monograph on his Udal project area to publication. She has extensive experience of working on, and publishing, other large multi-period sites. She is an archaeologist who lived and worked on Orkney for many years and has first-hand experience of the archaeology of Shetland, the UK, Faroes, Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and is now based in Scotland. Beverley is the Publications Manager at GUARD Archaeology Ltd and editor of ARO (Archaeology Reports Online), with the aim of disseminating information to relevant audiences. She undertakes specialist analysis of prehistoric pottery and coarse stone tools. She has been a member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists for nearly all her professional life; she served on the former IfA Council, was Vice Chair for Outreach, a member of the Validation Committee and was a CIfA Board director. She is a member of the Society of Antiquaries of London and also a member of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, where she has been Vice President. She is currently President of Archaeology Scotland and a Research Associate at National Museums Scotland.

Reviews
'...Ballin Smith and her colleagues have produced a worthy volume that answers many questions concerning the complex transition period between the Neolithic and Bronze Age within an area of the British Isles that would have been seen by late prehistoric pastoralists as the edge of the known world.' – George Nash (Current Archaeology #346, January 2019)
KYMISSALA: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability by Manolis I. Stefanakis. xii+192 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and Greek.. 52 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917685. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917692. Book contents pageDownload

The area of Kymissala on the southwest coast of Rhodes is of great archaeological interest, as it conceals a large number of important archaeological sites belonging to the lesser known ancient deme of the Rhodian countryside, the deme of Kymissaleis. The region is also of exceptional environmental and ecological importance, as it has a particular biodiversity and is protected by the European ‘Natura 2000’ network of nature protection areas.

Kymissala has systematically been researched during the past 10 years by the Kymissala Archaeological Research Project (KARP) inaugurated by the Department of Mediterranean Studies and the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese in 2006.

The research, escaping from its narrow academic and archaeological context and exploiting the comparative advantage of the region, may –and should– inter alia, intervene in a mild and sustainable manner in the promotion of the archaeological site of Kymissala. Its ultimate goal is to promote the antiquities of the area, its educational value and its historical and cultural continuity within a protected natural environment, in the context of an ecological-archaeological park.

Under the title Kymissala: Archaeology – Education – Sustainability, fourteen original studies have been published, constituting the first complete presentation of the area of Kymissala and the work in progress, after ten years of systematic research, in terms of Archaeology, Education and Sustainable Development.

About the Author
Manolis I. Stefanakis is an Associate Professor in Classical Archaeology and Numismatics in the Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean. Director of Postgraduate Studies in ‘Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean from the Prehistoric Era to the Late Antiquity: Greece, Egypt, Near East’.

Director of the University of the Aegean Archaeological Research in Kymissala, Rhodes (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of the Dodecanese) since 2006. Co-director (with Professor Nikolaos Stampolidis) of the University of the Aegean excavation (held in collaboration with the Ephorate of Antiquities of Rethymno) of the fortified citadel of Orne in Retymno, Crete, since 2016.

Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Dr. Nikos Litinas) of the annual scientific journal Eulimene: Studies in Classical Archaeology, Epigraphy, Numismatics and Papyrology, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society (ISSN 1108-5800) and of Eulimene Series of Independent Publications, Rethymno: Mediterranean Archaeological Society. Co-founder and Publishing Director (with Assistant Professor Sotiris Ntalis) of the annual scientific journal Yearbook of Mediterranean Studies, Rhodes.

His research interests focus on Field Archaeology, Classical Archaeology, Ancient Greek Numismatics, Archaeology and Sustainability.
Substantive Evidence of Initial Habitation in the Remote Pacific: Archaeological Discoveries at Unai Bapot in Saipan, Mariana Islands by Mike T. Carson and Hsiao-chun Hung. xii+180 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (91 plates in colour). 33 2017. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916657. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916664. Book contents pageDownload

At the Unai Bapot Site of the Mariana Islands, new excavation has clarified the oldest known instance of a residential habitation prior to 1500 B.C. in the Remote Pacific, previously difficult to document in deeply buried layers that originally had comprised near-tidal to shallow subtidal zones. The initial habitation at this site, as well as at others in the Mariana Islands, pre-dated the next Remote Oceanic archaeological evidence by about four centuries and in an entirely different part of the Pacific than previously had been claimed. The newest excavation at Unai Bapot in 2016 has revealed the precise location of an ancient seashore habitation, containing dense red-slipped pottery, other artefacts, food midden, and arrangements of hearths, pits, and post moulds in three distinguishable archaeological layers all pre-dating 1100 B.C. and extending just prior to 1500 B.C. The new discoveries are presented here in detail, as a substantive basis for learning about a rarely preserved event of the initial cultural inhabitation of a region, in this case in the Remote Oceanic environment of the world with its own set of unique challenges.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Arqueología urbana en el área central de la Ciudad de Córdoba, Argentina Excavaciones en la Sede Corporativa del Banco de la Provincia de Córdoba (2014-2016) by Andrés D. Izeta, Eduardo A. Pautassi, G. Roxana Cattáneo, Andrés I. Robledo, José María Caminoa, Julián Mignino and Isabel E. Prado. 256 pages; illustrated throughout with 119 plates in colour. Spanish text with English abstract. 29 2017 South American Archaeology Series 29. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916084. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916091. Book contents pageDownload

This work is part of a line of action proposed by the Institute of Anthropology of Córdoba (IDACOR), doubly dependent executing unit of the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET) and the National University of Cordoba (UNC). This action requires the intervention of professional archaeologists in order to evaluate the impact produced by subsurface excavation in cases related to the development of real estate projects.

Within this framework, in February 2014, there was the need to implement an archeological impact study on land under cadastral nomenclature 04-04-020-023 in the city of Cordoba, Argentina. The study was conducted in two instances. The first took place between the months of April and June 2014, consisting of various actions related to the systematic archaeological excavation, registration, conservation and interpretation of material culture recovered in depths between the surface and about 2.5 / 3m deep. The second stage, implemented between February and August 2015, consisted of the monitoring of the excavation while using heavy machinery allowed archaeologists to reach greater depths. The results of these tasks were submitted to the local authorities in five partial reports presented collectively here in order to have all the information available in one volume.

As a result of the excavations it was possible to retrieve information about land use in the last two hundred years. Previous occupations have been masked or destroyed mostly by architectural interventions in the mid-nineteenth century and early twentieth century. However more than 30,000 objects recovered during the archaeological project help us to interpret the life of the people who inhabited these spaces, as well as local and international production and trade networks where they were integrated.

Along with this, it was possible to recover significant portions of architectural structures that probably correspond to the eighteenth century, being the oldest constructive feature found on the parcel. This action, perhaps the most difficult due to the sheer scale of the objects, allowed the implementation of a novel technique for the recovery of archaeological objects in the city of Córdoba.

Eastern Sudan in its Setting The archaeology of a region far from the Nile Valley by Andrea Manzo. viii+82 pages; illustrated throughout with 38 colour plates. 24 2017 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 94. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915582. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915599. Book contents pageDownload

Eastern Sudan, like other regions far away from the Nile valley, has often been overlooked historically on account of a kind of prejudice towards areas lacking in monumental or urban remains or evidence of any literary production. Despite the relevance of the deserts and marginal areas becoming increasingly evident in the last year or so, in Sudan only a few research projects have been conducted in these regions. The ongoing research project in Eastern Sudan by the University ‘L’Orientale’ has provided a preliminary reconstruction of the history of the region from c. 6000 BC to AD 1500. This publication outlines this reconstruction and also considers the more general setting known for the other regions of northeastern Africa. Several issues remain to be clarified and understanding of some phases is still limited, nevertheless it can be safely stated that Eastern Sudan, was in ancient times, as it is now, a crossroads between the Nile basin, Eastern Desert, the Ethio-Eritrean highlands and the Red Sea, represented a crucial region in several respects: the spread of domestic crops and animals towards the Ethio-Eritrean highlands, the spread of the Sahelian crops towards India via the Red Sea and Arabia, as well as the long-distance trade network characterizing northeastern Africa in the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC.

Access Archaeology: This imprint is designed to make archaeological research accessible to all and to present a low-cost (or no-cost) publishing solution for academics from all over the world. Material ranges from theses, conference proceedings, catalogues of archaeological material, excavation reports and beyond. We provide type-setting guidance and templates for authors to prepare material themselves designed to be made available for free online via our Open Access platform and to supply in-print to libraries and academics worldwide at a reasonable price point. Click here to learn more about publishing in Access Archaeology.

Archaeological Research at Caution Bay, Papua New Guinea Cultural, Linguistic and Environmental Setting edited by Thomas Richards, Bruno David, Ken Aplin and Ian J. McNiven. x+200 pages; illustrated throughout with 26 plates in colour. 297 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784915049. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915056. Book contents pageDownload

In 2008 intensive archaeological surveys began at Caution Bay, located 20km to the northwest of Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. This was followed by the excavation of 122 stratified sites in 2009-2010, and detailed analysis of the well preserved and abundant faunal, ceramic and lithic finds has continued ever since. The Caution Bay Archaeology Project is providing new and exciting contributions to western Pacific prehistory. It has radically expanded the known geographic distribution of the Lapita Cultural Complex to include, for the first time, the southern coast of Papua New Guinea; it has established the relationship of Lapita to later cultural expressions in this area; it has pinpointed the time of arrival of domesticated animals along the southern coast of Papua New Guinea and, by inference, on the larger island of New Guinea; it has provided new insights into the impact of resident populations on local terrestrial and marine environments over a 5000 year time period; and perhaps of greatest significance, it has provided a unique opportunity to document, using multiple strands of archaeological evidence, interactions between resident and colonizing populations at a time of cultural transformation c. 2900 years ago.

The first volume of the Caution Bay monographs is designed to introduce the goals of the Caution Bay project, the nature and scope of the investigations and the cultural and natural setting of the study area. To this end a series of chapters are included on the ethnographic and linguistic setting, the present and past natural environment, archaeological surveys of the study area and investigative and analytical methods. These background chapters will be repeatedly referred to in all the other monographs, as foundational reference materials for the broader study.

Castles, Siegeworks and Settlements Surveying the Archaeology of the Twelfth Century edited by Duncan W. Wright Oliver H. Creighton. xii+180 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 288 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784914769. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914776. Book contents pageDownload

This volume presents twelve reports on archaeological investigations carried out at sites across England in support of a project investigating the so-called ‘Anarchy’ of King Stephen’s reign in the mid-twelfth century. Sites and their landscape settings are analysed through topographical and geophysical survey, as well as LiDAR and viewshed analysis, supported by cartographic and archival research. The reports examine sites at Burwell (Cambridgeshire), Castle Carlton (Lincolnshire), Corfe (Dorset), Crowmarsh (Oxfordshire), Faringdon (Oxfordshire), Hailes (Gloucestershire), Hamstead Marshall (Berkshire), Malmesbury (Wiltshire), Mountsorrel (Leicestershire), Rampton (Cambridgeshire), Wellow (Nottinghamshire) and Woodwalton (Cambridgeshire). The results help characterise the archaeological potential of this turbulent and controversial period, shedding new light on the castles, siegeworks and settlements of the twelfth century as well as antecedent activity and later phases of reuse.

Reviews

‘[This book] offers a fine appraisal of topographic and geophysical survey techniques used for military landscapes. The survey work demonstrated that, during the Anarchy, there was often a complex sequence of reuse of earlier sites. The landscape survey methodology worked especially well for a conflict that largely eschewed pitched battles in favour of dominating landscapes with castles, many of which were besieged repeatedly.’ – James Wright (Current Archaeology, Issue 333, December 2017)
Dja’de el-Mughara (Aleppo) by Eric Coqueugniot Taken from A History of Syria in One Hundred Sites by Y. Kanjou and A. Tsuneki (eds). Pages 51-53.Download

Excavated as part of the rescue campaigns of the Tishreen Dam in the Euphates valley, the Neolithic tell of Dja’de el Mughara has yielded archaeological levels belonging mostly to the 9th millennium BC (9310-8290 cal. BCE). It concerns a crucial phase in the process of Neolithisation, the one which corresponds to the end of the period of gestation, and invention of the domestication of plants (raw agricultural practices but with wild cereals). ...
About Bakr Awa Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Peter A. Miglus. Pages 229-239.Download

The site of Bakr Awa (35°13’14”N, 45°56’26”E) situated on the outskirts of the city of Halabja is one of the biggest ancient settlements in the western foothills of the Zagros in Iraqi Kurdistan (AAI 1970, 335 no. 54; AASI 1975-76, map 77 no. 14). It consists of a c. 800 x 600 m large lower city (max. +579 m a.s.l.) and a steep citadel mound (max. +595 m a.s.l.) dominating the plain (approx. +565 m a.s.l.). The citadel is crowned by an earthen parapet wall while the mound is surrounded by a moat dug probably in the Islamic period (Fig.1).
Ubaid-related sites of the southern Gulf revisited: the Abu Dhabi Coastal Heritage Initiative Taken from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies 46 (2016) by Mark Jonathan Beech, Kristian Strutt, Lucy Blue, Abdulla Khalfan al-Kaabi, Waleed Awad Omar, Ahmed Abdulla al-Haj El-Faki, Anjana Reddy Lingareddy & John Martin. Pages 9-23.Download

The Coastal Heritage Initiative of the Abu Dhabi Tourism and Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi) aims to investigate the rich maritime history of Abu Dhabi Emirate. Since the establishment of TCA Abu Dhabi in February 2012, a new phase of archaeological research has been carried out. Systematic mapping of sites, their integration into the Abu Dhabi geographic information system (GIS geodatabase of archaeological sites for the Emirate), as well as further investigations of key sites by both geophysical prospection and excavation have been undertaken. Recent work has concentrated on the Ubaid-related coastal sites on both Dalma Island (Jazīrat Dalmā) and Marawah Island (Jazīrat MarawaΉ). A combination of both magnetometry and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) geophysical surveys, as well as follow-up excavations are discussed. These shed new light on the structure of Ubaid-related coastal settlements between the mid-sixth and early fifth millennium BC. The full volume is available in paperback here.
CAMERA KALAUREIA An Archaeological Photo-Ethnography | Μια αρχαιολογική φωτο-εθνογραφία by Yannis Hamilakis & Fotis Ifantidis. Paperback; 170 pages; illustrated in full colour throughout. Full text in English and Greek. 259 2016. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784914127. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914141. Book contents pageDownload

How can we find alternative, sensorially rich and affective ways of engaging with the material past in the present?

How can photography play a central role in archaeological narratives, beyond representation and documentation?

This photo-book engages with these questions, not through conventional academic discourse but through evocative creative practice. The book is, at the same time, a site guide of sorts: a photographic guide to the archaeological site of the Sanctuary of Poseidon in Kalaureia, on the island of Poros, in Greece.

Ancient and not-so-ancient stones, pine trees that were “wounded” for their resin, people who lived amongst the classical ruins, and the tensions and the clashes with the archaeological apparatus and its regulations, all become palpable, affectively close and immediate.

Furthermore, the book constitutes an indirect but concrete proposal for the adoption of archaeological photo-ethnography as a research as well as public communication tool for critical heritage studies, today.

Click here to purchase hardback edition priced £55.00.
Halaf Settlement in the Iraqi Kurdistan: the Shahrizor Survey Project Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Olivier Nieuwenhuyse, Takahiro Odaka and Simone Mühl. Pages 257-266.Download

The archaeology of the Halaf period has seen a very significant increase over the past decades. This recent work almost exclusively focussed on Northern Syria and Southeastern Turkey, or Upper Mesopotamia (Akkermans and Schwartz 2003; Nieuwenhuyse et al. 2013). As scholarship returns to Iraqi Kurdistan, prehistorians bring implicit expectations and assumptions that are shaped to a large extent by the latest work in Upper Mesopotamia. At the same time, the various new projects are taking up the challenge of adapting the existing models to local expressions of the Halaf cultural idiom (Altaweel et al. 2012; Bonacossi and Iamoni 2015; Gavagnin et al. (forthcoming); Nieuwenhuyse et al. 2016; Saber et al. 2014; Tsuneki et al. 2015; Ur et al. 2013). For the Halaf period, it is necessary to develop a fine-tuned chronological system that is sensitive to local internal sub-divisions in order to assess the significance of fluctuating site densities through time. The coarsegrained chronological framework currently available only permits a generalized slicing-up of later prehistory into ‘Pre-Halaf’, ‘Halaf’ and ‘Ubaid’. Such broad chronological boundaries may well turn out to be less significant if these long periods can be split into more nuanced images of change and continuity. The ultimate aim is to develop local frameworks based on explicitly described parameters so as to facilitate inter-regional comparisons (Ball et al. 1989; Dittmann 1992; Ur 2010, 214-5; Wilkinson and Tucker 1995). Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Current Investigations into the Early Neolithic of the Zagros Foothills of Iraqi Kurdistan Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Roger Matthews, Wendy Matthews, Kamal Rasheed Raheem and Kamal Rauf Aziz. Pages 219-228.Download

One of the most significant transformations in history took place after the last Ice Age, from c. 12,000 BC (all dates calibrated BC), when human communities changed from being mobile hunter-foragers to more settled farmers and stock-keepers, with domesticated crops and animals. This Neolithic transformation was a fundamental development in the human condition across much of the world and led ultimately, through surplus accumulation and social differentiation, to the emergence of towns, cities, and empires, shaping the modern world. The full volume is available in paperback here.
In the Neo-Assyrian Border March of the Palace Herald: Geophysical Survey and Salvage Excavations at Gird-i Bazar and Qalat-i Dinka (Peshdar Plain Project 2015) Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Karen Radner, Andrei Ašandulesei, Jörg Fassbinder, Tina Greenfield, Jean-Jacques Herr, Janoscha Kreppner and Andrea Squitieri. Pages 353-367.Download

The Peshdar Plain is situated in the province of Sulaymaniyah, district of Raniyah (also known as Raparin district), in the Kurdish Autonomous Region of Iraq, directly at the border with Iran on the upper reaches of the Lower Zab. The regional centre is the town of Qaladze (Qalat Dizeh), in the northwest of the plain, whose impressive settlement mound (36° 11’ 7” N, 45° 6’ 53” E) demonstrates that the site has held this position since antiquity. The Peshdar Plain Project was inaugurated in 2015 with the goal of investigating the region in the Neo-Assyrian period and focuses on two sites: tiny Gird-i Bazar (36° 8’ 18” N, 45° 8’ 28” E; henceforth Bazar), a shallow mound (altitude: 539 m) of only 1.5 ha situated in the plain, and the more impressive Qalat-i Dinka (36° 8’ 12” N, 45° 7’ 57” E; henceforth Dinka), looming high over the Lower Zab on the imposing terminal outcrop of a crescent-shaped mountain range along the northern river bank. This first report will briefly detail the geophysical survey (section 1) and the excavations (section 2) conducted in 2015 before introducing the bioarchaeological sampling strategy (section 3) and presenting a first assessment of the sites and more generally of the significance of our work in the regional setting of the Peshdar Plain and within the Neo-Assyrian Empire and its client states (section 4). The full volume is available in paperback here.
Magnetic investigations in the Shahrizor Plain: Revealing the unseen in survey prospections Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Simone Mühl and Jörg Fassbinder. Pages 241-248.Download

Prospection by magnetometer in urban environments outside the limits of excavation offers the possibility to unveil the layout of entire settlements, including street networks and residential and other architectural features, without the use of a spade. Questions about city planning, the use of built and open space and the organization of religious and other architecture at sites can all be addressed (cf. Fassbinder 2002; Fassbinder et al. 2005; Benech 2007). Magnetic prospections of sites in the Shahrizor Plain, which have been conducted since October 2013, have the potential to provide insights into the diachronic use of rural space in the region. This paper will focus on the results of investigations which were carried out at Gird-i Shatwan (bečuk – ‘the small mound Shatwan’; SSP-51 & 52), a small Parthian site in the rural environment of Wadi Shamlu in the center of the Shahrizor Plain. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Palmyra, 30 Years of Syro-German/Austrian Archaeological Research (Homs) Taken from A History of Syria in One Hundred Sites by Andreas Schmidt-Colinet, Khaled al-As‘ad and Waleed al-As‘ad. Pages 339-348.Download

The temple- or house-like tomb no. 36 is situated in the centre of so-called ‘Valley of the Tombs’. With about 18m length from edge to edge and about 300 graves (loculi), it is the largest representative of this palace-like type of tombs at Palmyra. The architectural decoration of the building allows a dating to about 210 to 230 AD. Furthermore the tomb can be attributed probably to the family of the famous Iulius Septimius Aurelius Vorodes. The documentation of the more than 700 fallen blocks of the ruin enables us to draw an exact reconstruction of the building. The architecture documents a fusion of different traditions as well as the grandiose will of the buildings commissioner: The palace-like facade of the entrance contrasts with the square, two-storey and uncovered peristyle courtyard in the centre of the structure. Design and metrology of the building reveal at every point Roman principles of design, brought into line with oriental taste. The themes and the stylistic evidence of the architectural sculpture prove close relations with foreign sarcophagi workshops on the Syrian coast and their connections to Roman art: Dionysos-Baalshamin sitting in the vineyards, nereids and erotes riding on dolphins, seamonsters holding a shell between them, victories,winged Medusas, tragic masks. On the other hand, the exceptionally rich architectural decoration of highest quality was worked out by local workshops and enables us to reconstruct pattern books which partly can be traced back to native textile patterns. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Satu Qala: an Assessment of the Stratigraphy of the Site Taken from The Archaeology of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Adjacent Regions by Cinzia Pappi. Pages 297-307.Download

The view of historical developments within the area of Idu, identified with Sâtu Qalâ on the Lower Zāb in Iraqi Kurdistan (Van Soldt 2008), and its hinterland have so far been closely connected to available information on the imperial expansion of Assyria in the region. Through the support of the Directorate of Antiquities of the Kurdish Regional Government of Iraq, an international team consisting of the universities of Leiden (2010-12), Leipzig (2010-14), the Salahaddin University of Erbil (2010-12), and the University of Pennsylvania (2013) was able to conduct several seasons of fieldwork at Sâtu Qalâ. Data from this fieldwork can now provide a much wider historical sequence for the settlement. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.
Tell el-Kerkh (Idlib) Taken from A History of Syria in One Hundred Sites by Akira Tsuneki. Pages 61-64.Download

Tell el-Kerkh is a large tell-complex located in the south of the Rouj Basin, Idlib province. It was occupied for long periods from the Neolithic to the Byzantine, however we concentrated our excavations on the Neolithic period. It is the oldest Neolithic settlement in northwest Syria, dating back to the middle of the 9th millennium BC. Therefore, the site provided us with data on how farming villages appeared in this region. Based on the excavated plant remains and animal bones, the subsistence of the people who first settled at Tell el-Kerkh seemed to follow the path from hunter-gatherers to farmer-herders. Click on the PDF to read the full paper online, or download to your device. The full volume is available in paperback here.