​​ We use cookies to enhance your experience on our site. By continuing to use the site you agree to our use of cookies. Privacy & Cookies.​

 
Archaeopress logo
Archaeopress Publishing Ltd, Summertown Pavilion, 18-24 Middle Way, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7LG, England
tel +44 (0) 1865 311914 fax +44 (0) 1865 512231   email: info@archaeopress.com
Monthly AP Alert - join our mailing list today Archaeopress on Facebook Archaeopress on Twitter Archaeopress on Linked In Archaeopress Blog
Home  
|
  Browse by Subject  
|
  Browse by Series  
|
  Catalogues  
|
  Join Our Mailing List  
|
  Visit Our Blog  
|
  Login (Private Customers)  
|
  Login (Institutional Subscriptions)  
|
  View Basket

Search

title, author, ISBN, keyword

Browse for books in the following languages

ARCHAEOPRESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ACCESS ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHAEOPRESS JOURNALS
DISTRIBUTED
PUBLISHERS
DIGITAL EDITIONS
OPEN ACCESS PLATFORM
Ordering Information
About Us
Publish With Us
Standing Orders
Trade Sales
Contact Us
Request Review Copy
NEW: Wholesome Dwellings: Housing Need in Oxford and the Municipal Response, 1800-1939 by Malcolm Graham. Paperback; 205x255mm; 124 pages; 40 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). Print RRP: £30.00. 663 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789697353. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697360. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

A shortage of affordable new housing, builders choosing to build larger, more profitable houses, and a diminishing stock of cheap houses for rent. All this sounds very familiar today, but at the end of the Great War, scarcely any houses had been built for four years and there was political pressure to build ‘Homes for Heroes’, impelled to a degree by fear of revolution. Council housing, supported by central government funding, was the chosen solution in 1919, and this study by Malcolm Graham, a leading Oxford local historian for many years, examines the consequences in Oxford, then a university city on the cusp of change. Behind the city’s Dreaming Spires image, housing for the working population was already in short supply, but an economy-minded and largely non-political City Council had always been reluctant to intervene in the housing market. In 1919, there was no hint of the city’s industrial future, and the City Council saw the replacement of substandard houses as its main challenge. The meteoric rise of the local motor industry in the early 1920s led to rapid population growth and created a massive new demand for cheap housing. Dr Graham examines the uneasy partnership between the City Council and Whitehall which led to the building of over 3,000 council houses in Oxford between the Wars. The provision of these ‘wholesome dwellings’ was a substantial, and lasting, achievement, but private builders were in fact catering for most housing need in and around the city by the 1930s. The notorious Cutteslowe Walls, built to exclude council tenants from an adjoining private estate, reflected the way in which the growing city was being socially segregated. Dr Graham provides a fascinating insight into how modern Oxford evolved away from the university buildings and college quadrangles for which the city is internationally renowned.

About the Author
Malcolm Graham gained a B.A. in History at Nottingham University and an M.A. in English Local History at Leicester. A qualified librarian, he became Oxford City’s first full-time local history librarian in 1970 and has been hugely active in Oxford and Oxfordshire local history ever since. He completed a PhD at Leicester University in 1985, and was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London in 1999.
NEW: The Archaeology of Medieval Towns: Case Studies from Japan and Europe edited by Simon Kaner, Brian Ayers, Richard Pearson and Oscar Wrenn. Paperback; 210x297mm; 154pp; 111 black & white figures. 649 2020 Comparative and Global Perspectives on Japanese Archaeology 3. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789694260. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694277. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

In recent years, major new archaeological discoveries have redefined the development of towns and cities in the Japanese archipelago. The uncovering of the plans of major port towns such as Sakai, Kusado Sengen and Ichijōdani, and the revealing of early phases in the development of cities such as Kamakura and Hakata provide an important new resource in understanding the cultural and economic processes which shaped medieval Japan.

This fully illustrated book provides a sampler of these findings for a western audience. The new discoveries from Japan are set in context of medieval archaeology beyond Japan by accompanying essays from leading European specialists.

The global significance of Japanese medieval archaeology is assessed through comparing the development of towns in Japan and northern Europe. The medieval period in Japan and northwest Europe saw urban growth with towns not only providing centres of administration but also fostering economic development. The pressures which led to such growth, however, be they political or social, were universal in character. following basic requirements of food, shelter, security and spiritual nourishment, towns provided commercial infrastructures, transport and storage facilities, and the setting for trade, craft specialists and art.

Chapters include ‘The archaeology of medieval towns in Japan and europe: an introduction’ (Brian Ayers and Simon Kaner); ‘Permanent urban frameworks (‘armature’) and economic networks in northern France c.700 – c.1000’ (Henri Galinié); ‘Medieval urbanism and culture in the cities of the Baltic: with a comparison between Lübeck, Germany, and Sakai, Japan’ (Manfred Gläser); ‘The development of Hakata as a medieval port town’ (Ōba Kōji); ‘The establishment and transformation of Japan’s medieval capital, Kamakura’ (Oka Yōichirō); ‘Ichijōdani: the archaeology of a Japanese medieval castle town’ (Ono Masatoshi); ‘Japanese medieval trading towns: Sakai and Tosaminato’ (Richard Pearson); and ‘Medieval ceramic production in the aegean, 1100 – 1600 AD: some considerations in an east-west perspective’ (Joanita Vroom).

About the Editors
Simon Kaner is Executive Director of the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures where he is also Head of the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage, and Director of the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia. His publications include The Power of Dogu: Ceramic Figures from Ancient Japan and An Illustrated Companion to Japanese Archaeology.

Brian Ayers served as Honorary Secretary of the Society of Antiquaries of London, and Chief Executive of the Butrint Foundation and County Archaeologist for Norfolk. A specialist in medieval urban archaeology, his publications include Norwich: A Fine City and The German Ocean: Medieval Europe around the North Sea.

Richard Pearson is Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia and Senior Research Adviser to the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures. His publications include Ancient Ryukyu: An Archaeological Study of Island Communities and Ōsaka Archaeology.

Oscar Wrenn is Academic Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures.
FORTHCOMING: The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire A Juridical and Functional Approach to Town Life in Roman Gaul, Germania Inferior and Britain by Frida Pellegrino. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314 pages; 164 figures (83 pages in colour). Print RRP: £48.00. 685 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 72. ISBN 9781789697742. Buy Now

The Urbanisation of the North-Western Provinces of the Roman Empire investigates the development of urbanism in the north-western provinces of the Roman empire. Key themes include the continuities and discontinuities between pre-Roman and Roman ‘urban’ systems, the relationships between cities’ juridical statuses and their levels of monumentality, levels of connectivity and economic integration as illuminated by the geographical distribution of cities and town-like settlements belonging to various size brackets, and the shapes and nature of regional urban hierarchies, as reconstructed on the basis of not only the administrative centres but - crucially - all places that fulfilled urban ‘functions’.

About the Author
Frida Pellegrino graduated with honours in 2008, after completing a BA course in Archaeology at the University of Padua. She then enrolled in the MA course at the University of Padua and spent a year abroad, studying at Southampton University (UK), with the Erasmus project. She graduated summa cum laude in 2011, specialising in Roman archaeology. She completed her PhD at the University of Leiden in 2018.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Acknowledgements ;
Introduction . The study of the urbanisation of the North-Western provinces ;
Chapter 1: Object and Aims ;
Chapter 2: The Dawn of Urbanism ;
Chapter 3: The Integration of the North-Western Provinces into the Roman Empire ;
Chapter 4: The Self-Governing Cities: Elements and Rhythms of Urbanisation ;
Chapter 5: The Secondary Agglomerations of Gaul ;
Chapter 6: The Secondary Agglomerations of Germania Inferior and Britannia ;
Conclusions ;
Summary ;
Appendix A: List of Civitates in the North-western Provinces and Their Juridical Status and Dating (either Date or Reign) ;
Appendix B: Assured Magistrates of the North-Western Provinces ;
Appendix C: The Settlements of the North-Western Provinces ;
Bibliography
FORTHCOMING: El Palacio: Historiography and new perspectives on a pre-Tarascan city of northern Michoacán, Mexico edited by Marion Forest. Paperback; 203x276mm; 314 pages; 143 figures, 52 tables; papers in English and Spanish. Print RRP: £50.00. 125 2020 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 53. ISBN 9781789697964. Buy Now

In the centuries that preceded the European conquest in 1521, the central-northern region of the state of Michoacán, West Mexico, was a place of significant socio-political changes materialized by important transformations of settlement pattern and material culture. The archaeological site of El Palacio (also known as La Crucita or Mich. 23), located in the Zacapu Basin, constituted a major center throughout these regional events. The site has been mentioned in the archaeological literature as early as the end of the nineteenth century, and dispersed subsequent research has documented changes in site morphology, function, and degree of integration into interregional networks of cultural interaction. The present volume offers the first monographic publication about El Palacio. It is composed of a series of eleven contributions looking at both legacy and archive data (1896–1995) and results derived from recent archaeological investigations (2012–2017). The systematic review and analysis of the chrono-stratigraphy, material culture, urbanism, and economic and ritual practices at the site yields critical information that allows discussion of the role of El Palacio and the context of its development at both local and extra-local scales, between A.D. 850 and 1521. Beyond this central concern, this volume provides extended material for cultural comparisons with West, Northwest and Central Mexico during this time period, as well as for broader discussions about the complex social mechanisms involved in the rise, transformation, and fall of premodern urban centers.

About the Editor
Marion Forest received her PhD in archaeology from the University Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Anthropology of Brigham Young University. She specializes in urbanization processes in western and central Mexico. Her current research includes a survey and excavation field project at Teotihuacan and further developments in the integration of LiDAR data in archaeology.

Spanish Description
En los siglos que precedieron a la conquista española de 1521, la región centro-norte del estado de Michoacán, occidente de México, fue el escenario de cambios sociopolíticos importantes, materializados a través de transformaciones significativas en el patrón de asentamiento y la cultura material a escala regional. El sitio arqueológico de El Palacio (también conocido como La Crucita o Mich. 23), localizado en la cuenca de Zacapu, constituye un centro mayor que fue ocupado entre 850 y 1521 d. C y transformado de manera continua a lo largo de su historia ocupacional. El Palacio atrajo la atención de diversos investigadores desde finales del siglo diecinueve y fue sujeto a investigaciones subsecuentes. Si bien las intervenciones en el sitio fueron dispersas, éstas permitieron documentar ciertos cambios en la morfología del asentamiento, su función, y su grado de integración en las redes de interacción culturales a larga distancia. El presente volumen constituye la primera publicación monográfica sobre El Palacio. Se compone de once contribuciones enfocadas tanto en la reevaluación de la información existente del sitio (obtenida entre los años 1896 y 1995) como en el estudio de los datos adquiridos durante las investigaciones recientes (de 2012 a 2017). La revisión y análisis sistemático de la cronoestratigrafía, la cultura material, el urbanismo, y las prácticas rituales y económicas que caracterizan la ocupación prehispánica del sitio, produjeron una documentación que permite discutir el papel de El Palacio y su contexto de desarrollo en una escala local y regional. El presente volumen ofrece, asimismo, un contenido con material extensivo útil para ser retomado en estudios comparativos, sobre todo con respecto a las regiones Oeste, Noroeste y Central de México durante los periodos Epiclásico y Postclásico. Finalmente esta obra contribuye a generar una reflexión en tor
Building between the Two Rivers: An Introduction to the Building Archaeology of Ancient Mesopotamia by Stefano Anastasio and Piero Gilento. Paperback; 175x245mm; 220 pages; 136 figures. Print RRP: £34.0. 664 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789696035. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696042. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Building between the Two Rivers aims to supply university students and scholars of Near Eastern archaeology with an introduction to 'Building archaeology' methods as applied to the context of Ancient Mesopotamia. It helps the reader understand the principles underlying the discipline, which deals with the registration and analysis of all building materials and techniques involved in the assembly and erection of a construction, and to outline what knowledge and skills are needed, beyond those that are specific to archaeologists.

The in-depth registration and analysis of building materials and techniques requires professional skills and experience, which cannot be achieved with only a standard university training in archaeology. However, archaeologists need to know the basics of the classification of building materials, their physical properties, the main techniques of their finishing, as well as the basic principles of statics. They should also be able to let architects understand how to better tune the registration of data to ensure a fruitful archaeological interpretation.

Due to the introductory nature of the book, contents are organised in didactic chapters, trying to cover all the main topics and displaying them by means of selected examples. Particular attention is given to the methods of the 'stratigraphic reading', which are discussed in a dedicated appendix authored by Piero Gilento. A thematic bibliography and a technical glossary complete the book, helping readers enhance their understanding of the subject.

About the Authors
Stefano Anastasio is an archaeologist who specialises in the Ancient Near East. He is currently storehouse-keeper of the archaeological deposits of the Superintendency for Archaeology, Arts and Landscape in Florence. He is also currently working on the implementation of the new Photo-Archive for the Archaeological Conservation Centre of the Superintendency ;

Piero Gilento is an Associate Researcher at the Research Unit UMR7041-ArScAn (France), co-director of the French archaeological mission in northern Jordan, and Principal Investigator of the ACTECH project founded by a Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship.
Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East edited by Anja Fügert and Helen Gries. Paperback; 205x290mm; 130 pages; 97 figures, 5 tables (61 colour pages). 645 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696059. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696066. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Glazed bricks applied as a new form of colourful and glossy architectural decor first started to appear in the early Iron Age on monumental buildings of the Ancient Near East. It surely impressed the spectators then as it does the museum visitors today. Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East comprises the proceedings of a workshop held at the 11th International Congress of the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (ICAANE) at Munich in April 2018, organised by the editors. Over the last decade excavations have supplied new evidence from glazed bricks that once decorated the facades of the Ancient Near East’s public buildings during the Iron Age (1000–539 BC) and especially significant progress has been achieved from revived work on glazed bricks excavated more than a century ago which today are kept in various museum collections worldwide. Since the latest summarising works on Ancient Near Eastern glazed architectural décors have been published several decades ago and in the meantime considerable insight into the subject has been gained, this volume aims to provide an updated overview of the development of glazed bricks and of the scientific research on the Iron Age glazes. Furthermore, it presents the on-going research on this topic and new insights into glazed bricks from Ashur, Nimrud, Khorsabad, and Babylon.

About the Editors
Anja Fügert received her master’s degree in Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2005 with a dissertation on the Old Babylonian palace at Uruk. From 2005 to 2014 she was a staff member of the research project Tell Sheikh Hamad / Syria and in 2013 she defended her PhD on the Neo-Assyrian glyptics from this site. After working as a freelance illustrator in the Egyptian National Museum in Cairo she did a 2-year traineeship at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. She also taught courses of Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin and at the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. Since December 2017 she is the head of the editorial office of the Orient-Department of the German Archaeological Institute. Together with Helen Gries, she initiated and directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur).

Helen Gries obtained MA in Near Eastern Archaeology at Johannes Gutenberg-Universität of Mainz in 2010. In 2011 she started her PhD as a member of the Graduate School ‘Formen von Prestige in Kulturen des Altertums’ at Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität of Munich. In 2014 she completed her PhD at Munich with a dissertation on the Ashur temple at Ashur. She has undertaken fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Lebanon, and Jordan. In 2014 and 2015 she was postdoc researcher and lecturer at Institute of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Munich. Since 2015 she is researcher and curator for Mesopotamia at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. Together with Anja Fügert, she directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur), which is funded by the German Research Foundation since 2018.
On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids by David Ian Lightbody. Paperback; 203x276mm; 100 pages; 47 figures. 118 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696578. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696585. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids is a treatise on the subject of encircling symbolism in pharaonic monumental tomb architecture. The study focuses on the Early Dynastic Period and the Old Kingdom of ancient Egypt; from the first dynasty through the sixth. During that time, encircling symbolism was developed most significantly and became most influential. The cartouche also became the principal symbol of the pharaoh for the first time. This work demonstrates how the development of the cartouche was closely related to the monumental encircling symbolism incorporated into the architectural designs of the Old Kingdom pyramids. By employing a new architectural style, the pyramid, and a new iconographic symbol, the cartouche, the pharaoh sought to elevate his status above that of the members of his powerful court. These iconic new emblems emphasized and protected the pharaoh in life, and were retained in the afterlife. By studying the available evidence, the new and meaningful link between the two artistic media; iconographic and architectural, is catalogued, understood, and traced out through time.

Table of Contents
David Ian Lightbody, PhD., BEng (Hons), is an archaeologist with a special interest in the origins of architectural and scientific principles, most notably in the ancient Egyptian and Greek cultures. In 2016 he founded the Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture (JAEA) with co-editor Franck Monnier. He has published several journal articles, a monograph, and most recently, the Great Pyramid Haynes Operations Manual (2,590 B.C. onwards).
The Hippodrome of Gerasa A Provincial Roman Circus by Antoni A. Ostrasz with Ina Kehrberg-Ostrasz. Paperback; 205x290mm; 504 pages; 261 figures (77 plates in colour). 616 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918132. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918149. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Hippodrome of Gerasa: A Provincial Roman Circus publishes the unique draft manuscript by the late architect and restorer Antoni Ostrasz, the study of Roman circuses and the complex fieldwork for the restoration of the Jarash Hippodrome, a work in progress abruptly ended both in writing and in the field by his untimely death in October 1996. The manuscript is presented as it is in order to retain the authenticity of his work. It is, therefore, an unusual publication providing the researcher as well as restorer of ancient monuments with unparalleled insights of architectural studies for anastyloses. Compendia A and B have been added to supplement the incomplete segments of the manuscript with regard to his studies as well as archaeological data. This concerns the excavation and preparation for the restorations and the archaeological history or stratigraphic history of the site from the foundations to primary use as a circus to subsequent occupancies of the circus complex. The study of the architectural and archaeological remains at the hippodrome encapsulates the sequence of the urban history of the town from its early beginnings to Roman Gerasa and Byzantine and Islamic Jarash, including vestiges of the seventh century plague and still visible earthquake destructions, as well as Ottoman settlements.

About the Authors
Antoni Adam Ostrasz M.Eng PhD (Warsaw 1958, 1967) began his overseas work as research architect with the Polish Archaeological Centre in Cairo from 1961-1966 before joining expeditions to Alexandria, Palmyra and Nea Paphos. He was commissioned by the Syrian Authorities at Palmyra to prepare the restorations of several monuments, recently destroyed. He continued his architectural studies at Fustat and later joined the ‘Jarash Archaeological Project’ where he studied and restored the Umayyad House and the Church of Bishop Marianos. In 1984, the Dept of Antiquities appointed him as permanent director for the restoration project of the Hippodrome at Jarash. ;

Ina Kehrberg-Ostrasz graduated in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Sydney where she completed her postgraduate thesis on Cypriot ceramics. She began excavating in Jordan with the University of Sydney in 1975, followed by several international and long-term archaeological projects at Jarash and other Decapolis cities in Jordan. She became Hon. Research Fellow at the University of Sydney, and was made Hon. Lecturer at ANU/Canberra in 2019 where she offers Masterclasses in the study of ceramics and other artefacts.
London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 by John Schofield, Lyn Blackmore and Jacqui Pearce, with Tony Dyson. Paperback; 210x297mm; xxiv+514 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (132 colour plates). English text with summaries in French and German.. 422 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695595. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918385. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

Please note: 2018 hardback edition is now out of print. New paperback edition published in March 2020.

London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 presents and celebrates the mile-long Thames Street in the City of London and the land south of it to the River Thames as an archaeological asset. The argument is based on the reporting of four excavations of 1974–84 by the Museum of London near the north end of London Bridge: Swan Lane, Seal House, New Fresh Wharf and Billingsgate Lorry Park. Here the findings of the period 1100–1666 are presented.

Buildings and property development on sixteen properties south of Thames Street, on land reclaimed in many stages since the opening of the 12th century, include part of the parish church of St Botolph Billingsgate. The many units of land reclamation are dated by dendrochronology, coins and documents. They have produced thousands of artefacts and several hundred kilos of native and foreign pottery. Much of this artefactual material has been published, but in catalogue form (shoes, knives, horse fittings, dress accessories, textiles, household equipment). Now the context of these finds, their deposition in groups, is laid out for the first time. Highlights of the publication include the first academic analysis and assessment of a 13th- or 14th-century trumpet from Billingsgate, the earliest surviving straight trumpet in Europe; many pilgrim souvenirs; analysis of two drains of the 17th century from which suggestions can be made about use of rooms and spaces within documented buildings; and the proposal that one of the skeletons excavated from St Botolph’s church is John Reynewell, mayor of London in 1426–7 and a notable figure in London’s medieval history.

The whole publication encourages students and other researchers of all kinds to conduct further research on any aspect of the sites and their very rich artefactual material, which is held at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive. This is a significantly large and varied dataset for the archaeology and history of London in the period 1100 to 1666 which can be continuously interrogated for generations to come.

About the Authors
John Schofield was an archaeologist at the Museum of London from 1974 to 2008. He has written several well-received books on the archaeology of London and of British medieval towns; and as Cathedral Archaeologist for St Paul’s Cathedral, archaeological accounts of the medieval and Wren buildings. ;
Lyn Blackmore is a Senior Ceramics and Finds Specialist who has worked for MOLA and its predecessors since 1986. In 2009–14 she was Assistant Treasurer of the Medieval Pottery Research Group and in 2017 was elected co-editor of its journal Medieval Ceramics, a role she first held in 1989–94. ;
Jacqui Pearce is a Senior Ceramics Specialist with MOLA, focusing especially on medieval and later pottery, on which she has published widely. In 2017 she was elected President of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology. ;
Tony Dyson was the principal documentary historian and general editor at the Department of Urban Archaeology of the Museum of London from 1974 to 1998.

FORTHCOMING: Urbanisation in the Time of Claudius in the Western Provinces of the Empire by Erika Cappelletto. Paperback; 205x290mm; 314pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £50.00). 487 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology . ISBN 9781789690507. Buy Now

This volume analyses Claudius’ activities in the provinces of the western Empire in order to get an idea of his political attitude in a broader context and see how his interests in the provinces influenced the urban works.

The first aim of the project was to find structures, urban development and changes in the cities which were directly connected to Claudius; the second was to reflect on planning issues and strategies adopted by the emperor. A comprehensive examination of new buildings, or additions to prior ones (with statues, for example), was conducted in order to understand the underlying intentions, as well as how, and in which way, the prototypes in Italy influenced construction in the provinces. The final aim was connected to Venturi’s work, who deals with Claudius’ activities in Italy and in particular at Rome and Ravenna. The question was whether the trends found by Venturi can also be applied to the provinces. As a result of these investigations, the author has been able to propose new trends which might explain the emperor’s political actions.

About the Author
ERIKA CAPPELLETTO received a degree from the University of Venice with a thesis about the representation of spinning implements on gravestones. She gained her Masters from the same university with a study of the black glazed pottery from Pompeii. During this period, she participated in different projects in Italy and studied for six months at Ankara with the Erasmus project. Later, she moved to Heidelberg where she completed her PhD. She has participated in international projects and conferences, frequented workshops and undertaken an internship in digital archaeology (3d reconstruction and modelling). She currently works in cultural heritage in Germany.
The Role of Anglo-Saxon Great Hall Complexes in Kingdom Formation, in Comparison and in Context AD 500-750 by Adam McBride. Paperback; 205x290mm; xvi+350 pages; 228 figures (165 pages in colour). Print RRP (£55.00). 596 2020. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693874. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693881. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £55.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Following the collapse of Roman Britain, early medieval England shows little evidence for complex hierarchy or supra-regional socio-political units for nearly two hundred years, until the turn of the 7th century, when the documented emergence of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms is seemingly confirmed by the sudden appearance of the first high-status settlements – the so-called great hall complexes. This book explores the role of great hall complexes in kingdom formation through an expansive and ambitious study, incorporating new fieldwork, new quantitative methodologies and new theoretical models for the emergence of high-status settlements and the formation and consolidation of supra-regional socio-political units. This study begins with a comparative analysis of all known great hall complexes, through which evidence is presented for a broad chronological development, paralleling and contributing to the development of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. The wider context of great hall complexes is then explored through a regional case study, charting the development of socio-economic power in the burials and settlements of the Upper Thames Valley, before situating the great hall complexes within this development. Ultimately, an overarching theoretical explanation is proposed for the emergence, development and abandonment of the great hall complexes, linking these sites with the development of a new elite ideology, the integration of new supra-regional communities and the consolidation of the newly formed Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

About the Author
Adam McBride completed his DPhil in archaeology at the University of Oxford in 2019. During his doctoral studies, Adam collaborated with Helena Hamerow and Jane Harrison on the excavation of a high-status early medieval complex at Long Wittenham, Oxfordshire, UK. Adam previously worked in CRM/commercial archaeology in the Southeast United States, after completing an MPhil at the University of Cambridge.
Great Cloister: A Lost Canterbury Tale A History of the Canterbury Cloister, Constructed 1408-14, with Some Account of the Donors and their Coats of Arms by Paul A. Fox. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+694 pages; 759 illustrations, full colour throughout. 595 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693317. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693324. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Great Cloister: A Lost Canterbury Tale presents a new study of the heraldry, genealogy and history of the Canterbury Cathedral cloister. It is the first comprehensive and complete study of this monument ever undertaken, and it provides a detailed chronology as well as many new insights into the families who were donors. The monument is revealed to have been the personal project of Archbishop Thomas Arundel (d.1414), an individual closely connected with the overthrow of King Richard II. The work as a whole provides considerable insights into the revolution of 1399 and the troubled reign of Henry IV as seen through the lens of individual families.

The cloister, as originally conceived, contained 856 heraldic shields, badges and devices of which 576 were unique. Some 365 families, principalities, religious foundations and other individuals both real and imagined were represented, some with more than one shield or device. More precisely, there were 252 families, 51 peerage families, 3 English royal families (Lancaster, York and Beaufort), 20 principalities, 12 religious foundations, 9 bishops, 7 saints, 3 heroes, 4 cities or towns, 2 priests, 1 monk and 1 for God himself (in the form of the Holy Trinity). The origins and evolution of each shield represented are considered in detail.

About the Author
Dr Paul A. Fox, FHS, FSA is a retired consultant physician, medical researcher and university lecturer. He is the honorary editor of Coat of Arms: Journal of the Heraldry Society, a former Chairman of the Heraldry Society, and an Academician of the Académie Internationale d’Héraldique.

Reviews
'...this is a splendid volume allowing the history and genealogy of the Canterbury cloister and its hundreds of associated individuals and families to stand in new and radiant light. It will remain as an indispensable vade mecum for long into the future.'—David Wright, The Antiquaries Journal

'Like the enterprises of the early antiquarians, this book will doubtless stand the test of time; it will be consulted by scholars for generations to come.'—Michael Carter, Journal of the British Archaeological Association, September 2020

'This book will prove a valuable reference for those interested in the Cloister.'—Philip Allfrey, The Coat of Arms, 2020 Volume 3, no.237
Sources of Han Décor: Foreign Influence on the Han Dynasty Chinese Iconography of Paradise (206 BC-AD 220) by Sophia-Karin Psarras. Paperback; 175x245mm; x+138 pages; 4 maps, 69 figures. 591 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693256. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693263. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Sources of Han Décor: Foreign Influence on the Han Dynasty Chinese Iconography of Paradise (206 BC-AD 220) uses archaeological data to examine the development of Han dynasty Chinese art (206 BC-AD 220), focussing on three major iconographies (the animal master, the tree of life, and animal predation), together with a series of minor motifs (particularly the griffin and several vegetal forms). All of these are combined in what may be considered the most important iconographic creation of the Han: images of paradise. While influence from the Chinese Bronze Age (especially, c. the 14th-3rd centuries BC) on Han art is expected, a surprisingly profound debt to Greece, the Near East, and the steppe is evident not only in the art of the Han era, but in that of the preceding Eastern Zhou (c. 771-221 BC). Initial Eastern Zhou incorporation of this largely-Western influence appears concentrated in chronological parallel to the Orientalization of Greek art (c. the 7th century BC) and the eastern spread of Hellenism (c. the 4th century BC), followed by repeated introduction of foreign motifs during the Han, when these influences were fully integrated into Chinese art.

About the Author
Sophia-Karin Psarras is a specialist of the archaeology and political history of China and the non-Chinese during the Han dynasty (206 BC-AD 220). Much of her work focuses on retracing intercultural exchange through material culture, together with an exploration of how that culture reflects the past. Her work has appeared in journals such as Monumenta Serica, Early China, and Central Asiatic Journal; her research on Han dynasty Chinese archaeology was published in Han Material Culture: An Archaeological Analysis and Vessel Typology (Cambridge University Press, 2015).
The Busy Periphery: Urban Systems of the Balkan and Danube Provinces (2nd – 3rd c. AD) by Damjan Donev. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+380 pages; 106 figures, 21 tables, 123 maps (99 colour pages). (Print RRP: £54.00). 582 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 61. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789693492. £54.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693508. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £54.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Busy Periphery: Urban Systems of the Balkan and Danube Provinces (2nd – 3rd c. AD) considers the reconstruction of the urban geography of the Balkan and Danube provinces at the time of the Severan dynasty. Four basic parameters governed the focus of research: the origin and socio-economic character of the settlements, their size, micro-location, and the size of their administrative territories. The principal goal was to map the variable developments of the urban network, both between and within the sub-regions that constituted this part of the Roman Empire. This line of inquiry helped in bridging the gap between the regional and the general. In the process of explaining the apparent gaps in the urban map of the study-region or the differential growth of the individual towns and settlements, we were inevitably faced with the question of the role of towns in Roman provincial society and in the economy in general, and with the interpretation of the basic prerequisites for their emergence and prosperity.

About the Author
Damjan Donev completed his Master’s degree at the department of Archaeology and Art History at Bilkent University, Ankara, and earned his doctoral degree in September 2014, at Leiden University, the Netherlands. Between 2013 and 2017, he worked on the ERC-funded project ‘An Empire of 2000 cities’, hosted by Leiden University. Over the past couple of decades, Damjan has participated in and directed a number of archaeological field projects. His geographic focus is the Balkan Peninsula, while his research interest include regional studies, with a special emphasis on settlement patterns, hierarchies, and territoriality, methods of field survey and remote sensing.
Country in the City: Agricultural Functions of Protohistoric Urban Settlements (Aegean and Western Mediterranean) edited by Dominique Garcia, Raphaël Orgeolet, Maia Pomadère and Julian Zurbach. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+200; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (32 plates in colour). 518 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691320. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691337. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £35.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The validity of an opposition between rural and urban spaces is an important question for our societies; this question has been raised since the radical transformations of the 20th century and the so-called ‘end of the peasants’. In this context it becomes also a question for archaeologists and historians. Country in the City: Agricultural Functions in Protohistoric Urban Settlements (Aegean and Western Mediterranean) assembles contributions on the place of agricultural production in the context of urbanization in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Mediterranean. The contributions concentrate on the second millennium Aegean and the protohistoric northwestern Mediterranean. They offer a reflection on the nature of urbanization and its consequences for rural spaces near cities and on the many ways in which rural spaces and agricultural activities may be intertwined with urban spaces – a reconsideration of the very nature of urbanism. A deliberate accent is laid on the comparative perspectives between different regions and periods of Mediterranean protohistory, and on the integration of all kinds of sources and research methods, from texts to survey to environmental archaeology. Highlighted throughout are the original paths followed in the Peloponnese or in the Troad with regard to the Minoan model of urbanization, and the many aspects of Minoan urbanization, and many regional differences in Languedoc vis-à-vis Catalonia. Thus a new perspective on Mediterranean urbanization is offered.

About the Editors
Dominique Garcia is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Aix-Marseille and, since 2014, has been president of the lnstitut national de recherches archéologiques préventives (National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research).

Raphaël Orgeolet is Senior Lecturer in Mediterranean Bronze Age Archaeology at Aix-Marseille University. His main research interests focus on settlement, funeral practices and society. He has taken part in various archaeological projects in the Mediterranean and especially in the Aegean and is now leading the excavations of the Neolithic and Bronze Age site of Kirrha in Mainland Greece.

Maia Pomadère is a Senior Lecturer in Aegean Archaeology at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon Sorbonne and member of the UMR 7041-ArScAn. Her research interests encompass Aegean Bronze Age and Early Iron Age archaeology, especially architecture and funerary practices. She has been directing an archaeological excavation in the Minoan town of Malia in Crete since 2005, and is codirecting a geoarchaeological project on the same site.

Julien Zurbach is Senior Lecturer in Greek history at the ENS Paris. He is working on agricultural practices, land distribution and workforce in the Aegean world from the Late Bronze Age to the Archaic period. He concentrates particularly on Mycenaean epigraphy and has led field projects in Kirrha (Phocis) and Miletus (Ionia).
Culture and Society at Lullingstone Roman Villa by Caroline K. Mackenzie. Paperback; 205x255 pages; viii+50 pages; 40 figures (colour throughout). 563 . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789692907. £14.99 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692914. £9.99 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £14.99 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Culture and Society at Lullingstone Roman Villa paints a picture of what life might have been like for the inhabitants of the villa in the late third and fourth centuries AD. The villa today, in the Darent Valley, Kent, has an unusual amount of well-preserved evidence for its interior decoration and architecture. Seventy years on from the commencement of the excavation of the site, this study draws on the original reports but also embraces innovative approaches to examining the archaeological evidence and sheds new light on our understanding of the villa’s use. For the first time, the site of Lullingstone Roman Villa is surveyed holistically, developing a plausible argument that the inhabitants used domestic space to assert their status and cultural identity.

An exploration of the landscape setting asks whether property location was as important a factor in the time of Roman Britain as it is today and probes the motives of the villa’s architects and their client. Lullingstone’s celebrated mosaics are also investigated from a fresh perspective. Why were these scenes chosen and what impact did they have on various visitors to the villa? Comparison with some contemporary Romano-British villas allows us to assess whether Lullingstone is what we would expect, or whether it is exceptional. Examples from the wider Roman world are also introduced to enquire how Lullingstone’s residents adopted Roman architecture and potentially the social customs which accompanied it.

About the Author
Caroline K. Mackenzie read Classics at Pembroke College, Cambridge. As an undergraduate she gained a place to study for a month at the British School at Athens. After Cambridge, she continued her studies at law school where she was awarded a distinction and then practised as a Private Client solicitor in London for over a decade. Caroline subsequently pursued a teaching career, first as a law lecturer and then as Head of Classics at a preparatory school in Sevenoaks, Kent. In 2018 Caroline was awarded a Master of Arts with distinction in Classical Art and Archaeology at King’s College London.

Caroline’s current work includes private tutoring in Latin and Greek, providing workshops for schools and leading short courses in Classical Art and Archaeology as well as Classical literature. She also teaches on the annual Summer School in Homer at University College London. Caroline writes regularly for Argo, a journal of the Hellenic Society, and various other Classical publications. She has lectured for English Heritage who invited her to deliver a study day including a private tour of Lullingstone Roman Villa. Her website is: www.carolinetutor.co.uk

Reviews
'This book offers a unique interpretation of the Lullingstone Roman Villa in the Darent Valley of Kent, exploring how its inhabitants used space to assert their position in society, as well as their cultural identity. The first section of the book looks at the position of the villa and its ancillary buildings in the wider landscape, focusing on how the hills and views of the river valley might have been used to impress visitors. The second section turns to the interior of the building, particularly the central room and apse, exploring how the position and use of certain mosaics and inscriptions were used to highlight the villa owner's wealth and education, perhaps in an attempt to emulate Roman aristocrats. Richly illustrated with photographs of mosaics and wall-paintings from the villa, as well as reconstruction drawings of how both the interior and exterior may have looked during the Roman period, it takes the reader on an in-depth, but not remote, tour of the villa.' — Kathryn Krakowka, Current Archaeology, November 2019
La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana Ricerche archeologiche nell’isola di Ventotene 2 by Giovanni Maria De Rossi. Paperback; 205x290mm; 360 pages; 608 figures (256 pages in colour). Italian text. (Print RRP £65.00). 527 2019 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 57. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691467. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691474. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £65.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana is presented in two parts. The first examines the topographical and technical problem of the water supply on the island of Ventotene, where there is an absence of natural springs. The second, consisting of separate entries, analyses the individual components of the water supply system built by the Romans on the island. The Roman installation developed in two phases alongside changes in life at the villa located at Ventotene: the first connected to a residence used for otium, the second to an official site of relegatio ad insulam.

The Roman architect exploited the island’s natural slope to collect rainwater in a large initial reservoir, later known as the ‘Cistern of the Prisoners’, surmounted by a vast catchment basin: from here a conduit departed which, through various branches, reached the ‘heart’ of the villa extending over the promontory of Punta Eolo and the port facilities. The water was channelled from the cistern by an extensive network of tunnels, dug, depending on the height, either wholly or partially into the tufa or built on the surface.

Even during the second phase, when the villa was turned into a large and elaborate residential complex used throughout the year, it could rely only on rainwater as a resource. The Roman architect was thus forced to increase the collection areas, attempting to capture as much water as possible. This was achieved by increasing the number of large initial collection tanks, dislocating them strategically around the island to ensure that each of the sectors with the highest residential density and main infrastructure installations had its own independent resource alongside the standard existing resources. The number of catchment basins also multiplied considerably along the route of the main conduit and its branches.

About the Author
Giovanni Maria De Rossi (Rome 1942), Full Professor of Topography of Ancient Italy at the University of Salerno, has published many articles and books on ancient and medieval topography. He has directed archaeological excavations in Italy, and he conceived and designed the Archaeological park and Historical-Archaeological museum at Ventotene island, where he has been director for over twenty years.

Italian Description
La raccolta e la distribuzione dell’acqua a Ventotene in età romana si compone di due parti. Nella prima viene esaminato il problema topografico e tecnico relativo all’approvvigionamento idrico dell’isola di Ventotene, in rapporto alla sostanziale assenza di sorgenti d’acqua. Nella seconda, composta di schede, si analizzano le singole componenti del sistema idrico costruito dai Romani nell’isola. L’impianto romano va inserito nelle due fasi di vita della villa realizzata a Ventotene: la prima legata a una residenza per l’otium, la seconda a una sede ufficiale per la relegatio ad insulam. L’architetto romano sfruttò il naturale pendio dell’isola per raccogliere acqua piovana in un grande serbatoio iniziale, poi detto “Cisterna dei Carcerati”, sormontato da un vastissimo compluvio di raccolta: da qui partiva un condotto che raggiungeva, con varie diramazioni, il “cuore” della villa distesa sul promontorio di Punta Eolo e gli impianti portuali. Lo smistamento dell’acqua dal serbatoio venne affidato a una capillare rete di cunicoli, scavati, a seconda delle quote, interamente o parzialmente nel tufo oppure costruiti in superficie. Per aumentare notevolmente la quantità d’acqua messa a disposizione dell’impianto, si realizzarono lungo i condotti abbinamenti formati da compluvi di superficie e cisterne di raccolta. Potendo contare, anche per la seconda fase, in cui però la villa era stata trasformata in un grande e articolato complesso residenziale da utilizzarsi per tutto l’anno, sulla sola risorsa delle piogge, all’architetto romano di turno non rimase che l’espediente di aumentare i punti di raccolta, cercando c
RACTA 2018: Ricerche di Archeologia Cristiana, Tardantichità e Altomedioevo edited by Chiara Cecalupo, Giovanna Assunta Lanzetta and Priscilla Ralli. Paperback; 203x276; 248 pages; illustrated throughout in black & white with 20 plates in colour. Papers in Italian, English, French and German. Introduction and abstracts in English. (Print RRP £45.00). 84 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691740. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691757. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

RACTA (Ricerche di Archeologia Cristiana, Tardantichità e Altomedioevo) was the first international conference for PhD students of Christian Archaeology. It took place in Rome in February 2018, hosted by Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana and gathered more than 50 multidisciplinary talks and posters from PhD students from Europe, America and Russia. The engagement shown at the well-attended event, and the interest of several institutions, proved that Christian archaeology continues to be important to new generations of archaeologists, art historians, and researchers of the ancient world.

About the Editors
CHIARA CECALUPO has a PhD in History of Christian Archaeology from the Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana (‘La Roma Sotterranea di Antonio Bosio e i primi collezionisti di antichità cristiane’), and is a researcher and teaching assistant at the University of Pisa. Her work concerns the history of archaeology and collections.

GIOVANNA ASSUNTA LANZETTA is a PhD student at The Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana (‘La basilica di Santa Eufemia a Grado’). Her research focusses on early Christian architecture with the support of new technologies (such as 3D reconstructions) and on Christian and medieval topography.

PRISCILLA RALLI is a PhD student at the Pontificio Istituto di Archeologia Cristiana (thesis “L’architettura paleocristiana del Peloponneso”) in agreement with the Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene (SAIA-IASA) and with a scholarship (related to the study of Argos and the Argolid during the Late Antiquity) from the Ecole Française d’Athènes (EFA).
Greco-Roman Cities at the Crossroads of Cultures: The 20th Anniversary of Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission Marina el-Alamein edited by Grażyna Bąkowska-Czerner and Rafał Czerner. Paperback; 205x290mm; iv+312 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (128 colour plates). 513 2019. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789691481. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691498. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £60.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The ancient town, discovered at the site of today’s Marina el-Alamein, located on the northern coast of Egypt, developed from the 2nd century BC to the 6th century AD, finding itself at the crossroads of several civilisations: Hellenic, later replaced by Roman, and eventually Christian – and always strongly influenced by Egyptian tradition. A variety of cultures have met and appeared, their prominence flourishing and faltering at different times, but they have always co-existed and influenced one another. The syncretism prevailing here is notable in art, architecture, religion and worship.

In 2015, it had been thirty years since the discovery of the remains of the ancient city, which, for many centuries, had been unknown to the world. They were found unexpectedly during the preparatory work for the construction of a modern tourist settlement on the Mediterranean coast, and the significance and extraordinary value of the find was immediately recognised. Now the ancient city, and the historic remains of its buildings, are gradually coming to light.

The Jubilee was twofold, since 2015 marked also the 20th anniversary of the setting up of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission, Marina el-Alamein. During this time, architectural and archaeological research has been carried out at the site, many discoveries have been made, numerous relics of historic building structures have been preserved, and conservation methods have been improved. In the jubilee year, we invited researchers who work on archaeological sites and towns with a similar history and position in the ancient world, art and culture, to take part in a scientific discussion and exchange of experience. The authors of the presented papers are representatives of different disciplines and research methodologies: archaeologists, architects, Egyptologists, specialists in religious studies, historians and conservators. The present volume contains an interdisciplinary review of both the newest and long-term studies and achievements made in various regions of the ancient world.

Greco-Roman Cities at the Crossroads of Cultures: The 20th Anniversary of Polish- Egyptian Conservation Mission Marina el-Alamein presents papers ranging from ancient Mauritania, through Africa, Egypt, Cyprus, Palestine, Syria, as well as sites in Crimea and Georgia. The topography of cities, architecture of public buildings, as well as houses and their décor – architectural, sculptured and painted – are presented. Religious syncretism and the importance of ancient texts are discussed. Studies on pottery are also presented. The volume includes studies on the conservation of architecture, sculpture and painting. Several articles are devoted to the study of Marina el-Alamein; others talk about ancient Alexandria, Deir el- Bahari, Hermopolis Magna, Bakchias, Pelusium, Kom Wasit, Berenike, Ptolemais, Apollonia, Palmyra, Nea Paphos, as well as Chersonesus Taurica and Apsarus.

About the Editors
GRAŻYNA BĄKOWSKA-CZERNER (PhD) is Assistant Professor at the Centre of Comparative Studies of Civilisations of the Jagiellonian University. She specialises in archaeology of the Greco-Roman period in Egypt. Since 2001 she has been working as a permanent member of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission at the archaeological site Marina el-Alamein (Egypt), and since 2004 she has been a member of the Italian Archaeological Mission at Jebel Barkal (Sudan). Greco- Roman art, in particular iconography, are her main areas of interest. She is also involved in the study of ancient gems, as well as the iconography of decorated meroitic pottery.

RAFAŁ CZERNER (Professor) is the head of the Department of History of Architecture, Arts and Technology at the Faculty of Architecture, Wrocław University of Science and Technology (Poland) and the director of the Polish-Egyptian Conservation Mission at the archaeological site Marina el-Alamein (Eg
Blood, Faith and Iron: A dynasty of Catholic industrialists in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England by Paul Belford. Paperback; 175x245mm; viii+226 pages; 54 figures (black & white throughout). 490 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781789690682. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690699. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £34.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

The Ironbridge Gorge is an iconic industrial landscape, presented as the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution and so part of a national narrative of heroic Protestant individualism. However this is not the full story. In fact this industrial landscape was created by an entrepreneurial Catholic dynasty over 200 years before the Iron Bridge was built. This book tells that story for the first time.

Acquiring land at the Dissolution of the Monasteries, the Brooke family invested in coal mining and iron production – and introduced a radical new method of steelmaking which transformed that industry. Drawing together years of painstaking archaeological and historical research, this book looks in detail at the landscape, buildings and industrial installations created by the Brooke dynasty between the Dissolution and the English Civil War. It also explores the broader contexts – religious, economic and political – which shaped their mind-set and their actions. It considers medieval influences on these later developments, and looks at how the Brookes’ Catholicism was reflected in the way they created a new industrial landscape. In so doing it questions traditional narratives of English industrialisation, and calls for a more sophisticated understanding of this period by historical archaeologists.

About the Author PAUL BELFORD is an archaeologist. Currently the Director of the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust, he was for ten years Head of Archaeology at the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust. His main interests include early industrialisation, urban archaeology, the archaeology of earthwork monuments, and public engagement with archaeology and cultural heritage. A Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, Dr Belford is also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists.
Barrow Old Hall and Twiss Green Investigations of two sub-manorial estate centres within the townships of Bold and Culcheth in the Hundred of Warrington 1982-87 by Dan Garner, Jennifer Lewis and David Freke, edited by Jill Collens. Paperback; 205x290mm; viii+108 pages; 93 illustrations (30 plates in colour). 473 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919689. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919696. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £30.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Excavations were carried out at the moated sites of Barrow Old Hall and Twiss Green, in Warrington, North West England, in the 1980s. Sub-manorial estates were established at these two sites by the fourteenth century, located near the boundaries of their multi-moated townships. Townships with multiple moats were a feature of parts of North West England and may have been the result of medieval assarting and the expansion of agriculture on to fringe or marginal areas, on the boundaries of earlier manors. It also owed much to the unusual tenurial arrangements of the region, whereby lords granted small estates out of their holdings, often to family members, to construct moated homesteads.

This report presents the results of the excavations at these two small moated sites, including evidence for possible aisled halls at both sites, as well as a significant assemblage of medieval and early post-medieval pottery. There is also a full account of the finding of the remains of a timber bridge at Twiss Green and its full reconstruction; an illustration of which was previously published in the Shire Archaeology series book on Moated Sites in 1985.

The publication of these excavations contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of the role and development of moated sites in this part of North West England and completes the outstanding analysis of moated sites excavated in the Warrington area.
Hatra: Il territorio e l’urbanistica Prefazione di Roberta Venco Ricciardi by Enrico Foietta. Paperback; 203x276mm; x+560 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (140 plates in colour). Italian text; Introduction and chapter summaries in English. 64 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690057. £88.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789690064. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The ancient city of Hatra is located 80 km southwest of the modern city of Mosul. The site reached its apogee during the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD, arriving at the striking dimensions of c. 300 hectares and into a new role as the capital of a significant buffer state between the Parthian and Roman empires.

This volume is devoted to the study of the landscape surrounding Hatra and of the development of this important city, drawing on published information gathered by Iraqi and foreign expeditions, as well as unpublished data garnered from over fifteen years of fieldwork at the site by the Italian Archaeological Expedition.

The study of the landscape comprehends the morphology, hydrology and geology of the region and offers new proposals regarding the exploitation of natural resources and the development of regional and local routes through the territory under Hatra’s political and military control during the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD.

The analysis of Hatra as an urban centre consists of a detailed study of the city’s hydrology, street network and urban areas, with the purpose of detecting the principles behind the planning and development of the city. The main elements of the urban space are treated in this book: the Temenos area and the Small Shrines, the Necropoles, the Fortifications, the Houses, and the Palaces. Due to the cross-referencing of archaeological, historical and epigraphic data, new ideas have been proposed regarding the chronological phases of urbanism at Hatra, from its foundation up to the destruction of the city by the Sasanian army in AD 241.

La città di Hatra si trova nella Jazira irachena a circa 80 km a sud-ovest di Mosul. Il centro raggiunse il suo apogeo durante il II-III sec. d.C., toccando l’impressionante estensione di quasi 300 ettari e divenendo la capitale di un influente stato cuscinetto, collocato tra l’impero partico e l’impero romano.

Questo volume è dedicato allo studio del territorio e dell’urbanistica di questo importante sito antico, impiegando contestualmente informazioni edite, raccolte dalle varie missioni irachene e straniere che si sono avvicendate sul terreno, e inedite, provenienti dal vasto Archivio della Missione Archeologica Italiana a Hatra in più di quindici anni di ricerche sul campo.

Lo studio del territorio definisce un quadro dettagliato della morfologia, idrologia e geologia della regione e dell’area prossima al centro, oltre a proporre alcune nuove ipotesi interpretative sullo sfruttamento delle risorse ambientali, sull’articolazione della rete viaria periurbana e regionale e sull’estensione del territorio sottoposto al controllo politico e militare della città durante il II e III sec. d.C.

L’analisi urbanistica comprende uno studio approfondito dell’idrologia cittadina, della rete stradale e delle aree urbane, allo scopo di individuarne le principali caratteristiche ed eventuali regole nella pianificazione e nello sviluppo della città. Nel libro sono inoltre analizzati i principali elementi che compongono il tessuto urbano: il Temenos e i templi minori, le necropoli, le difese cittadine, le case e i palazzi. Grazie all’utilizzo contestuale del dato archeologico, storico ed epigrafico, è stato inoltre possibile formulare nuove ipotesi sulle fasi urbanistiche e sulla cronologia di Hatra dalla fondazione alla sua distruzione, avvenuta per mano sasanide nel 241 d.C.

ENRICO FOIETTA è dottore di ricerca e borsista presso l’Università degli Studi di Torino. È membro di varie missioni archeologiche nel Vicino Oriente (Siria e Iran). Attualmente collabora attivamente con la Missione Archeologica Congiunta Italo-Iraniana in Khuzistan (ICAR - CRAST), con la Missione Archeologica Italiana a Hatra, con il Centro Ricerche Archeologiche e Scavi di Torino (CRAST) e la Missione Franco-Siriana a Europos-Dura (CNRs Paris).
The Palace Lady’s Summerhouse and other inside stories from a vanishing Turkey by Patricia Daunt. Hardback with Dust Jacket; 210x260mm; 304 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 5 2017. ISBN 9780995756601. £25.00 (No VAT). Buy Now

From Istanbul's palatial old embassies to its glorious Bosphorus summerhouses, from Ottoman Paris to Ankara's Art Deco, from rainforest mansions to a mad mosque in the mountains... a diplomat's wife reveals their secret histories. This book brings together essays by Patricia Daunt written over the past 25 years for Cornucopia Magazine. It concludes with her latest article, on the magnificent ruins of Aphrodisias, newly listed as a World Heritage Site but long one of her greatest loves. The images are by internationally renowned photographers, including Fritz von der Schulenburg, Simon Upton, Cemal Emden and Jean-Marie del Moral. Foreword by John Julius Norwich.

About the Author
Patricia Daunt is a writer, married to a former ambassador to Turkey, Sir Timothy Daunt; they first met when both were stationed at the British Embassy in Ankara in 1960. Over the past sixty years she has travelled widely in Turkey, often on horse or foot, acquiring a deep knowledge of its history and civilizations. She has introduced parties of enthusiasts to Turkey's archaeological and architectural treasures, as well as its indigenous plants and trees. But her abiding interest remains the ancient city of Aphrodisias. Since 1993, she has been chairman of the Friends of Aphrodisias Trust, a British charity that supports archaeological projects at the site, in the southwest of Turkey.

Reviews
".a record of her expertise and enthusiasms, whose coffee-table dimensions belie its scholarly contents."--Yasmine Seale (Times Literary Supplement) (03/01/2018)

"[This is] much more than a beautifully illustrated book: it's about the people who lived - and live - in these buildings... a love letter to a country and to a world that has been almost completely swallowed up by tourism, new money and development.""--Owen Matthews (The Spectator) (12/01/2017)

Table of Contents
Foreword

PALACES OF DIPLOMACY
1 The Winter Palaces The Pera Embassies

WINDOW ON THE BOSPHORUS
2 Boating with Billy
3 The Summer Palaces: The Bosphorus Embassies
4 The Jewel Box: The Çürüksulu Mehmet Pasha Yalı
5 The Vizier’s Retreat: The Kıbrıslı Yalı
6 A Room for the Books: Ahmed Vefik Pasha’s Library
7 Water’s Edge: The Hekimbaşı Yalı
8 The Talk of the Bosphorus: The Zeki Pasha Yalı
9 Some Enchanted Evenings: The Ratip Efendi Yalı
10 The House that Came out of the Blue: The Germen Yalı
11 In the Spirit’s Wake: Sumahan on the Water
12 The Palace Lady’s Summerhouse: The Ethem Pertev Yalı

TRAVELS IN ANATOLIA
13 The Country Houses that Ride the Storm
14 The Lake that Time Forgot
15 Sublime Portals The Great Mosque and Hospital of Divriği

SECRET ANKARA
16 A Brave New World The Embassies’ Big Move to Ankara
17 Fly in the Face of Fashion Ankara’s Hidden Assets

PARIS A LA TURQUE
18 Treasures of a Lost Dynasty
19 From Lunacy to Diplomacy 276

APHRODISIAS REBORN
20 City of Aphrodite

Acknowledgements and glossary
Index
The Hydraulic System of Uxul Origins, functions, and social setting by Nicolaus Seefeld. Paperback; 205x290mm; xxii+518 pages, 21 folded pull-outs; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (183 colour plates). 440 2018 Archaeopress Pre-Columbian Archaeology . Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784919290. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919306. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £90.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Since the inception of Maya studies, the issue of water supply in Classic Maya society has been a matter of controversial debate. Due to the annually recurring dry seasons the availability of water during this period is and has always been problematic. In the light of these conditions, the fact that the pre-Hispanic Maya were able to establish, developed and maintain prosperous urban centres over long periods is hard to explain.

In order to resolve this open issue, this book aims to explain the water management strategies of the Maya in pre-Hispanic times. To this end, this volume analyses the intricate relationship between the natural environment and the adaptation strategies of the pre-Hispanic population, whose physical remains were documented in the form of hydraulic features. A large section of this book discusses the different forms, functions, and the geographic distribution of the published hydraulic features. The main body of this monograph focuses on the archaeological investigation of the hydraulic system of Uxul, a medium-sized Maya centre in the south of the state of Campeche, Mexico. As many open research questions could be addressed and studied in this site, the hydraulic system of Uxul acted as a central point of reference for the evaluation of the socio-political relevance of water management in the Maya Lowlands. This book identifies both the natural causes for water scarcities and the cultural adaptation strategies that were designed to overcome them. Due to this comprehensive approach, the present book is the most extensive and exhaustive account on the hydraulic features of the Maya Lowlands and thus enables representative statements on the sociopolitical relevance of water management in Classic Maya society.

About the Author
Nicolaus Seefeld is an archaeologist who specializes in Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica with a focus on the ancient Maya. He has participated in archaeological investigations at several Maya sites in Mexico and Guatemala. Since 2008, his research has focused on the water management practices and the agricultural production of the Classic Maya. He holds an MA and a doctorate from the University of Bonn.

Note regarding the eBook version: Due to the number of illustrations and the extent of the volume the eBook has had to be compressed down to a manageable size for downloading. If you purchase the eBook version (or are entitled to a free eBook along with a print purchase) and would like the full-resolution version please email your order receipt to info@archaeopress.com and we will send the larger file via wetransfer.

Reviews:
'This publication offers a fresh look at the study of water management among the pre-Hispanic Maya... and helps us to understand the underlying problems of the Yucatán Peninsula and how the pre-Hispanic population developed various strategies for the management of rainwater. The publication is commended both for its academic content and good images (more than 260, many of them in colour) as well as its printing quality. The volume contains an extensive discussion and summary of the history of research related to the management of water and land in pre-Hispanic times.'
⁠—Antonio Benavides Castillo, Estudios de Cultura Maya 54, August 2019

'In sum, this large volume of 517 pages provides a unique synthesis that many will find useful. Indeed, Seefeld’s book constitutes the best comprehensive study of ancient Maya water management available at this time, with no comparable work out there. The book is a very valuable addition to a Mayanist’s library because of everything it brings together on the topic of ancient Maya water management. Scholars working in water management in other regions of the world will also find a very good place to start here if they intend to look at the Maya case.'
⁠—Thomas Ruhl and Nicholas P. Dunning, Latin American Antiquity V
Grabados rupestres en La Mancha centro: documentación y estudio de un patrimonio desconocido Rock engravings in La Mancha center: documentation and study of an unknown heritage by Rocío Ramiro Rodero, Víctor Manuel López-Menchero Bendicho, Ángel Marchante Ortega, Ángel Javier Cárdenas Martín-Buitrago, Pedro Miguel García Zamorano and Jorge Onrubia Pintado. Paperback; 203x276mm; 116 pages; illustrated throughout with 67 plates in colour. Spanish text with English abstract. 63 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919962. £36.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919979. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This book deals with the documentation and interpretation of the rock sites located in La Mancha center (Spain), from the detailed study of the symbols that have been engraved in the rock. These sites, from historical times, can provide valuable information for the study of the mentalities and beliefs of the popular classes during the Modern Age, strongly influenced by the atmosphere created after the Counter-Reformation. Crosses, calvaries, orbs, human and animal representations, letters, cup-marks and game boards make up an authentic symbolic universe, of clear Christian roots, whose understanding is possible to achieve even though it requires collaboration between multiple fields of knowledge such as archaeology, theology, numismatics, heraldry, architecture, sculpture, painting...

Unfortunately, researchers have paid scant attention to the issue at hand, assuming paradigms that from our point of view should be reviewed, such as the authorship of the petroglyphs or their chrono-cultural affiliation. The study of the rock formations located in La Mancha center can shed light on these and other subjects, providing a good starting point in order to improve the documentation and interpretation of historical rock engravings in other parts of the world.

El presente libro aborda la documentación e interpretación de las estaciones rupestres localizadas en La Mancha centro (España), a partir del estudio pormenorizado de los símbolos que han sido grabados en la roca. Estas estaciones, de época histórica, pueden proporcionar valiosa información para el estudio de las mentalidades y creencias de las clases populares durante la Edad Media y la Edad Moderna, fuertemente influenciadas por la atmósfera creada tras la Contrarreforma. Cruces, calvarios, orbes, representaciones humanas y de animales, letras, cazoletas y tableros de juego conforman un auténtico universo simbólico, de clara raíz cristiana, cuya comprensión es posible alcanzar aunque requiere de la colaboración entre múltiples ramas del saber como la arqueología, la teología, la numismática, la heráldica, la arquitectura, la escultura, la pintura...

Desafortunadamente, hasta el momento los investigadores han prestado escasa atención al tema que nos ocupa, asumiendo paradigmas que desde nuestro punto de vista deben ser revisados, como la autoría de los petroglifos o su adscripción crono-cultural. El estudio de las estaciones rupestres localizadas en La Mancha centro puede arrojar luz sobre estos y otros temas, proporcionando un buen punto de partida de cara a mejorar la documentación e interpretación de los grabados rupestres de época histórica en otros puntos del mundo.
Oikèma ou pièce polyvalente: recherches sur une installation commerciale de l’Antiquité grecque by Pavlos Karvonis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 110pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. French text. 60 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919399. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919405. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This volume discusses the evolution of oikema, which is the most common type of commercial facility in ancient Greece. The study covers a large area including Continental Greece, the Aegean islands, the Ionian islands and the west coast of Asia Minor. The author, after a thorough analysis, proposes a new terminology for commercial and industrial facilities. The book also presents the architectural characteristics and the equipment of oikemata and discusses their location and relationship with other buildings. The ownership, use and maintenance of oikemata are also discussed. It is argued that oikemata provided merchants and craftsmen with a suitable working space and contributed to the gradual abandonment of houses as working places, especially in cities that developed in the Hellenistic period. Their characteristics corresponded perfectly well to the needs of Greek commerce.

PAVLOS KARVONIS studied archaeology in Athens from 1994 to 1998. In 2000, he finished his Masters degree at the University of Paris X-Nanterre and in 2004 he defended a thesis entitled “Lieux et locaux de vente dans la Grèce égéenne du IVe au Ier siècle av. J.-C.” at the same University. In 2006, he worked for the Archaeological Society at Athens, and since 2007 he has been working for the Academy of Athens in the Tabula Imperii Romani program. He has published two volumes on the Aegean islands and Attica, and has published several articles on commercial architecture. He is also preparing the publications of two commercial buildings located on the western shore of the island and participates in a research programme on stone and its use on Delos.

Table of Contents
Avant-propos
English Summary
Nomenclature
Le vocabulaire antique des installations commerciales
Les critères d’identification des pièces polyvalentes
L’apparition de la pièce polyvalente
Les activités attestées dans les pièces polyvalentes
Les caractéristiques des pièces polyvalentes
La gestion des pièces polyvalentes
Les pièces polyvalentes et l’organisation du commerce
Conclusion
Bibliographie
Index des lieux
Index des mots grecs
Index des auteurs anciens
Index des inscriptions
Origine des illustrations
Treinta años de Arqueología Medieval en España edited by Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. Paperback; 203x276mm; xii+418 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Spanish text with English preface and introduction (Print RRP £64.00). 58 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784919238. £64.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784919245. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

This book presents, in sixteen papers, recent developments and some of the main topics seen in academic Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain. The papers explore some of the emergent and consolidated topics of the discipline, such as landscapes, cities, rural spaces, bio-archaeological records, archaeology of architectures, agrarian archaeology, post-Roman archaeology, colonial archaeology in the Canary Islands and the archaeology of religious minorities, opening new lines of enquiries and providing new theoretical and methodological approaches. An overview of Medieval Archaeology studies in Spain is offered, proposing a wide range of topics for discussion. Finally, the book explores the connections between Spanish Medieval Archaeology and other European traditions, specifically, English, Italian and Portuguese Medieval Archaeology.

About the Editor
Juan Antonio Quirós is a Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country, Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology (University College London), and Visiting Fellow at All Souls College (University of Oxford). He is the director of the ‘Heritage and Cultural Landscapes Research Group’ of the University of the Basque Country and the 'Rural Medieval Research Group', CSIC-UPV/EHU. His principal interests lie in the study of the archaeology of landscapes, the archaeology of rural communities, Mediterranean Archaeology, Archaeology of Architectures, and the study of Social Complexity. Besides, he is very interested in a multi-proxy and multidisciplinary approach to cultural resources. Some of his recent works include ‘Arqueología de una comunidad campesina medieval: Zornoztegi’ (Bilbao, 2018); ‘Longhouses, house biography and social complexity in Early Medieval Northwestern Iberia’ (Arqueología de la Arquitectura 2017); ‘Local identities and desertions in Late Medieval period’ (Reti Medievali, 2017); ‘Social complexity in Early Medieval rural communities’ (Oxford, 2016); and ‘Agrarian Archaeology in Early Medieval Europe’ (Quaternary International 346, 2014). Currently, he is preparing a book about the Archaeology of Medieval Peasantry.
Hercules’ Sanctuary in the Quarter of St Theodore, Pula by Alka Starac. Paperback; vi+126 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (42 colour plates). 431 2018 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 40. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918736. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918743. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Hercules’ Sanctuary in the Quarter of St. Theodore in Pula deals with many aspects of the Roman sanctuary erected at the spring in Pula as well as with objects of cult dated to the Hellenistic period. The site was in use from the late fourth century BC to the fall of the Western Roman Empire, a date that approximately coincides with the demolition of the temple. Research focuses on Roman foundations which trace the ground plan of the temple that was surrounded by portico. Architectural fragments found at the site, as well as those kept in the collection of Pula Museum, were used to form proposals for a hypothetical reconstruction of the temple. The discovery of a relief club is the only reliable link with a particular deity i.e. Hercules. The continuity of the cult of Hercules has been recognised at the spring from the Histrian to Roman periods. Hercules was considered a founder and patron of the Roman colony of Pola. Nearness of the assumed umbilicus of the colony offers additional reasons to reconsider sacred rituals of the foundation of the colony. Traces of ritual desacralization, purification and storing of sacrificial remnants could be recognised at the site. A hypothetical reconstruction of the Roman sanctuary is followed by calculations of construction costs.

About the Author
ALKA STARAC (born 15 April 1966 in Pula) defended PhD thesis Roman Rule in Histria and Liburnia in 1996 at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Philosophy. During her studies, Alka obtained Rector’s award of the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb for year 1986/1987. She was the winner of scholarship of CNRS France for scholarly research (duration six months) at Centre Pierre Paris, Bordeaux, in 1994. She worked as Head of Roman Archaeology Department and was senior curator in the Archaeological Museum of Istria, Pula (Croatia) and at the University of Juraj Dobrila, Pula. She is the author of some eighty scholarly papers published in archaeological journals with international review, as well as of eight monographs and of exhibitions in the field of Roman archaeology, epigraphy, history and economy.
Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era edited by Liz Thomas and Jill Campbell. Paperback; 205x290mm; vi+150 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (36 colour plates). 426 2018. Available both in printed and e-versions. Printed ISBN 9781784918316. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918323. £16.00 (Exc. VAT) Institutional Price £32.00 (Exc. UK VAT) Book contents pageBuy Now

Buildings in Society: International Studies in the Historic Era presents a series of papers reflecting the latest approaches to the study of buildings from the historic period. This volume does not examine buildings as architecture, but adopts an archaeological perspective to consider them as artefacts, reflecting the needs of those who commissioned them. Studies have often failed to consider the historical contexts in which the buildings were constructed and how they were subsequently used and interpreted. The papers in this volume situate their interpretation in their social context. Buildings can inform us about past cultures as they are responsive and evolve to meet people’s needs over time.

The buildings examined in this volume range from the twelfth to the twenty-first century and cross continents including case-studies from America, Australia and Europe, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Scandinavia and the Mediterranean. Themes include: Approaches to the study of buildings, Buildings of Power, Buildings in Identity, Domestic Space and Urban and Village Spaces. The essays consider building design, role, and how the buildings were altered as their function changed to coincide with the needs and aspirations of those who owned or used the buildings. This collection of papers emphasizes the need for further international multidisciplinary approaches including archaeology, architectural history and art history in order to understand how ideas, styles, approaches and designs spread over time and space. Together, these papers generate valuable new insights into the study of buildings in the historic period.

About the Editors
LIZ THOMAS is a historical-archaeologist and heritage and cultural researcher based at the School of Natural and Built Environment, The Queen’s University of Belfast. She recently completed her British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship, a multidisciplinary study that focused on the docklands of Belfast, Northern Ireland. She specialises in the study of institutions, in particular won policymaking, political environments and human agency. Thomas’ current research is based on Public Heritage.

JILL CAMPBELL is a skilled buildings archaeologist. She has conducted fieldwork in Northern Ireland, England and Scotland and has produced architectural histories for the Northern Ireland Environment Agency. Dr Campbell has several published papers, and has contributed a chapter on medieval manor houses to the Oxford Handbook of Later Medieval Archaeology.
Life on the Edge: The Neolithic and Bronze Age of Iain Crawford’s Udal, North Uist edited by Beverley Ballin Smith. Hardback; xxxii+270 pages; highly illustrated in full colour throughout. 408 2018. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784917708. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784917715. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF   Buy Now

The discovery of archaeological structures in North Uist in 1974 after storm damage led to the identification by Iain Crawford of a kerb cairn complex, with a cist and human remains. Six years later he went back, and over the next three years excavated another cist with human remains in its kerbed cairn, many bowl pits dug into the blown sand, and down to two late Neolithic structures and a ritual complex. He intensively studied the environmental conditions affecting the site and was among the first archaeologists in Scotland to understand the climate changes taking place at the transition between late Neolithic and the early Bronze Age. The deposition of blown sand and the start of the machair in the Western Isles, including the rise in sea-level and inundations into inhabited and farmed landscapes, are all part of the complex story of natural events and human activities.

Radiocarbon dating and modern scientific analyses provide the detail of the story of periods of starvation suffered by the people that were buried on the site, of the movement away of the community, of their attempts of bringing the ‘new’ land back into cultivation, of a temporary tent-like structure, and of marking their territory by the construction of enduring monuments to the dead.

About the Editor
BEVERLEY BALLIN SMITH took up the mantle left by Iain Crawford and has brought this first monograph on his Udal project area to publication. She has extensive experience of working on, and publishing, other large multi-period sites. She is an archaeologist who lived and worked on Orkney for many years and has first-hand experience of the archaeology of Shetland, the UK, Faroes, Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and is now based in Scotland. Beverley is the Publications Manager at GUARD Archaeology Ltd and editor of ARO (Archaeology Reports Online), with the aim of disseminating information to relevant audiences. She undertakes specialist analysis of prehistoric pottery and coarse stone tools. She has been a member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists for nearly all her professional life; she served on the former IfA Council, was Vice Chair for Outreach, a member of the Validation Committee and was a CIfA Board director. She is a member of the Society of Antiquaries of London and also a member of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, where she has been Vice President. She is currently President of Archaeology Scotland and a Research Associate at National Museums Scotland.

Reviews
'...Ballin Smith and her colleagues have produced a worthy volume that answers many questions concerning the complex transition period between the Neolithic and Bronze Age within an area of the British Isles that would have been seen by late prehistoric pastoralists as the edge of the known world.' – George Nash (Current Archaeology #346, January 2019)