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NEW: Uno sguardo su Pisa ellenistica da piazza del Duomo Lo scavo del saggio D 1985-1988 by Emanuele Taccola. Paperback; 203x276mm; 410pp; 39 figures; 95 plates (22 colour pages). 103 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694000. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694017. Book contents pageDownload

The Etruscan character of the city of Pisa has been questioned for a long time. However, thanks to a thriving period of archaeological investigations undertaken in the mid-1980s, it was possible to definitively confirm the ancient Etruscan origin of the settlement.

One of the main excavations was carried out between 1985 and 1988 a few steps away from the Leaning Tower (saggio D), where a complex and uninterrupted stratigraphy dating from the middle of the 6th century BC and the end of the 5th century AD was brought to light. The anthropic installations and wall structures unearthed share the same alignments and the same orientation, within an apparently orthogonal urban network designed at least from the end of the 5th century BC and knowingly respected until the end of the Roman imperial age.

Uno sguardo su Pisa ellenistica da piazza del Duomo, dedicated to the Hellenistic period documented in the excavation of saggio D, presents a substantial catalogue of the ceramic repertoire therein recovered, most of which are still not attested in the city. Due to the results of this work, it is now possible to redefine the role of Pisa in this period as one of the major trade centres of northern coastal Etruria.

About the Author
Dr. Emanuele Taccola is a Teaching Assistant of Etruscology and Italic Archaeology, and an Adjunct Professor of Methodology of Survey and Representation in Archaeology at the University of Pisa.

Italian Description:
Il carattere etrusco della città di Pisa è stato messo in discussione per molto tempo. Tuttavia, grazie a un periodo intenso di indagini archeologiche sistematiche intraprese a metà degli anni Ottanta del secolo scorso, è stato possibile confermare definitivamente l'antica origine etrusca dell'insediamento, come già riportato da numerose fonti storiche antiche.

Uno dei principali interventi di scavo è quello effettuato tra il 1985 e il 1988 a breve distanza dalla torre pendente (saggio D), dove è stata portata alla luce una complessa e ininterrotta sequenza stratigrafica compresa tra la metà del VI secolo a.C. e la fine del V secolo d.C.

I resti degli edifici delle varie fasi identificate dall’indagine archeologica condividono lo stesso orientamento, inseriti all'interno di una rete urbana apparentemente ortogonale progettata almeno dalla fine del V secolo a.C. e consapevolmente rispettata fino alla fine dell'età imperiale romana. Questo libro, dedicato al periodo ellenistico documentato nello scavo del saggio D di Piazza del Duomo, presenta un consistente catalogo del repertorio ceramico ivi recuperato, gran parte del quale non ancora attestato in città.

Grazie ai nuovi dati emersi da questo lavoro, è possibile ridefinire il ruolo di Pisa in questo periodo come uno dei maggiori centri commerciali dell'Etruria costiera settentrionale.

Emanuele Taccola ha completato il suo intero percorso di studi presso l’Università di Pisa, dove ha ottenuto due Lauree con lode in Lettere Classiche e Archeologia (2003, 2006) e il Dottorato con lode in Scienze dell'Antichità e Archeologia (2019). È Cultore della Materia in Etruscologia e Archeologia Italica e Professore a contratto di Metodologia del Rilievo e della Rappresentazione in Archeologia all'Università di Pisa. Emanuele Taccola ha partecipato a numerosi scavi in Italia e all'estero come archeologo e responsabile del rilievo topografico e fotogrammetrico. È autore di numerose pubblicazioni su riviste scientifiche e importanti conferenze internazionali. Dal 2008 Emanuele Taccola è impiegato come tecnico laureato e responsabile del Laboratorio di Disegno e Restauro (LADIRE) presso il Dipartimento di Civiltà e Forme del Sapere dell'Università di Pisa.
NEW: The Dialectic of Practice and the Logical Structure of the Tool Philosophy, Archaeology and the Anthropology of Technology by Jannis Kozatsas. Paperback; 150x210mm; 92pp. 7 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694048. £19.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694055. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £19.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The book undertakes a critical review of recent trends in the archaeological and anthropological theory of technology from processual neo-positivism and postprocessual relativism to the contemporary French and American anthropology, and the symmetrical theory of material culture. On the basis of a critique of their logical premises and epistemological consequences, it draws on the tradition of Hegelian dialectics in order to propose an alternative understanding of technology as a material social practice within which the subject and the object –the socio-cultural and the natural– are produced concurrently as inter-constituted elements, and they are unified through their mutual negative relation to each other. Consequently, it is argued that this dynamic practical relation is consolidated in the concept of the tool. The analysis of its logical structure shows its role as an immanent moment of technological practice. According to Hegel, a tool is not a neutral means for transmitting subjective ends to an external object but the material expression of the practical relationship between artisan and matter, and of their negative unity within practice. Concerning this point, the discussion follows a detailed reconstruction of Hegel’s theoretical reflections on the tool concept, and it evaluates their significance for the contemporary debates on the question of techniques and technology.

About the Author
Jannis Kozatsas’ research broadly focuses on philosophy and archaeology. Currently, he is a postdoctoral researcher in philosophy at the Department of Political Science and History, Panteion University of Athens, as a Fellow of the State Scholarship Foundation. Since 2018 he has been lecturing in modern European philosophy at the Department of Philosophy, University of Patras. Alongside his activity in philosophy, he is writing a doctoral thesis on Neolithic pottery at the Department of History and Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. He is currently co-editor-in-chief of KRISI – Biannual Scientific Review in Greece, which specializes in humanities and social sciences.
NEW: Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt ca. 700 BC – AD 1000 edited by Mohamed Kenawi. Hardback; xxviii+350 pages; 358 figures, 52 tables. (Print RRP £65.00). 575 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692983. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692990. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Cristina Mondin, Michele Asolati Louise Bertini, Audrey Eller, Urška Furlan, Ole Herslund, Israel Hinojosa Baliño, Marie-Caroline Livaditis, Giorgia Marchiori, Marcus Müller, Benjamin T. Pennington and Amy Wilson.

In 2012, fieldwork began at two large sites in the Beheira Province in the western Nile Delta: Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit (ancient Metelis). Being close to the important ports of Thonis-Heracleion, Alexandria, and Rosetta meant that they had been ideally placed to take advantage of the trade between the Mediterranean and Egypt. The sites are being thoroughly investigated to reveal their archaeological significance.

Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt presents the results of the Italian archaeological mission between 2012 and 2016. It provides details of the survey and excavation results from different occupation phases. A complete town beneath the Nile silt was revealed using a combination of modern scientific techniques. Hellenistic houses and a temple enclosure wall were investigated at Kom Wasit; while at Kom al-Ahmer, a Late Roman house, an amphora storage building, a cistern and an early Islamic cemetery were revealed.

Dating from the Late Dynastic to the Early Islamic period, the remains found at Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit demonstrate for the first time the rich archaeological heritage of this region.

About the Editor
Mohamed Kenawi is a Researcher and Training Manager at the School of Archaeology, University of Oxford, for the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa project. He was Head Researcher (2011–16), followed by Acting Director (2016–17), of the Hellenistic Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria. He taught at the American University in Cairo and at Catania University. He has participated in various archaeological missions in Libya, Italy, and Egypt, among them those at Kom al-Ahmer/Kom Wasit, Athribis, Dionysias, and Manqbad. He currently collaborates on projects with Padua University and Tübingen University. He has published various articles about his research, in addition to his monograph, Alexandria’s Hinterland: Archaeology of the Western Nile Delta, Egypt (2014). He published a co-authored book with G. Marchiori entitled Unearthing Alexandria’s Archaeology: the Italian Contribution (2018). He is Egypt Coordinator for the Manar al-Athar open access photo-archive.
FORTHCOMING: Farmsteads and Funerary Sites: The M1 Junction 12 Improvements and the A5–M1 Link Road, Central Bedfordshire Archaeological investigations prior to construction, 2011 & 2015–16 by Jim Brown. Hardback; 205x290mm; xxiv+596 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £120.00). 556 2020. ISBN 9781789692600. Book contents pageBuy Now

With major contributions by Paul Blinkhorn, Dana Challinor, Andy Chapman, Chris Chinnock, Joanne Clawley, Olly Dindol, Claire Finn, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Sarah Inskip, James Ladocha, Phil Mills, Stephen Morris and Jane Timby.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook extensive excavations during the construction of two separate, but adjacent road schemes, some 4.5km apart near Houghton Regis and Toddington, in south Central Bedfordshire. Taken as a whole, the excavations provide a detailed multi-period dataset for regional and national comparison.

The first evidence for occupation occurred in the middle/late Bronze Age comprising pits and clusters of postholes, including four-post and six-post structures. Two pit alignments, more than 2km apart, also indicate that land divisions were being established, and in the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a significant new settlement emerged in the valley bottom. Parts of a further contemporary earlier-middle Iron Age settlement lay at the top of the valley but neither settlement extended into the Roman period. In the late Iron Age or early Roman period three or four new settlements emerged with occupation continuing into the late Roman period in at least one of these. Of particular interest was the recovery of two significant Aylesford-Swarling type cemeteries as well as a third cemetery which largely comprised unurned burials, including some busta, but with few accompanying grave goods.

In the late 7th-century a small probable Christian conversion open-ground inhumation cemetery was established with burials accompanied by a range of objects, including a rare work box, knives, brooches, chatelaine keys and a spearhead. Parts of three medieval settlements were uncovered including one with a potters' working area.
NEW: Les restes humains badegouliens de la Grotte du Placard Cannibalisme et guerre il y a 20,000 ans by Bruno Boulestin and Dominique Henry-Gambier. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+138 pages; 47 figures, 14 tables (56 pages of colour). 579 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693690. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693706. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Placard is a major Upper Palaeolithic site in France, known from as early as the middle of the nineteenth century. Paradoxically, owing to the antiquity of the poorly-documented early excavations, dozens of thousands of remains that were uncovered then are either unpublished to this day, or have only been the subjects of limited and often obsolete studies. This is the case in particular for the human remains, for which, until recently, the cultural attribution was moreover still under debate. Dating makes it clear they belong to various periods, yet most of them form a homogeneous group remarkable by traces of a specific treatment. Thanks to radiocarbon dating and to data from further excavations carried out some thirty years ago, this group can be dated from the Badegoulian period.

The writers present in this book a detailed study of the Badegoulian human remains. On the basis of quantification and bone modification analyses, they describe and identify the treatments of the dead. Whereas the general treatment pertains to the practice of cannibalism, more specific ones, focused on the head, can be explained by the crafting of trophies. On the whole, these treatments can be interpreted in a consistent manner by one or several episodes of armed conflicts, begging the question of the possible existence of warfare during the Upper Palaeolithic. Thus, despite the antiquity of the discovery, the Badegoulian human bones from le Placard still constitute a unique assemblage that contributes greatly to our knowledge of the behaviours of hunter-gatherer populations in European prehistory.

About the Authors
Bruno Boulestin and Dominique Henry-Gambier are anthropologists at the University of Bordeaux (France), members of the research unit ‘De la Préhistoire à l’Actuel : Culture, Environnement, Anthropologie’ (PACEA, UMR 5199 of the CNRS). They are working on practices surrounding death in ancient societies, from both archaeological, bioarchaeological and socio-anthropological data. B. Boulestin’s work deals more specifically with bone modifications and the treatments of corpses. D. Henry-Gambier is a former Research Director at France's National Scientific Research Centre (CNRS) and is a specialist of Upper Palaeolithic populations.

French Description:
Connu depuis le milieu du 19e siècle, le site du Placard est un site majeur du Paléolithique supérieur français. Paradoxalement, en raison de l’ancienneté des premières fouilles, mal documentées, les dizaines de milliers de vestiges qui y ont été découverts sont pour la plupart inédits ou n’ont fait l’objet que d’études ponctuelles et souvent obsolètes. C’est le cas en particulier des restes humains, dont l’attribution culturelle était par ailleurs jusqu’à récemment discutée. Leur datation montre qu’ils appartiennent à plusieurs époques, mais la plus grande partie d’entre eux constitue un lot homogène qui se distingue par les traces d’un traitement spécifique. Grâce au radiocarbone et aux données provenant de nouvelles fouilles menées il y a une trentaine d’années, ce lot peut être daté du Badegoulien.

Les auteurs livrent ici l’étude détaillée de ces restes humains badegouliens. À partir de l’analyse quantitative et de celle des modifications osseuses, ils décrivent et identifient les traitements des morts. L’un, général, renvoie à la pratique du cannibalisme, tandis que d’autres, particuliers à la tête, peuvent s’expliquer par la fabrication de trophées. Globalement, ces traitements peuvent être interprétés de façon cohérente par un ou plusieurs épisodes de conflits armés, ce qui conduit à s’interroger sur la possible existence de la guerre au Paléolithique supérieur. Ainsi, malgré l’ancienneté de leur découverte, les restes humains badegouliens du Placard forment un ensemble exceptionnel qui apporte une contribution importante à notre connaissance des comportements des populations de chasseurs-cueilleurs de la Préhistoire europé
FORTHCOMING: Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit II: Coin Finds 2012–2016 / Late Roman and Early Islamic Pottery from Kom al-Ahmer by Michele Asolati, Cristina Crisafulli and Cristina Mondin with contributions by Maria Lucia Patanè and Mohamed Kenawi. Hardback; 205x290mm; xii+340 pages; 41 figures; 22 tables; 127 plates (88 colour pages). (Print RRP £65.00). 592 2019. ISBN 9781789693966. Book contents pageBuy Now

Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit were ideally placed to take advantage of the Mediterranean trade given their close proximity to the Egyptian ports of Thonis-Heracleion, Alexandria, and Rosetta during the Hellenistic, Roman, Late Roman, and early Islamic period. The social and economic vitality of the sites has been revealed during investigations undertaken by the Italian archaeological mission between 2012 and 2016 and published in Kom al-Ahmer – Kom Wasit I: Excavations in the Metelite Nome, Egypt ca. 700 BC – AD 100.

This volume presents over 1070 coins (ca. 310 BC–AD 641) and 1320 examples of Late Roman and Early Islamic pottery, testimony to the considerable commercial activity in the region during the Late Antique period. Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit emerge as centers of an exchange network involving large-scale trade of raw materials to and from the central and eastern Mediterranean.

About the Authors
Michele Asolati is Associate Professor of Numismatics at the University of Padua. His research focuses on Late Roman and Early Medieval coinage and on the coin finds of the Mediterranean area, having published extensively on the subject.

Cristina Crisafulli is Curator of the Numismatic Collections of the Correr Museum in Venice. Her research focuses on the Roman coins of the third century AD and on coin finds of the Mediterranean area, especially North Africa.

Cristina Mondin is the coordinator of the Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit Archaeological Project and Manager of the Asolo Museum. She authored many articles on Roman and Late Roman pottery from contexts in Italy, Egypt, Turkey, and Croatia. Her research focuses on the economy and the trade in the Mediterranean.
FORTHCOMING: Bridge of Civilizations: The Near East and Europe c. 1100–1300 edited by Peter Edbury, Denys Pringle and Balázs Major. Hardback; 176x250mm; xx+318 pages; 170 figures, 10 maps. (Print RRP £65.00). 576 2019. ISBN 9781789693270. Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume brings together 22 of the papers presented at a conference held in Esztergom, Hungary, in May 2018 to coincide with the 800th anniversary of the crusade of King Andrew II of Hungary to the Holy Land in 1217–18. The theme, Bridge of Civilizations, was chosen to highlight aspects of the links and contrasts between Europe and the areas around the eastern Mediterranean that were visited and occupied by western crusaders and settlers in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, giving special attention to the evidence provided by archaeology and material culture, as well as historical sources.

The results of the joint Syrian-Hungarian Archaeological Mission (SHAM) to the Hospitaller castle of Margat (al-Marqab) highlighted in this volume include an up-to-date overview of the structural development of the site from 1187 to 1285, as well as particular studies of the wall paintings, cooking installations and pottery. SHAM’s recent rescue work at Crac des Chevaliers also provides the basis for studies of the water-management system and medieval burials revealed in its courtyard, while other papers examine the masonry marks and surviving evidence of medieval trebuchet damage at both castles. Other papers focus on the medieval castles of Karak (Jordan) and Jubayl (Lebanon), the medieval buildings of Latakia (Syria), the impact of the Crusades on buildings in Cairo, historic bridges in Lebanon, the medieval chapels of Yanouh-Mghayreh and Edde-Jbeil (Lebanon), piscinas in Crusader churches in the East, the images of donors found in medieval Lebanese churches, and the activity of late thirteenth-century Western metal-workers in Cyprus.

Papers focusing more particularly on historical sources include a new edition of a late eleventh- to twelfth-century pilgrimage itinerary from Hungary to the Holy Land, a discussion of two minor military orders in Hungary, and the portrayal of Sultan al-Kāmil in a contemporary western account of the Fifth Crusade.

About the Editors
Peter Edbury is Emeritus Professor of Medieval History in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. He has published widely on the history and institutions of the kingdoms founded by the crusaders in the Near East and has re-edited the legal treatises by John of Ibelin (2003) and Philip of Novara (2009).

Denys Pringle is Emeritus Professor in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University. In addition to his four-volume corpus, The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem (1993–2009), his recent publications include a volume of translated texts, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 (2012), and a volume of collected studies, Churches, Castles and Landscape in the Frankish East (2013).

Balázs Major is an archaeologist, Arabist and historian by training and holds a PhD from Cardiff University. He is the director of the Institute of Archaeology at Pázmány Péter Catholic University and a lecturer in the Department of Arabic Studies.
FORTHCOMING: Ephyra-Epirus: The Mycenaean Acropolis Results of the Excavations 1975-1986 and 2007-2008 edited by Thanasis I. Papadopoulos and Evangelia Papadopoulou. Paperback; 205x290mm; 300pp; 600 figures approx.. 602 2020. ISBN 9781789693713. Buy Now

Ephyra-Epirus: The Mycenaean Acropolis presents the results of the 1975-1986 and 2007-2008 excavations on the prehistoric-Mycenaean acropolis of Ephyra, one of the most important Bronze Age sites of Epirus. Ephyra is a small coastal fortified site in the region of the lower Acheron valley and the only one that has been systematically excavated, producing impressive and, in some cases, unique Bronze Age remains (architectural, burial, pottery, artefacts). It stands on a high hill, in an exceptional position that overlooks and commands the lower Acheron valley and provides easy access both to the nearby Glykis Limin, the Ionian sea and the hinterland. Moreover, it is surrounded by three successive perivoloi, two of which (middle and lower) belong to LH III times, with a monumental south entrance gate.

Ephyra fits the criteria of a major fortified settlement, as it covers an important and strategic prehistoric citadel, cemetery, residence and port of call for those travelling to the West. Strictly based on the archaeological data presented, this study suggests that the acropolis had a permanent Mycenaean population during the entire LH III period and continued to thrive after the collapse of Mycenaean centres until (and including) the Archaic period. Finally, it is tempting to suggest a correlation of the archaeological record with the Homeric tradition (Homeric Εφύρα, Od.a..259,b.238).

About the Editors
Thanasis J. Papadopoulos obtained his PhD in Aegean Prehistoric Archaeology at Bedford College, University of London in 1972. He has worked at the University of Ioannina, the University of Crete and Ionian University as epimeletes, lecturer, associate professor, visiting professor and full professor, teaching Aegean Prehistoric, Cypriot, Egyptian and Neareastern Archaeology.

Evangelia Papadopoulou-Chrysikopoulou is an archaeologist with a PhD in Prehistoric Archaeology from the University of Ioannina, Greece. Since 1996, she has been an active member of excavations at Patras, S.Olynthus at Halkidiki, Dodoni, Ithaca and Jordan, overseeing archaeological research and educating students on excavation techniques.
Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past. Volume I A biography of a Soviet archaeologist (1900s - 1950s) by A. K. Konopatskii, translated by Richard L. Bland and Yaroslav V. Kuzmin. Paperback; 148x210mm; xxiv+410 pages; 30 black & white figures. (Print RRP: £24.99). 547 2019 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692044. £24.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692051. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Aleksei P. Okladnikov: The Great Explorer of the Past is about the life and works of Aleksei P. Okladnikov (1908– 1981), a prominent archaeologist who spent more than 50 years studying prehistoric sites in various parts of the Soviet Union—mainly in Siberia and Central Asia as well as in Mongolia. Okladnikov made numerous fascinating discoveries in the 1930s, including the first Neanderthal remains in the USSR at Teshik Tash (Uzbekistan) and unique figurines at the Upper Palaeolithic site of Buret’ in the Angara River basin (Eastern Siberia). His research and achievements are presented on the background of ideological campaigns inspired by the Communist Party in the 1920s–1950s, a subject that is very rarely described in non-Russian sources. Particular attention is given to the debunking of the ‘Japhetic theory’ and the ‘new doctrine of language’ developed by Nikolai Y. Marr, an Oriental scholar and specialist in languages who in the 1920s–early 1930s was a formal leader of Soviet archaeology. Marr’s principles of linguistic studies were mechanically transmitted to several fields of the humanities, including archaeology, and were mandatory for every Soviet scholar. In 1950 an abrupt end to Marr’s theories was enacted by Josef Stalin. Details of these events—important for development of archaeology, ancient history, and linguistics in the USSR—were never previously described.

The book is for archaeologists, historians, and everyone who is interested in the history of scholarship (particularly the humanities) in the twentieth century.

Contributors to this volume:
Aleksander K. Konopatskii was born in 1951 in Tambovka County, Amur Province, USSR. After graduating from Suvorov’s Military Boarding School in Ussuriisk (Maritime Province), he met Aleksei P. Okladnikov in 1969. Konopatskii became a cadet at the Novosibirsk Military-Political Academy but dropped out in 1972 and joined the Institute of History, Philology and Philosophy, Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences. Since this time, he was closely associated with Okladnikov, assisting in fieldwork, travel and preparation of scientific reports. In 1974, Konopatskii graduated from Kemerovo State University in History (including archaeology). In the 1970s, he studied prehistoric sites on the shore of Lake Baikal in Siberia, and gained the Candidate of Sciences (PhD-equivalent) degree in 1979; in the 1980s and early 1990s, he excavated ancient sites in the lower course of the Amur River (Russian Far East). Since 1998, Konopatskii has been an Assistant Professor of the Novosibirsk General Military Academy where he teaches humanities.

Richard L. Bland studied Alaskan prehistory in the 1970s – 1990s (PhD 1996, University of Oregon). He has translated numerous books and articles on the archaeology of Northeastern Siberia and the Russian Far East, helping to bring the rich Soviet/Russian records of prehistory and early history to the international scholarly community.

Yaroslav V. Kuzmin has been studying geoarchaeology of the Russian Far East, Siberia and neighbouring Northeast Asia since 1979 (PhD 1991; DSc. 2007). He has also assisted in translating and editing books on the archaeology of eastern Russia.
Yellow Beach 2 after 75 Years The Archaeology of a WWII Invasion Beach on Saipan and its Historic Context in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands by Boyd Dixon, Brenda Tenorio, Cherie Walth and Kathy Mowrer with contributions by Isla Nelson and Robert Jones. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+128 pages; 88 figures, 10 tables (50 colour pages). 92 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692587. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692594. Book contents pageDownload

After 75 years, this story presents archaeological evidence, archival records, and respected elders’ accounts from WWII and the most catastrophic period in Pacific Basin history, and then into modern times on Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. On June 15, 1944, Afetna Point was called ‘Yellow Beach 2’ by the U.S. Marines and Army infantry braving Japanese resistance to establish a beachhead before capturing As Lito airfield the following days. The beachhead then served as a resupply landing for the next two weeks or more as U.S. forces slowly cleared the island of enemy strongpoints, and removed wounded Americans and battle weary civilians to off-shore medical treatment. At the end of the battle Chamorro, Carolinian, Okinawan, and Korean residents were relocated into stockades for their separation from Japanese soldiers until liberation on July 4, 1946. American military and eventual civilian administration of the San Antonio area transformed the agrarian landscape into a busy corridor of residential, industrial, and then tourist development. Once again in the 21st century, competition for regional tourism and investment makes Saipan a nexus of geopolitical intrigue and economic speculation where the past is not forgotten.

About the Authors
Boyd Dixon is Senior Archaeologist for the Cardno GS office in Guam and the CNMI. With over 40 years of archaeological experience in North America, Latin America, Western Europe, and the Pacific Basin, his interests are equally varied. They embrace prehistoric and historic patterns of settlement, subsistence, interaction, power, and conflict. Boyd holds a BA from the University of Alabama, with MA and PhD in Anthropology from the University of Connecticut. He has also been a research associate in the Micronesian Area Research Center at the University of Guam.

Brenda Y. Tenorio has played a role in shaping US/CNMI relations, has worked with, represented and advised leadership in the CNMI executive and legislative branches of government in negotiations with the U.S. and in the process developed public policy on a variety of issues locally. Over the years, Ms. Tenorio has also provided research/consulting services for proposed multi-million dollar private development projects and a number of firms in the gaming, construction and energy fields. As staff for CNMI Covenant negotiators, Ms. Tenorio worked on issues ranging from the labor and immigration to bonds and financial assistance packages to the CNMI. As a CNMI Covenant negotiator Ms. Tenorio addressed CNMI concerns over citizenship by birth and ownership of submerged land. Ms. Tenorio has a Bachelor’s Degree in History and Philosophy from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Cherie Walth is a Project Manager, Principal Investigator, and Bioarchaeologist for SWCA Environmental Consultant’s Albuquerque Office. Cherie has worked in such diverse regions as the Rocky Mountains, the U.S. Southwest, the Pacific West, Micronesia, and North Africa. Her experience is in all levels of prehistoric and historic archaeological investigations and includes human and non-human osteological analysis (bioarchaeology). In her 30+ years of experience in cultural resource management, the analysis of human remains has remained her passion. Cherie has an M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Colorado and her thesis reported on human remains from her fieldwork in Tunisia, North Africa.

Kathy Mowrer is an Archaeologist and Bioarchaeologist for SWCA Environmental Consultant’s Albuquerque Office. Kathy has 20 years of archaeological experience in the U. S. Southwest, Pacific Coast, Plains, and CNMI, Saipan. She has been the consulting osteologist for Crow Canyon Archaeological Center in Cortez, Colorado for 13 years. Kathy’s experience includes prehistoric and historic data recovery, survey, and research. Kathy holds a B.A .from Fort Lewis College with a major in Anthropol
Messages from the Past: Rock Art of Al-Hajar Mountains by Angelo E. Fossati. Paperback; 210x297mm; xxx+304 pages; 398 figures; 10 maps; 1 table (215 colour pages). (Print RRP £58.00). 557 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 4. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692860. £58.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692877. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £58.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Turtles, ibexes, ships, inscriptions... Thousands of engraved and painted figures intrigue visitors in the wadis of Al-Hajar Mountains. Who created these enigmatic figures and when were they made? What are their hidden meanings? For the first time, this volume tries to answer these questions. It is the result of the archaeological surveys and investigations undertaken by the author over the last ten years under the patronage of the Ministry of Heritage and Culture. In this book, the author takes the reader on an in-depth journey into the various themes present in the rock art of Oman. He offers theories on the chronology and interpretation, while exploring the landscape setting of the decorated panels and how best to research these. Several beautiful photographs and scientific tracings of the rock art accompany the text. The volume closes offering to enthusiasts and tourists a series of guided visits with GPS maps to the most interesting and visible rock art sites protected by Royal Decrees of the Sultanate.

About the author
Angelo E. Fossati is an Italian archaeologist specialized in rock art studies. He teaches Prehistory and Protohistory at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan (Italy) and researches mainly on Alpine megalithism and pre-Roman inscriptions. Dr Fossati has conducted rock art documentation and studies in several countries including Italy, France, Portugal and the USA. He has been consultant for the UNESCO Word Heritage Center and is President of «Footsteps of Man» an Italian rock art society member of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations. The author has published several papers and books on various rock art traditions. In Oman, he has conducted numerous surveys and documentation works under the patronage of the Ministry of Heritage and Culture in several areas of Al-Hajar Mountains.
Taming the Great Desert: Adam in the Prehistory of Oman by Guillaume Gernez and Jessica Giraud. Paperback; xiv+128 pages; 106 figures (colour throughout). (Print RRP £30.00). 538 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691801. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691818. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Located at the margins of the Rub Al-Khali desert, a place of interactions between settled and nomadic populations, the Adam oasis occupies a pivotal role in the history of Oman. However, almost nothing was known about its foundation and early developments. In 2006, the French Archaeological Mission in Central Oman began the exploration of the area. After ten years of field research using innovative methods and technologies, much is now revealed about the importance of Adam in the prehistory and early history of Oman. This is the first monograph about the research carried out at Adam and it includes seven chapters written by specialists directly involved in the field activities. Each major period is described in detail, including evidence of Palaeolithic occupation, Neolithic settlements, Early and Middle Bronze Age necropolises, Iron Age ritual sites and also an ethnographic study of the traditional water sharing within the oasis.

About the Authors
GUILLAUME GERNEZ is associate professor of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne and Director of the French Archaeological Mission in Central Oman. A former researcher at the French Institute for the Near East in Beirut, he specializes in protohistoric periods, material culture and funerary customs. For more than fifteen years, he has participated in archaeological excavations, surveys and material studies in Syria, Lebanon, Iraq and Oman. He has published books on the prehistory and antiquity of Lebanon (2010) and the history and early developments of weapons in the ancient Near and Middle East (2017).

JESSICA GIRAUD is associated researcher at the Laboratory Archaeology and Sciences of Antiquity (CNRS / University Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne) and is CEO and founder of the company ArCHaios — Archaeology, Culture & Heritage. She has been working on the archaeology of Oman for fifteen years, researching mainly on landscape archaeology in the Ja’alan province and in the Adam oasis, where she conducted the very first surveys and excavations. Since 2012, she has worked in Kurdistan as Director of the French Archaeological Mission to the Governorate of Sulaimaniyah (Iraq), and she continues to work in Oman at Adam and Quriyat.
Rus Africum IV. La fattoria Bizantina di Aïn Wassel, Africa Proconsularis (Alto Tell, Tunisia) Lo scavo stratigrafico e i materiali edited by Mariette de Vos Raaijmakers and Barbara Maurina. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+438 pages; 390 figures, 37 tables (143 colour pages). Italian text with English abstracts. 515 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 58. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691153. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691160. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £75.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Aïn Wassel is the only rural site of Africa Proconsularis which has been excavated using the stratigraphic method and the detailed results are published in this volume thanks to an archaeological field survey of the surrounding rural region. The interpretation of the stratigraphic sequence of the excavated area was able to determine a precise chrono-typology of pottery and amphoras, and to outline the importance of the Vandal and Byzantine period, which was confirmed by additional data from the survey.

The excavation provided evidence of sustainable intensive mixed farming: an oil mill and press, a grain hand mill, a sundial, bones of cattle and dromedaries raised for labour, transport, milk, meat, skins, wool. Remains of fowl, such as a partridge and fragments of ash tree, pine and olive stones were found and analyzed. Local imitations of African Red Slip (ARS) wares were identified for the first time, and three new types of amphoras of large dimensions were discovered and classified as Aïn Wassel 1, 2 and 3. The excavation proved that in the 7th c. AD North Africa was still very active and dynamic, where regional trade used both fluvial and ground transportation. Until recently, this was considered a period of crisis, abandonment of the countryside and ruralization of cities; it was not so.

About the Editors
MARIETTE DE VOS RAAIJMAKERS, BA and MA Utrecht, PhD Leiden, is retired Full Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Trento (Italy) where she founded in 1994 the Laboratorio di Archeologia e Scienze Affini. She conducted archaeological fieldwork in Italy (Rome, Pompeii, Sicily, Isera, Tivoli, Ventotene) from 1968, in North Africa from 1994 and in Turkey from 2003-2005. Her research interests lie in domestic architecture and late-antique and rural archaeology in Tunisia, Algeria and Cilicia.

BARBARA MAURINA is Archaeological Curator at the Museo Civico di Rovereto Foundation. She received her BA in Roman Archaeology from the University of Trento, an advanced degree from the University of Trieste, her PhD in ‘Cultures of the Roman Provinces’ from the University of Siena and she has attended post-degree courses at the Institute of Archaeology of the University College London. She has been collaborator at various universities, museums and institutes and has taken part in several archaeological campaigns in Italy and abroad. Her main research interests include Roman and Late antique material culture, Roman wall coatings and fieldwork. In the years 1994-1996 she took part in the archaeological excavation of Aïn Wassel in Tunisia and afterwards she studied the amphorae coming from the site.

Italian Description
Fino ad oggi Aïn Wassel è l'unico sito rurale dell'Africa Proconsularis che è stato scavato con metodo stratigrafico, pubblicato in dettaglio e contestualizzato grazie al survey archeologico della regione circostante. L'interpretazione della sequenza stratigrafica dei 252 m2 scavati ha permesso di determinare una precisa crono-tipologia di vasellame e anfore, e di delineare l'importanza del periodo vandalo e bizantino, come confermato da altri dati provenienti dall'indagine sul campo.

Gli scavi dimostrano un'agricoltura mista intensiva sostenibile: un elemento di macina e una pressa olearia, una macina manuale per cereali, una meridiana, ossa di bovini e dromedari, allevati per lavoro, trasporti, latte, carne, pelli e lana. Resti di uccelli, come una pernice e frammenti di frassini, noccioli di pino e ulivo sono stati trovati e analizzati. Le imitazioni locali delle ceramiche di sigillata africana (African Red Slip) sono identificate per la prima volta durante lo scavo di Aïn Wassel e l'indagine sul campo nella regione circostante. Tre nuovi tipi di anfora di grandi dimensioni furono scoperti ad Aïn Wassel e classificati come Aïn Wassel 1, 2 e 3. Lo scavo dimostrò che nel 7°secolo il Nord Africa era ancora molto attivo e dinamico
Excavation of Later Prehistoric and Roman Sites along the Route of the Newquay Strategic Road Corridor, Cornwall by Andy M. Jones. Paperback; 205x290mm; 144pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 526 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691528. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691535. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Ryan S Smith, Dana Challinor, Julie Jones, Graeme Kirkham, Anna Lawson-Jones, Henrietta Quinnell and Roger Taylor.

During November and December 2014, the Cornwall Archaeological Unit undertook a programme of archaeological excavation in advance of construction of a road corridor to the south of Newquay. Evidence for Middle Bronze Age occupation took the form of a hollow-set roundhouse; however, the majority of the excavated features have been dated to the Iron Age and Roman periods. The area was enclosed as fields associated with extensive settlement activity throughout the last centuries cal BC into the third century AD.

The excavations revealed the character of settlement-related activity during the later prehistoric and Roman periods. The evidence strongly suggests growing intensification of agriculture, with ditched fields and enclosures appearing in the landscape from the later Iron Age and into the Roman period.

The results shed light on later prehistoric and Roman practices involving the division of the landscape with ditched fields and enclosed buildings. Many of the structures and pits were found to be set within their own ring-ditched enclosures or hollows, and the field system ditches were in some instances marked by ‘special’ deposits. As has previously been demonstrated for Middle Bronze Age roundhouses, structures could be subject to formal abandonment processes. Gullies and hollows were deliberately infilled, so that they were no longer visible at surface. However, unlike the abandoned Bronze Age roundhouses, the later structures appear to have been flattened and not monumentalized. In other words, buildings could be both etched into and subsequently erased from the landscape and thereby forgotten.

This volume takes the opportunity presented by investigations on the Newquay Strategic Road to discuss the complexity of the archaeology, review the evidence for ‘special’ deposits and explore evidence for the deliberate closure of buildings especially in later prehistoric and Roman period Cornwall. Finally, the possible motives which underlie these practices are considered.

About the Author
ANDY M. JONES is Principal Archaeologist with the Cornwall Archaeological Unit. His research interests include the Neolithic, Bronze Age periods, as well as the archaeology of the uplands and coastal areas of western Britain. His recent research includes the log coffin dating project and the publication of the Whitehorse Hill cist, Preserved in the Peat: An Extraordinary Bronze Age Burial on Whitehorse Hill (2016). In 2017 he co-edited An Intellectual Adventurer in Archaeology: Reflections on the work of Charles Thomas. Other recent publications include Settlement and Metalworking in the Middle Bronze Age and Beyond: New evidence from Tremough, Cornwall (2015) and Archaeology and Landscape at the Land’s End, Cornwall (2016).
Early Neolithic, Iron Age and Roman settlement at Monksmoor Farm, Daventry, Northamptonshire by Tracy Preece. Paperback; viii+82 pages; 53 figures, 27 tables (36 plates presented in full colour). 544 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692105. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692112. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Includes contributions from Rob Atkins, Andy Chapman, Mary Ellen Crothers, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Rob Perrin and Yvonne Wolframm-Murray; illustrations by Olly Dindol and Rob Reed.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) has undertaken archaeological work at Monksmoor Farm on the north-eastern edge of Daventry in six different areas. The earliest archaeological features lay in Area 6 at the southern end of the development area, where two pits were radiocarbon dated to the early Neolithic. They contained a moderate assemblage of worked flints along with sherds of early Neolithic pottery. In the middle Iron Age a settlement was established in the same location comprising a roundhouse and several enclosures.

Two other contemporary settlements are thought to have originated in the late Iron Age/ early 1st century BC and were identified in Areas 1 and 2 between c0.2km and 0.5km apart and 500m to the north of Area 6. Area 1 contained evidence for a cluster of eight roundhouses with associated enclosures clearly showing sequential activity, while in Area 2, a large ditched enclosure defined as a Wootton Hill type, within which another roundhouse was present. It is possible that the Wootton Hill type enclosure in particular may have a slighter earlier origin than the limited pottery assemblage suggests. Sparse early Roman features were also found in Areas 3, 4 and 5.

This settlement continued in use through the later 1st to 2nd century AD. During the early Roman period the settlement in Area 6 was greatly expanded with large rectilinear ditched enclosures along with smaller enclosures and paddocks being established on either side of a routeway indicating movement of livestock was important.
The Middle Stone Age of Nigeria in its West African Context by Philip Allsworth-Jones. Paperback; 205x290mm; xiv+240 pages; 317 figures, 27 tables (83 colour pages). 529 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691382. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691399. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £44.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book provides a full up to date account of the evidence relating to the Middle Stone Age in Nigeria and the other countries of West Africa. It relies upon the author’s own fieldwork and extensive personal knowledge of the region and its archaeology. It is abundantly illustrated with maps, photographs, and drawings. The emphasis is on stratigraphy, chronology, site situation, and artefact characteristics, with such general background information about the countries concerned as is required. A summary account is also provided of the current situation in relation to this topic (covering climate, archaeology, and human evolution) in the African continent as a whole, so that a judgement can made as to how the West African evidence fits in with the rest. In general accounts of the African palaeolithic record up to now, West Africa tends to be neglected, so this book goes a long way to fill a gap in the available literature.

About the Author
PHILIP ALLSWORTH-JONES completed his PhD on the European Palaeolithic in Cambridge, before serving as a staff member of the Department of Archaeology in Ibadan for a number of years, during which time much of the fieldwork described in this work was carried out. He subsequently held an analogous appointment at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica, but he has continued to take an interest in West Africa up to this day. He is currently an Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology of the University of Sheffield, and while holding this appointment he has in recent years published a number of works on Nigeria, including the results of his excavations at the rock shelter sites of Itaakpa and Kariya Wuro. This is however his first attempt to tell the story of the Middle Stone Age in West Africa as a whole in book form.
Early Farming in Dalmatia Pokrovnik and Danilo Bitinj: two Neolithic villages in south-east Europe by Andrew Moore and Marko Menđušić. Paperback; 175x245mm; ix+110 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 532 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691580. £26.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691597. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £26.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Lawrence Brown, Sue Colledge, Robert Giegengack, Thomas Higham, Vladimir Hršak, Anthony Legge†, Drago Marguš, Sarah McClure, Carol Palmer, Emil Podrug, Kelly Reed, Jennifer Smith, and Joško Zaninović.

The origins and spread of farming are vital subjects of research, notably because agriculture makes possible our modern world. The Early Farming in Dalmatia Project is investigating the expansion of farming from its centre of origin in western Asia through the Mediterranean into southern Europe. This multidisciplinary ecological project combines comprehensive recovery of archaeological materials through excavation with landscape studies. It addresses several key questions, including when and how farming reached Dalmatia, what was the nature of this new economy, and what was its impact on the local environment. Excavations at Danilo Bitinj and Pokrovnik have demonstrated that their inhabitants were full-time farmers. The two sites were among the largest known Neolithic villages in the eastern Adriatic. A comprehensive program of AMS dating indicates that together they were occupied from c. 8,000 to 6,800 cal BP. Our research has begun to illuminate the details of their farming system, as well as the changes that took place in their way of life through the Neolithic. Their economy was derived from western Asia and it is likely that their ancestors came from there also. It was these people who brought agriculture and village life to the Adriatic and to the rest of the central and western Mediterranean. Once in place, this farming economy persisted in much the same form from the Neolithic down to the present.

About the Authors

ANDREW MOORE’s archaeological interests span the Middle East, the Mediterranean, and Europe. His principal research focus is the beginning of agriculture and sedentary life in the Middle East and their spread to Africa and Eurasia. Moore has conducted field research in Syria, Iraq, Palestine, Croatia and other countries. In the 1970s Moore excavated the site of Abu Hureyra in the Euphrates Valley in Syria threatened by the construction of a new dam. The site was significant because it documented the transition from foraging to farming 13,000 years ago, much earlier than had been suspected. Moore is currently investigating the spread of farming around the Mediterranean and into southern Europe. He is co-director with Marko Menđušić of the Early Farming in Dalmatia Project. The project has demonstrated that agriculture reached the Adriatic region as a mature mixed farming system 8,000 years ago, brought in from farther east by migrating farmers. Moore’s M.A. and D.Phil. degrees are from the University of Oxford. He has taught archaeology at the University of Arizona and Yale University. Past President of the Archaeological Institute of America, Moore is currently Professor and Dean Emeritus at Rochester Institute of Technology.

MARKO MENĐUŠIĆ is a prehistoric archaeologist specializing in the Neolithic of Croatia. He was born in the village of Pokrovnik near Šibenik, in a farming family that traces its roots as far back as the seventeenth century. After graduating from the University of Zagreb he became Curator for Archaeology in the Šibenik City Museum and, in time, head of the Archaeological Department there. Menđušić has excavated numerous prehistoric and later sites in northern Dalmatia and on the offshore islands. He has also organized many exhibitions in museums in Croatia. In 2000 Menđušić invited Andrew Moore to join him in developing the Early Farming in Dalmatia Project, and has been co-director of the project since its inception. Menđušić became head of the Conservation Department of the Ministry of Culture in Šibenik in 2004. His responsibilities included preservation of historic buildings in the region at a time of rapidly increasing development. A long-standing membe
Dhofar Through the Ages An Ecological, Archaeological and Historical Landscape by Lynne S. Newton and Juris Zarins. Paperback; 210x297mm; xvi+132 pages; 61 figures, 47 tables (colour throughout). 521 2019 The Archaeological Heritage of Oman 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691603. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691610. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dhofar, the southern governorate of Oman, lies within a distinctive ecological zone due to the summer Southwest Monsoon. It is home to numerous indigenous succulent plants, the most famous of which is frankincense (Boswellia sacra). The region, tied in the past to both Oman and Yemen, has a long and distinguished archaeological past stretching back to the Lower Paleolithic ca. 1.5 my BP. Dhofar is also home to a distinctive people, the Modern South Arabian Languages speakers (MSAL) since at least the last 15,000 years. Ancient Zafar (Al-Habudi), now called Al-Baleed, and its successor Salalah was and is the province’s largest city. From the seventh century onwards until the arrival of the Portuguese in 1504 AD Al-Baleed dominated the central southern Arabian coastline politically and economically. Archaeological surveys and excavations in the governorate, beginning in 1954, have brought to light Dhofar’s ancient past.

About the Authors
LYNNE S. NEWTON received her doctorate from the University of Minnesota with research on the Iron Age and Islamic periods in the Mahra Governorate of Yemen. Since 2007, she has co-directed excavations at the Medieval port of Al-Baleed and the general archaeological survey of Dhofar. Between 2011 and 2014, she was Curator of Maritime History at the National Museum of Qatar. The author published numerous research articles on Dhofar and the Mahra Governate, including also her doctorate A Landscape of Pilgrimage and Trade in Wadi Masila Yemen (2009) and is co-author of the Atlas of Archaeological Survey in Governorate of Dhofar, Sultanate of Oman (2013).

JURIS ZARINS is retired Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology at Missouri State University. He has excavated sites from the Lower Paleolithic to the Ottoman period in Mesopotamia (Turkey and Iraq) and more recently in the Arabian Peninsula, with a specific focus on the development of pastoral nomadism in Arabia and the origins of the Bedouin. Between 1992 and 2011, he worked in the Sultanate of Oman to uncover the Medieval port of al-Baleed and to conduct a general archaeological survey of Dhofar. The author has published many scientific research articles, including Dhofar: The Land of Incense (2001) and The Domestication of Equids in Ancient Mesopotamia (2014).
Greco-Roman Cities at the Crossroads of Cultures: The 20th Anniversary of Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission Marina el-Alamein edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner and Rafał Czerner. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+312 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (128 colour plates). 513 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691481. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691498. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The ancient town, discovered at the site of today’s Marina el-Alamein, located on the northern coast of Egypt, developed from the 2nd century BC to the 6th century AD, finding itself at the crossroads of several civilisations: Hellenic, later replaced by Roman, and eventually Christian – and always strongly influenced by Egyptian tradition. A variety of cultures have met and appeared, their prominence flourishing and faltering at different times, but they have always co-existed and influenced one another. The syncretism prevailing here is notable in art, architecture, religion and worship.

In 2015, it had been thirty years since the discovery of the remains of the ancient city, which, for many centuries, had been unknown to the world. They were found unexpectedly during the preparatory work for the construction of a modern tourist settlement on the Mediterranean coast, and the significance and extraordinary value of the find was immediately recognised. Now the ancient city, and the historic remains of its buildings, are gradually coming to light.

The Jubilee was twofold, since 2015 marked also the 20th anniversary of the setting up of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission, Marina el-Alamein. During this time, architectural and archaeological research has been carried out at the site, many discoveries have been made, numerous relics of historic building structures have been preserved, and conservation methods have been improved. In the jubilee year, we invited researchers who work on archaeological sites and towns with a similar history and position in the ancient world, art and culture, to take part in a scientific discussion and exchange of experience. The authors of the presented papers are representatives of different disciplines and research methodologies: archaeologists, architects, Egyptologists, specialists in religious studies, historians and conservators. The present volume contains an interdisciplinary review of both the newest and long-term studies and achievements made in various regions of the ancient world.

Greco-Roman Cities at the Crossroads of Cultures: The 20th Anniversary of Polish- Egyptian Conservation Mission Marina el-Alamein presents papers ranging from ancient Mauritania, through Africa, Egypt, Cyprus, Palestine, Syria, as well as sites in Crimea and Georgia. The topography of cities, architecture of public buildings, as well as houses and their décor – architectural, sculptured and painted – are presented. Religious syncretism and the importance of ancient texts are discussed. Studies on pottery are also presented. The volume includes studies on the conservation of architecture, sculpture and painting. Several articles are devoted to the study of Marina el-Alamein; others talk about ancient Alexandria, Deir el- Bahari, Hermopolis Magna, Bakchias, Pelusium, Kom Wasit, Berenike, Ptolemais, Apollonia, Palmyra, Nea Paphos, as well as Chersonesus Taurica and Apsarus.

About the Editors
GRAŻYNA BĄKOWSKA-CZERNER (PhD) is Assistant Professor at the Centre of Comparative Studies of Civilisations of the Jagiellonian University. She specialises in archaeology of the Greco-Roman period in Egypt. Since 2001 she has been working as a permanent member of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission at the archaeological site Marina el-Alamein (Egypt), and since 2004 she has been a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission at Jebel Barkal (Sudan). Greco- Roman art, in particular iconography, are her main areas of interest. She is also involved in the study of ancient gems, as well as the iconography of decorated meroitic pottery.

RAFAŁ CZERNER (Professor) is the head of the Department of History of Architecture, Arts and Technology at the Faculty of Architecture, Wrocław University of Science and Technology (Poland) and the director of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission at the archaeological site Marina el-Alamein (Eg
Afetna Point, Saipan: Archaeological Investigations of a Latte Period Village and Historic Context in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands by Boyd Dixon, Cherie Walth, Kathy Mowrer and Danny Welch with contributions by Isla Nelson and Robert Jones. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+188 pages; 106 figures, 52 tables (66 plates in colour). 81 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691764. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691771. Book contents pageDownload

When Ferdinand Magellan first anchored off the island of Guam in 1521, the inhabitants of the small Chamorro village at Afetna Point on the southwest coast of Saipan were likely unaware. Archaeological investigations of the traditional village yielded Latte Period burials, ceramics, stone and shell tools, microfossils from food remains, and charcoal from cooking features dating between A.D. 1450 and 1700. No direct evidence of Spanish Contact before forced abandonment of the island circa 1730 was encountered, after which time Saipan remained virtually unpopulated until the arrival of Carolinian and Chamorro settlers from Guam nearly a century later. Spanish settlement in 1668, the German occupation from 1898-1914, and the Japanese sugarcane period from 1914-1944 left few traces at the site until WWII and subsequent American administration. Afetna Point and Saipan have therefore been a contested landscape for centuries, but the island’s prehistory has deep roots that tie the Mariana Islands and its modern culture to ancestral SE Asia.
Egitto, Iraq ed Etruria nelle fotografie di John Alfred Spranger Viaggi e ricerche archeologiche (1929-1936) by Stefano Anastasio and Barbara Arbeid. Paperback; 205x290mm; 178 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text with English summary. 512 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691269. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691276. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume – in Italian, with an English summary – presents the 1930s archaeological photo-albums of John Alfred Spranger (1889-1968). Engineer, topographer, mountain climber, archaeologist, art collector and photographer, Spranger traveled extensively – in the Balkans, Greece, Egypt and the Near East, Canada, Central Asia – and left several photo albums detailing archaeological explorations as well as travel memories. In the 1920s-1930s, he took part in a number of Etruscan excavations in Tuscany, together with Harry Burton, the photographer of the Tomb of Tutankhamun. With a pioneering approach, they used the photo-camera to document the excavation work in progress. The albums are dedicated to a trip to Egypt in 1929, a trip to Mesopotamia (Iraq) in 1936 and some surveys and excavations carried out in Etruria (Tuscany, Italy) in 1929-1935. Spranger’s photos are particularly meaningful, especially because he combined his skills in using the camera with a great expertise in archaeology and topography. His photos make it possible to understand, after almost a century, how many Egyptian, Mesopotamian and Etruscan sites appeared at the time of their first excavations.

About the Authors
STEFANO ANASTASIO has carried out archaeological researches in Italy (Sardinia, Tuscany), Syria, Turkey, Jordan and currently works at the Archaeological Photo Archive of the Superintendency of Florence. His main research interests are the Mesopotamian Iron Age pottery and architecture, the building archaeology and the use of the early photo archives for the study of the Near Eastern archaeology.

BARBARA ARBEID is an archaeologist at the Superintendency of Florence, appointed to the archaeological heritage protection service. Her main research interests are the archaeology of Norther Etruria, the Etruscan bronze craftsmanship, the archaeological collecting and photography.

Italian Description
Il volume – in italiano con riassunto in inglese – è dedicato agli album fotografici realizzati negli anni Trenta del Novecento da John Alfred Spranger (1889-1968): fu ingegnere, topografo, alpinista, archeologo, collezionista e fotografo. Viaggiò molto – nei Balcani, in Grecia, in Egitto e nel Vicino Oriente, in Canda e in Asia centrale – lasciandoci molti album fotografici dedicati ai suoi viaggi e alle sue ricerche archeologiche. Negli anni Venti e Trenta partecipò a ricognizioni e scavi archeologici in Toscana, assieme a Harry Burton, il fotografo della Tomba di Tutankhamun. Con un approccio pionieristico, ambedue sperimentarono l’uso della macchina fotografica per documentare lo scavo archeologico. Gli album presentati sono dedicati a due viaggi, uno in Egitto nel 1929 e l’altro in Mesopotamia (Iraq) nel 1936, e a ricognizioni e scavi condotti in siti etruschi della Toscana tra 1929 e 1935. Le fotografie di Spranger sono particolarmente significative perché riflettono sia la competenza del fotografo che quella del topografo e dell’archeologo, e ci permettono di capire, a quasi un secolo di distanza, quale fosse l’aspetto di numerosi siti egizi, mesopotamici ed etruschi, al momento della loro prima indagine archeologica.

Biografia
STEFANO ANASTASIO, archeologo, ha svolto ricerche in Italia (Sardegna, Toscana), Siria, Turchia e Giordania. Attualmente lavora all’Archivio Fotografico Archeologico della Soprintendenza di Firenze. Si interessa soprattutto di ceramica e architettura dell’età del Ferro in Mesopotamia, di Building archaeology e dell’uso delle fotografie antiche per lo studio dell’archeologia vicinorientale.

BARBARA ARBEID è archeologa presso la Soprintendenza di Firenze, con incarichi di tutela del patrimonio. Il suo ambito di studio principale è la civiltà dell'Etruria settentroinale, con particolare interesse per la bronzistica, ma ha svolto anche ricerche riguardanti la storia del collezionismo e della fotografia in ambito archeologico.
Taymāʾ I: Archaeological Exploration, Palaeoenvironment, Cultural Contacts edited by Arnulf Hausleiter, Ricardo Eichmann, Muhammad al-Najem. Hardback; 210x297mm; xii+268 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (66 plates in colour). 499 2018 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690439. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690446. Book contents pageDownload

Archaeological investigations in the north-western part of the Arabian Peninsula has increased during the last 15 years. One of the major sites in the region is the ancient oasis of Taymāʾ, known as a commercial hub on the so-called Incense Road connecting South Arabia with the Eastern Mediterranean. In the context of this new research a multidisciplinary project by the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and the Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) has been investigating the archaeology and ancient environment of Taymāʾ since 2004. A major aim of this project was the development of new perspectives of the site and the region, characterised by elaborating the local socio-cultural and economic contexts. So far, Taymāʾ has been known mainly through exogenous sources.

The present volume is the first of the publication series of the Saudi-German archaeological project and focuses on three fundamental aspects of research at Taymāʾ: the current archaeological exploration of the oasis is contextualised with previous and ongoing research within the region, while at the same time offering a first overview of the settlement history of the site, which may have started as early as more than 6000 years ago. New information on the palaeoenvironment has been provided by multiproxy- analysis of sediments from a palaeolake immediately north of the settlement. The results indicate an Early Holocene humid period in the region that is shorter than the so-called African Humid Period. The abrupt aridification at around 8 ka BP, known from other regions in the Near East, is also attested in north-western Arabia. The reconstruction of the past vegetation of the site and its surroundings demonstrates that oasis cultivation at Taymāʾ started during the 5th millennium BCE with grapes and figs, rather than with the date palm. According to hydrological investigations on water resources, groundwater aquifers provided the main source of local water supply. These were exploited through wells, some of which have been identified in the area of the ancient oasis. Finally, since the time of early travellers to Northwest Arabia evidence of cultural contacts has been observed in the records from the site, which had been occupied by the last Babylonian king, Nabonidus (556–539 BCE) for ten years. A historical-archaeological essay on Egypt and Arabia as well as a study on the ambiguous relationship between Assyria and Arabia – characterised by conflict and commerce – shed new light on the foreign relations of ancient Taymāʾ.

About the Editors
ARNULF HAUSLEITER is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Taymāʾ project, funded by the German Research foundation (DFG). He has been field director of the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 and has co-directed the project with Ricardo Eichmann.

RICARDO EICHMANN is director of the Orient Department at the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin. He is the head of the German component of the Taymāʾ project and has co-directed it with Arnulf Hausleiter.

MUHAMMAD AL-NAJEM is head of the Antiquities Office of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and director of the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography at Taymāʾ, Province of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
The Pioneer Burial: A high-status Anglian warrior burial from Wollaston Northamptonshire by Ian Meadows. Paperback; viii+70 pages; 56 illustrations (27 plates in colour). 510 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691191. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691207. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £24.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

With contributions by Rob Atkins, Alison Draper, J N James, Lloyd Laing, Matthew Ponting, Anthony Read, Jenny Wakely, Penelope Walton-Rogers, and Jacqui Watson.

Illustrations by Olly Dindol, Jacqueline Harding and James Ladocha

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook evaluation and subsequent excavation at Wollaston Quarry, near Wellingborough through the 1990s. These excavations took place in advance of gravel extraction on land to the north and south of Hardwater Road, Wollaston. The archaeological work found Iron Age and Roman farms arranged along a single routeway and the remains of at least two Roman vineyards.

A single late 7th century grave, the Pioneer burial, lay alongside a long-lived routeway at the southern end of the quarry, close to the floodplain and any burial mound would have overlooked the River Nene. The burial was an isolated feature; the only other Saxon artefacts recovered from other parts of the quarry were limited to two scatters of pottery and two fragments of small long brooch recovered by metal detection. All were located some distance from the grave.

The Pioneer burial was adjacent to the south-western corner of the later Saxon Higham Hundred boundary where it meets the River Nene. It is probable the burial had originally been within a barrow, but no evidence was found for it. Within the grave there was an individual adult of slender build probably in their early to middle 20s equipped with a boar-crested iron helmet, a pattern-welded sword, a copper alloy hanging bowl with enamelled escutcheon, an iron knife, a copper alloy clothing hook and three iron buckles. The burial contained artefacts indicative of very high status, with the early to middle Saxon helmet being at the time only the fourth to have been recovered from a burial in England.
From Cambridge to Lake Chad: Life in archaeology 1956–1971 by Graham Connah. Paperback; 175x245mm; xxii+270 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 9 colour plates. 505 2019 Archaeological Lives . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919580. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919597. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £38.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is about how the author became an archaeologist at a time when opportunities for employment were rare and how he worked as a field researcher in West Africa and wrote about his work there. It traces his archaeological training and employment at Cambridge and his practical experience on British excavations and explains how he became one of the pioneers of Nigerian archaeology during a decade in that country. It is not so much a study of the archaeology that was done, as an account of how it was done; its circumstances, organization, and economic and social and cultural context. As a result, it is both a professional and personal account, for these two aspects of life were inseparably intertwined, his wife Beryl becoming an integral part of the story. Other archaeologists and many non-archaeologists also feature in the account. The period in Nigeria from 1961 to 1971 included the Nigerian Civil War from 1967 to 1970, when archaeological work continued with difficulty. Both circumstances and preference meant that the author always worked with a labour team of Nigerians and with Nigerian assistants, of whom few had any experience in archaeology and none had any formal training; there were no postgraduates or others from outside the country. Success in excavations in Benin City, in the south of the country, and in Borno, in its far north-east, was as much the achievement of those Nigerians as it was the author’s.

About the Author
GRAHAM CONNAH was born in Cheshire, educated at the Wirral Grammar School, served on a destroyer in the Mediterranean, read history and archaeology at Cambridge University, and worked there as a Research Assistant. After experience on numerous excavations in Britain, including assistant director and director, in 1961 he went to Nigeria, where he spent ten years excavating and on fieldwork, the subject of this book. In 1971 he moved to the University of New England, in Australia, founding the Archaeology Department there and later becoming its Foundation Professor. He returned to Nigerian fieldwork in 1978 and 1981, and subsequently excavated in Egyptian Nubia and Uganda. He also contributed to Australian historical archaeology and founded the journal Australasian Historical Archaeology. He is a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological institute, a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities, MA (Cantab), D.Litt (UNE), and holds the Order of Australia, and the Australian Centenary Medal. He is currently a Visiting Fellow in Archaeology and Anthropology at the Australian National University, Canberra.
Hellenistic Alexandria: Celebrating 24 Centuries Papers presented at the conference held on December 13–15 2017 at Acropolis Museum, Athens edited by Christos S. Zerefos and Marianna V. Vardinoyannis. Hardback; 205x290mm; xx+296 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (56 plates in colour). 493 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690668. £68.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690675. Book contents pageDownload

Hellenistic Alexandria: Celebrating 24 Centuries presents the proceedings of a conference held at the Acropolis Museum in Athens, on December 13–15, 2017, and includes high-level dialogues and philosophical discussions between international experts on Hellenistic Alexandria. The goal was to celebrate the 24 centuries which have elapsed since its foundation and the beginning of the Library and the Museum of Alexandria. The conference was divided into two parts, to include in the first part archaeology, history, philosophy, literature, art, culture and legal issues and in the second part science, medicine, technology and environment. A total of 28 original and peer-reviewed articles point to the importance of the brilliantly-original ideas that emerged during the Hellenistic age and the curious modernity of the whole atmosphere of the time. The range of presented topics covers a variety of new data on the foundation of Alexandria to comparison between Ptolemaic Alexandria and Ptolemaic Greece through philosophy, culture and drama to the forgotten revolution of science, medicine and the prevailing climatological and geophysical conditions throughout the Hellenistic Period. The conference and its proceedings were co-sponsored by the Μarianna V. Vardinoyannis Foundation, the Acropolis Museum, the Alexandria Center for Hellenistic Studies at Bibliotheca Alexandrina and the Mariolopoulos-Kanaginis Foundation for the Environmental Sciences.

The Publication also celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Alexandria Center for Hellenistic Studies, a joint collaboration between the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, the Vardinoyannis Foundation and the University of Alexandria. Scholars from around the world follow the Center’s programme in various specialisations, ranging from historyliterature- art, to archaeology and architecture-philosophy, and science.

About the Editors
Christos Zerefos is Head of Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens and president-elect of the General Assembly of the Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation; Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Physics at the Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki; Visiting Professor, Universities of Minnesota and Boston; Samarbeidspartnere (Scientific Collaborator), University of Oslo. He is known for his research into ozone, UV, ozone-climate interactions and climate-extreme events. He is member of the Academy of Athens, Academia Europaea, Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters, European Academy of Sciences, Russian Academy of Natural Sciences and other distinguished scientific societies. He is recipient of the UNEP Global Ozone Award, 1997 and of a number of distinctions, awards and medals from WMO/UNEP, and various scientific societies (e.g. Blaise Pascal Medal, European Academy of Sciences; AGU Kaufman Award; European and Balkan Physics Societies’ Award; European Union Prize for Cultural Heritage-Europa Nostra Award, and others). He received the Award Certificate and Letter from UNEP and IPCC for substantial contribution to the reports of IPCC, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with the former Vice President of USA, Al Gore (December 2007). He is honorary professor, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; has an honorary doctoral degree from the Physics Department, University of Patras; honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, university division of the American College ANATOLIA, Thessaloniki. He has supervised 50 MSc and 30 PhD degrees and has originated eight international research centres. His research work in peer-reviewed scientific journals is acknowledged widely by the scientific community. (For more see www.christoszerefos.com/)

Marianna V. Vardinoyannis is a Goodwill Ambassador of UNESCO for the protection of children, founder and president of the ‘Marianna V. Vardinoyannis Foundation’, of the ‘ELPIDA Friends’ Association of Children with cancer
The Mycenaean Cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras People, material remains and culture in context by Constantinos Paschalidis with contributions by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. Paperback; 205x290mm; xxiv+510 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (277 plates in colour). (Print RRP £90.00). 436 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919191. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919207. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Mycenaean Cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras: People, material remains and culture in context comprises the study of the finds from the excavation of the Mycenaean cemetery of Clauss near Patras, carried out by the University of Ioannina and the Archaeological Society at Athens from 1988 to 1992, under the direction of Professor Thanassis Papadopoulos. In the course of the excavation project, fifteen chambered tombs were located and researched in detail, to be added to those already known from the pre-war excavations by Nikolaos Kyparissis. The presentation of the topic expands into seven thematic chapters: from a general review of the cemetery space and the sites, to analytical description of the excavation, remarks on the architecture, study of the finds, analysis of the burial customs and finally, narration of the overall history of the cemetery according to chronological period and generation of its occupants. The eighth and last chapter is an addendum including a brief presentation of the anthropological analysis of the skeletal material by Photini J. P. McGeorge and Wiesław Więckowski. The Mycenaean cemetery at Achaia Clauss near Patras presents fragments of the life and death of some members of a local community that existed for almost four centuries at the western end of the Mycenaean world.

About the Author
CONSTANTINOS PASCHALIDIS was born in Athens in 1973. He studied History at the Ionian University, Corfu, and Archaeology at the University of Ioannina, where he successfully composed his doctoral thesis on the Mycenaean cemetery at Clauss, near Patras. Starting in 1992 he has participated in and worked for several archaeological projects (excavations, surveys and study-seasons) in Crete, Keos, Kythnos, Achaea, Argolid, Kefalonia, Ithaca, Corfu, Chalkidiki in Greece, as well as at the sites of Ghor as Safi and Tell Kafrein in Jordan. Since 2002 he is a Curator of Antiquities at the Department of Prehistoric, Egyptian, Cypriot and Near Eastern Collections of the National Archaeological Museum at Athens, and from 2012 he holds the position of Secretary at the Central Archaeological Council of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports. Paschalidis.

Reviews

'As the primary publication… of archaeological data, this volume will quickly take its place as the repository and discussion of an important cemetery in the northwest Peloponnese, in a part of the Mycenaean world that never boasted a palatial center. The excellent illustrations will serve generations of scholars interested in various aspects of Mycenaean material culture.' - John K. Papadopoulos, UCLA (Bryn Mawr Classical Review: http://www.bmcreview.org/2019/05/20190550.html)
The Middle Ages Revisited: Studies in the Archaeology and History of Medieval Southern England Presented to Professor David A. Hinton edited by Ben Jervis. Paperback; 205x290mm; ii+160mm; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 501 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690354. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690361. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume, produced in honour of Professor David A. Hinton’s contribution to medieval studies, re-visits the sites, archaeologists and questions which have been central to the archaeology of medieval southern England. Contributions are focused on the medieval period (from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Reformation) in southern England, to reflect the research of Professor Hinton.

The contributions largely re-examine important debates believed to have been settled long ago, or explore the implications of changing research traditions for the interpretation of archaeological sites. The volume begins with two considerations of archaeologists themselves, the antiquary Richard James (Tom James) and those who have shaped our understanding of Anglo-Saxon Hamwic (Mark Brisbane and Richard Hodges). Both studies show the role of individuals, and the times in which they worked, on the questions and interpretations advanced by archaeological study. Staying in the Anglo-Saxon period, Barbara Yorke re-opens the debate about the Jutish archaeology of Wessex, Martin Biddle re-visits the archaeology of Winchester Old Minster and Katherine Weikert explores the household of early medieval Facombe Netheron.

Moving into the later medieval period, Duncan H. Brown re-assesses the evidence from the important site at Cuckoo Lane, Southampton, with a focus on ceramics, and Maureen Mellor examines the evidence of church floor tiles from Oxfordshire, an early research interest of Professor Hinton. Two chapters deal with medieval food, Mark Robinson discusses wheat cultivation and Dale Serjeantson et. al. revisit the animal bones from excavations at Eynsham Abbey, comparing them with those from St Albans to explore the issue of the Saxon-Norman transition. Finally, staying with the archaeology elite culture, the volume concludes with Matthew Johnson’s contribution on recent work on late medieval elite landscapes in south-east England.

Together, these contributions combine historiography, new evidence and emerging ideas, helping us to understand how the landscape of research has developed, whilst showing the importance of re-visiting old sites and questions to advance the discipline of medieval studies.

About the Editor
BEN JERVIS is Lecturer in Archaeology at Cardiff University, where he specialises in the medieval archaeology of southern Britain. He undertook his doctoral research at the University of Southampton and his current research is concerned with the material culture of English rural households, medieval pottery and the study of urbanism in Wessex.
Barrow Old Hall and Twiss Green Investigations of two sub-manorial estate centres within the townships of Bold and Culcheth in the Hundred of Warrington 1982-87 by Dan Garner, Jennifer Lewis and David Freke, edited by Jill Collens. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+108 pages; 93 illustrations (30 plates in colour). 473 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919689. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919696. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations were carried out at the moated sites of Barrow Old Hall and Twiss Green, in Warrington, North West England, in the 1980s. Sub-manorial estates were established at these two sites by the fourteenth century, located near the boundaries of their multi-moated townships. Townships with multiple moats were a feature of parts of North West England and may have been the result of medieval assarting and the expansion of agriculture on to fringe or marginal areas, on the boundaries of earlier manors. It also owed much to the unusual tenurial arrangements of the region, whereby lords granted small estates out of their holdings, often to family members, to construct moated homesteads.

This report presents the results of the excavations at these two small moated sites, including evidence for possible aisled halls at both sites, as well as a significant assemblage of medieval and early post-medieval pottery. There is also a full account of the finding of the remains of a timber bridge at Twiss Green and its full reconstruction; an illustration of which was previously published in the Shire Archaeology series book on Moated Sites in 1985.

The publication of these excavations contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of the role and development of moated sites in this part of North West England and completes the outstanding analysis of moated sites excavated in the Warrington area.
Tarascan Copper Metallurgy: A Multiapproach Perspective by Blanca Estela Maldonado. Paperback; 205x290mm; 168pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 447 2018 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916251. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916268. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In the early sixteenth century much of West México was under the rule of the Purhépecha Empire, known to Europeans as the Tarascan Kingdom of Michuacan. Both archaeological and ethnohistorical evidence indicate that during the Late Postclassic Period (A.D. 1350-1525) this political unit was the primary center for metallurgy and metalworking in Mesoamerica. This technology was largely based on copper and its alloys.

Tarascan Copper Metallurgy: A multiapproach perspective focuses on evidence recovered from the area surrounding Santa Clara del Cobre, a Tarascan community in Central Michoacán. This pioneer research required the employment of multiple strands of evidence, including archaeological survey and excavation, ethnoarchaeology, experimental replication, and archaeometallurgy. Intensive surface survey located concentrations of manufacturing byproducts (i.e. slag) on surface that represented potential production areas. Stratigraphic excavation and subsequent archaeometallurgical analysis of physical remains were combined with ethnohistorical and ethnoarchaeological data, as well as comparative analogy, to propose a model for prehispanic copper production among the Tarascans.

The goal of this analysis was to gain insights into the nature of metal production and its role in the major state apparatus. The study provides valuable insights into the development of technology and political economy in ancient Mesoamerica and offers a contribution to general anthropological theories of the emergence of social complexity.

About the Author
BLANCA MALDONADO is an archaeologist specialised in ancient metallurgy and production processes. Specific areas of interest include pre-Columbian copper metallurgy in the New World, preindustrial non-ferrous metallurgy, and the cultural dynamics of technological practices. Her research has focused mainly on Mesoamerica and the South Central Andes.

Prof. Maldonado holds a PhD in Anthropology from The Pennsylvania State University, with specialization in Archaeology. Her doctoral studies included training in archaeological science and archaeometallurgy at the University of Oxford and at University College London. She has received several research grants and awards, including a DAAD Research Grant (for an Academic Stay at the University of Bonn, Germany) and a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, also in Germany (Curt-Engelhorn-Zentrum Archäometrie Mannheim). She is currently Professor and Researcher in the Centre for Archaeological Studies at El Colegio de Michoacán, A.C, in Mexico.

Introduzione alle antichità di Ventotene Ricerche archeologiche nell’isola di Ventotene 1 by Giovanni Maria De Rossi and Salvatore Medaglia. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+120 pages; 158 figures (81 plates in colour). Italian text. 469 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 44. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690170. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690187. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Ventotene is a small island located in the Tyrrhenian sea, known in Antiquity as Pandateria. The site hosts the ruins of a large Roman villa for otium dated to the Augustan age where, during the first century AD, many women related to imperial families were exiled and enclosed. Notable figures exiled to Ventotene include Agrippina the Elder, Julia Livilla and Claudia Octavia, amongst others. This volume is an introduction to the roman antiquities of the island and is the first of a series of thematic monographs dedicated to the island. The first part of the book offers a brief overview of the geology of the island and reviews the studies and archaeological excavations carried out in Ventotene since the 18th century. The central part of the monograph is dedicated to the reconstruction of the historical events that have affected the island and to the development of the archaeological topography of the Roman age. The final chapter examines the numerous underwater archaeological discoveries made in the waters surrounding the island.

Ventotene è una piccola isola del medio Tirreno conosciuta nell’antichità con il nome di Pandateria. In questo luogo si conservano gli imponenti resti di una villa romana di età augustea destinata all’otium. Nel corso del I sec. d.C. l’isola funse da luogo di prigionia per una serie di donne legate alla famiglia imperiale che vi furono mandate in esilio. La prima di esse fu, nel 2 a.C., Giulia: era stata accusata di impudicizia sulla base della ‘Lex Iulia de adulteriis coercendis’ e rimase nell’isola con sua madre Scribonia, che la seguì volontariamente, fino al 3 d.C. Nel 29 d.C. la relagatio ad insulam toccò ad Agrippina Maggiore esiliata su ordine di Tiberio: la figlia di Giulia e di Vipsanio Agrippa morì a Ventotene nel 33 d.C. e le sue spoglie furono recuperate e riportate in pompa magna a Roma da Caligola nel 37 d.C. Dal 39 al 41 d.C. l’imperatore Caligola confinò a Pandateria sua sorella Iulia Livilla. Nel 62 d.C. Nerone mandò in esilio a Ventotene Ottavia, sua prima moglie, che vi morì solo pochi giorni dopo. L’ultima esiliata fu, nel 95 d.C., Flavia Domitilla, nipote di Domiziano, accusata di giudaismo. Questo volume costituisce un’introduzione alle antichità romane di Ventotene ed è il primo di una serie contributi monografici dedicati da Archaeopress Publishing al patrimonio archeologico isolano. Nella prima parte del libro si offre una breve panoramica sulla geologia e sulla storia degli studi e degli scavi che hanno interessato Ventotene sin dal XVIII secolo. La parte centrale della monografia è dedicata alla ricostruzione dei tempi e dei modi che hanno caratterizzato lo sviluppo insediamentale dell’isola e si fornisce un esauriente quadro della topografia di età imperiale. Il capitolo finale prende in esame le numerose testimonianze archeologiche recuperate nelle acque che circondano Ventotene.

About the Authors
Giovanni Maria De Rossi (Rome, 1942), Professor of Topography of ancient Italy at University of Salerno, has published many books about ancient and medieval Topography. He has directed archaelogical excavations in Italy; he conceived and designed the Archaeological Park and Historical and Archaeological Museum in Ventotene island; he has directed, in Ventotene, the archaeological excavations and, for twenty years, the Museum. | Giovanni Maria De Rossi (Roma, 1942), Professore Ordinario di Topografia dell’Italia Antica presso l’Università di Salerno, è autore di molte pubblicazioni scientifiche di Topografia antica e medievale. Ha diretto numerosi scavi in Italia. Ha ideato il Parco Archeologico e il Museo Storico Archeologico dell’Isola di Ventotene, dirigendo, nell’isola, gli scavi e, per 20 anni, il Museo.

Salvatore Medaglia (Crotone, 1971) is a classical archaeologist. He holds a PhD in Ancient Topography from the University of Salento and a joint Post-PhD in Landscape Archaeology at the University of Calabria and the University o