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FORTHCOMING: Considering Creativity: Creativity, Knowledge and Practice in Bronze Age Europe edited by Joanna Sofaer. x+164 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (33 colour plates). 387 2017. ISBN 9781784917548. £28.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

Creativity is embedded in human history. Indeed, it is impossible to understand material change and the development of the new without invoking creativity. The location, exploration and analysis of creativity should therefore be of particular concern to archaeologists. This volume engages with this challenge by focusing on the outcomes of creativity – material culture – and an exploration of creative practice. The European Bronze Age provides a useful focus for discussions of the outcomes of creativity because in this period we see the development of new and pre-existing materials that we take for granted today, in particular textiles and bronze. We also see new ways of working with existing materials, such as clay, to create novel forms. In both new and existing materials it is frequently possible to see the growth of technical skill, to produce complex forms and elaborate decorated surfaces.

The papers in this volume view Bronze Age objects through the lens of creativity in order to offer fresh insights into the interaction between people and the world, as well as the individual and cultural processes that lie behind creative expression. Many have their origin in the international conference Creativity: An Exploration Through the Bronze Age and Contemporary Responses to the Bronze Age held at Magdalene College, University of Cambridge in 2103 as part of the HERA-funded project Creativity and Craft Production in Middle and Late Bronze Age Europe. Contributions span the early to late Bronze Age, deal with a range of materials including textiles, metal, and ceramics, and reflect on data from across the continent including Iberia, Scandinavia, Central and Eastern Europe. This breadth illustrates the wideranging importance and applicability of creativity as an heuristic concept. The volume further develops a range of theoretical and methodological directions, opening up new avenues for the study of creativity in the past.
Glassware and Glassworking in Thessaloniki 1st Century BC – 6th Century AD by Anastassios Ch. Antonaras. viii+384 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (70 colour plates). 360 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 27. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916794. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916800. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Glassware and Glassworking in Thessaloniki: 1st Century BC – 6th Century AD is a detailed examination of the production of glass and glass vessels in the eastern Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Age to the Early Christian period, analysing production techniques and decoration. The volume establishes the socio-economic framework of glassmaking and glassmakers’ social status in the Roman world generally and in Thessaloniki specifically, while identifying probable local products. Presented are all the excavation glass finds from Thessaloniki and its environs found between 1912 and 2002. A typological classification was created for almost 800 objects – which encompass the overwhelming majority of common excavation finds in the Balkans – as well as for the decorative themes that appear on the more valuable pieces. Comparative material from the entire Mediterranean was studied, verified in its entirety through primary publications. A summary of the excavation history of these vessels’ find-spots is provided, with details for each excavation, in many cases unpublished and identified through research in the archives of the relevant museums and Ephorates of Antiquities. The uses of glass vessels are presented, and there is discussion and interpretation of the reasons that permitted, or imposed, the choice of glass for their production. The finds are statistically analysed, and a chronological overview examining them century by century on the basis of use and place of production is given. Finally, there is an effort to interpret the data from the study in historical terms, and to incorporate the results into the political-economic evolution of the region’s political history. Relatively unfamiliar glassmaking terms are explained in a glossary of glassworking technology and typology terms. The material is fully documented in drawings and photographs, and every object in the catalogue is illustrated. A detailed index of the 602 geographical terms in the work, many unknown, concludes the book.

About the Author:
Anastassios C. Antonaras, a specialist in the history of glass, jewellery and textiles, is an archaeologist and curator at the Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki. His books include: Glassworking, Ancient and Medieval: Terminology, Technology and Typology; A Greek- English-English-Greek Dictionary; Roman and Early Christian Glassworking: Vessels from Thessaloniki and its Region (which received a prize from the Academy of Athens in 2010); Fire and Sand: Ancient Glass in the Princeton University Art Museum; and Artisanal Production in Ancient and Byzantine Thessaloniki: Archaeological, Literary and Epigraphic Evidence. Antonaras has organized numerous exhibitions and symposia, and has published numerous articles on objects from Thessaloniki. He currently serves on the board of the Christian Archaeological Association and is the secretary general of the International Association for the History of Glass.

New Perspectives on the Bronze Age Proceedings of the 13th Nordic Bronze Age Symposium held in Gothenburg 9th to 13th June 2015 edited by Sophie Bergerbrant and Anna Wessman. x+450 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 61 colour plates. 334 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915988. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915995. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Nordic Bronze Age Symposium began modestly in 1977 with 13 participants, and has now expanded to over 120 participants: a tenfold increase that reflects the expanding role of Bronze Age research in Scandinavia, not least amongst younger researchers. From having taken a back seat in the 1970s, it is now in the driver’s seat in terms of expanding research themes, publications and international impact.

This collection of articles helps to explain why the Bronze Age has come to hold such a fascination within modern archaeological research. By providing new theoretical and analytical perspectives on the evidence new interpretative avenues have opened, it situates the history of the Bronze Age in both a local and a global setting.

About the Editors:
Sophie Bergerbrant completed her doctoral thesis in archaeology in 2007 at the University of Stockholm. She currently leads the research project Bronze Age wool economy: production, trade, environment, husbandry and society at the department of historical studies, University of Gothenburg.

Anna Wessman is currently a PhD candidate at the department of historical studies, University of Gothenburg. Her PhD project focuses on south Scandinavian rock art, with a special focus on regional features and styles in relation to time and change.

Cedar Forests, Cedar Ships Allure, Lore, and Metaphor in the Mediterranean Near East by Sara A. Rich. x+280 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 249 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913656. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913663. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

It is commonly recognized that the Cedars of Lebanon were prized in the ancient world, but how can the complex archaeological role of the Cedrus genus be articulated in terms that go beyond its interactions with humans alone? And to what extent can ancient ships and boats made of this material demonstrate such intimate relations with wood? Drawing from object-oriented ontologies and other ‘new materialisms,’ Cedar Forests, Cedar Ships constructs a hylocentric anti-narrative spreading from the Cretaceous to the contemporary. With a dual focus on the woods and the watercraft, and on the considerable historical overlap between them, the book takes another step in the direction of challenging the conceptual binaries of nature/culture and subject/object, while providing an up-to-date synthesis of the relevant archaeological and historical data.

Binding physical properties and metaphorical manifestations, the fluctuating presence of cedar (forests, trees, and wood) in religious thought is interpreted as having had a direct bearing on shipbuilding in the ancient East Mediterranean. Close and diachronic excavations of the interstices of allure, lore, and metaphor can begin to navigate the (meta) physical relationships between the forested mountain and the forest afloat, and their myriad unique realities.
Dress and Identity in Iron Age Britain A study of glass beads and other objects of personal adornment by Elizabeth M. Foulds. xiv+338 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 16 colour plates. 301 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915261. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915278. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Studies of Iron Age artefacts from Britain tend to be dominated either by the study of metalwork, or pottery. This book presents a study not only of a different material, but also a different type of object: glass beads. These are found in a range of different sizes, shapes, colours, and employ a variety of different decorative motifs.

Through an analysis of glass beads from four key study regions in Britain, the book aims not only to address regional differences in appearance and chronology, but also to explore the role that this object played within the networks and relationships that constructed Iron Age society. It seeks to understand how they were used during their lives and how they came to be deposited within the archaeological record, in order to establish the social processes that glass beads were bound within.

The results indicate that glass beads were a strongly regionalised artefact, potentially reflecting differing local preferences for colour and motif. In addition, glass beads, in combination with several other types of object, were integral to Middle Iron Age dress. Given that the first century BC is often seen as a turning point in terms of settlements and material culture, this supports the possibility of strong continental exchange during an earlier period for either glass beads or raw materials. However, by the Late Iron Age in the first century BC and early first century AD, their use had severely diminished.

Ceramiche vicinorientali della Collezione Popolani by Stefano Anastasio and Lucia Botarelli. vi+200 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Italian text with English summary. 282 2016 La Collezione Orientale del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Firenze 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914646. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914653. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The volume – in Italian, with an English summary – illustrates the Popolani Collection, that was donated to the Archaeological Museum of Florence by Carlo Popolani, a physician who lived in Damascus in the early 20th century. The collection consists of ancient pottery vessels, terracotta oil-lamps, glazed Islamic tiles, Romano-Byzantine glassware, as well as various objects from the Damascene antique market. In particular, the rich group of glazed tiles is very representative of the typical Mamluk and Ottoman production that flourished in Damascus between the XV and XVIII century.

Italian Description:
Il volume – in italiano con un riassunto in inglese – illustra la Collezione Popolani, donata al Museo Archeologico di Firenze da Carlo Popolani, un medico vissuto a Damasco agli inizi del Novecento. La collezione è composta da vasellame ceramico, lucerne in terracotta, mattonelle invetriate islamiche, vetri di età romana e bizantina, cui si aggiungono vari oggetti acquistati sul mercato antiquario damasceno. Il ricco gruppo di mattonelle invetriate, in particolare, è rappresentativo della produzione mamelucca e ottomana che fiorì a Damasco tra XV e XVIII secolo.

Stefano Anastasio, archeologo, è stato uno dei curatori del primo volume della collezione orientale del Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Firenze. Ha svolto ricerche archeologiche in Siria, Turchia, Giordania. Si occupa in particolare di ceramica di età del Ferro, archeologia dell’architettura, storia della ricerca archeologica nel Vicino Oriente fino alla seconda guerra mondiale.

Lucia Botarelli, archeologa, ha conseguito il titolo di dottore di ricerca presso l’Università di Siena nel 2006, con una tesi sulla ceramica romana e protobizantina da Efestia (Lemnos), proseguendo gli studi con borse presso la Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, l’Università di Heidelberg, la Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. Ha svolto ricerche in Italia, in Grecia e Giordania.
The Small Finds and Vessel Glass from Insula VI.1 Pompeii: Excavations 1995-2006 by H.E.M. Cool. xii+304 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 283 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 17. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914523. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914530. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This report presents the vessel glass and small finds found during the excavations between 1995 and 2006 that took place in Insula VI.1, Pompeii (henceforth VI.1). More than 5,000 items are discussed, and the size of the assemblage has meant that the publication is in two parts. The book you are reading consists of the discussion with associated illustrations and the catalogue entries for a subset of the data. The other half is available digitally on the Archaeological Data Service. That part contains the full catalogue of the material recorded, additional contextual information, and details about the initial excavations of the insula during the eighteenth century.
L’artisanat de l’os à l’époque Gallo-Romaine De l’ostéologie à l’archéologie expérimentale by Marc Barbier. ii+ 140 pages; highly illustrated throughout with 57 plates in colour. French text. 263 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 16. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914219. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914226. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The transfer, in 1981, of the town Museum collections in Sens (Yonne) to the old Archbishop’s palace required great discretion and an underground passage was planned between the two buildings. Preventive archaeological excavations unearthed 22 Gallo-Roman bone combs, as well as a further 17 pieces when the excavation area was expanded.

This exceptional concentration of bone artefacts incited the author to start on an experimental search at a time when bone artefacts were not finding much interest among specialists. However, it was extremely adventurous to piece together a bone-worker production line and create a never before archaeologically discovered appliance used in Roman times.

Obviously, the first reproductions have been directed towards combs. Those replicas pointed towards the material constraints, but also defined the constructions of necessary tools to take slabs off and conceive objects.

Moreover, matrix origin – small sized compact bone – explained why bone workers used to juxtapose elements to get suitable surfaces. Various complications during free hand denture sawing led them to perfect another operating system, plausible and more reliable.

Logical follow up would have been to extend experimental investigations, perhaps not to all the bone artefacts, but to a typical class of them, in order to complete the reconstructions of the equipment and suggest a general bone worker’s workshop arrangement.

French Description:
Le transfert, en 1981, des collections du Musée municipal de Sens (Yonne) dans l’ancien palais des Archevêques a nécessité le terrassement d’une jonction souterraine entre deux des bâtiments. Des fouilles archéologiques préventives ont notamment permis de découvrir 22 peignes en os d’époque gallo-romaine, puis 17 autres lors de l’extension du secteur.

Cette exceptionnelle concentration a incité l’auteur à entreprendre une démarche expérimentale à une époque où l’on n’accordait que peu d’intérêt au mobilier osseux. On comprendra qu’il était alors aventureux de vouloir reconstituer la chaîne opératoire d’un tabletier et matérialiser l’appareillage dont on n’a aucun témoignage archéologique.

C’est évidemment sur la mise en œuvre de peignes qu’ont porté les premières reproductions. Ces répliques montraient déjà certaines contraintes liées à la matière elle-même, mais permettaient également de cerner les outils nécessaires au prélèvement des plaquettes et à la conception de l’objet.

Par ailleurs, l’origine des matrices - os compact dimensionnellement limité - expliquait pourquoi les tabletiers juxtaposaient les éléments pour obtenir la surface adéquate. Diverses complications, lors du sciage à main levée de la denture, ont amené à mettre au point un autre mode opératoire plausible et plus assuré.

La suite logique voulait que les recherches expérimentales s’étendent sinon à l’ensemble du mobilier osseux, du moins à des catégories d’objets d’une même typologie permettant de compléter l’outillage et suggérer l’agencement de l’atelier d’un tabletier généraliste.

Cultural Dynamics and Production Activities in Ancient Western Mexico Papers from a symposium held in the Center for Archaeological Research, El Colegio de Michoacán 18-19 September 2014 edited by Eduardo Williams Blanca Maldonado. 237 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913557. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913564. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book presents a collection of papers from the Symposium on Cultural Dynamics and Production Activities in Ancient Western Mexico, held at the Center for Archaeological Research of the Colegio de Michoacán on September 18-19, 2014. While these thought-provoking essays on key topics in Western Mexican archaeology will spark debate among scholars interested in this cultural area, they will also be of interest to students of ancient Mesoamerica as a whole. The time is ripe for insightful discussions and new syntheses of archaeological research in Western Mesoamerica, and this volume represents, undoubtedly, a valuable contribution to this urgent task.

These papers are grouped into three thematic areas. The first, Cultural dynamics in Western Mexico, includes essays on: The challenges of archaeology in flood-prone areas; Exploitation of local resources and imported products; Settlement systems of the Tarascan state; and Stone tools as indicators of task specialization. The second section, Production of strategic resources, analyzes the following topics: The obsidian jewelry of the Teuchitlán Tradition; Differing obsidian economies in Teuchitlán culture; Source areas and obsidian exploitation in Michoacán; The history of pottery production in Capula, Michoacán; Ethnoarchaeology of Tarascan pottery: domestic production and decoration styles; Ceramics, social status, and the Tarascan state economy; and Copper as a strategic resource in pre-Hispanic Western Mexico; while part three focuses on Trade and exchange: Circulation of goods and communication routes between Western and Central Mexico; Contrasting models of ceramic production in the Tarascan state; and Ceramic evidence of contact between Teotihuacan, the Bajío, and southern Hidalgo.
Glass Beads from Early Medieval Ireland Classification, dating, social performance by Mags Mannion. viii+145 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 colour plates. 177 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911966. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911973. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This is the first dedicated and comprehensive study of glass beads from Early Medieval Ireland, presenting the first national classification, typology, dating, symbology and social performance of glass beads.

Glass beads are one of the most visually stunning archaeological objects and they remain as popular a part of body ornament today as in the past. This continuing fascination is explained somewhat by the versatility of glass which can be rendered opaque or transparent and produced in a variety of colours. Glass has an almost mesmerising effect in its ability to reflect light, presenting not just a surface but also dimensional depths of shade and light. In this respect the crafting of glass beads as representations of the human eye may go some way towards explaining their enduring and universal popularity.

Glass beads however are much more than this and their enduring appeal is also a reflection of their aesthetic and symbolic qualities. This book explores not only the importance of beads as a tool of archaeological research but also the relevance of beads in the social arena and their significance as markers of cultural and religious identity and symbols of status and age both in Ireland and further afield.
I vetri del Museo archeologico di Tripoli by Sofia Cingolani. ii+182 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 3 colour plates. Italian text. 142 2015 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910945. £33.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910952. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is focused on the cataloguing of glass conserved in the Archaeological Museum of Tripoli. This is so far an unpublished corpus of objects identified from investigations into the necropolis and other burials in Tripoli and its suburbs, in conjunction with the activities of the Italian Government in Libya during the first twenty years of the last century. The main objective of the work is filling the gaps in the state of knowledge concerning the production of glass of the North-African area by providing as complete as possible a documentation on the findings from Oea and its territory.
The Origins and Use of the Potter’s Wheel in Ancient Egypt by Sarah Doherty. x+140 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with two colour plates. 131 2015 Archaeopress Egyptology 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910600. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910617. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The invention of the wheel is often highlighted as one of humankinds’ most significant inventions. Wheels do not exist in nature, and so can be viewed entirely as a human-inspired invention. Machinery too, was relatively rare in the ancient world. The potter’s wheel is arguably the most significant machine introduced into Egypt, second only perhaps to the drill, the loom and the bellows for smelting metal. In Predynastic Egypt (c3500 B.C.), the traditional methods of hand-building pottery vessels were already successful in producing pottery vessels of high quality on a large scale for the domestic market, so it would seem that the potter’s wheel was a rather superfluous invention. However, the impact of this innovation would not just have affected the Egyptian potters themselves learning a new skill, but also signalled the beginnings of a more complex and technologically advanced society.

Despite many years work on the technology of pottery production it is perhaps surprising that the origins of the potter’s wheel in Egypt have yet to be determined. This present project seeks to rectify this situation by determining when the potter’s wheel was introduced into Egypt, establishing in what contexts wheel thrown pottery occurs, and considering the reasons why the Egyptians introduced the wheel when a well-established hand making pottery industry already existed.

A sequence of videos by the author to compliment her publication can be viewed here.

'While addressing the intricacies of ceramic research, Doherty succeeds in making an often complex subject accessible to the reader, drawing together archaeological, epigraphic and scientific evidence to address the challenges inherent in such a study... The volume is richly illustrated with accompanying images and statistical data, and a comprehensive bibliography will be of considerable use to those interested in furthering their knowledge of this fascinating area of research.' - Anna Garnett (Ancient Egypt Magazine, February/March 2016)
Looted, Recovered, Returned: Antiquities from Afghanistan by J. Ambers, C. R. Cartwright, C. Higgitt, D. Hook, E. Passmore, St J. Simpson, G. Verri, C. Ward and B. Wills. 342 pages, highly illustrated in colour throughout. 112 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910167. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910174. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A detailed scientific and conservation record of a group of ivory and bone furniture overlays excavated at Begram, stolen from the National Museum of Afghanistan, privately acquired on behalf of Kabul, analysed and conserved at the British Museum and returned to the National Museum of Afghanistan in 2012

The “Begram ivories” are widely considered to be miniature masterpieces of Indian art and are one of the largest archaeological collections of ancient ivories. They were excavated at the site of Begram, in northern Afghanistan, in 1937 and 1939 and belong to a period when Afghanistan, Pakistan and northern India were united under rulers of the Kushan dynasty. Divided soon afterwards between the National Museum of Afghanistan in Kabul and the Musée national des arts asiatiques–Guimet in Paris, the collection in Kabul suffered a disaster during the civil war which ravaged the country during the early 1990s. Some of the pieces were successfully concealed by museum staff but most were stolen, hundreds have since been reported in different collections and very few have yet been recovered. In 2011 a group of twenty bone and ivory plaques was generously acquired for the National Museum of Afghanistan by a private individual. These were scientifically analysed, conserved and exhibited at the British Museum and returned to Kabul in 2012. This book describes their story from excavation to display and return, with individual object biographies and detailed scientific analyses and conservation treatments. It also discusses how these objects have attracted very different interpretations over the decades since their discovery, and how the new analyses shed a completely fresh light on the collection. It is lavishly illustrated in full colour, and includes many previously unpublished views of the objects when they were originally exhibited in Kabul. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in the archaeology of Afghanistan, Indian art, polychromy, museum studies, object biographies or the history of conservation.
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