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NEW: Immagini del tempo degli dei, immagini del tempo degli uomini Un’analisi delle iconografie dei mesi nei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e del loro contest storico-culturale by Ciro Parodo. viii+338 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. Italian text with English summary. 376 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 30. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784917340. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917357. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A characteristic shared by the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars is that they represent the twelve months of the year, referable to an iconographic repertoire which is divided into three themes: the astrological-astronomical, the festive-ritual and the rural-seasonal. With regard to the first type, the months are depicted through images of the signs of the zodiac, often associated with images of the guardian deities of the months; the second category includes depictions of the months that refer to some important religious festivals; finally, the third theme includes images of the months that allude to the most important work activities performed in the countryside. The figurative calendars, which in most cases are made on mosaics, are characterized by a wide distribution in terms of time, concentrated between the 3rd and 6th century, and geography, with the areas of greatest attestation consisting of Italy, Africa Proconsularis, Greece and Arabia. With regard to the architectural context, the calendars from the West are prevalently documented in the domus, while those from the East are particularly attested in ecclesiastical buildings. The aim of research presented in this volume is the in-depth study of the connections between the meaning of the iconography of the Roman and Byzantine illustrated calendars and their historical and cultural context.

About the Author:
Ciro Parodo (1978) received a Degree and a Post-Graduate Degree in Archaeology at the University of Cagliari (Italy), and a PhD in Classical Archaeology at the Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen (Germany). He focuses his research on two principal domains: the study of Greek and Roman Iconography as a means of understanding the social and cultural issues of the Classical World, and the reception of Classical Antiquity in the Modern and Contemporary Age. Italian Description: La caratteristica comune dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini consiste nella rappresentazione dei dodici mesi dell’anno, riferibile a un repertorio iconografico articolato in tre temi: quelli di tipo astrologico-astronomico, festivo-rituale e rurale-stagionale. Per quanto riguarda la prima tipologia, i mesi sono raffigurati mediante le immagini dei segni zodiacali, spesso associate a quelle delle divinità tutelari mensili; la seconda categoria include quelle raffigurazioni dei mesi che si riferiscono ad alcune importanti festività religiose; la terza tematica, infine, comprende quelle immagini dei mesi che alludono alle più rilevanti attività lavorative svolte in ambito campestre. I calendari figurati, realizzati nella maggioranza dei casi su mosaico, si contraddistinguono per un’ampia distribuzione in senso temporale, con una concentrazione cronologica fra il III e il VI secolo d.C., e geografico, con le aree di maggior attestazione costituite dall’Italia, l’Africa Proconsularis, la Grecia e l’Arabia. In merito invece al contesto architettonico, i calendari di provenienza occidentale sono documentati in prevalenza presso le domus, mentre per quanto concerne quelli orientali, sono attestati in particolare negli edifici ecclesiastici. L’obiettivo della ricerca presentata in questo volume si focalizza sull’approfondimento delle connessioni esistenti tra il significato dell’iconografia dei calendari figurati romani e bizantini e il loro contesto storico- culturale.

Ciro Parodo (1978) ha conseguito la Laurea e la Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia presso l’Università di Cagliari (Italia) e il Dottorato di Ricerca in Archeologia Classica presso l’Eberhard- Karls-Universität di Tübingen (Germania). Focalizza la sua ricerca su due ambiti principali: lo studio dell’iconografia greca e romana come strumento per analizzare le problematiche socio- culturali del mondo classico e l’indagine delle dinamiche di ricezione dell’antichità classica nell’età moderna e contemporanea.
FORTHCOMING: Natter’s Museum Britannicum: British gem collections and collectors of the mid-eighteenth century by John Boardman, Julia Kagan and Claudia Wagner with contributions by Catherine Phillips. iv+304 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Casebound with dust jacket. 379 2017. ISBN 9781784917272. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The German gem-engraver, medallist, and amateur scholar Lorenz Natter (1705- 1763), was so impressed by the size and quality of the collections of ancient and later engraved gems which he found in Britain that he proposed the publication of an extraordinarily ambitious catalogue – Museum Britannicum – which would present engravings and descriptions of the most important pieces. He made considerable progress to this end, producing several hundred drawings, but in time he decided to abandon the near completed project in the light of the apparent lack of interest shown in Britain. Only one of the intended plates in its final form ever appeared, in a catalogue which he published separately for Lord Bessborough’s collection. On Natter’s death the single copy of his magnum opus vanished mysteriously, presumed lost forever.

All hope of recovering Natter’s unpublished papers seemed vain, and their very existence had come to be doubted. Yet they were to be found more than two hundred years after his death, in Spring 1975, when the classical scholar and renowned expert in gems, Oleg Neverov, chanced upon them at the bottom of a pile of papers in the archives of the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg. Neverov and his colleague Julia Kagan carried out the initial research on the Hermitage manuscripts and produced the first published account of this archival treasure.

The present volume builds upon their earlier work to produce the first comprehensive publication of Museum Britannicum, offering full discussion in English and presenting Natter’s drawings and comments alongside modern information on the gems that can be identified and located through fresh research. This book is the result of a ten-year collaboration between scholars on the Beazley Archive gems research programme at Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre and the State Hermitage Museum. It fulfills Natter’s vision for the Museum Britannicum – albeit two and a half centuries late – to the benefit of art historians, cultural historians, curators, and gem-lovers of today.
NEW: Elements of Continuity: Stone Cult in the Maltese Islands by George Azzopardi. x+94 pages; 41 figs. In black & white. 370 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916954. £18.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916961. £9.60 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stones can serve an infinite array of functions both when they are worked and when they are left in a ‘raw’ state. Depending on their function, stones can also be meaningful objects especially when they act as vehicles of ideas or instruments of representation. And it is, therefore, in their functional context, that the meaning of stones can be best grasped.

The stones dealt with in this study are non-figural (or aniconic) or, sometimes, semi-figural. They come from ritual contexts and, as such, act as a material representation of divine presence in their role as betyls. But it is not mainly the representational aspect of these stones that this study seeks to highlight. As material representations of divine presence that are also worshipped, these particular stones form part of a phenomenon that seems to know no geographical or temporal boundaries. They are of a universal character.

It is this universal character of theirs that seems to qualify these stones as elements forming part of the phenomenon of continuity: continuity across different cultures and in different places along several centuries. It is this phenomenon which this study seeks to highlight through a study of these stones. The Maltese islands are presented as a case study to demonstrate the phenomenon of continuity through a study of these stones. Worship of stones in representation of divine presence is found on the Maltese islands since prehistoric times. But the practice survived several centuries under different cultures represented by unknown communities during the islands’ prehistory and the Phoenicians / Carthaginians and the Romans in early historic times.
NEW: Die Ausrüstung der römischen Armee auf der Siegessäule des Marcus Aurelius in Rom Ein Vergleich zwischen der skulpturalen Darstellung und den archäologischen Bodenfunden by Boris Alexander Nikolaus Burandt. iv+412 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. German text. 369 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 28. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784916930. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916947. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The reliefs of the column of Marcus Aurelius in Rome are used extensively for the illustration of Roman soldiers. However, despite the fact that in the last decades a number of sites at the Danube Limes have been analyzed, where numerous militaria from the Markomannic Wars have emerged, there is no comparison between this work of official Roman art and the archaeological finds. This book aims to address this lacuna. Each piece of equipment of the Roman soldier is analyzed in its sculptural representation and compared with the existing finds as well as supplementary comparisons with secondary sources. The result is a broad picture of the Roman army under Marcus Aurelius and of Rome's depiction of their forces in state propaganda. In addition, the present work comprehensively separates the antique parts of the frieze from the additions made during the late Renaissance for the first time and thus provides a solid basis for future archaeological and art historical evaluations.

About the Author
Boris A. N. Burandt studied Archeology of the Roman Provinces, Classical Archeology, History of Art and Ancient History at the University of Cologne, and specialized early in Roman military equipment. After completing his studies he was research assistant at the Morphomata International Center for Advanced Studies and in three projects of the German Archaeological Institute as well as a trainee of the State Office for National Heritage Conservation in the Rhineland. He also participated in various excavations and campaigns in Germany, Italy and North Africa. Since 2017 he has undertaken research at the Goethe-University in Frankfurt on the Main about Roman memorabilia in the context of gladiator fights and chariot races. This book is based on his PhD thesis, which was written between 2012 and 2015 at the University of Cologne.

German Description:
Die Reliefs der Marcussäule in Rom bilden seit Langem vielfach verwendete Vorlagen zur Illustration römischer Soldaten. Doch obwohl in den letzten Dekaden mehrere Fundplätze am Donaulimes aufgearbeitet wurden, an denen zahlreiche Militaria aus den Markomannenkriegen zutage gekommen sind, fehlt bislang ein Vergleich zwischen den Arbeiten der offiziellen römischen Staatskunst und den archäologischen Bodenfunden. Diesen Mangel soll nun das vorliegende Werk beheben. Jeder Ausrüstungsgegenstand des römischen Soldaten wird in seiner skulpturalen Darstellung analysiert und mit den vorliegenden Funden sowie ergänzenden Sekundärquellen verglichen. Es entsteht somit ein umfangreiches Bild der römischen Armee unter Marcus Aurelius und von Roms Umgang mit dem Militär in der staatlichen Propaganda. Außerdem separiert das vorliegende Werk erstmals umfassend die antiken Partien des Friesbandes von den Ergänzungen der Spätrenaissance und legt somit eine solide Basis für künftige archäologische und kunsthistorische Auswertungen.

Boris A. N. Burandt studierte Archäologie der römischen Provinzen, Klassische Archäologie, Kunstgeschichte und Alte Geschichte an der Universität zu Köln und spezialisierte sich früh auf die Erforschung römischer Militärausrüstung. Nach seinem Studium war B. Burandt Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Internationalen Kolleg Morphomata und in drei Projekten des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts sowie Volontär des Rheinischen Amtes für Bodendenkmalpflege. Außerdem nahm er an diversen Ausgrabungen und Kampagnen in Deutschland, Italien und Nordafrika teil. Seit 2017 forscht B. Burandt an der Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt am Main zu römischen Memorabilien im Kontext von Gladiatorenkämpfen und Wagenrennen. Das vorliegende Buch basiert auf seiner Dissertation, die zwischen 2012 und 2015 an der Universität zu Köln entstanden ist.
NEW: Imágenes de centauros en los vasos áticos de figuras negras y de figuras rojas Siglos VIII A.C. – IV A.C. by María Herranz. 298 pages; 15 graphs, 124 tables (all in colour). Spanish text with English summary. Available both in print and Open Access. 38 2017. ISBN 9781784916831. £40.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The centaur, a hybrid being with the body of horse and a human head and torso, first appeared in the mountains of Thessaly. This was the Greek horse-breeding region and it seemed natural for the centaur to have originated there, in the heart of this exclusive heritage of the landed gentry. Centaurs belonged to the spheres of heroic mythology, with clear ties to the values of the aristocracy.

This book is composed of a catalogue divided into nine chapters. Each chapter comprises catalogue entries for a number of black-figure and red-figure Attic vases. The division into chapters is based on the various types of centaurs and different conflicts, either among themselves or against a hero. In addition to the catalogue is a chapter on images and statistics. Each of these nine chapters corresponds to a section of catalogue entries and statistics, as the information refers to two examples in each section, one in black figures and another in red figures. The highlighted examples illustrate the variety of different vase types (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC). The statistics are likewise divided into black and red figures, and various themes, such as the centaur Pholos and the banquet, or Herakles and Nessos. For each of these themes or groups of examples, a table is given showing the number of vases (amphorae, lekythoi, etc.) and their place in the chronology (550-500 BC, 500-450 BC, etc.).

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Le guerrier, le chat, l’aigle, le poisson et la colonne: la voie spiralée des signes Approche sémiologique, structurale et archéologique du disque de Phaistos by Serge Collet. 90 pages; 15 tables, 1 colour illustration. French text with English Abstract and Foreword. 6 2017. ISBN 9781784916169. £14.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Phaistos Disc is one of the most studied documents of the Minoan civilization, enticing scholars and simple enthusiasts with the mysterious aura that envelops it and with its singularity among Minoan scriptures. It has entered the collective imagination, both at academic and popular levels. Representations of the Disc can be found abundantly in popular culture, from appearances in Mickey Mouse comics to a prop amidst the curios on the tables of a television magician.

It is this very overexposure that risks undermining the understanding of an object that is, first and foremost, an archaeological artefact found in a chronological and cultural context. Much has been said and much and has been written about the Disc. Collet brings a new approach. It’s not a deciphering but an interpretation, a depiction of the Minoan Weltanschauung through the symbols on the Disc and their connections with reality. This begins with the spiral-shaped construction of the inscription and its possible temporal allusions, and moves on to a structuralist view of use of the signs, and in which the repetitions take on almost ritual significance. Hence it is a pictorial interpretation rather than syllabic, whereby the pictograph is not intended as a rigid reproduction of logical discourse, but rather a path.

About the Author: Serge Collet (1950-2016) was a French scientist who became known for his interdisciplinary research on early sea-dependent societies. His main study “Uomini e Pesce, La caccia al pesce spada tra Scilla e Cariddi” as well as his publications with SAGE Publications over the years, as well as his several contributions to international conferences (inter alia funded by the EU and FAO) gave substantial examples as to what contributions maritime ethnology and archaeology can make for the preservation of cultures and the seas over the millennia.
Birds, Beasts and Burials: A study of the human-animal relationship in Romano-British St. Albans by Brittany Elayne Hill. vi+204 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 35 colour plates. 333 2017 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 24. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915964. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915971. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The human-animal relationship is one that has been pondered by scholars for ages. It has been used to define both what it means to be human and what it means to be animal. Birds, Beasts and Burials examines human-animal relationships as found in the mortuary record within the area of Verulamium that is now situated in the modern town of St. Albans. Once considered a major centre, the mortuary rites given to its people suggest high variabilities in the approach to the personhood of certain classes of both people and animals. While 480 human individuals were examined, only a small percentage was found to have been afforded the rite of a human-animal co-burial. It is this small percentage that is examined in greater detail. Of major concern are the treatments to both the human and animal pre- and post- burial and the point at which the animal enters into the funerary practice.

About the Author:
Dr Brittany Elayne Hill is an American archaeologist who completed her undergraduate studies at University of Kansas in 2009 before coming to the University of Southampton in 2010 to pursue her master’s degree, which was then followed up by her acceptance to a PhD course in 2011. An ongoing fascination with Romano-British culture and osteology inspired her to engage in research covered in this book. She is particularly pleased by the combined representation of human osteology and zooarchaeology demonstrated in this monograph, as both play roles in the formation of the Romano-British burials found in St. Albans. This is her first monograph and she is excited to release the results of her PhD work to the public sphere for the first time. She is hopeful that the content of this monograph inspires others to consider the influence human-animal relationships have on the formation of ancient and modern cultures alike.
Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times Η ΜΕΓΑΛΗ ΡΟΔΙΑΚΗ ΠΛΑΣΤΙΚΗ ΤΩΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΣΤΙΚΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΡΩΜΑΪΚΩΝ ΧΡΟΝΩΝ by Kalliope Bairami. xviii+864 pages; 222 plates, 23 in colour. Greek text with 19 page English summary. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784915766. £80.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hellenistic society of the Rhodian metropolis, a naval aristocracy (Gabrielsen), dedicated bronze statues of their members in the sanctuaries and public buildings and used marble and -occasionally-lartios lithos to carve portrait-statues originally for funerary use and in a later period also for honorific purposes, figures of deities and decorative sculpture for the houses and the parks. The artists, local and itinerant, from Athens, the islands and the Asia Minor, established artistic workshops on Rhodes, some of them active for three centuries and for more than one generation. The impact of Rhodian art is evident on the islands of the Aegean and the cities of Asia Minor, due to the expansion of the Rhodian Peraia. Together with Pergamon, Rhodes emerges as a productive artistic centre of the Hellenistic era, creating statuary types and combining them with landscape elements. The radiance of its art is evident in the late Hellenistic period in Rome, the new capital of the world, where the Rhodian artists create mythological statuary groups set in grottoes.

This volume presents the large-scale Rhodian sculpture of the Hellenistic and Roman period through the publication of sixty unpublished sculptures of life size or larger than life size, together with forty-five sculptures already published. The sculptures are grouped according to their statuary type (gods, mortals and portraits), while those unable to be firmly identified due to their fragmentary condition are grouped under the category ‘uncertain identification’. The presentation of the sculptures is further supplemented by a technical description and an analysis of stylistic characteristics according to chronological development. Excavation data, wherever available, are also provided.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Greek Art: From Oxford to Portugal and Back Again by Rui Morais. vi+58 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 330 2017. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915865. £15.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915872. £15.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

One of the most fascinating topics in the study of ancient art concerns artistic practices and models and the means of transmission of iconographic designs and decorative compositions. This phenomenon, although well known, has not drawn much attention of scholars of the ancient art. Apart from copies of originals, the practice dates back to the first civilizations and may be even older. The media used could be painted vignettes on papyri, paint on leather, or sketches painted on ostraca, used as pattern books.

This issue is practically unheard of regarding ancient Greece, although a few media have been found which may have facilitated the transmission of iconographic designs and decorative compositions. In this study we present some examples that suggest the existence of pattern books in the Greek world.

If the media used in the Greek world are insofar unknown, the same cannot be said of the Roman world. Written sources mention the existence of manuals in the form of papyrus scrolls (stemmata, imagines) which served as models as well as inspiration for the artists.

About the author:
Rui Manuel Lopes de Sousa Morais was born in Porto in 1969 and has a degree in history from the University of Coimbra, MA in Urban Archaeology, PhD in archaeology, technology and materials, both from the University of Minho, Braga. He was a professor at Minho University until 2013 and is currently an Assistant Professor with Aggregation at the Faculty of Arts, Oporto University. Rui has dedicated special attention to the study of trade in antiquity, with numerous published works, individually or with other national and foreign authors. He is also a researcher in the Classical and Humanistic Centre at Coimbra University (CECH) where he has developed his interest in classical art with several books published. He is a consultant of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for the classical antiquities, member of the Scientific Committee of the IBERIA GRAEGA Project, and the coordinator of the monographic series Classica Instrumenta from Coimbra University.
Egypt 2015: Perspectives of Research Proceedings of the Seventh European Conference of Egyptologists (2nd-7th June, 2015, Zagreb – Croatia) by Mladen Tomorad and Joanna Popielska-Grzybowska. xii+358 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 329 2017 Archaeopress Egyptology 18. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915841. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915858. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Seventh Central European Conference of Egyptologists. Egypt 2015: Perspectives of Research (CECE7) was held at the University of Zagreb in Croatia in 2015. It was co-organised by two scholarly institutions: the Department of History at the Centre for Croatian Studies of the University of Zagreb, Croatia (Dr Mladen Tomorad), and the Department of Ancient Cultures of the Pułtusk Academy of Humanities in Pułtusk, Poland (Dr Joanna Popielska-Grzybowska).

This book presents a selection of papers which were read at the conference. The volume is divided into six sections in which thirty-two scholars from fourteen European countries cover various fields of modern Egyptological research. The first group of five papers is devoted to language, literature and religious texts; in the second section three authors describe various themes related to art, iconography and architectural studies; the third group contains four contributions on current funerary and burial studies; in the fourth (largest) section, ten authors present their recent research on material culture and museum studies; the fifth is concerned with the history of Ancient Egypt; and in the last (sixth), two authors examine modern Egyptomania and the 19th century travellers to Egypt.
The Death of the Maiden in Classical Athens Ο ΘΑΝΑΤΟΣ ΤΗΣ ΑΓΑΜΟΥ ΚΟΡΗΣ ΣΤΗΝ ΑΘΗΝΑ ΤΩΝ ΚΛΑΣΙΚΩΝ ΧΡΟΝΩΝ by Katia Margariti. xlviii+636 pages; 105 plates in colour and black & white. Text in Greek with extensive 63 page english summary. Available both in print and Open Access.ISBN 9781784915469. £80.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

The present study examines the death of maidens in classical Athens, combining the study of Attic funerary iconography with research on classical Attic maiden burials, funerary inscriptions, tragic plays, as well as the relevant Attic myths.

The iconography of funerary reliefs focuses on the idealized image of the deceased maiden, as well as the powerful bonds of love and kinship that unite her with the members of her family, whereas the iconography of vases emphasizes the premature death of the maiden, the pain of loss and mourning felt by her family, as well as the observance of the indispensable funerary rites concerning her burial and ‘tomb cult’. Particularly interesting is the fact that the ‘traditional’ theory according to which the loutrophoros marked the graves of the unmarried dead alone has been proven non valid.

The study of classical Attic maiden burials indicates that the prematurely dead maidens were buried as children who didn’t live long enough to reach adulthood.

The untimely death of maidens in Attic drama and mythology is beneficial to the family or the city. In great contrast to that, the premature death of real - life Athenian maidens was a terrible disaster for the girls’ families, as well as the polis itself. Despite this, the iconography of dead maidens in classical Athens is in accordance with the ‘image’ of the deceased maidens presented by funerary epigrams, tragedy, and mythology. It has to be noted though, that the same is not true in the case of maiden burials.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.
Recent Investigations in the Puuc Region of Yucatán edited by Meghan Rubenstein. viii+164 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 8 papers in English, 3 in Spanish. Abstracts in English and Spanish. 312 2017 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 8. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915445. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915452. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The scholarship assembled in this volume was first presented at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) in Austin, Texas, in April 2014. Some of the authors have chosen to publish their conference papers while others have expanded their topics. As a collection, the papers demonstrate a myriad of approaches to understanding the history of the Puuc region, incorporating archaeological, architectural, epigraphic, and iconographic studies. The geographic scope is also broad. Many of the recent and ongoing archaeological projects in the eastern Puuc region and its periphery are represented, including Dzehkabtún, H’wasil, Kabah, Kiuic, Labná, Sayil, Uxmal, and Xcoch, as well as the Chocholá ceramic tradition from the western Puuc. The projects are at various stages—some preliminary, others a portion of a larger investigation, while still others are revisiting older data—all with the aim to advance our field of study.

It has been more than 10 years since a volume dedicated solely to the Puuc region has been published. While Puuc research frequently appears in collected volumes on the Yucatán peninsula or the Terminal Classic period, we are pleased to offer this representative example of ongoing work.
Mesoamerican Religions and Archaeology Essays in Pre-Columbian Civilizations by Aleksandar Bošković. viii+90 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 304 2017 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 7. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784915025. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784915032. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Our understanding of ancient Pre-Columbian civilizations has changed significantly as the result of archaeological research in the last fifty years. Major projects during this period included dealing with cultural change in different contexts (Valley of Mexico, Oaxaca), regional research projects (“Olmec”), as well as attempts to understand more general trends in interpreting Pre-Columbian art and ideology (Codex Cihuacoatl, Templo Mayor). This book presents both the changes that occurred in the last few decades, and the impact that they had on our understanding on ancient Mesoamerican religions and cultures. It also includes references to some lesser-known research traditions (such as Croatia, Serbia, and Slovenia), as well as to the work of scholars like Jacques Soustelle or Didier Boremanse. With the insistence on clear methodology, based on field research, this book uses the context of specific archaeological finds in order to put Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures in a historical perspective. In terms of method, the author follows R. E. W. Adams, Jeremy Sabloff, Robert J. Sharer and other archaeologists in emphasizing the “field archaeology school” approach, with its insistence on using the data acquired in context. Archaeological and anthropological research is in itself fascinating enough to not need stolen artefacts, forged vases, fantastic stories and invented mythical genealogies. The main goal of this book is to produce a methodologically sound and ethically valid interdisciplinary introduction into the exciting world of ancient Mesoamerica.
Stone Carving of the Hospitaller Period in Rhodes: Displaced pieces and fragments by Anna-Maria Kasdagli. ii+212 pages; illustrated through in black & white with 1 colour plate. 287 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914783. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914790. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The work presents 230 stone carvings of the Hospitaller period in Rhodes (1309-1522), which for various reasons are no longer in their original setting. Most of them are cut in local stone or reused antique marble and belong to three broad groups: decorative architectural elements, funerary slabs and markers, and heraldry from secular and religious buildings and fortifications.

Their architectural, artistic, inscriptional and social significance are discussed, providing insights into the way cultural influences from different parts of Western Europe were introduced, maintained and adapted in an Eastern Mediterranean context by the Knights of Saint John, other Westerners the presence of the Order encouraged to travel to Rhodes and even live there and, occasionally, by wealthy Greeks. The study includes a full catalogue and touches upon recent archaeological activity in the historic centre of the town of Rhodes.
Archaeology with Art edited by Helen Chittock and Joana Valdez-Tullett. xx+176 pages; illustrated in black & white throughout with 7 colour plates. 293 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914929. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914936. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Archaeology with Art is the result of a 2013 Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) conference session that aimed to merge the perspectives of artists and archaeologists on making art. It explores the relationship between archaeology and art practice, the interactions between materials and practitioners, and the processes that result in the objects and images we call ‘art’. The book offers new approaches to the study of creative practices in archaeology, ranging from experimental investigations to philosophical explorations and contains a diverse set of papers that use insights from contemporary art practice to examine the making of past artworks.

About the editors:
Joana Valdez-Tullett is an archaeologist currently finishing a PhD thesis at the University of Southampton, funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT). She has been studying prehistoric art since 2003 in several countries and is currently interested in the social and cultural connections of late prehistoric Atlantic façade, which led to the widespread phenomenon of Atlantic Rock Art.

Helen Chittock is an archaeologist, who has recently finished writing a PhD thesis on decorative practices in Iron Age Britain as the holder of an AHRCfunded Collaborative Doctoral award with the British Museum and University of Southampton. Her wider research interests encompass the study of Celtic Art across northwest Europe.
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 1 2016 edited by Dr Patricia Kögler, Dr Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Prof. Dr Wolf Rudolph (Heads of Editorial Board). xiv+212 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Available in print and Open Access. 1 2016. ISBN 2399-1844-1-2016. £30.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

ISSN 2399-1844 (Print)
ISSN 2399-1852 (online)

Table of Contents:
A Fill from a Potter’s Dump at Morgantina – by Shelley Stone
Trade in Pottery within the Lower Adriatic in the 2nd century BCE – by Carlo De Mitri
Hellenistic Ash Containers from Phoinike (Albania) – by Nadia Aleotti
Pottery Production in Hellenistic Chalkis, Euboea. Preliminary Notes – by Yannis Chairetakis
A Terracotta Figurine of a War Elephant and Other Finds from a Grave at Thessaloniki – by Eleni Lambrothanassi & Annareta Touloumtzidou
Moldmade Bowls from Straton’s Tower (Caesarea Maritima) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom
Greco-Roman Jewellery from the Necropolis of Qasrawet (Sinai) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECTS
Panathenaic Amphorae of Hellenistic and Roman Times – by Martin Streicher

BOOK REVIEWS
Shelley C. Stone, Morgantina Studies 6. The Hellenistic and Roman Fine Wares – by Peter J. Stone
Pia Guldager Bilde & Mark L. Lawall (eds.), Pottery, Peoples and Places, BSS 16 – by Kathleen Warner Slane
Susan I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pottery. The Plain Wares, Agora 33 – by Patricia Kögler

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Complete eJournal available to download now in Open Access - click here to follow the link
Making Pictures of War Realia et Imaginaria in the Iconology of the Ancient Near East edited by Laura Battini. xi+88 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 256 2016 Archaeopress Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology 1. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914035. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914042. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book brings together the main discussions that took place at an international conference on the iconology of war in the ancient Near East, a subject never addressed at an international meeting before. The articles span the 3rd to the 1st millennium, with a special stress on the Neo-Assyrian period. They try to respond to many questions about representations of war: what is ‘warrior’ iconography and on what basis it can be defined? Did the war scenes follow a specific directory whereby they adopted the most varied forms? Can we determine the most usual conditions for the creation of pictures of wartime (such as periods of great change)? Were the war scenes referring to specific historical events or were they generic representations? What can a society accept from the representations of war? What did war images silence and why? What is a ‘just’ punishment for enemies and thus the ‘just’ representation of it? Who has control of the representation and therefore also the memory of war? Who is the real subject of war representations? What emerges from all the articles published here is the relevance of textual data in any analysis of iconological material. And this is not only true for iconology, but for all the archaeological material discovered at historical sites.
ΠΟΤΑΜΙΚΟΝ: Sinews of Acheloios A Comprehensive Catalog of the Bronze Coinage of the Man-Faced Bull, with Essays on Origin and Identity edited by Nicholas J. Molinari and Nicola Sisci. x+354 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 255 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784914011. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784914028. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Potamikon attempts to solve a question that has perplexed scholars for hundreds of years: Who exactly is the man-faced bull featured so often on Greek coinage? It approaches this question by examining the origin of the iconography and traces its development throughout various Mediterranean cultures, finally arriving in Archaic and Classical Greece in the first millennium BC. Within the context of Greek coinage, the authors review all the past arguments for the identity of the man-faced bull before incorporating the two leading theories (Local River Gods vs. Acheloios) into a new theory of local embodiments of Acheloios, thereby preserving the sanctity of the local rivers while recognizing Acheloios as the original god of all water. The second part of the book exhibits many of these ‘Sinews of Acheloios’ as they appear throughout the Greek world on bronze coinage, in each case paying careful attention to the reasons a specific group adopted the iconography and shedding further light on the mythos of Acheloios.

Italian Description:
Potamikon tenta di dare risposte ad una domanda che per centinaia di anni ha assillato gli studiosi di Numismatica antica: chi è esattamente il toro androprosopo che compare così frequentemente sulla monetazione greca? Lo studio introduttivo pubblicato nel volume affronta tale questione esaminando l'origine preistorica dell'iconografia e tracciando il suo sviluppo nelle varie culture del Mediterraneo antico, per arrivare infine alla sua diffusione nel mondo greco arcaico e classico. Nell'ambito della monetazione greca gli autori passano in rassegna tutti gli argomenti passati riguardanti l'identità del toro androprosopo, prima di integrare le due teorie principali (divinità fluviali locali o Acheloios) in una nuova teoria, che propone di leggere tale figura come declinazione locale di Acheloios, inteso come il dio originario di tutte le acque da cui scaturisce la "deità" dei vari fiumi locali: i 'tendini' di Acheloios, così come furono descritti dalle fonti antiche. La seconda parte del libro presenta un repertorio dei 'tendini di Acheloios' che furono rappresentati come tori androprosopi nella monetazione in bronzo delle varie zecche greche, prestando attenzione caso per caso alle ragioni che spinsero le comunità emittenti ad adottare tale iconografia, possibilmente gettando ulteriore luce sul mito di Acheloios.

German Description:
Potamikon versucht, eine Frage zu lösen, die Wissenschaftler seit Hunderten von Jahren verwirrt hat: Wer genau ist dieser menschengesichtige Stier, der so oft auf griechischen Münzen dargestellt wird?Es nähert sich dieser Frage, indem es den Ursprung dieser Ikonographie untersucht und ihre Entwicklung innerhalb verschiedener Kulturen des Mittelmeerraumes nachverfolgt, um schließlich im Griechenland des ersten vorchristlichen Jahrtausends anzukommen. Im Rahmen der griechischen Münzprägung bewerten die Autoren alle bisher vorgebrachten Argumente für die Identität des menschengesichtigen Stiers um dann die zwei führenden Theorien (lokale Flussgötter oder Acheloios) in einer neuen Theorie von lokalen Verkörperungen von Acheloios zusammenzuführen, womit die Heiligkeit der lokalen Flüsse erhalten bleibt, währen trotzdem Acheloios als Gott aller Gewässer anerkannt wird. Der zweite Teil des Buches zeigt viele der "Sehnen von Acheloios", wie sie in der gesamten griechischen Welt auf Bronzemünzen erscheinen, wobei jeweils großes Augenmerk auf die Frage gelegt wird, warum eine spezifische Gruppe sich dieser Ikonographie bediente und der Mythos von Achelaios näher beleuchtet.

French Description:
Potamikon tente de répondre à la question qui embarrasse les chercheurs depuis de nombreuses années : Qui est le personnage figuré par un taureau androcéphale que l’on rencontre si souvent sur les monnaies grecques ? L’ouvrage aborde cette question par l’examen de l’origine iconographique puis de son développ
Drawings in Greek and Roman Architecture by Antonio Corso. vi+112 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with one colour plate. 243 2016. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784913717. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784913724. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This book is an essay on architectural drawings of the Greek and Roman world. The first chapter is focused on the possibility that ancient treatises of architectures were endowed with drawings in order to make clear expositions which sometimes were not easily explainable only with words. Then the drawings which once clarified the treatise of Vitruvius are considered. The problem concerning the possible presence of drawings in post-Vitruvian architectural treatises is also discussed. The issue as to whether descriptive literary compositions sometimes contained illustrations as well is also examined. Then representations of architecture in Roman treatises on divisions of land (the so called gromatic treatises) are considered. The references to architectural drawings in literary and epigraphical testimonia are collected and a catalogue of the surviving Greek and Roman drawings of buildings or of parts of them is given. Thus this research offers all the basic data for the study of an important tool in the context of architecture in antiquity.
Diseños geométricos en los mosaicos del Conventus Astigitanus by Sebastián Vargas Vázquez. vi+342; highly illustrated throughout with 170 colour plates. Spanish text with English summary. 240 2016 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 13. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912734. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912741. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume focuses on the study of the geometric designs documented in the mosaics of the Conventus Astigitanus, one of the four conventi iuridici of Roman Baetica. This study is part of a much broader undertaking, the primary objective of which is the analysis of the geometric mosaic designs of the province as a whole.

The number of mosaics in the Conventus Astigitanus, and the larger number still documented in other areas of Baetica, place this province among those with the highest count of mosaics in the Roman world providing evidence of the level of cultural and economic power enjoyed by the province over the centuries.

As a whole, this study makes an absolutely necessary contribution to the understanding of Roman mosaics in general and Hispanic mosaics in particular, based on an innovative and unprecedented approach in Spain. It includes a very significant number of designs and provides the basis for a completely open catalogue, to which new models may be added as they become available through the continual study of new mosaics. This catalogue ultimately aims to become a reference for the study of geometric mosaics and compositions in the Roman world. Moreover, the value of the present volume also lies in the contribution that is offered to a topic, the analysis of geometric composition, which is of great interest beyond the author’s specific field of study.
Intellectual and Spiritual Expression of Non-Literate Peoples Proceedings of the XVII UISPP World Congress (1–7 September, Burgos, Spain): Volume 1 / Session A20 edited by Emmanuel Anati. xiv+386 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Available both in print and Open Access. 212 2016. ISBN 9781784912819. £55.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume presents the proceedings of the session ‘Intellectual and Spiritual Expression of Non-literate Peoples’ part of the XVII World UISPP Congress, held in Burgos (Spain), the 4th September 2014. The session brought together experts from various disciplines to share experience and scientific approaches for a better understanding of human creativity and behaviour in prehistory.

This book is also available to download in PDF format in our Open Access section.

Prehistoric Art as Prehistoric Culture Studies in Honour of Professor Rodrigo de Balbín-Behrmann edited by Primitiva Bueno-Ramírez and Paul G. Bahn. x+180 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 197 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784912222. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784912239. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Professor Rodrigo de Balbín has played a major role in advancing our knowledge of Palaeolithic art, and the occasion of his retirement provides an excellent opportunity to assess the value of prehistoric art studies as a factor in the study of the culture of those human groups which produced this imagery. The diverse papers in this volume, published in Professor de Balbín’s honour, cover a wide variety of the decorated caves which traditionally defined Palaeolithic art, as well as the open-air art of the period, a subject in which he has done pioneering work at Siega Verde and elsewhere. The result is a new and more realistic assessment of the social and symbolic framework of human groups from 40,000 BP onwards.
The Mysterious Wall Paintings of Teleilat Ghassul, Jordan In Context by Bernadette Drabsch. x+230 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with two colour plates. 170 2015 Monographs of the Sydney University Teleilat Ghassul Project 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911706. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911713. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This volume is primarily concerned with the re-analysis of the wall paintings from the Jordanian Chalcolithic period (ca. 4700-3700 BC) settlement site of Teleilat Ghassul, first excavated in 1929 by scholars from the Pontifical Biblical Institute Rome and latterly by Australians from the University of Sydney. The seven major paintings were re-analysed using a methodology based on contextualisation, digital reconstruction, experimental replication and subject analysis.

A comprehensive theoretical framework was constructed from published and unpublished materials from the site, consisting of geographical and environmental datasets, topographic, settlement-location and structural contexts. These included material/artefactual associations, technological issues and a comprehensive symbolic regional comparative analysis of the artworks themselves.

The interpretive structure, reconstructed and re-evaluated scenes, and replication studies, have revealed numerous insights into the artistic traditions and cultic practices of South Levantine Ghassulian Chalcolithic culture, with considerable relevance to the ongoing debate on such matters as prehistoric societal makeup and art historical scholarship.

This study has provided intriguing glimpses into the lives of a brilliantly artistic and deeply ritualised society, shedding new light on this little-known and still mysterious people.
Royal Statues in Egypt 300 BC-AD 220 Context and Function by Elizabeth Brophy. iv+166 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 166 2015 Archaeopress Egyptology 10. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911515. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911522. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The aim of this book is to approach Ptolemaic and Imperial royal sculpture in Egypt dating between 300 BC and AD 220 (the reigns of Ptolemy I and Caracalla) from a contextual point of view. To collect together the statuary items (recognised as statues, statue heads and fragments, and inscribed bases and plinths) that are identifiably royal and have a secure archaeological context, that is a secure find spot or a recoverable provenance, within Egypt. This material was used, alongside other types of evidence such as textual sources and numismatic material, to consider the distribution, style, placement, and functions of the royal statues, and to answer the primary questions: where were these statues located? What was the relationship between statue, especially statue style, and placement? And what changes can be identified between Ptolemaic and Imperial royal sculpture?

From analysis of the sculptural evidence, this book was able to create a catalogue of 103 entries composed of 157 statuary items, and use this to identify the different styles of royal statues that existed in Ptolemaic and Imperial Egypt and the primary spaces for the placement of such imagery, namely religious and urban space. The results, based on the available evidence, was the identification of a division between sculptural style and context regarding the royal statues, with Egyptian-style material being placed in Egyptian contexts, Greek-style material in Greek, and Imperial-style statues associated with classical contexts. The functions of the statues appear to have also typically been closely related to statue style and placement. Many of the statues were often directly associated with their location, meaning they were an intrinsic part of the function and appearance of the context they occupied, as well as acting as representations of the monarchs. Primarily, the royal statues acted as a way to establish and maintain communication between different groups in Egypt.
Word Becomes Image: Openwork vessels as a reflection of Late Antique transformation by Hallie G. Meredith. x+279 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 160 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911294. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911300. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Transformation presents a diachronic investigation providing a rich case study as well as an approach tracing the contours of a category of Roman material culture defined by the Roman period technique of openwork carving. As the first comprehensive assemblage of openwork vessels from Classical to late Antiquity, this work offers primary evidence documenting a key example of the fundamental shift from naturalism to abstraction in which inscriptions are transformed and word becomes image. A glass blower herself, Hallie Meredith poses questions about process, tactility and reception providing a clear picture of the original contexts of production and reception demonstrated by the Roman technique of openwork carving. In an in-depth analysis of the corpus as a whole, typologies (old and new), imagery, geometric patterning and inscriptions as the major divisions among openwork decorative elements, basic design principles are identified, non openwork carving and its relation to openwork decoration are discussed, as are the function, handling, display, movement and provenance of openwork vessels throughout the Roman Empire. Art historians and archaeologists working on the transition from Classical to late Antiquity, as well as scholars focusing on these and later periods of study, can fruitfully apply this approach to visual culture. This work shows how openwork vessels are a reflection of a wide-reaching Roman cultural aesthetic.
L’oblique dans le monde grec Concept et imagerie by Thibault Girard. iv+189; illustrated throughout in black & white. French text. 159 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784911393. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784911409. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

What could be more evident than the concepts of oblique, horizontal or vertical? In the modern world, these concepts form the basis of our thought system, both from a mathematical and artistic point of view. Everything would suggest that these principles were known to the Greek civilization. However, the study of the surviving texts casts a different light on the matter. Homer did not know the concept of oblique - no word could translate it into the language of his time. Even later, the Greeks had five adjectives approximately meaning oblique: λοξός, πλάγιος, λέχριος, σκολιός and δόχμιος. Each discipline (cosmology, optic, geography, art, etc.) had its own way of looking at these five words. Paradoxically, what the written language had not yet synthesized was abundant in imagery. Even more surprising, the oblique in images, which we consider as a sign of movement in our own iconographic language, is found to signify both movement and rest. Two monuments of Greek art draw attention to this new paradox: the frieze of the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus and the Mourning Athena. In each of them, the oblique line is present, and carries two distinct meanings.

These two forms of language, written and figurative, bring a different and complementary perspective on the ancient Greeks' apprehension (or lack thereof) of the concept of oblique.

French description:
Quoi de plus évident que les concepts d’oblique, d’horizontal ou de vertical ? Pour nous, modernes,ces concepts fondamentaux sont la base de tout notre système de pensée, tant mathématiquequ’artistique. Tout porterait à croire que ces principes soient présents dans la civilisation grecque,dont nous nous réclamons les héritiers. Ce n’est pourtant pas une évidence au vu des textes quinous ont été rapportés. Homère n’a pas connu le concept d’oblique – aucun mot ne saurait letraduire dans la langue de son époque. Et même plus tard. Les Grecs ont cinq adjectifs pour signifierapproximativement l’oblique : λοξός, πλάγιος, λέχριος, σκολιός et δόχμιος. Chaque discipline(cosmologie, optique, géographie, artistique, etc.) a sa façon d’appréhender ces cinq termes.Paradoxalement, ce que le langage écrit n’a pas synthétisé se retrouve en abondance dans l’imagerie.Plus surprenant encore, l’oblique dans l’image, que nous considérons comme signe du mouvementdans notre langage iconographique, se retrouve aussi bien pour signifier le mouvement que le repos.Deux monuments de l’art grec attirent notre attention sur ce nouveau paradoxe : la frise du Mausoléed’Halicarnasse et l’Athéna Pensive. À chaque fois l’oblique est présente, à chaque fois elle porte deuxsens bien distincts.

Ces deux formes de langage, écrit et imagé, apportent un éclairage différent, et pour le moinscomplémentaire, sur la façon dont les Grecs de l’Antiquité ont appréhendé (ou non) le conceptd’oblique.

Read an interview with author Thibault Girard published in Insula: Le blog de la Bibliothèque des Sciences de l'Antiquité (Lille 3) — ISSN 2427-8297 concerning his publication L’oblique dans le monde grec.
The Traditio Legis: Anatomy of an Image by Robert Couzin. vi+140 pages; extensively illustrated with 56 plates, 3 in colour. 147 2015. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910815. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910822. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The bearded and mature figure of Christ stands majestically raising his right hand, open palm facing the viewer. In his left he holds an unfurled scroll. Saints Peter and Paul appear on either side, Peter approaching to catch or protect the dangling bookroll. This image, the so-called traditio legis, first appeared in late fourthcentury Rome in a variety of media, from the monumental to the miniature, including mosaic, catacomb painting, gold-glass and, the most numerous group, marble relief carving on sarcophagi.

This monograph engages in a close reading of the traditio legis, highlighting its novelty and complexity to early Christian viewers. The image is analyzed as a conflation of two distinct forms of representation, each constructed of unusual and potentially multivalent elements. Iconographical details like the hirsute Christ, his gesture, Peter’s covered hands and the unorthodox positioning of the two saints are examined in isolation and as elements of the whole. The synthetic composition invited alternative and over-determined meanings.
Stone Trees Transplanted? Central Mexican Stelae of the Epiclassic and Early Postclassic and the Question of Maya ‘Influence’ by Keith Jordan. xii+237 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white. 109 2014 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology 2. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784910105. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784910112. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Stelae dating to the Epiclassic (650-900 CE) and Early Postclassic (950-1150 CE) from Tula, Xochicalco, and other sites in Central Mexico have been presented in the archaeological and art historical literature of the last four decades—when they have been addressed at all—as evidence of Classic Maya ‘influence’ on Central Mexican art during these periods. This book re-evaluates these claims via detailed comparative analysis of the Central Mexican stelae and their claimed Maya counterparts. For the first time the Central Mexican stelae are placed in the context of often earlier local artistic traditions as well as other possible long-distance connections.

Comparison of Tula and Xochicalco stelae with earlier and contemporary stelae from Oaxaca and Guerrero demonstrates connections equally as plausible as those posited with the Maya region, and supported by archaeological evidence. While it is clear that some Central Mexican stelae, especially Stela 4 from Tula, reflect Maya contacts, this has to be balanced by consideration of local and other long distance developments and connections.
L’incoronazione celeste nel mondo Bizantino Politica, cerimoniale, numismatica e arti figurative by Andrea Torno Ginnasi. vi+251 pages; illustrated throughout in black and white. Italian text with English Abstract. 102 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739974. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781905739981. £19.00 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

This study deals with the iconographic theme of imperial Byzantine ‘heavenly coronation’, or André Grabar’s couronnement symbolique, with particular attention to fine arts and numismatics. This theme, along with the rituals of imperial investiture, represents the concept of divine kingship in figurative terms, a significant ideological premise for Byzantine theocracy. The book is structured in seven chapters, investigating both the origination and conclusion of the iconographical subject and its political derivations. It attempts to assemble all the known images of the ‘heavenly coronation’ theme and to explain its political and iconographical roots.
The Triumph of Dionysos Convivial processions, from antiquity to the present day by John Boardman. ii+78 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour & black and white. 90 2014. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781905739707. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781905739738. £16.99 (Inc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Dionysos carried the blessing of wine to the whole world, and his triumphant return from India became a popular subject for the arts of Greece and Rome in many media. It became associated with Alexander the Great’s comparable victories and later served as a message of immortality for any mortal prince. The iconography survived the ancient world into Renaissance and neo-Classical arts, and may even have contributed to the practices of modern circus parades with their wild animals, maenad-snake-charmers and clown-satyrs: an unusual, indeed unique, survival.